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1

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual...

2

A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Title A Sensitivity Study of Building Performance Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2013 Authors Hong, Tianzhen, Wen-Kuei Chang, and Hung-Wen Lin Date Published 05/2013 Keywords Actual meteorological year, Building simulation, Energy use, Peak electricity demand, Typical meteorological year, Weather data Abstract Traditional energy performance calculated using building simulation with the typical meteorological year (TMY) weather data represents the energy performance in a typical year but not necessarily the average or typical energy performance of a building in long term. Furthermore, the simulated results do not provide the range of variations due to the change of weather, which is important in building energy management and risk assessment of energy efficiency investment. This study analyzes the weather impact on peak electric demand and energy use by building simulation using 30-year actual meteorological year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels across all 17 climate zones. The simulated results from the AMY are compared to those from TMY3 to determine and analyze the differences. It was found that yearly weather variation has significant impact on building performance especially peak electric demand. Energy savings of building technologies should be evaluated using simulations with multi-decade actual weather data to fully consider investment risk and the long term performance.

3

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

4

Verktyg för lönsamhetsberäkningar vid bränslekonvertering av spetslastpannor frĺn olja till pellets; Tool for estimating the profitability of converting a peak-load oil-fired boiler to pellets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report summarizes the development of a calculation program estimating the profitability of converting a peak-load oil-fired boiler to pellets. To convert an oil-fired… (more)

Sorby, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Hydrogen-or-Fossil-Combustion Nuclear Combined-Cycle Systems for Base- and Peak-Load Electricity Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined-cycle power plant is described that uses (1) heat from a high-temperature nuclear reactor to meet base-load electrical demands and (2) heat from the same high-temperature reactor and burning natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen to meet peak-load electrical demands. For base-load electricity production, fresh air is compressed; then flows through a heat exchanger, where it is heated to between 700 and 900 C by heat provided by a high-temperature nuclear reactor via an intermediate heat-transport loop; and finally exits through a high-temperature gas turbine to produce electricity. The hot exhaust from the Brayton-cycle gas turbine is then fed to a heat recovery steam generator that provides steam to a steam turbine for added electrical power production. To meet peak electricity demand, the air is first compressed and then heated with the heat from a high-temperature reactor. Natural gas, jet fuel, or hydrogen is then injected into the hot air in a combustion chamber, combusts, and heats the air to 1300 C-the operating conditions for a standard natural-gas-fired combined-cycle plant. The hot gas then flows through a gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator before being sent to the exhaust stack. The higher temperatures increase the plant efficiency and power output. If hydrogen is used, it can be produced at night using energy from the nuclear reactor and stored until needed. With hydrogen serving as the auxiliary fuel for peak power production, the electricity output to the electric grid can vary from zero (i.e., when hydrogen is being produced) to the maximum peak power while the nuclear reactor operates at constant load. Because nuclear heat raises air temperatures above the auto-ignition temperatures of the various fuels and powers the air compressor, the power output can be varied rapidly (compared with the capabilities of fossil-fired turbines) to meet spinning reserve requirements and stabilize the electric grid. This combined cycle uses the unique characteristics of high-temperature reactors (T>700 C) to produce electricity for premium electric markets whose demands can not be met by other types of nuclear reactors. It may also make the use of nuclear reactors economically feasible in smaller electrical grids, such as those found in many developing countries. The ability to rapidly vary power output can be used to stabilize electric grid performance-a particularly important need in small electrical grids.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Conklin, Jim [ORNL

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads served power-system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. The rationale is that appliance loads can be curtailed for about ten minutes or less in response to a grid contingency without any diminution in the quality of service to the consumer. We then estimate the wholesale grid operating-cost savings based on historical wholesale-market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States. The savings derived from the smart grid capabilities of an appliance are then compared to the savings derived from a five percent increase in traditional operational machine efficiencies, referred to as cost in this report, to determine whether the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as or higher than the operational machine efficiency credit (cost).

Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

How People Actually Use Thermostats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential thermostats have been a key element in controlling heating and cooling systems for over sixty years. However, today's modern programmable thermostats (PTs) are complicated and difficult for users to understand, leading to errors in operation and wasted energy. Four separate tests of usability were conducted in preparation for a larger study. These tests included personal interviews, an on-line survey, photographing actual thermostat settings, and measurements of ability to accomplish four tasks related to effective use of a PT. The interviews revealed that many occupants used the PT as an on-off switch and most demonstrated little knowledge of how to operate it. The on-line survey found that 89% of the respondents rarely or never used the PT to set a weekday or weekend program. The photographic survey (in low income homes) found that only 30% of the PTs were actually programmed. In the usability test, we found that we could quantify the difference in usability of two PTs as measured in time to accomplish tasks. Users accomplished the tasks in consistently shorter times with the touchscreen unit than with buttons. None of these studies are representative of the entire population of users but, together, they illustrate the importance of improving user interfaces in PTs.

Meier, Alan; Aragon, Cecilia; Hurwitz, Becky; Mujumdar, Dhawal; Peffer, Therese; Perry, Daniel; Pritoni, Marco

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)"...

9

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 1 YEAR 2011 Males 18 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 2 EJ/EK 2 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 35 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 9 Asian Male 0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 2 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 12 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Information Management & Chief Information Officer, NA-IM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 18 43.9% 23 56.1% Gender Males Females 4.9% 4.9% 85.4% 4.9% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2.4% 4.9% 7.3% 22.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 14.6% 29.3% 14.6% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

10

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

4 4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJ/EK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 31 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 2 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 6 Hispanic Female 10 White Male 13 White Female 10 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Office of General Counsel, NA-GC As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 21 47.7% 23 52.3% Gender Males Females 6.8% 2.3% 2.3% 6.8% 70.5% 11.4% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK EN 03 NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.0% 0.0% 2.3% 4.5% 2.3% 2.3% 13.6% 22.7% 29.5% 22.7% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male

11

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 6 YEAR 2011 Males 7 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 9 GS 15 2 GS 13 2 GS 12 1 GS 11 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0 African American Male 1 African American Female 3 Asian Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 4 White Female 6 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator of External Affairs, NA-EA As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 7 43.8% 9 56.3% Gender Males Females 6.3% 56.3% 12.5% 12.5% 6.3% 6.3% Pay Plan SES NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) GS 15 GS 13 GS 12 GS 11 0.0% 0.0% 6.3% 18.8% 6.3% 0.0% 6.3% 0.0% 25.0% 37.5% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male Asian Female Hispanic Male Hispanic Female White Male White Female FY11 Workforce Diversity

12

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJ/EK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 115 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2 African American Male 3 African American Female 7 Asian Male 4 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 25 Hispanic Female 26 White Male 35 White Female 37 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management, NA-APM As of Sep 24, 2011 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER 68 48.6% 72 51.4% Gender Males Females 3.6% 0.7% 11.4% 82.1% 2.1% Pay Plan SES EJ/EK NN (Engineering) NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) NU (Tech/Admin Support) 0.7% 1.4% 2.1% 5.0% 2.9% 0.0% 17.9% 18.6% 25.0% 26.4% Race and Gender American Indian Male American Indian Female African American Male African American Female Asian Male

13

Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology in and Technology in the National Interest 60 Years of Excellence Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory FY 2012 Annual Report About the Cover: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) engineers Chris Spadaccini (left) and Eric Duoss are shown experimenting with direct ink-writing to create micro- to macroscale structures with extreme precision. The Laboratory is advancing this process and other additive manufacturing technologies to develop new materials with extraordinary properties for use in a wide range of national-security and other applications. About the Laboratory: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in 1952 to enhance the security of the United States by advancing nuclear weapons science and technology. With a talented and dedicated workforce and

14

Predicted vs. Actual Energy Savings of Retrofitted House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of actual energy savings and the predicted energy savings of retrofitted one-story house located in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. The process started with modeling the house prior to retrofitting and after retrofitting. The monthly metered energy consumption is acquired from the electric company archives for seven years prior to retrofitting and recording the actual monthly energy consumption of the post retrofitting. The house model is established on DOE 2.1. Actual monthly energy consumption is used to calibrate and fine-tuning the model until the gap between actual and predicted consumption was narrowed. Then the Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) are entered into the modeled house according to the changes in thermo-physical properties of the envelope and the changes in schedules and number of users. In order to account for those differences, electrical consumption attributed to A/C in summer was isolated and compared. The study followed the International Performance Measurement & Verification Protocol (IPMVP) in assessing the impact of energy conservation measures on actual, metered, building energy consumption. The study aimed to show the predicted savings by the simulated building model and the actual utility bills' analysis in air conditioning consumption and peak at monthly load due to building envelope.

Al-Mofeez, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Before Getting There: Potential and Actual Collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce the concepts of Actual and Potential Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the space where collaborative activities are performed, while the second relates to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are ... Keywords: Doc2U, PIŃAS, casual and informal interactions, potential and actual collaboration spaces, potential collaboration awareness

Alberto L. Morán; Jesús Favela; Ana María Martínez Enríquez; Dominique Decouchant

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",999,1021,1041,1051,1056,1066,1073,1081,1087,1098,1107,1122,1121,1128,1143,1173,1201,1223 "AEO 1995",,1006,1010,1011,1016,1017,1021,1027,1033,1040,1051,1066,1076,1083,1090,1108,1122,1137 "AEO 1996",,,1037,1044,1041,1045,1061,1070,1086,1100,1112,1121,1135,1156,1161,1167,1173,1184,1190 "AEO 1997",,,,1028,1052,1072,1088,1105,1110,1115,1123,1133,1146,1171,1182,1190,1193,1201,1209 "AEO 1998",,,,,1088,1122,1127.746338,1144.767212,1175.662598,1176.493652,1182.742065,1191.246948,1206.99585,1229.007202,1238.69043,1248.505981,1260.836914,1265.159424,1284.229736

17

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",11.24893441,11.08565002,10.98332766,10.82852279,10.67400621,10.54170176,10.39583203,10.27184573,10.14478673,10.02575883,9.910410202,9.810812106,9.69894802,9.599821783,9.486985399,9.394733753,9.303329725,9.221322623 "AEO 1995",,10.86137373,10.75116461,10.60467959,10.42268977,10.28668187,10.14461664,10.01081222,9.883759026,9.759022105,9.627404949,9.513643295,9.400418762,9.311729546,9.226142899,9.147374752,9.071102491,8.99599906 "AEO 1996",,,10.71047701,10.59846153,10.43655044,10.27812088,10.12746866,9.9694713,9.824165152,9.714832565,9.621874334,9.532324916,9.428169355,9.32931308,9.232716414,9.170931044,9.086870061,9.019963901,8.945602337

18

Improving Industrial Refrigeration System Efficiency - Actual Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses actual design and modifications for increased system efficiency and includes reduced chilled liquid flow during part load operation, reduced condensing and increased evaporator temperatures for reduced system head, thermosiphon cycle cooling during winter operation, compressor intercooling, direct refrigeration vs. brine cooling, insulation of cold piping to reduce heat gain, multiple screw compressors for improved part load operation, evaporative condensers for reduced system head and pumping energy, and using high efficiency motors.

White, T. L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Table 14. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual (million short tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 914 939 963 995 1031 1080 AEO 1983 900 926 947 974 1010 1045 1191 AEO 1984 899 921 948 974 1010 1057 1221 AEO 1985 886 909 930 940 958 985 1015 1041 1072 1094 1116 AEO 1986 890 920 954 962 983 1017 1044 1073 1097 1126 1142 1156 1176 1191 1217 AEO 1987 917 914 932 962 978 996 1020 1043 1068 1149 AEO 1989* 941 946 977 990 1018 1039 1058 1082 1084 1107 1130 1152 1171 AEO 1990 973 987 1085 1178 1379 AEO 1991 1035 1002 1016 1031 1043 1054 1065 1079 1096 1111 1133 1142 1160 1193 1234 1272 1309 1349 1386 1433 AEO 1992 1004 1040 1019 1034 1052 1064 1074 1087 1102 1133 1144 1156 1173 1201 1229 1272 1312 1355 1397 AEO 1993 1039 1043 1054 1065 1076 1086 1094 1102 1125 1136 1148 1161 1178 1204 1237 1269 1302 1327 AEO 1994 999 1021

20

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO Dollar Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1992,1.9399,2.029,2.1099,2.1899,2.29,2.35,2.39,2.42,2.47,2.55,2.65,2.75,2.89,3.01,3.17,3.3,3.35,3.47 "AEO 1995",1993,,1.85,1.899,1.81,1.87,1.8999,2.06,2.14,2.34,2.47,2.69,2.83,3.02,3.12,3.21,3.3,3.35,3.39 "AEO 1996",1994,,,1.597672343,1.665446997,1.74129355,1.815978527,1.866241336,1.892736554,1.913619637,1.928664207,1.943216205,1.964540124,1.988652706,2.003382921,2.024799585,2.056392431,2.099974155,2.14731431,2.218094587

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 14a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1995 1993 6.80 6.80 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.70 6.80 6.80 6.90 6.90 6.90 7.00 7.00 7.10 7.10 7.20 AEO 1996 1994 7.09 6.99 6.94 6.93 6.96 6.96 6.96 6.97 6.98 6.97 6.98 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.96 6.95 6.91 AEO 1997 1995 6.94 6.89 6.90 6.91 6.86 6.84 6.78 6.73 6.66 6.60 6.58 6.54 6.49 6.48 6.45 6.36

22

Table 7a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual a. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per thousand cubic feet in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.94 2.03 2.11 2.19 2.29 2.35 2.39 2.42 2.47 2.55 2.65 2.75 2.89 3.01 3.17 3.30 3.35 3.47 AEO 1995 1993 1.85 1.90 1.81 1.87 1.90 2.06 2.14 2.34 2.47 2.69 2.83 3.02 3.12 3.21 3.30 3.35 3.39 AEO 1996 1994 1.60 1.67 1.74 1.82 1.87 1.89 1.91 1.93 1.94 1.96 1.99 2.00 2.02 2.06 2.10 2.15 2.22

23

Table 23. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu / $Billion Nominal GDP) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 20.1 18.5 16.9 15.5 14.4 13.2 AEO 1983 19.9 18.7 17.4 16.2 15.1 14.0 9.5 AEO 1984 20.1 19.0 17.7 16.5 15.5 14.5 10.2 AEO 1985 20.0 19.1 18.0 16.9 15.9 14.7 13.7 12.7 11.8 11.0 10.3 AEO 1986 18.3 17.8 16.8 16.1 15.2 14.3 13.4 12.6 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.5 8.9 8.3 7.8 AEO 1987 17.6 17.0 16.3 15.4 14.5 13.7 12.9 12.1 11.4 8.2 AEO 1989* 16.9 16.2 15.2 14.2 13.3 12.5 11.7 10.9 10.2 9.6 9.0 8.5 8.0 AEO 1990 16.1 15.4 11.7 8.6 6.4 AEO 1991 15.5 14.9 14.2 13.6 13.0 12.5 11.9 11.3 10.8 10.3 9.7 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.9 7.4 7.0 6.7 6.3 6.0 AEO 1992 15.0 14.5 13.9 13.3 12.7 12.1 11.6 11.0 10.5 10.0 9.5 9.0 8.6 8.1 7.7 7.3 6.9 6.6 6.2 AEO 1993 14.7 13.9 13.4 12.8 12.3 11.8 11.2 10.7 10.2 9.6 9.2 8.7 8.3 7.8 7.4 7.1 6.7 6.4

24

Comparison of actual and predicted energy savings in Minnesota gas-heated single-family homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data available from a recent evaluation of a home energy audit program in Minnesota are sufficient to allow analysis of the actual energy savings achieved in audited homes and of the relationship between actual and predicted savings. The program, operated by Northern States Power in much of the southern half of the state, is part of Minnesota's version of the federal Residential Conservation Service. NSP conducted almost 12 thousand RCS audits between April 1981 (when the progam began) and the end of 1982. The data analyzed here, available for 346 homes that obtained an NSP energy audit, include monthly natural gas bills from October 1980 through April 1983; heating degree day data matched to the gas bills; energy audit reports; and information on household demographics, structure characteristics, and recent conservation actions from mail and telephone surveys. The actual reduction in weather-adjusted natural gas use between years 1 and 3 averaged 19 MBtu across these homes (11% of preprogram consumption); the median value of the saving was 16 MBtu/year. The variation in actual saving is quite large: gas consumption increased in almost 20% of the homes, while gas consumption decreased by more than 50 MBtu/year in more than 10% of the homes. These households reported an average expenditure of almost $1600 for the retrofit measures installed in their homes; the variation in retrofit cost, while large, was not as great as the variation in actual natural gas savings.

Hirst, E.; Goeltz, R.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan and Sergey Paltsev://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Shale Gas Production: Potential versus Actual GHG Emissions Francis O'Sullivan* and Sergey Paltsev* Abstract Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use

26

Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Real Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Projected Real GDP Growth Trend (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 3.1% 3.2% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% AEO 1995 3.7% 2.8% 2.5% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% AEO 1996 2.6% 2.2% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 1.6% AEO 1997 2.1% 1.9% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.1% 2.1% 1.5% AEO 1998 3.4% 2.9% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2% 1.8% AEO 1999 3.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 2.4% 1.8% AEO 2000 3.8% 2.9% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5%

27

Table 3. Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual Gross Domestic Product, Projected vs. Actual (cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown for each AEO) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.3% 3.8% 3.6% 3.3% 3.2% 3.2% AEO 1983 3.3% 3.3% 3.4% 3.3% 3.2% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1984 2.7% 2.4% 2.9% 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% 2.7% AEO 1985 2.3% 2.2% 2.7% 2.8% 2.9% 3.0% 3.0% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.8% AEO 1986 2.6% 2.5% 2.7% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% 2.5% AEO 1987 2.7% 2.3% 2.4% 2.5% 2.5% 2.6% 2.6% 2.5% 2.4% 2.3% AEO 1989* 4.0% 3.4% 3.1% 3.0% 2.9% 2.8% 2.7% 2.7% 2.7% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% 2.6% AEO 1990 2.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.5% 2.4% AEO 1991 0.8% 1.0% 1.7% 1.8% 1.8% 1.9% 2.0% 2.1% 2.1% 2.1% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% AEO 1992 -0.1% 1.6% 2.0% 2.2% 2.3% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.2% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.3% 2.2%

28

Table 13. Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 999...

29

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002...

30

Table 14b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars, cents per kilowatt-hour)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,200...

31

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011...

32

Peak-load pricing and thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty papers were presented at the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 19 papers. One paper was processed previously for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Fifteen of the papers were processed for inclusion in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (LCL)

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level

34

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft July 9, 2009 Draft July 9, 2009 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2009 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

35

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million short tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",920,928,933,938,943,948,953,958,962,967,978,990,987,992,1006,1035,1061,1079 "AEO 1995",,935,940,941,947,948,951,954,958,963,971,984,992,996,1002,1013,1025,1039 "AEO 1996",,,937,942,954,962,983,990,1004,1017,1027,1033,1046,1067,1070,1071,1074,1082,1087 "AEO 1997",,,,948,970,987,1003,1017,1020,1025,1034,1041,1054,1075,1086,1092,1092,1099,1104 "AEO 1998",,,,,1009,1051,1043.875977,1058.292725,1086.598145,1084.446655,1089.787109,1096.931763,1111.523926,1129.833862,1142.338257,1148.019409,1159.695312,1162.210815,1180.029785

36

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6450 6566 6643 6723 6811 6880 6957 7059 7125 7205 7296 7377 7446 7523 7596 7665 7712 7775 AEO 1995 6398 6544 6555 6676 6745 6822 6888 6964 7048 7147 7245 7337 7406 7472 7537 7581 7621 AEO 1996 6490 6526 6607 6709 6782 6855 6942 7008 7085 7176 7260 7329 7384 7450 7501 7545 7581 AEO 1997 6636 6694 6826 6953 7074 7183 7267 7369 7461 7548 7643 7731 7793 7833 7884 7924 AEO 1998 6895 6906 7066 7161 7278 7400 7488 7597 7719 7859 7959 8074 8190 8286 8361 AEO 1999 6884 7007 7269 7383 7472 7539 7620 7725 7841 7949 8069 8174 8283 8351 AEO 2000 7056 7141 7266 7363 7452 7578 7694 7815 7926 8028 8113 8217 8288

37

Table 6. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2935 3201 3362 3504 3657 3738 3880 3993 4099 4212 4303 4398 4475 4541 4584 4639 4668 4672 AEO 1995 2953 3157 3281 3489 3610 3741 3818 3920 4000 4103 4208 4303 4362 4420 4442 4460 4460 AEO 1996 3011 3106 3219 3398 3519 3679 3807 3891 3979 4070 4165 4212 4260 4289 4303 4322 4325 AEO 1997 3099 3245 3497 3665 3825 3975 4084 4190 4285 4380 4464 4552 4617 4654 4709 4760 AEO 1998 3303 3391 3654 3713 3876 4053 4137 4298 4415 4556 4639 4750 4910 4992 5087 AEO 1999 3380 3442 3888 4022 4153 4238 4336 4441 4545 4652 4780 4888 4999 5073 AEO 2000 3599 3847 4036 4187 4320 4465 4579 4690 4780 4882 4968 5055 5113

38

Tropical Africa: Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Open and Closed Forests (1980) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Land Use Maximum Potential Biomass Density Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By Country) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1960 (By Administrative Unit)

39

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final July 01, 2010 Final July 01, 2010 1 Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance On Real Property 1. The following is the FY 2010 implementation procedures for the field offices/sites to determine and report deferred maintenance on real property as required by the Statement of Federal Financial Accounting Standards (SFFAS) No. 6, Accounting for Property, Plant, and Equipment (PP&E) and DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management (RPAM). a. This document is intended to assist field offices/sites in consistently and accurately applying the appropriate methods to determine and report deferred maintenance estimates and reporting of annual required and actual maintenance costs. b. This reporting satisfies the Department's obligation to recognize and record deferred

40

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million barrels) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 2508 2373 2256 2161 2088 2022 1953 1891 1851 1825 1799 1781 1767 1759 1778 1789 1807 1862 AEO 1995 2402 2307 2205 2095 2037 1967 1953 1924 1916 1905 1894 1883 1887 1887 1920 1945 1967 AEO 1996 2387 2310 2248 2172 2113 2062 2011 1978 1953 1938 1916 1920 1927 1949 1971 1986 2000 AEO 1997 2362 2307 2245 2197 2143 2091 2055 2033 2015 2004 1997 1989 1982 1975 1967 1949 AEO 1998 2340 2332 2291 2252 2220 2192 2169 2145 2125 2104 2087 2068 2050 2033 2016 AEO 1999 2340 2309 2296 2265 2207 2171 2141 2122 2114 2092 2074 2057 2040 2025 AEO 2000 2193 2181 2122 2063 2016 1980 1957 1939 1920 1904 1894 1889 1889

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.983258692,2.124739238,2.26534793,2.409252566,2.585728477,2.727400662,2.854942053,2.980927152,3.13861755,3.345819536,3.591100993,3.849544702,4.184279801,4.510016556,4.915074503,5.29147351,5.56022351,5.960471854 "AEO 1995",,1.891706924,1.998384058,1.952818035,2.064227053,2.152302174,2.400016103,2.569033816,2.897681159,3.160088567,3.556344605,3.869033816,4.267391304,4.561932367,4.848599034,5.157246377,5.413405797,5.660917874 "AEO 1996",,,1.630674532,1.740334763,1.862956911,1.9915856,2.10351261,2.194934146,2.287655669,2.378991658,2.476043002,2.589847464,2.717610782,2.836870306,2.967124845,3.117719429,3.294003735,3.485657428,3.728419409

42

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",88.02,89.53,90.72,91.73,92.71,93.61,94.56,95.73,96.69,97.69,98.89,100,100.79,101.7,102.7,103.6,104.3,105.23 "AEO 1995",,89.21,89.98,90.57,91.91,92.98,93.84,94.61,95.3,96.19,97.18,98.38,99.37,100.3,101.2,102.1,102.9,103.88 "AEO 1996",,,90.6,91.26,92.54,93.46,94.27,95.07,95.94,96.92,97.98,99.2,100.38,101.4,102.1,103.1,103.8,104.69,105.5 "AEO 1997",,,,92.64,93.58,95.13,96.59,97.85,98.79,99.9,101.2,102.4,103.4,104.7,105.8,106.6,107.2,107.9,108.6 "AEO 1998",,,,,94.68,96.71,98.61027527,99.81855774,101.254303,102.3907928,103.3935776,104.453476,105.8160553,107.2683716,108.5873566,109.8798981,111.0723877,112.166893,113.0926208

44

Table 4. Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Petroleum Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6449.55,6566.35,6643,6723.3,6810.9,6880.25,6956.9,7059.1,7124.8,7205.1,7296.35,7376.65,7446,7522.65,7595.65,7665,7712.45,7774.5 "AEO 1995",,6398.45,6544.45,6555.4,6675.85,6745.2,6821.85,6887.55,6964.2,7048.15,7146.7,7245.25,7336.5,7405.85,7471.55,7537.25,7581.05,7621.2 "AEO 1996",,,6489.7,6526.2,6606.5,6708.7,6781.7,6854.7,6942.3,7008,7084.65,7175.9,7259.85,7329.2,7383.95,7449.65,7500.75,7544.55,7581.05 "AEO 1997",,,,6635.7,6694.1,6825.5,6953.25,7073.7,7183.2,7267.15,7369.35,7460.6,7548.2,7643.1,7730.7,7792.75,7832.9,7884,7924.15

45

Table 10. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2.02,2.4,2.66,2.74,2.81,2.85,2.89,2.93,2.95,2.97,3,3.16,3.31,3.5,3.57,3.63,3.74,3.85 "AEO 1995",,2.46,2.54,2.8,2.87,2.87,2.89,2.9,2.9,2.92,2.95,2.97,3,3.03,3.19,3.35,3.51,3.6 "AEO 1996",,,2.56,2.75,2.85,2.88,2.93,2.98,3.02,3.06,3.07,3.09,3.12,3.17,3.23,3.29,3.37,3.46,3.56 "AEO 1997",,,,2.82,2.96,3.16,3.43,3.46,3.5,3.53,3.58,3.64,3.69,3.74,3.78,3.83,3.87,3.92,3.97 "AEO 1998",,,,,2.95,3.19,3.531808376,3.842532873,3.869043112,3.894513845,3.935930967,3.976293564,4.021911621,4.062207222,4.107616425,4.164502144,4.221304417,4.277039051,4.339964867

46

Table 12. Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Coal Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million short tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 920 928 933 938 943 948 953 958 962 967 978 990 987 992 1006 1035 1061 1079 AEO 1995 935 940 941 947 948 951 954 958 963 971 984 992 996 1002 1013 1025 1039 AEO 1996 937 942 954 962 983 990 1004 1017 1027 1033 1046 1067 1070 1071 1074 1082 1087 AEO 1997 948 970 987 1003 1017 1020 1025 1034 1041 1054 1075 1086 1092 1092 1099 1104 AEO 1998 1009 1051 1044 1058 1087 1084 1090 1097 1112 1130 1142 1148 1160 1162 1180 AEO 1999 1040 1075 1092 1109 1113 1118 1120 1120 1133 1139 1150 1155 1156 1173 AEO 2000 1053 1086 1103 1124 1142 1164 1175 1184 1189 1194 1199 1195 1200 AEO 2001 1078 1112 1135 1153 1165 1183 1191 1220 1228 1228 1235 1240

47

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

48

Table 16. Total Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual Electricity Sales, Projected vs. Actual (billion kilowatt-hours) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2364 2454 2534 2626 2708 2811 AEO 1983 2318 2395 2476 2565 2650 2739 3153 AEO 1984 2321 2376 2461 2551 2637 2738 3182 AEO 1985 2317 2360 2427 2491 2570 2651 2730 2808 2879 2949 3026 AEO 1986 2363 2416 2479 2533 2608 2706 2798 2883 2966 3048 3116 3185 3255 3324 3397 AEO 1987 2460 2494 2555 2622 2683 2748 2823 2902 2977 3363 AEO 1989* 2556 2619 2689 2760 2835 2917 2994 3072 3156 3236 3313 3394 3473 AEO 1990 2612 2689 3083 3488.0 3870.0 AEO 1991 2700 2762 2806 2855 2904 2959 3022 3088 3151 3214 3282 3355 3427 3496 3563 3632 3704 3776 3846 3916 AEO 1992 2746 2845 2858 2913 2975 3030 3087 3146 3209 3276 3345 3415 3483 3552 3625 3699 3774 3847 3921 AEO 1993 2803 2840 2893 2946 2998 3052 3104 3157 3214 3271 3327

49

Table 5. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million barrels)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",2507.55,2372.5,2255.7,2160.8,2087.8,2022.1,1952.75,1890.7,1850.55,1825,1799.45,1781.2,1766.6,1759.3,1777.55,1788.5,1806.75,1861.5 "AEO 1995",,2401.7,2306.8,2204.6,2095.1,2036.7,1967.35,1952.75,1923.55,1916.25,1905.3,1894.35,1883.4,1887.05,1887.05,1919.9,1945.45,1967.35 "AEO 1996",,,2387.1,2310.45,2248.4,2171.75,2113.35,2062.25,2011.15,1978.3,1952.75,1938.15,1916.25,1919.9,1927.2,1949.1,1971,1985.6,2000.2 "AEO 1997",,,,2361.55,2306.8,2244.75,2197.3,2142.55,2091.45,2054.95,2033.05,2014.8,2003.85,1996.55,1989.25,1981.95,1974.65,1967.35,1949.1

50

Direct quantum communication without actual transmission of the message qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently an orthogonal state based protocol of direct quantum communication without actual transmission of particles is proposed by Salih \\emph{et al.}{[}Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{110} (2013) 170502{]} using chained quantum Zeno effect. As the no-transmission of particle claim is criticized by Vaidman {[}arXiv:1304.6689 (2013){]}, the condition (claim) of Salih \\emph{et al.} is weaken here to the extent that transmission of particles is allowed, but transmission of the message qubits (the qubits on which the secret information is encoded) is not allowed. Remaining within this weaker condition it is shown that there exists a large class of quantum states, that can be used to implement an orthogonal state based protocol of secure direct quantum communication using entanglement swapping, where actual transmission of the message qubits is not required. The security of the protocol originates from monogamy of entanglement. As the protocol can be implemented without using conjugate coding its security is independent of non-commutativity.

Chitra Shukla; Anirban Pathak

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (trillion cubic feet)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",17.71,17.68,17.84,18.12,18.25,18.43,18.58,18.93,19.28,19.51,19.8,19.92,20.13,20.18,20.38,20.35,20.16,20.19 "AEO 1995",,18.28,17.98,17.92,18.21,18.63,18.92,19.08,19.2,19.36,19.52,19.75,19.94,20.17,20.28,20.6,20.59,20.88 "AEO 1996",,,18.9,19.15,19.52,19.59,19.59,19.65,19.73,19.97,20.36,20.82,21.25,21.37,21.68,22.11,22.47,22.83,23.36 "AEO 1997",,,,19.1,19.7,20.17,20.32,20.54,20.77,21.26,21.9,22.31,22.66,22.93,23.38,23.68,23.99,24.25,24.65 "AEO 1998",,,,,18.85,19.06,20.34936142,20.27427673,20.60257721,20.94442177,21.44076347,21.80969238,22.25416183,22.65365219,23.176651,23.74545097,24.22989273,24.70069313,24.96691322

52

Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under-predicted to 77% over-predicted by the model with respect to monitored energy use. Many of the discrepancies were associated with occupant behavior which influences energy use, dramatically in some cases, actual versus modeled weather differences, modeling input limitations, and complex homes that are difficult to model. The discrepancy between actual and estimated energy use indicates a need for better modeling tools and assumptions. Despite the best efforts of researchers, the estimated energy savings are too inaccurate to determine reliable paybacks for retrofit projects. While the monitored data allows researchers to understand why these differences exist, it is not cost effective to monitor each home with the level of detail presented here. Therefore an appropriate balance between modeling and monitoring must be determined for more widespread application in retrofit programs and the home performance industry. Recommendations to address these deficiencies include: (1) improved tuning process for pre-retrofit energy use, which currently utilized broad-based monthly utility bills; (2) developing simple occupant-based energy models that better address the many different occupant types and their impact on energy use; (3) incorporating actual weather inputs to increase accuracy of the tuning process, which uses utility bills from specific time period; and (4) developing simple, cost-effective monitoring solutions for improved model tuning.

Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Actual versus predicted impacts of three ethanol plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help reduce US dependence on imported petroleum, Congress passed the Energy Security Act of 1980 (public Law 96-294). This legislation authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to promote expansion of the fuel alcohol industry through, among other measures, its Alcohol Fuels Loan Guarantee Program. Under this program, selected proposals for the conversion of plant biomass into fuel-grade ethanol would be granted loan guarantees. of 57 applications submitted for loan guarantees to build and operate ethanol fuel projects under this program, 11 were considered by DOE to have the greatest potential for satisfying DOE`s requirements and goals. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE evaluated the potential impacts of proceeding with the Loan Guarantee Program in a programmatic environmental assessment (DOE 1981) that resulted in a finding of no significant impact (FANCY) (47 Federal Register 34, p. 7483). The following year, DOE conducted site-specific environmental assessments (EAs) for 10 of the proposed projects. These F-As predicted no significant environmental impacts from these projects. Eventually, three ethanol fuel projects received loan guarantees and were actually built: the Tennol Energy Company (Tennol; DOE 1982a) facility near Jasper in southeastern Tennessee; the Agrifuels Refining Corporation (Agrifuels; DOE 1985) facility near New Liberia in southern Louisiana; and the New Energy Company of Indiana (NECI; DOE 1982b) facility in South Bend, Indiana. As part of a larger retrospective examination of a wide range of environmental effects of ethanol fuel plants, we compared the actual effects of the three completed plants on aquatic and terrestrial resources with the effects predicted in the NEPA EAs several years earlier. A secondary purpose was to determine: Why were there differences, if any, between actual effects and predictions? How can assessments be improved and impacts reduced?

Eddlemon, G.K.; Webb, J.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Miller, R.L.

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Nonlinear excitations in DNA: Aperiodic models vs actual genome sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of the sequence on the propagation of nonlinear excitations in simple models of DNA in which we incorporate actual DNA sequences obtained from human genome data. We show that kink propagation requires forces over a certain threshold, a phenomenon already found for aperiodic sequences [F. Dom\\'\\i nguez-Adame {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 52}, 2183 (1995)]. For forces below threshold, the final stop positions are highly dependent on the specific sequence. The results of our model are consistent with the stick-slip dynamics of the unzipping process observed in experiments. We also show that the effective potential, a collective coordinate formalism introduced by Salerno and Kivshar [Phys. Lett. A {\\bf 193}, 263 (1994)] is a useful tool to identify key regions in DNA that control the dynamical behavior of large segments. Additionally, our results lead to further insights in the phenomenology observed in aperiodic systems.

Sara Cuenda; Angel Sanchez

2004-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63 21.08 21.50 21.98 22.44 22.94 23.50 24.12 AEO 1996 1994 16.81 16.98 17.37 17.98 18.61 19.27 19.92 20.47 20.97 21.41 21.86 22.25 22.61 22.97 23.34 23.70 24.08

56

Table 11a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual a. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO Dollar Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1992 1.47 1.48 1.53 1.57 1.58 1.57 1.61 1.63 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.72 1.70 1.76 1.79 1.81 1.88 1.92 AEO 1995 1993 1.39 1.39 1.38 1.40 1.40 1.39 1.39 1.42 1.41 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.46 1.46 1.47 1.50 AEO 1996 1994 1.32 1.29 1.28 1.27 1.26 1.26 1.25 1.27 1.27 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.27 1.28 1.26 1.28

57

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Table 17. Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 10.6 AEO 1995 11.0 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 AEO 1996 10.4 10.7 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 AEO 1997 11.1 10.9 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1998 10.7 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 11.9 12.1 12.1 12.2 12.3 AEO 1999 10.5 11.1 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0 12.1 AEO 2000 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.9 12.0

59

Table 7. Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Petroleum Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 7.58 7.45 7.12 6.82 6.66 7.09 AEO 1983 5.15 5.44 5.73 5.79 5.72 5.95 6.96 AEO 1984 4.85 5.11 5.53 5.95 6.31 6.59 8.65 AEO 1985 4.17 4.38 4.73 4.93 5.36 5.72 6.23 6.66 7.14 7.39 7.74 AEO 1986 5.15 5.38 5.46 5.92 6.46 7.09 7.50 7.78 7.96 8.20 8.47 8.74 9.04 9.57 9.76 AEO 1987 5.81 6.04 6.81 7.28 7.82 8.34 8.71 8.94 8.98 10.01 AEO 1989* 6.28 6.84 7.49 7.96 8.53 8.83 9.04 9.28 9.60 9.64 9.75 10.02 10.20 AEO 1990 7.20 7.61 9.13 9.95 11.02 AEO 1991 7.28 7.25 7.34 7.48 7.72 8.10 8.57 9.09 9.61 10.07 10.51 11.00 11.44 11.72 11.86 12.11 12.30 12.49 12.71 12.91 AEO 1992 6.86 7.42 7.88 8.16 8.55 8.80 9.06 9.32 9.50 9.80 10.17 10.35 10.56 10.61 10.85 11.00 11.15 11.29 11.50 AEO 1993 7.25 8.01 8.49 9.06

60

Table 7b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual b. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 1.98 2.12 2.27 2.41 2.59 2.73 2.85 2.98 3.14 3.35 3.59 3.85 4.18 4.51 4.92 5.29 5.56 5.96 AEO 1995 1.89 2.00 1.95 2.06 2.15 2.40 2.57 2.90 3.16 3.56 3.87 4.27 4.56 4.85 5.16 5.41 5.66 AEO 1996 1.63 1.74 1.86 1.99 2.10 2.19 2.29 2.38 2.48 2.59 2.72 2.84 2.97 3.12 3.29 3.49 3.73 AEO 1997 2.03 1.82 1.90 1.99 2.06 2.13 2.21 2.32 2.43 2.54 2.65 2.77 2.88 3.00 3.11 3.24 AEO 1998 2.30 2.20 2.26 2.31 2.38 2.44 2.52 2.60 2.69 2.79 2.93 3.06 3.20 3.35 3.48 AEO 1999 1.98 2.15 2.20 2.32 2.43 2.53 2.63 2.76 2.90 3.02 3.12 3.23 3.35 3.47

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 23.6 24.1 24.5 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 AEO 1995 23.3 24.0 24.2 24.7 25.1 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.5 26.9 27.3 27.7 28.0 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 AEO 1996 23.9 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.3 25.7 26.0 26.4 26.7 27.1 27.5 27.8 28.1 28.4 28.6 28.9 29.1 AEO 1997 24.7 25.3 25.9 26.4 27.0 27.5 28.0 28.5 28.9 29.4 29.8 30.3 30.6 30.9 31.1 31.3 AEO 1998 25.3 25.9 26.7 27.1 27.7 28.3 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.3 32.8 33.1 AEO 1999 25.4 26.0 27.0 27.6 28.2 28.8 29.4 30.0 30.6 31.2 31.7 32.2 32.8 33.1 AEO 2000 26.2 26.8 27.4 28.0 28.5 29.1 29.7 30.3 30.9 31.4 31.9 32.5 32.9

62

Table 22. Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Energy Intensity, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu / real GDP in billion 2005 chained dollars) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 11.2 11.1 11.0 10.8 10.7 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 AEO 1995 10.9 10.8 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.1 9.0 AEO 1996 10.7 10.6 10.4 10.3 10.1 10.0 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1997 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 AEO 1998 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.0 9.9 9.8 9.7 9.6 9.5 9.5 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 AEO 1999 9.6 9.7 9.7 9.7 9.6 9.4 9.3 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.6 8.5 AEO 2000 9.4 9.4 9.3 9.2 9.1 9.0 8.9 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 AEO 2001 8.7 8.6 8.5 8.4 8.3 8.1 8.0 7.9 7.8 7.6 7.5 7.4

63

Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.6 AEO 1995 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 AEO 1997 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.2 AEO 1998 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1999 7.4 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 8.8 8.9 AEO 2000 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.5 8.7 8.7 8.8 AEO 2001 7.8 8.1 8.3 8.6 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.3 9.5 9.6 9.7 AEO 2002 8.2 8.4 8.7 8.9 9.0 9.2 9.4 9.6 9.7 9.9 10.1

64

Table 21. Total Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 18.6 18.2 17.7 17.3 17.0 16.9 AEO 1983 19.8 20.1 20.4 20.4 20.5 20.5 20.7 AEO 1984 19.2 19.0 19.0 19.0 19.1 19.2 20.1 AEO 1985 20.0 19.8 20.0 20.0 20.0 20.1 20.3 AEO 1986 20.5 20.8 20.8 20.6 20.7 20.3 21.0 AEO 1987 21.3 21.5 21.6 21.7 21.8 22.0 22.0 22.0 21.9 22.3 AEO 1989* 21.8 22.2 22.4 22.4 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 23.0 23.2 AEO 1990 22.0 22.4 23.2 24.3 25.5 AEO 1991 22.1 21.6 21.9 22.1 22.3 22.5 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.8 24.1 24.5 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 AEO 1992 21.7 22.0 22.5 22.9 23.2 23.4 23.6 23.9 24.1 24.4 24.8 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.0 26.3 26.6 26.9 27.1 AEO 1993 22.5 22.8 23.4 23.9 24.3 24.7 25.1 25.4 25.7 26.1 26.5 26.8 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.1 28.4 28.7 AEO 1994 23.6

65

Table 10. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production, Projected vs. Actual Production, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 14.74 14.26 14.33 14.89 15.39 15.88 AEO 1983 16.48 16.27 16.20 16.31 16.27 16.29 14.89 AEO 1984 17.48 17.10 17.44 17.58 17.52 17.32 16.39 AEO 1985 16.95 17.08 17.11 17.29 17.40 17.33 17.32 17.27 17.05 16.80 16.50 AEO 1986 16.30 16.27 17.15 16.68 16.90 16.97 16.87 16.93 16.86 16.62 16.40 16.33 16.57 16.23 16.12 AEO 1987 16.21 16.09 16.38 16.32 16.30 16.30 16.44 16.62 16.81 17.39 AEO 1989* 16.71 16.71 16.94 17.01 16.83 17.09 17.35 17.54 17.67 17.98 18.20 18.25 18.49 AEO 1990 16.91 17.25 18.84 20.58 20.24 AEO 1991 17.40 17.48 18.11 18.22 18.15 18.22 18.39 18.82 19.03 19.28 19.62 19.89 20.13 20.07 19.95 19.82 19.64 19.50 19.30 19.08 AEO 1992 17.43 17.69 17.95 18.00 18.29 18.27 18.51 18.75 18.97

66

Table 17. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 79.1 79.6 79.9 80.8 82.1 83.3 AEO 1983 78.0 79.5 81.0 82.4 83.9 84.6 89.0 AEO 1984 78.5 79.4 81.2 83.1 85.1 86.4 93.0 AEO 1985 77.6 78.5 79.8 81.2 82.7 83.3 84.2 85.0 85.7 86.3 87.2 AEO 1986 77.0 78.8 79.8 80.7 81.5 82.9 83.8 84.6 85.3 86.0 86.6 87.4 88.3 89.4 90.2 AEO 1987 78.9 80.0 82.0 82.8 83.9 85.1 86.2 87.1 87.9 92.5 AEO 1989* 82.2 83.8 84.5 85.4 86.2 87.1 87.8 88.7 89.5 90.4 91.4 92.4 93.5 AEO 1990 84.2 85.4 91.9 97.4 102.8 AEO 1991 84.4 85.0 86.0 87.0 87.9 89.1 90.4 91.8 93.1 94.3 95.6 97.1 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.4 102.5 103.6 104.7 105.8 AEO 1992 84.7 87.0 88.0 89.2 90.5 91.4 92.4 93.4 94.5 95.6 96.9 98.0 99.0 100.0 101.2 102.2 103.2 104.3 105.2 AEO 1993 87.0 88.3 89.8 91.4 92.7 94.0 95.3 96.3 97.5 98.6

67

Table 20. Total Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 24.0 24.1 24.4 24.9 25.5 26.1 AEO 1983 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.9 25.0 25.4 AEO 1984 24.1 24.5 25.4 25.5 27.1 27.4 28.7 AEO 1985 23.2 23.6 23.9 24.4 24.8 24.8 24.4 AEO 1986 22.2 22.8 23.1 23.4 23.4 23.6 22.8 AEO 1987 22.4 22.8 23.7 24.0 24.3 24.6 24.6 24.7 24.9 22.6 AEO 1989* 23.6 24.0 24.1 24.3 24.5 24.3 24.3 24.5 24.6 24.8 24.9 24.4 24.1 AEO 1990 25.0 25.4 27.1 27.3 28.6 AEO 1991 24.6 24.5 24.8 24.8 25.0 25.3 25.7 26.2 26.5 26.1 25.9 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.7 27.0 27.2 27.4 27.7 28.0 AEO 1992 24.6 25.3 25.4 25.6 26.1 26.3 26.5 26.5 26.0 25.6 25.8 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.4 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.3 AEO 1993 25.5 25.9 26.2 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.8 27.4 27.1 27.4 27.6 27.8 28.0 28.2 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.1 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9

68

Table 8. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Projected vs. Actual (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 9.2 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 7.29 8.09 8.94 9.62 10.27 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 6.37 6.89 7.50 8.15 9.05 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30

69

Table 16. Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 88.0 89.5 90.7 91.7 92.7 93.6 94.6 95.7 96.7 97.7 98.9 100.0 100.8 101.7 102.7 103.6 104.3 105.2 AEO 1995 89.2 90.0 90.6 91.9 93.0 93.8 94.6 95.3 96.2 97.2 98.4 99.4 100.3 101.2 102.1 102.9 103.9 AEO 1996 90.6 91.3 92.5 93.5 94.3 95.1 95.9 96.9 98.0 99.2 100.4 101.4 102.1 103.1 103.8 104.7 105.5 AEO 1997 92.6 93.6 95.1 96.6 97.9 98.8 99.9 101.2 102.4 103.4 104.7 105.8 106.6 107.2 107.9 108.6 AEO 1998 94.7 96.7 98.6 99.8 101.3 102.4 103.4 104.5 105.8 107.3 108.6 109.9 111.1 112.2 113.1 AEO 1999 94.6 97.0 99.2 100.9 102.0 102.8 103.6 104.7 106.0 107.2 108.5 109.7 110.8 111.8

70

Table 9. Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Production, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.71 17.68 17.84 18.12 18.25 18.43 18.58 18.93 19.28 19.51 19.80 19.92 20.13 20.18 20.38 20.35 20.16 20.19 AEO 1995 18.28 17.98 17.92 18.21 18.63 18.92 19.08 19.20 19.36 19.52 19.75 19.94 20.17 20.28 20.60 20.59 20.88 AEO 1996 18.90 19.15 19.52 19.59 19.59 19.65 19.73 19.97 20.36 20.82 21.25 21.37 21.68 22.11 22.47 22.83 23.36 AEO 1997 19.10 19.70 20.17 20.32 20.54 20.77 21.26 21.90 22.31 22.66 22.93 23.38 23.68 23.99 24.25 24.65 AEO 1998 18.85 19.06 20.35 20.27 20.60 20.94 21.44 21.81 22.25 22.65 23.18 23.75 24.23 24.70 24.97 AEO 1999 18.80 19.13 19.28 19.82 20.23 20.77 21.05 21.57 21.98 22.47 22.85 23.26 23.77 24.15

71

Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (quadrillion Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 25.4 25.9 26.3 26.7 27.0 27.1 26.8 26.6 26.9 27.2 27.7 28.1 28.3 28.7 29.1 29.4 29.7 30.0 AEO 1995 26.2 26.3 26.5 27.0 27.3 26.9 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.5 27.9 28.2 28.4 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.6 AEO 1996 26.5 26.6 27.3 27.5 26.9 26.5 26.7 26.9 27.2 27.6 27.9 28.2 28.3 28.5 28.7 28.9 29.2 AEO 1997 26.2 26.5 26.9 26.7 26.6 26.8 27.1 27.4 27.8 28.0 28.4 28.7 28.9 29.0 29.2 29.4 AEO 1998 27.2 27.5 27.2 26.9 27.1 27.5 27.7 27.9 28.3 28.7 29.0 29.3 29.7 29.9 30.1 AEO 1999 26.7 26.4 26.4 26.8 27.1 27.3 27.5 27.9 28.3 28.6 28.9 29.2 29.5 29.7 AEO 2000 25.8 25.5 25.7 26.0 26.5 26.9 27.4 27.8 28.1 28.3 28.5 28.8 29.0

72

Table 18. Total Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Residential Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.1 10.2 10.2 AEO 1983 9.8 9.9 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.1 10.0 AEO 1984 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.5 AEO 1985 9.8 10.0 10.1 10.3 10.6 10.6 10.9 AEO 1986 9.6 9.8 10.0 10.3 10.4 10.8 10.9 AEO 1987 9.9 10.2 10.3 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.6 AEO 1989* 10.3 10.5 10.4 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 10.5 AEO 1990 10.4 10.7 10.8 11.0 11.3 AEO 1991 10.2 10.7 10.7 10.8 10.8 10.8 10.9 10.9 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 11.6 AEO 1992 10.6 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.5 11.6 11.7 11.8 11.8 11.9 12.0 AEO 1993 10.7 10.9 11.0 11.0 11.0 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.1 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.2 11.3 11.3 11.4 11.4 11.5 AEO 1994 10.3 10.4 10.4 10.4

73

Table 6. Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual Domestic Crude Oil Production, Projected vs. Actual (million barrels per day) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 8.79 8.85 8.84 8.80 8.66 8.21 AEO 1983 8.67 8.71 8.66 8.72 8.80 8.63 8.11 AEO 1984 8.86 8.70 8.59 8.45 8.28 8.25 7.19 AEO 1985 8.92 8.96 9.01 8.78 8.38 8.05 7.64 7.27 6.89 6.68 6.53 AEO 1986 8.80 8.63 8.30 7.90 7.43 6.95 6.60 6.36 6.20 5.99 5.80 5.66 5.54 5.45 5.43 AEO 1987 8.31 8.18 8.00 7.63 7.34 7.09 6.86 6.64 6.54 6.03 AEO 1989* 8.18 7.97 7.64 7.25 6.87 6.59 6.37 6.17 6.05 6.00 5.94 5.90 5.89 AEO 1990 7.67 7.37 6.40 5.86 5.35 AEO 1991 7.23 6.98 7.10 7.11 7.01 6.79 6.48 6.22 5.92 5.64 5.36 5.11 4.90 4.73 4.62 4.59 4.58 4.53 4.46 4.42 AEO 1992 7.37 7.17 6.99 6.89 6.68 6.45 6.28 6.16 6.06 5.91 5.79 5.71 5.66 5.64 5.62 5.63 5.62 5.55 5.52 AEO 1993 7.20 6.94 6.79 6.52 6.22 6.00 5.84 5.72

74

Table 15. Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual Average Electricity Prices, Projected vs. Actual (nominal cents per kilowatt-hour) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.38 6.96 7.63 8.23 8.83 9.49 AEO 1983 6.85 7.28 7.74 8.22 8.68 9.18 13.12 AEO 1984 6.67 7.05 7.48 7.89 8.25 8.65 11.53 AEO 1985 6.62 6.94 7.32 7.63 7.89 8.15 8.46 8.85 9.20 9.61 10.04 AEO 1986 6.67 6.88 7.05 7.18 7.35 7.52 7.65 7.87 8.31 8.83 9.41 10.01 10.61 11.33 12.02 AEO 1987 6.63 6.65 6.92 7.12 7.38 7.62 7.94 8.36 8.86 11.99 AEO 1989* 6.50 6.75 7.14 7.48 7.82 8.11 8.50 8.91 9.39 9.91 10.49 11.05 11.61 AEO 1990 6.49 6.72 8.40 10.99 14.5 AEO 1991 6.94 7.31 7.59 7.82 8.18 8.38 8.54 8.73 8.99 9.38 9.83 10.29 10.83 11.36 11.94 12.58 13.21 13.88 14.58 15.21 AEO 1992 6.97 7.16 7.32 7.56 7.78 8.04 8.29 8.57 8.93 9.38 9.82 10.26 10.73 11.25 11.83 12.37 12.96 13.58 14.23 AEO 1993

75

Table 11. Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual Natural Gas Net Imports, Projected vs. Actual (trillion cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 1.19 AEO 1983 1.08 1.16 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 1.23 AEO 1984 0.99 1.05 1.16 1.27 1.43 1.57 2.11 AEO 1985 0.94 1.00 1.19 1.45 1.58 1.86 1.94 2.06 2.17 2.32 2.44 AEO 1986 0.74 0.88 0.62 1.03 1.05 1.27 1.39 1.47 1.66 1.79 1.96 2.17 2.38 2.42 2.43 AEO 1987 0.84 0.89 1.07 1.16 1.26 1.36 1.46 1.65 1.75 2.50 AEO 1989* 1.15 1.32 1.44 1.52 1.61 1.70 1.79 1.87 1.98 2.06 2.15 2.23 2.31 AEO 1990 1.26 1.43 2.07 2.68 2.95 AEO 1991 1.36 1.53 1.70 1.82 2.11 2.30 2.33 2.36 2.42 2.49 2.56 2.70 2.75 2.83 2.90 2.95 3.02 3.09 3.17 3.19 AEO 1992 1.48 1.62 1.88 2.08 2.25 2.41 2.56 2.68 2.70 2.72 2.76 2.84 2.92 3.05 3.10 3.20 3.25 3.30 3.30 AEO 1993 1.79 2.08 2.35 2.49 2.61 2.74 2.89 2.95 3.00 3.05 3.10

76

Table 8. Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Total Natural Gas Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Projected (trillion cubic feet) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 19.87 20.21 20.64 20.99 21.20 21.42 21.60 21.99 22.37 22.63 22.95 23.22 23.58 23.82 24.09 24.13 24.02 24.14 AEO 1995 20.82 20.66 20.85 21.21 21.65 21.95 22.12 22.25 22.43 22.62 22.87 23.08 23.36 23.61 24.08 24.23 24.59 AEO 1996 21.32 21.64 22.11 22.21 22.26 22.34 22.46 22.74 23.14 23.63 24.08 24.25 24.63 25.11 25.56 26.00 26.63 AEO 1997 22.15 22.75 23.24 23.64 23.86 24.13 24.65 25.34 25.82 26.22 26.52 27.00 27.35 27.70 28.01 28.47 AEO 1998 21.84 23.03 23.84 24.08 24.44 24.81 25.33 25.72 26.22 26.65 27.22 27.84 28.35 28.84 29.17 AEO 1999 21.35 22.36 22.54 23.18 23.65 24.17 24.57 25.19 25.77 26.41 26.92 27.42 28.02 28.50

77

Comparison of Projections to Actual Performance in the DOE-EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), Global Energy Concepts (GEC) worked with participating utilities to develop a set of performance projections for their projects based on historical site atmospheric conditions, turbine performance data, operation and maintenance (O and M) strategies, and assumptions about various energy losses. After a preliminary operation period at each project, GEC compared the actual performance to projections and evaluated the accuracy of the data and assumptions that formed the performance projections. This paper presents a comparison of 1999 power output, turbine availability, and other performance characteristics to the projections for TVP projects in Texas, Vermont, Iowa, Nebraska, Wisconsin, and Alaska. Factors that were overestimated or underestimated are quantified. Actual wind speeds are compared to projections based on long-term historical measurements. Turbine power curve measurements are compared with data provided by the manufacturers, and loss assumptions are evaluated for accuracy. Overall, the projects performed well, particularly new commercial turbines in the first few years of operation. However, some sites experienced below average wind resources and greater than expected losses. The TVP project owners successfully developed and constructed wind power plants that are now in full commercial operation, serving a total of approximately 12,000 households.

Rhoads, H.; VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Compton, A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Table 19. Total Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual (quadrillion Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.8 6.8 6.9 AEO 1983 6.4 6.6 6.8 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.2 AEO 1984 6.2 6.4 6.5 6.7 6.8 6.9 7.3 AEO 1985 5.9 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.7 AEO 1986 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.4 AEO 1987 6.1 6.1 6.3 6.4 6.6 6.7 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.3 AEO 1989* 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 AEO 1990 6.6 6.8 7.1 7.4 7.8 AEO 1991 6.7 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.6 8.7 AEO 1992 6.8 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 8.4 8.5 8.6 8.7 AEO 1993 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 7.9 8.0 8.0 8.1 8.1 8.1 8.2 8.2 AEO 1994 6.8 6.9 6.9 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.5 7.5 7.5 AEO 1995 6.94 6.9 7.0 7.0 7.0 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 AEO 1996 7.1 7.2 7.2 7.3 7.3 7.4 7.4 7.5 7.6 7.6 7.7 7.7 7.8 7.9 8.0

79

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Feb-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Mar-03 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1

Johns, Russell Taylor

80

Actual Scale MOX Powder Mixing Test for MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. (hereafter, JNFL) promotes a program of constructing a MOX fuel fabrication plant (hereafter, J-MOX) to fabricate MOX fuels to be loaded in domestic light water reactors. Since Japanese fiscal year (hereafter, JFY) 1999, JNFL, to establish the technology for a smooth start-up and the stable operation of J-MOX, has executed an evaluation test for technology to be adopted at J-MOX. JNFL, based on a consideration that J-MOX fuel fabrication comes commercial scale production, decided an introduction of MIMAS technology into J-MOX main process, from powder mixing through pellet sintering, well recognized as mostly important to achieve good quality product of MOX fuel, since it achieves good results in both fuel production and actual reactor irradiation in Europe, but there is one difference that JNFL is going to use Japanese typical plutonium and uranium mixed oxide powder converted with the micro-wave heating direct de-nitration technology (hereafter, MH-MOX) but normal PuO{sub 2} of European MOX fuel fabricators. Therefore, in order to evaluate the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process, JNFL manufactured small scale test equipment, and implemented a powder mixing evaluation test up until JFY 2003. As a result, the suitability of the MH-MOX powder for the MIMAS process was positively evaluated and confirmed It was followed by a five-years test named an 'actual test' from JFY 2003 to JFY 2007, which aims at demonstrating good operation and maintenance of process equipment as well as obtaining good quality of MOX fuel pellets. (authors)

Osaka, Shuichi; Kurita, Ichiro; Deguchi, Morimoto [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., 4-108, Aza okitsuke, oaza obuchi rokkasyo-mura, kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Ito, Masanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4-33 Muramatu, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan); Goto, Masakazu [Nuclear Fuel Industries, Ltd., 14-10, Mita 3-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

Actual versus design performance of solar systems in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report relates field measured performance to the designer predicted performance. The field measured data was collected by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) over a period of six years. Data from 25 solar systems was selected from a data pool of some 170 solar systems. The scope of the project extends beyond merely presenting comparisons of data. There is an attempt to provide answers which will move the solar industry forward. As a result of some industry and research workshops, several concerns arose which can be partially allayed by careful study of the NSDN data. These are: What types of failures occurred and why. How good was the design versus actual performance. Why was predicted performance not achieved in the field. Which components should be integrated with a system type for good performance. Since the designs span several years and since design philosophies are quite variable, the measured results were also compared to f-Chart 5.1 results. This comparison is a type of normalization in that all systems are modeled with the same process. An added benefit of this normalization is a further validation of the f-Chart model on a fairly large scale. The systems were modeled using equipment design parameters, measured loads, and f-Chart weather data from nearby cities.

Logee, T.L.; Kendall, P.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Stress Actually Makes You Stronger ... At Least Some of the Time News Featured Articles 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Presentations & Testimony...

83

The Multiple Peril Crop Insurance Actual Production History (APH) Insurance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Actual Production History insurance plan protects against crop losses from a number of causes. All aspects of this insurance are described, including reporting requirements for the producer.

Stokes, Kenneth; Barnaby, G. A. Art; Waller, Mark L.; Outlaw, Joe

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Assessing Climate Information Use in Agribusiness. Part I: Actual and Potential Use and Impediments to Usage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A project for the development of methodology to enable agribusiness decision makers to utilize more effectively climate information involved investigation of three agribusiness firms, as well as measurement of their actual and potential use. The ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Steven T. Sonka; Steven Hofing

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Trends of Calculated and Simulated Actual Evaporation in the Yangtze River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actual evaporation in the Yangtze River basin is calculated by the complementary relationship approach—that is, the advection–aridity (AA) model with parameter validation from 1961 to 2007—and simulated by the general circulation model (GCM) ...

Yanjun Wang; Bo Liu; Buda Su; Jianqing Zhai; Marco Gemmer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Use of Remotely Sensed Actual Evapotranspiration to Improve Rainfall–Runoff Modeling in Southeast Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the use of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), mounted on the polar-orbiting Terra satellite, to determine leaf area index (LAI), and use actual evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS LAI data combined ...

Yongqiang Zhang; Francis H. S. Chiew; Lu Zhang; Hongxia Li

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Meteorological Data in Central Bolivia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial estimates of actual evapotranspiration are useful for calculating the water balance of river basins, quantifying hydrological services provided by ecosystems, and assessing the hydrological impacts of land-use practices. To provide this ...

Christian Seiler; Arnold F. Moene

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.7% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-11 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

89

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.3% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY of Texas at Austin Jan-00 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas) #/Month

Johns, Russell Taylor

90

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 1.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-06 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

91

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1. 8.0% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-09 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other

Johns, Russell Taylor

92

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Total % Rcvd. 2.2% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-08 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

93

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1.1% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY University of Texas at Austin Jan-04 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List Other Target Areas

Johns, Russell Taylor

94

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance. 1/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-01 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION

Johns, Russell Taylor

95

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-05 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET

Johns, Russell Taylor

96

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION Maintenance Shops Offices 6 OF REPORT DP Form #31 - Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-10 PART I CRIMES

Johns, Russell Taylor

97

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd. 1 Theft Total $280 $280 Total % Rcvd 0.4% DP Form #31 - Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas/93)Co #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan-02 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY & THEFT TARGET SECTION (List

Johns, Russell Taylor

98

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared % Clrd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES Reported Unfounded Actual Cleared.1% DP Form #31 Page 1(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY Form #31 Page 2(Rev. 1/93) #12;The University of Texas at Austin Jan07 PART I CRIMES BURGLARY

Johns, Russell Taylor

99

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Optimal Oil Production and Comparing with Actual and Contractual Oil Production: Iran, Davis Introduction · The Iran Oil Project, initiated in 2007, aims to find the inefficiencies and their possible sources in Iranian oil and gas policies. Background Information Assumptions · Perfect Competition

California at Davis, University of

100

Satellite-Based Actual Evapotranspiration over Drying Semiarid Terrain in West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink’s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the ...

D. Schüttemeyer; Ch Schillings; A. F. Moene; H. A. R. de Bruin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

102

The Actual Impact of the International Tribunal for former Yugoslavia on the Reconciliation Process in Bosnia-Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the actual impact of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on the reconciliation process in Bosnia-Herzegovina and analyses possible… (more)

Johansen, Kristine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

How many people actually see the price signal? Quantifying market failures in the end use of energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment, behaviour, energy price, consumers Abstract “suggest that raising energy prices—such as in the form ofconsumers actually “see” energy prices and are therefore

Meier, Alan; Eide, Anita

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Method and apparatus for distinguishing actual sparse events from sparse event false alarms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Remote sensing method and apparatus wherein sparse optical events are distinguished from false events. "Ghost" images of actual optical phenomena are generated using an optical beam splitter and optics configured to direct split beams to a single sensor or segmented sensor. True optical signals are distinguished from false signals or noise based on whether the ghost image is presence or absent. The invention obviates the need for dual sensor systems to effect a false target detection capability, thus significantly reducing system complexity and cost.

Spalding, Richard E. (Albuquerque, NM); Grotbeck, Carter L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",1.502753725,1.549729719,1.64272351,1.727259934,1.784039735,1.822135762,1.923203642,2.00781457,2.134768212,2.217425497,2.303725166,2.407715232,2.46134106,2.637086093,2.775389073,2.902293046,3.120364238,3.298013245 "AEO 1995",,1.4212343,1.462640338,1.488780998,1.545300242,1.585877053,1.619428341,1.668671498,1.7584219,1.803937198,1.890547504,1.968695652,2.048913043,2.134750403,2.205281804,2.281690821,2.375434783,2.504830918 "AEO 1996",,,1.346101641,1.350594221,1.369020126,1.391737646,1.421340737,1.458772082,1.496497523,1.561369914,1.619940033,1.674758358,1.749420803,1.800709877,1.871110564,1.924495246,2.006850327,2.048938234,2.156821499

106

"Table 20. Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Transportation Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",23.62,24.08,24.45,24.72,25.06,25.38,25.74,26.16,26.49,26.85,27.23,27.55,27.91,28.26,28.61,28.92,29.18,29.5 "AEO 1995",,23.26,24.01,24.18,24.69,25.11,25.5,25.86,26.15,26.5,26.88,27.28,27.66,27.99,28.25,28.51,28.72,28.94 "AEO 1996",,,23.89674759,24.08507919,24.47502899,24.84881783,25.25887871,25.65527534,26.040205,26.38586426,26.72540092,27.0748024,27.47158241,27.80837631,28.11616135,28.3992157,28.62907982,28.85912895,29.09081459 "AEO 1997",,,,24.68686867,25.34906006,25.87225533,26.437994,27.03513145,27.52499771,27.96490097,28.45482063,28.92999458,29.38239861,29.84147453,30.26097488,30.59760475,30.85550499,31.10873222,31.31938744

107

"Table 19. Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Industrial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",25.43,25.904,26.303,26.659,26.974,27.062,26.755,26.598,26.908,27.228,27.668,28.068,28.348,28.668,29.068,29.398,29.688,30.008 "AEO 1995",,26.164,26.293,26.499,27.044,27.252,26.855,26.578,26.798,27.098,27.458,27.878,28.158,28.448,28.728,29.038,29.298,29.608 "AEO 1996",,,26.54702756,26.62236823,27.31312376,27.47668697,26.90313339,26.47577946,26.67685979,26.928811,27.23795407,27.58448499,27.91057103,28.15050595,28.30145734,28.518,28.73702901,28.93001263,29.15872662 "AEO 1997",,,,26.21291769,26.45981795,26.88483478,26.67847443,26.55107968,26.78246968,27.07367604,27.44749539,27.75711339,28.02446072,28.39156621,28.69999783,28.87316602,29.01207631,29.19475644,29.37683575

108

File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Theoretical vs Actual Data Lesson Plan .pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 257 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 09:33, 3 January 2014 Thumbnail for version as of 09:33, 3 January 2014 1,275 × 1,650, 2 pages (257 KB) Foteri (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools High School Curricula

109

Table 3b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual b. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per barrel) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AEO 1994 17.06 17.21 18.24 19.43 20.64 22.12 23.76 25.52 27.51 29.67 31.86 34.00 36.05 38.36 40.78 43.29 45.88 48.37 AEO 1995 15.24 17.27 18.23 19.26 20.39 21.59 22.97 24.33 25.79 27.27 28.82 30.38 32.14 33.89 35.85 37.97 40.28 AEO 1996 17.16 17.74 18.59 19.72 20.97 22.34 23.81 25.26 26.72 28.22 29.87 31.51 33.13 34.82 36.61 38.48 40.48

110

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

111

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CSSX SOLVENT WITH ACTUAL SRS TANK WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts are underway to qualify the Next-Generation Solvent for the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process. Researchers at multiple national laboratories have been involved in this effort. As part of the effort to qualify the solvent extraction system at the Savannah River Site (SRS), SRNL performed a number of tests at various scales. First, SRNL completed a series of batch equilibrium, or Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS), tests. These tests used {approx}30 mL of Next-Generation Solvent and either actual SRS tank waste, or waste simulant solutions. The results from these cesium mass transfer tests were used to predict solvent behavior under a number of conditions. At a larger scale, SRNL assembled 12 stages of 2-cm (diameter) centrifugal contactors. This rack of contactors is structurally similar to one tested in 2001 during the demonstration of the baseline CSSX process. Assembly and mechanical testing found no issues. SRNL performed a nonradiological test using 35 L of cesium-spiked caustic waste simulant and 39 L of actual tank waste. Test results are discussed; particularly those related to the effectiveness of extraction.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Fink, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

"Table 18. Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" Total Delivered Commercial Energy Consumption, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (quadrillion Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",6.82,6.87,6.94,7,7.06,7.13,7.16,7.22,7.27,7.32,7.36,7.38,7.41,7.45,7.47,7.5,7.51,7.55 "AEO 1995",,6.94,6.9,6.95,6.99,7.02,7.05,7.08,7.09,7.11,7.13,7.15,7.17,7.19,7.22,7.26,7.3,7.34 "AEO 1996",,,7.059859276,7.17492485,7.228339195,7.28186655,7.336973667,7.387932777,7.442782879,7.501244545,7.561584473,7.623688221,7.684037209,7.749266148,7.815915108,7.884147644,7.950204372,8.016282082,8.085801125 "AEO 1997",,,,7.401538849,7.353548527,7.420701504,7.48336792,7.540113449,7.603093624,7.663851738,7.723834991,7.783358574,7.838726044,7.89124918,7.947964668,8.008976936,8.067288399,8.130317688,8.197405815

114

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Exposure of Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites in Simulated and Actual Combustor Environments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-temperature, high-pressure, tube furnace has been used to evaluate the long term stability of different monolithic ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials in a simulated combustor environment. All of the tests have been run at 150 psia, 1204 degrees C, and 15% steam in incremental 500 h runs. The major advantage of this system is the high sample throughput; >20 samples can be exposed in each tube at the same time under similar exposure conditions. Microstructural evaluations of the samples were conducted after each 500 h exposure to characterize the extent of surface damage, to calculate surface recession rates, and to determine degradation mechanisms for the different materials. The validity of this exposure rig for simulating real combustor environments was established by comparing materials exposed in the test rig and combustor liner materials exposed for similar times in an actual gas turbine combustor under commercial operating conditions.

Brentnall, W.D.; Ferber, M.K.; Keiser, j.R.; Miriyala, N.; More, K.L.; Price, J.R.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Walker, L.R.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

117

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Table 12. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 2.03 2.17 2.33 2.52 2.73 2.99 AEO 1983 1.99 2.10 2.24 2.39 2.57 2.76 4.29 AEO 1984 1.90 2.01 2.13 2.28 2.44 2.61 3.79 AEO 1985 1.68 1.76 1.86 1.95 2.05 2.19 2.32 2.49 2.66 2.83 3.03 AEO 1986 1.61 1.68 1.75 1.83 1.93 2.05 2.19 2.35 2.54 2.73 2.92 3.10 3.31 3.49 3.68 AEO 1987 1.52 1.55 1.65 1.75 1.84 1.96 2.11 2.27 2.44 3.55 AEO 1989* 1.50 1.51 1.68 1.77 1.88 2.00 2.13 2.26 2.40 2.55 2.70 2.86 3.00 AEO 1990 1.46 1.53 2.07 2.76 3.7 AEO 1991 1.51 1.58 1.66 1.77 1.88 1.96 2.06 2.16 2.28 2.41 2.57 2.70 2.85 3.04 3.26 3.46 3.65 3.87 4.08 4.33 AEO 1992 1.54 1.61 1.66 1.75 1.85 1.97 2.03 2.14 2.26 2.44 2.55 2.69 2.83 3.00 3.20 3.40 3.58 3.78 4.01 AEO 1993 1.92 1.54 1.61 1.70

119

Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

Han Chunhui [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)], E-mail: chan@coh.org; Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Division of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling of Boehmite Leaching from Actual Hanford High-Level Waste Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high level waste sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of high level waste requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove about 90 percent of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum in the form of gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic, but boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. In this work, the dissolution kinetics of aluminum species during caustic leaching of actual Hanford high level waste samples is examined. The experimental results are used to develop a shrinking core model that provides a basis for prediction of dissolution dynamics from known process temperature and hydroxide concentration. This model is further developed to include the effects of particle size polydispersity, which is found to strongly influence the rate of dissolution.

Peterson, Reid A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Rapko, Brian M.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Actinide partitioning from actual Idaho chemical processing plant acidic tank waste using centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Iron was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Mercury was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (76%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} wash section.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Todd, T.A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Predicted Versus Actual Savings for a Low-Rise Multifamily Retrofit in Boulder, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

To determine the most cost-effective methods of improving buildings, accurate analysis and prediction of the energy use of existing buildings is essential. However, multiple studies confirm that analysis methods tend to over-predict energy use in poorly insulated, leaky homes and thus, the savings associated with improving those homes. In NREL's report titled 'Assessing and Improving the Accuracy of Energy Analysis of Residential Buildings,' researchers propose a method for improving the accuracy of residential energy analysis methods. A key step in this process involves the comparisons of predicted versus metered energy use and savings. In support of this research need, CARB evaluated the retrofit of a multifamily building in Boulder, CO. The updated property is a 37 unit, 2 story apartment complex built in 1950, which underwent renovations in early 2009 to bring it into compliance with Boulder, CO's SmartRegs ordinance. Goals of the study were to: 1) evaluate predicted versus actual savings due to the improvements, 2) identify areas where the modeling assumptions may need to be changed, and 3) determine common changes made by renters that would negatively impact energy savings. In this study, CARB seeks to improve the accuracy of modeling software while assessing retrofit measures to specifically determine which are most effective for large multifamily complexes in the cold climate region. Other issues that were investigated include the effects of improving building efficiency on tenant comfort, the impact on tenant turnover rates, and the potential market barriers for this type of community scale project.

Arena, L.; Williamson, J.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario Electricity System for the 10-year period from 2003 to 2012. This assessment is based on forecasts of electricity demand and available supply combined with current information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Based on existing and proposed facilities, Ontario is expected to have a reliable supply of electricity during the forecast period under a wide-variety of conditions. Opportunities also exist for additional enhancements to improve the efficiency of the Ontario electricity market. The assessments in this report were made based on a number of key planning assumptions. Assuming a median growth scenario, the energy demand is forecast to grow over the study period from 151 terawatt-hours (TWh) in 2003 to 164 TWh in 2012, at an average annual growth rate of 0.9%. Peak demands are forecast to increase from about 24,000 MW in 2003 to 26,000 MW in 2012 at an average annual growth rate of 0.9%. Under normal weather conditions, Ontario is expected to be summer peaking by 2008. However, given the high variability of summer peak demands, there is a possibility that actual summer peaks may be higher than the winter peaks in some or all of the years before 2008, as has been the case in the recent past. In addition to the

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTING OF ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT TO AUGMENT THE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OF SRS SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

In support of Savannah River Site (SRS) tank closure efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted Real Waste Testing (RWT) to evaluate Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC), an alternative to the baseline 8 wt% oxalic acid (OA) chemical cleaning technology for tank sludge heel removal. ECC utilizes a more dilute OA solution (2 wt%) and an oxalate destruction technology using ozonolysis with or without the application of ultraviolet (UV) light. SRNL conducted tests of the ECC process using actual SRS waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. The previous phase of testing involved testing of all phases of the ECC process (sludge dissolution, OA decomposition, product evaporation, and deposition tank storage) but did not involve the use of UV light in OA decomposition. The new phase of testing documented in this report focused on the use of UV light to assist OA decomposition, but involved only the OA decomposition and deposition tank portions of the process. Compared with the previous testing at analogous conditions without UV light, OA decomposition with the use of UV light generally reduced time required to reach the target of <100 mg/L oxalate. This effect was the most pronounced during the initial part of the decomposition batches, when pH was <4. For the later stages of each OA decomposition batch, the increase in OA decomposition rate with use of the UV light appeared to be minimal. Testing of the deposition tank storage of the ECC product resulted in analogous soluble concentrations regardless of the use or non-use of UV light in the ECC reactor.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

STEAM REFORMING TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF ORGANICS ON ACTUAL DOE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE TANK 48H WASTE 9138  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR); a processing unit for demonstrating steam reforming technology on actual radioactive waste [1]. It describes the operating conditions of the unit used for processing a sample of Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 48H waste. Finally, it compares the results from processing the actual waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in the BSR to processing simulant waste in a large pilot scale unit, the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR), operated at Hazen Research Inc. in Golden, CO. The purpose of this work was to prove that the actual waste reacted in the same manner as the simulant waste in order to validate the work performed in the pilot scale unit which could only use simulant waste.

Burket, P

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE  

SciTech Connect

Glycolic acid was effective at dissolving many metals, including iron, during processing with simulants. Criticality constraints take credit for the insolubility of iron during processing to prevent criticality of fissile materials. Testing with actual waste was needed to determine the extent of iron and fissile isotope dissolution during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing. The Alternate Reductant Project was initiated by the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Company to explore options for the replacement of the nitric-formic flowsheet used for the CPC at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The goals of the Alternate Reductant Project are to reduce CPC cycle time, increase mass throughput of the facility, and reduce operational hazards. In order to achieve these goals, several different reductants were considered during initial evaluations conducted by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). After review of the reductants by SRR, SRNL, and Energy Solutions (ES) Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL), two flowsheets were further developed in parallel. The two flowsheet options included a nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet, and a nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet. As of July 2011, SRNL and ES/VSL have completed the initial flowsheet development work for the nitric-formic-glycolic flowsheet and nitric-formic-sugar flowsheet, respectively. On July 12th and July 13th, SRR conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to down select the alternate reductant flowsheet. The SEE team selected the Formic-Glycolic Flowsheet for further development. Two risks were identified in SEE for expedited research. The first risk is related to iron and plutonium solubility during the CPC process with respect to criticality. Currently, DWPF credits iron as a poison for the fissile components of the sludge. Due to the high iron solubility observed during the flowsheet demonstrations with simulants, it was necessary to determine if the plutonium in the radioactive sludge slurry demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

The influence of indoor temperature on the difference between actual and theoretical energy consumption for space heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Advice procedure (EAP) is developed to evaluate the energetic performance of "existing" dwellings to generate a useful advice for the occupants of the dwelling to invest in rational energy measures. The EAP is based on a theoretical calculation ... Keywords: actual energy consumption, consumer behaviour, indoor temperature, space heating, theoretical energy consumption

Amaryllis Audenaert; Katleen Briffaerts; Dries De Boeck

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Property:Incentive/SWHComYears | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWHComYears SWHComYears Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/SWHComYears Property Type String Description The number of years of energy production to which the commercial incentive applies. For commercial/Non-profit/gov't systems, this is may be an upfront rebate based on an estimate of first-year production or this may be actual measured output over several years. Ex: APS's (AZ) RE incentive for commercial SWH is $0.057/kWh over 10 years. Format: 10.0 [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/SWHComYears" Showing 21 pages using this property. A APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) + 1 + C CPS Energy - Solar Hot Water Rebate Program (Texas) + 1 + California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program (California) + 1 +

130

2009 Reporting Year  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

FRS Accumu- Book Value Year End Year's Foot Line # Gross Lated DD&A Net Additions DD&A of Disposals Other Balance Additions Other note Petroleum: A BCD E F G H IJ

131

Vernon K. Hagen Early Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and some advanced infantry training. Then I got sent over to Hawaii. Actually we were en route to Okinawa S] Truman decided that he was going to drop the atomic bomb, so we didn't even go to Okinawa

US Army Corps of Engineers

132

July 2003ENERGY POLICIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES AFTER 25 YEARS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hans Landsberg and Sam Schurr each led research teams that produced two important energy futures policy studies that were published in 1979. The conclusions, policy recommendations, and energy demand, supply, and price forecasts contained in these studies are reviewed. Developments in U.S. energy policy over the last 25 years are discussed and compared with the recommendations contained in the two studies. The projections of energy demand, supply, and prices for 2000 contained in the studies is presented and compared to actual realizations. The nature, magnitudes, and reasons for the differences between the studies ’ forecasts and what actually emerged 25 years later are discussed. All things considered, the Landsberg and Schurr studies have stood the test of time very well. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Allocation Year Rollover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover: 2013 to 2014 Note: Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. Below are major changes that will go into effect with the beginning of AY14 on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. All times listed are PST. Scheduled System Downtimes There will be no service disruption during the allocation year rollover this year. Interactive and batch use will continue uninterrupted (except for "premium" jobs on Hopper; see below). Charging Across AY Boundary All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14 repos. Running batch jobs that are associated with

134

Demonstration of a SREX flowsheet for the partitioning of strontium and lead from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning {sup 90}Sr and Pb from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Previous countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process with simulated waste resulted in 99.98% removal of Sr and 99.9% removal of Pb. Based on the results of these studies, a demonstration of the SREX flowsheet was performed. The demonstration consisted of (1) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using simulated sodium-bearing waste spiked with {sup 85}Sr and (2) countercurrent flowsheet testing of the SREX process using actual waste from tank WM-183. All testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0. 15 M 4`,4`(5)-di-(tert-butyldicyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L{reg_sign}), a 2.0 MHNO{sub 3} scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.1 M ammonium citrate strip section for the removal of Pb from the SREX solvent, and a 3.0 M HNO{sub 3} equilibration section. The behavior of {sup 90}Sr, Pb, Na, K, Hg, H{sup +}, the actinides, and numerous other non-radioactive elements was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted and selectively stripped Sr and Ph from the SBW simulant and the actual tank waste. For the testing with actual tank waste (WM - 183), removal efficiencies of 99.995 % and >94% were obtained for {sup 90}Sr and Pb, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Olson, L.G.; Todd, T.A.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2009 Year-End...

136

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2010 Year-End...

137

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End...

138

Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End Summary Report Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2008 Year-End...

139

Previous Year Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards Awards Previous Year Awards 2013 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2013 allocation year (Jan 8, 2013 through Jan 13, 2014). Read More » NERSC Initiative for Scientific Exploration (NISE) 2013 Awards NISE is a mechanism used for allocating the NERSC reserve (10% of the total allocation). In 2013 we made the second year of the two-year awards made in 2012, supplemented by projects selected by the NERSC director. Read More » Data Intensive Computing Pilot Program 2012/2013 Awards NERSC's new data-intensive science pilot program is aimed at helping scientists capture, analyze and store the increasing stream of scientific data coming out of experiments, simulations and instruments. Read More » 2012 Allocation Awards This page lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the 2012 allocation

140

Welcome Year in Review  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 NMMSS Users Annual Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Welcome & Year In Review...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Multi-Year Program Plan, Building Regulatory Programs: 2010-2015  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Year Program Plan Multi-Year Program Plan - Building Regulatory Programs - U.S. Department of Energy - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Building Technologies Program - October 2010 [This plan will be updated based on actual appropriations, future budget requests and other program developments; the next significant revision is expected to be completed by spring 2011] 1 Building Regulatory Programs Multi Year Program Plan ďż˝ Contents 1. Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................................................... 7 - 2. Introduction ...................................................................................................................................................................14

142

Is interactivity actually important?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It appears that it is a well-accepted assumption that interactivity will improve the entertainment and/or learning value of a media. This paper reviews various studies exploring the role of interactivity and reports on a study conducted to see whether ... Keywords: game engine, interactivity, learning, simulation, training

Debbie Richards

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Agency Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improvement Plan For Fiscal Year 2006 and Fiscal Year 2007 More Documents & Publications U.S> Department of Energy, Fiscal Year 2007 Buy American Act Report. Audit Report:...

144

An experimental and computational leakage investigation of labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large scale water test facility and a commercial CFD computer program were used to investigate labyrinth seals with rub grooves of actual size and shape found in aircraft engines. The 2-D test rig cases focused on the effect of tooth position and operating condition for the standard geometry. The computed cases considered tooth axial and radial position, different operating conditions, and several geometric dimensions. This investigation also compares the leakage of the standard geometry to that of a modified convex wall geometry. The test facility is a 33 times enlargement of the actual seal. The pressure drop leakage rate and flow visualization digital images for the standard geometry seal were measured at various Reynolds numbers and at nine different tooth positions. The discharge coefficient and a dimensionless pressure drop number were used to plot the leakage data to make it easier for seal designers to predict the leakage of labyrinth seals. The experimental visualization results show for a given Reynolds number that the closer the labryinth tooth gets to the step the deeper the throughflow jet penetrated into the seal cavity. The decrease of the tooth tip clearance also has a similar effect. Specifically the smaller the tooth tip clearance the deeper the flow path penetrated into the seal cavity. The experimental measurements show that the tooth tip axial position, as well as the minimum-tooth clearance, affect the leakage. A significant improvement in leakage was generally observed when the minimum-distance tooth clearance occurs across the entire tip of the tooth. This occurs only at the most upstream tooth position tested. Similarly, the computed results show that the tooth axial position affects the seal leakage. It was also found that the leakage of the modified convex wall geometry was significantly less than that of the standard geometry.

Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fiscal Year Justification of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, epidemiology, laboratory services strengthen support for state, tribal, local, and territorial public healthDEPARTMENT of HEALTH and HUMAN SERVICES Fiscal Year 2012 Justification of Estimates Justification is one of several documents that fulfill the Department of Health and Human Services` (HHS

147

Year 2000: energy enough  

SciTech Connect

The growing needs for energy in the U.S. are reviewed, and it is predicted that energy supplies will need be more than doubled by the year 2000. The solution lies in three areas: goal targeting, resource management, and timing. A no-growth economy and an economy continuing growth at an appropriate rate are two scenarios discussed. The second major area of choice in fixing energy capabilities for the year 2000 involves management of fuel resources. Shortages of oil and gas dictate that the increase in energy consumption be changed to coal and uranium, both of which are available domestically; utilization of these energy sources will mean increased electrification. It is concluded, then, that the best avenues toward ensuring a national energy supply are utilization of coal and uranium and the practice of energy conservation through greater efficiency. Timing is the third critical area of decision making that affects future energy supply. The long lead time required to bring about a change in the national energy mix is cited. Current estimates indicate that now is the time to push toward a national electricity target of at least 7500 billion kWh for the year 2000. Meeting the target means almost four times the present electricity supply, at a growth rate of about 5.7 percent per year. This target assumes a reasonable measure of energy conservation. (MCW)

Starr, C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Rainfall-Induced Changes in Actual Surface Backscattering Cross Sections and Effects on Rain-Rate Estimates by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors used Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission precipitation radar (TRMM PR) data to investigate changes in the actual (attenuation corrected) surface backscattering cross section (?0e) due to changes in surface conditions ...

Shinta Seto; Toshio Iguchi

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Estimation of daily actual evapotranspiration from remotely sensed data under complex terrain over the upper Chao river basin in North China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily actual evapotranspiration over the upper Chao river basin in North China on 23 June 2005 was estimated based on the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL), in which the parameterization schemes for calculating the instantaneous solar ...

Yanchun Gao; Di Long; Zhao-Liang Li

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Through the years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Through the years Through the years Early 1960s Researchers at PNL (now called PNNL) developed the standards and devices for setting and measuring radiation doses received by nuclear industry work- ers. Tens of thousands of people, including children, have been mea- sured by whole-body counters since the 1960s to relate their physical content of radioactive materials to sources such as food and water. 1960s PNL formulated the first use of a digital computer for complete process control of a mass spectrometer. Mid-1960s PNL devised a computer code, called COBRA for COolant Boiling in Rod Arrays, which allowed for three-dimensional, multiphase hydrothermal modeling of reactor and other complex systems. 1967 PNL researchers continued the fundamental scientific and

151

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs Actual Peakload Reductions Total, 1989-2010 Actual Peakload Reductions, 2010 Energy Savings, 1989-2010 Electric Utility Costs,Âą 1989-2010 266 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Program costs consist of all costs associated with providing the various Demand-Side Management (DSM) programs or measures. The costs of DSM programs fall into these major categories: customer rebates/incentives, administration/marketing/training, performance incen- tives, research and evaluation, and other (most likely indirect) costs. 2 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Source: Table 8.13. 12 14 16 17 23 25 30 30 25 27 26 23 25 23 23 24 26 27 30 32 32 33 1989 1991 1993

152

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Demonstration of the SREX process for the removal of {sup 90}Sr from actual highly radioactive solutions in centrifugal contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SREX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of {sup 90}Sr from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration of the SREX process with actual tank waste. This demonstration was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. An overall removal efficiency of 99.995% was obtained for {sup 90}Sr. As a result, the activity of {sup 90}Sr was reduced from 201 Ci/m{sup 3} in the feed solution of 0.0089 Ci/m{sup 3} in the aqueous raffinate, which is below the U.S. NRC Class A LLW limit of 0.04 Ci/m{sup 3} for {sup 90}Sr. Lead was extracted by the SREX solvent and successfully partitioned from the {sup 90}Sr using an ammonium citrate strip solution. Additionally, 94% of the total alpha activity, 1.9% of the {sup 241}Am, 99.94% of the {sup 238}Pu, 99.97% of the {sup 239}Pu, 36.4% of the K, 64% of the Ba, and >83% of the Zr were extracted by the SREX solvent. Cs, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Na were essentially inextractable. 10 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Calendar Year 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 3 Office of Inspector General 
1000 Independence Avenue, SW 
 Washington, DC 20585 202-586-4128 en Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03 http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-oas-fs-14-03 Audit Report: OAS-FS-14-03

155

Fiscal year 1990 Rocky Flats Plant Environmental Restoration program Current-Year Work Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) is a nuclear weapons manufacturing facility currently operated by EG G for the US Department of Energy (DOE). RFP is located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains in Jefferson Country, Colorado. The Fiscal Year 1990 (FY90) Current-Year Work Plan (CYWP) is intended to serve as a guidance document for the Environmental Restoration (ER) and RCRA Compliance programs that will be implemented at RFP. The CYWP provides in one document any cross-references necessary to understand the interrelationships between the CYWP and the DOE Five-Year Plan (FYP), Site-Specific Plan (SSP), and other related documents. The scope of this plan includes comparison of planned FY90 ER activities to those actually achieved. The CYWP has been updated to include Colorado Department of Health (CDH), US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and DOE Inter-Agency Agreement ER activities. It addresses hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, mixed wastes (radioactive and hazardous), and sanitary wastes. The CYWP also addresses facilities and sites contaminated with or used in management of those wastes.

Nielsen, T. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (USA)); Waage, E.; Miller, D. (Stoller (S.M.) Corp., Boulder, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

2013 Director's New Year Address  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director's New Year Address 2013 Director's New Year Address Print Looking Forward and Celebrating 20 Years in 2013 falocne We recently sat down with ALS Director Roger Falcone to...

157

Residential Commercial Industrial Year  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Residential Commercial Industrial Year and State Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers Volume (million cubic feet) Consumers 2000 Total ................... 4,996,179 59,252,728 3,182,469 5,010,817 8,142,240 220,251 2001 Total ................... 4,771,340 60,286,364 3,022,712 4,996,446 7,344,219 217,026 2002 Total ................... 4,888,816 61,107,254 3,144,169 5,064,384 7,507,180 205,915 2003 Total ................... R 5,079,351 R 61,871,450 R 3,179,493 R 5,152,177 R 7,150,396 R 205,514 2004 Total ................... 4,884,521 62,469,142 3,141,653 5,135,985 7,250,634 212,191 Alabama ...................... 43,842 806,175 26,418 65,040 169,135 2,800 Alaska.......................... 18,200 104,360 18,373 13,999 46,580 10 Arizona ........................

158

WMAP First Year Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team has released results from the first year of operation at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. The maps are consistent with previous observations but have much better sensitivity and angular resolution than the COBE DMR maps, and much better calibration accuracy and sky coverage than ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. The angular power spectra from these ground-based and balloon-borne experiments are consistent within their systematic and statistical uncertainties with the WMAP results. WMAP detected the large angular-scale correlation between the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB caused by electron scattering since the Universe became reionized after the "Dark Ages", giving a value for the electron scattering optical depth of 0.17+/-0.04. The simplest Lambda-CDM model with n=1 and Omega_tot=1 provides an adequate fit to the WMAP data and gives parameters which are consistent with determinations of the Hubble constant and observations of the accelerating Universe using supernovae. The time-ordered data, maps, and power spectra from WMAP can be found at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov along with 13 papers by the WMAP science team describing the results in detail.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Projects of the year  

SciTech Connect

The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

Hansen, T.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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161

YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Introduction: Twenty Years of ACCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vision of future priorities in transportation research ands 20th Transportation Center. A year ago, UCTC’s future, and

Cervero, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection  

SciTech Connect

This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

Farr, L.E.

1991-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

165

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 35.3% 29.4% 17.6% 5.9% 11.8% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.0% 23.5% 58.8% 17.6% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

166

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 24.8% 15.0% 21.7% 31.8% 5.6% 1.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.3% 31.5% 37.4% 30.8% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

167

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 2.3% 2.3% 20.5% 50.0% 22.7% 2.3% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 6.8% 38.6% 45.5% 9.1% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

168

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 6.6% 41.7% 32.7% 16.0% 3.0% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.4% 7.6% 16.0% 76.0% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

169

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 11.6% 27.9% 18.6% 18.6% 23.3% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 41.9% 16.3% 25.6% 16.3% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters...

170

Yearly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2009, a new activity was launched under the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement (IEA Wind) for the small wind sector. The main focus of this activity, called Task 27, is to develop recommended practices for consumer labeling of existing commercial small wind turbines. Participants will also exchange information about the status of the small wind industry in the member countries. This report outlines the status of the small wind sector in 2009 in the countries participating in Task 27. (For more information about IEA Wind and the consumer label developed under Task 27, see www.ieawind.org.)

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 15 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 49 White Female (W, F) 12 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Los Alamos Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.0% 9.4% 28.1%...

172

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 28 White Female 6 Workforce Diversity Kansas City Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

173

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

29 Hispanic Male 220 Hispanic Female 202 White Male 1340 White Female 519 Workforce Diversity National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

174

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 5 Hispanic Female (H, F) 4 White Male (W, M) 25 White Female (W, F) 17 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Livermore Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.2% 4.7% 3.5%...

175

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

7 Asian Female 6 Hispanic Male 8 Hispanic Female 7 White Male 128 White Female 83 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immedidate Office of the Deputy Administrator (NA-20) As of...

176

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 12 Hispanic Female (H, F) 11 White Male (W, M) 34 White Female (W, F) 16 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Sandia Field Office As of March 23, 2013 2.5% 8.8% 13.8% 1.3%...

177

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 23 Hispanic Female 24 White Male 36 White Female 35 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Acquistion & Project Management...

178

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 29 26 -10.34% White Female (W,F) 19 16 -15.79% Change DIVERSITY Change Livermore Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

179

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 21 Hispanic Female 47 White Male 61 White Female 92 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Management & Budget, NA-MB As of Sep...

180

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 8 White Female 3 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE 9 64.3% 5 35.7%...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 4 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 4 White Male 30 White Female 19 Workforce Diversity Livermore Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY...

182

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female (W, F) 474 Total includes 2561 permanent and 21 temporary employees. PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER National Nuclear Security Administration As of March 23, 2013...

183

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 74 Hispanic Female (H, F) 22 White Male (W, M) 393 White Female (W, F) 19 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation...

184

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 1 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 1 White Male 46 White Female 22 Workforce Diversity Y-12 Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 51...

185

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 9 White Female 1 Workforce Diversity Office of the Administrator (NA-1) As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE...

186

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

32 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 1.5% 0.7% 21.9% 21.9% 1.5% 16.8% 32.8% 2.9% Pay Plan Males 65.7% Females 34.3%...

187

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 28 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Defense Nuclear Security, NA-70 As...

188

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

-8.33% White Male (W,M) 34 34 0.00% White Female (W,F) 17 16 -5.88% Change DIVERSITY Change Sandia Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

189

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 15 13 -13.33% White Female (W,F) 8 6 -25.00% Change DIVERSITY Change Savannah River Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

190

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M) 6 Hispanic Female (H, F) 6 White Male (W, M) 51 White Female (W, F) 14 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Nevada Field Office As of March 23, 2013 1.1% 3.4% 1.1% 31.8%...

191

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 1 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 0 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 14 White Female 8 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Savannah River Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN...

192

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 3 White Male 29 White Female 5 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Safety & Health, NA-SH As of Sep 24,...

193

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 3 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 1 Hispanic Female 0 White Male 76 White Female 22 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors (NA-30) As of March 24,...

194

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 1 Hispanic Male 3 Hispanic Female 6 White Male 50 White Female 11 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Associate Administrator for Emergency Operations (NA-40)...

195

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

F) 6 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Kansas City Field Office As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 2.6% 2.6% 28.9% 21.1% 39.5% 5.3% Pay Plan Males 71.1% Females 28.9% Gender AIAN, M...

196

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 5 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 44 White Female 13 Workforce Diversity Pantex Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE DIVERSITY GENDER 57...

197

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 85 71 -16.47% White Female (W,F) 33 30 -9.09% Change DIVERSITY Change NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

198

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 0 Hispanic Male 20 Hispanic Female 11 White Male 53 White Female 17 Workforce Diversity Los Alamos Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER...

199

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9 Asian Female 5 Hispanic Male 18 Hispanic Female 12 White Male 101 White Female 49 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Immediate Office of the Deputy Administrator (DP) (NA-10) As of...

200

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Administration As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER PAY PLAN Change DIVERSITY Change 4.2% 0.1% 0.0% 3.5% 1.6% 6.8% 0.7% 17.6% 49.5% 2.6% 13.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.1%...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Male 2 Asian Female 4 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 53 White Female 19 DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity Nevada Site Office As of September 25, 2010 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

202

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Female 3 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 5 White Male 52 White Female 20 Workforce Diversity Nevada Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER DIVERSITY 64...

203

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

F) 7 TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER Savannah River Field Office As of March 23, 2013 PAY PLAN DIVERSITY 6.5% 12.9% 38.7% 38.7% 3.2% Pay Plan Males 64.5% Females 35.5% Gender AIAN, M AIAN,...

204

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 7 Hispanic Female 18 White Male 40 White Female 25 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL WORKFORCE Associate...

205

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 389 400 2.83% White Female (W,F) 21 19 -9.52% Change DIVERSITY Change Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (NA-15) As of...

206

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2 Asian Female 0 Hispanic Male 13 Hispanic Female 17 White Male 37 White Female 17 DIVERSITY GENDER Workforce Diversity Sandia Site Office As of March 24, 2012 PAY PLAN TOTAL...

207

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reactors (120) and Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (586) DIVERSITY Workforce Diversity National Nuclear Security Administration As of Apr 10, 2011 PAY...

208

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

<30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 6.1% 21.6% 26.7% 34.5% 10.6% 0.6% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 3.5% 30.8% 34.2% 31.5% Education J.D....

209

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

50% <30 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70+ 7.5% 22.5% 30.0% 32.5% 7.5% 0.0% Age Groups as a Percentage of Workforce 0.0% 32.5% 27.5% 40.0% Education J.D.Ph.DSc.D Degrees Masters Degrees...

210

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG's FY 2009 actual performance and FY 2010 planned activities. Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan More Documents & Publications U.S. Departmetn of Energy, Office of Inspector General, Annaul Peformance Report FY 2009, Annual Performance Plan Fy 2010 Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and FY 2012

212

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of the typical meteorological years for solar heating and cooling system studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an evaluation of the weather data set, generated at Sandia Laboratories, known as the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) Data. The purpose of the evaluation is to determine how well the TMY data represent actual long-term weather data in affecting the performance of solar heating and cooling systems. The two data sets are compared through detailed SHAC simulation.

Freeman, T. L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

SciTech Connect

I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the bigquestions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

Murayama, Hitoshi

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

215

Outlook: The Next Twenty Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present an outlook for the next twenty years in particle physics. I start with the big questions in our field, broken down into four categories: horizontal, vertical, heaven, and hell. Then I discuss how we attack the big questions in each category during the next twenty years. I argue for a synergy between many different approaches taken in our field.

Hitoshi Murayama

2003-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

216

CALENDAR YEAR 2011 ANNUAL SECURITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALENDAR YEAR 2011 ANNUAL SECURITY FIRE SAFETY REPORT& #12;University of North Dakota Annual Security & Fire Safety Report: Calendar Year 2011 n Page 1 Dear Community Member: I am pleased to introduce the 2011 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report for the University of North Dakota. This report

Delene, David J.

217

Microsoft Word - The Oppenheimer Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Years 1943-1945 At 5:29:45 am MWT on July 16, 1945, the world's first atomic bomb exploded 100 feet over a portion of the southern New Mexico desert known as the Jornada...

218

70 Images for 70 Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70 Images for 70 Years 70 Images for 70 Years 70 Images for 70 Years Los Alamos has a proud history and heritage of almost 70 years of science and innovation. The people of the Laboratory work on advanced technologies to provide the best scientific and engineering solutions to many of the nation's most crucial security challenges. Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. 1938 Hahn and Meitner Fission 1938 Hahn and Meitner Fission 1939 Einstein-Szilard 1939 Einstein-Szilard 1940s Main Guard Gate (671938) 1940s Main Guard Gate (671938) 1940s Security check 1940s Security check 1940 Boys Ranch School hockey on Ashley Pond 1940 Boys Ranch School hockey on Ashley Pond 1942 Fuller Lodge 1942 Fuller Lodge

219

Accountability report - fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the US NRC`s accountability report for fiscal year 1997. Topics include uses of funds, financial condition, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

FEMP Year in Review 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identifying and implementing energy saving projects, the 2003 award winners have created energy cost savings of more than 62 million and 3.4 trillion Btu in one year. Our winners...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

World Year of Physics 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMAGE: World Year of Physics 2005 nameplate Berkeley Lab logo Berkeley Lab Celebrates World Year of Physics 2005 Berkeley Lab Web Search Berkeley Lab Phone Book Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Berkeley Lab Privacy and Security Notice IMAGE: World Year of Physics 2005 nameplate Berkeley Lab logo Berkeley Lab Celebrates World Year of Physics 2005 Berkeley Lab Web Search Berkeley Lab Phone Book Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Berkeley Lab Privacy and Security Notice IMAGE: World of Physics graphic Symposia page link Special Events page link Lectures page link Education page link The World Year of Physics is a worldwide celebration of physics and its importance in our everyday lives. Physics not only plays an important role in the development of science and technology but also has a tremendous impact on our society. WYP aims to raise the worldwide awareness of physics and physical science. The United Nations has declared 2005 to be the International Year of Physics. This declaration coincides with the 100th anniversary of physicist

222

Performance evaluation of 24 ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated N-Reactor storage basin water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of 24 organic and inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium and strontium from actual and simulated waters from the 100 Area 105 N-Reactor fuel storage basin. The data described in this report can be applied for developing and evaluating ion exchange pre-treatment process flowsheets. Cesium and strontium batch distribution ratios (K{sub d}`s), decontamination factors (DF), and material loadings (mmol g{sup -1}) are compared as a function of ion exchange material and initial cesium concentration. The actual and simulated N-Basin waters contain relatively low levels of aluminum, barium, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (ranging from 8.33E-04 to 6.40E-05 M), with slightly higher levels of boron (6.63E-03 M) and sodium (1.62E-03 M). The {sup 137}Cs level is 1.74E-06 Ci L-{sup 1} which corresponds to approximately 4.87E-10 M Cs. The initial Na/Cs ratio was 3.33E+06. The concentration of total strontium is 4.45E-06 M, while the {sup 90}Sr radioactive component was measured to be 6.13E-06 Ci L{sup -1}. Simulant tests were conducted by contacting 0.067 g or each ion exchange material with approximately 100 mL of either the actual or simulated N-Basin water. The simulants contained variable initial cesium concentrations ranging from 1.00E-04 to 2.57E- 10 M Cs while all other components were held constant. For all materials, the average cesium K{sub d} was independent of cesium concentration below approximately 1.0E-06 M. Above this level, the average cesium K{sub d} values decreased significantly. Cesium K{sub d} values exceeding 1.0E+07 mL g{sup -1} were measured in the simulated N-Basin water. However, when measured in the actual N-Basin water the values were several orders of magnitude lower, with a maximum of 1.24E+05 mL g{sup -1} observed.

Brown, G.N.; Carson, K.J.; DesChane, J.R.; Elovich, R.J.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Photovoltaics Overview: Fiscal Year 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 2001, for the third year in a row, the solar electric market grew at more than 30%. Fueling this growth is the U.S. photovoltaic industry - the companies that design, manufacture, install, operate, and maintain all components of solar generating systems. The messages of the U.S. PV industry roadmap are taken very seriously by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Solar Energy Technologies. Achieving industry's goals will demand aggressive work in fundamental and exploratory research, manufacturing, and system applications to reduce the cost of solar electric systems. This is an annual report of the DOE PV Program, FY2001.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Boehmite Actual Waste Dissolutions Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level waste (HLW) sludge from underground storage tanks at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. To reduce the volume of HLW requiring treatment, a goal has been set to remove a significant quantity of the aluminum, which comprises nearly 70 percent of the sludge. Aluminum is found in the form of gibbsite, sodium aluminate and boehmite. Gibbsite and sodium aluminate can be easily dissolved by washing the waste stream with caustic. Boehmite, which comprises nearly half of the total aluminum, is more resistant to caustic dissolution and requires higher treatment temperatures and hydroxide concentrations. Samples were taken from four Hanford tanks and homogenized in order to give a sample that is representative of REDOX (Reduction Oxidation process for Pu recovery) sludge solids. Bench scale testing was performed on the homogenized waste to study the dissolution of boehmite. Dissolution was studied at three different hydroxide concentrations, with each concentration being run at three different temperatures. Samples were taken periodically over the 170 hour runs in order to determine leaching kinetics. Results of the dissolution studies and implications for the proposed processing of these wastes will be discussed.

Snow, Lanee A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Peterson, Reid A.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL OUTLOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outlook) for the City of San Diego which presented a comprehensive examination of the City’s long range fiscal condition. The Financial Outlook has proven to be an important planning tool for the City of San Diego. The Outlook guided the City in establishing the fiscal year 2008 annual budget and has served throughout the year as the basis for longer term fiscal decisionmaking. The Outlook has communicated the City’s fiscal priorities along with the City’s strengths and the challenges that remain in achieving a balanced General Fund budget and fiscal health. The updated Five-Year Financial Outlook (2009-2013 Outlook) includes revised revenue and expenditure projections for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 as well as additional fiscal commitments that have emerged since the 2008-2012 Outlook was issued. Similar to the 2008-2012 Outlook, the revised revenue and expenditure estimates in the 2009-2013 Outlook are based on a variety of assumptions in the context of current and projected economic conditions. The updated Outlook not only identifies revenue and expenditure trends but also discusses risks and opportunities that affect fiscal decisions and the City’s ability to accomplish its strategic goals over the next five-year period. Those goals include: • Preservation of City services to the fullest extent possible. Fund the operations of new public facilities. • Meet contractual obligations and fund mandated programs. • Contribute the full payment of the Annual Required Contribution (ARC) for the City’s pension system. • Establish and maintain adequate General Fund reserves according to City Charter Section 91 and the City Reserve Policy recently approved by the City Council. • Address other significant financial obligations with a longer-term strategy.

Jerry Sanders; Jay M. Goldstone

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

Jenifer Nordstrom

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ontario’s electricity system faces significant challenges over the next 10 years. The uncertainty surrounding the return to service of Pickering A nuclear units, the lack of new generation investment and the commitment to shut down 7,500 MW of coal fired generation by December 31, 2007, all contribute to a potentially severe shortfall. New transmission, supply and demand side initiatives are urgently needed to address this gap and secure Ontario’s energy future. The need is most pressing in the Toronto area, to deal with the immediate impact of the April 30, 2005 shutdown of the Lakeview Thermal Generating Station. Plans are being implemented to address this in the short term. In the longer term, additional generation is also required in the Toronto area to replace the Lakeview generating capacity and to meet load growth in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Each year the Independent Electricity Market Operator (IMO) publishes an integrated assessment of the security and adequacy of the Ontario electricity system over the next 10 years. This report presents the IMO assessment for the 10-year period from 2005 to 2014. It is based on the IMO’s forecast of electricity demand, information provided by Ontario generators on the supply that will be available and the latest information on the configuration and capability of the transmission system. Electricity Supply Outlook Additional Ontario electricity supply and demand-side measures are required to maintain supply adequacy into the future and to reduce Ontario’s dependency on supply from other jurisdictions.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Year STB EIA STB EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: November 16, 2012 Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample

232

10-Year Outlook Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The provincial government?s plan to phase out coal?fired generation in favour of cleaner forms of generation represents one of the most significant undertakings in the 100?year history of Ontario?s electricity sector. Aging generation facilities and the continued increase in demand for electricity add to the urgency of proceeding with new generating and transmission facilities over the next 10 years. Over the last 12 months 650 MW of new gas?fired generation has been put in place and 515 MW of nuclear generation and 370 MW of renewable generation is expected to be in service within the next 18 months. There are also a number of projects totalling more than 9,000 MW of additional capacity that are in various stages of discussion, development or negotiation. Timely progress to achieve this additional capacity must continue if Ontario is to ensure a reliable supply of electricity over the next decade and beyond. This 10?year Outlook from the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) provides an assessment of the demand?supply picture for the province over the next decade and provides a plan identifying the timing and requirements of system changes needed to meet the government’s coal shutdown timeframe. Under the provisions of Bill 100, the Ontario Power

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

Michael Lewis

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ten Year Site Plans Ten Year Site Plans A Ten Year Site Plan (TYSP) is the essential planning document linking a site's real property requirements to its mission in support of the...

236

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Universal Solvent Exchange (UNEX) Process II: Flowsheet Development & Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Actual Acidic Radioactive Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel solvent extraction process, the Universal Extraction (UNEX) process, has been developed for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from acidic waste solutions. The UNEX process solvent consists of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide for the extraction of 137Cs, polyethylene glycol for the extraction of 90Sr, and diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide for the extraction of the actinides and lanthanides. A nonnitroaromatic polar diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone has been developed for this process. A UNEX flowsheet consisting of a single solvent extraction cycle has been developed as a part of a collaborative effort between the Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI) and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This flowsheet has been demonstrated with actual acidic radioactive tank waste at the INEEL using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors installed in a shielded cell facility. The activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and the actinides were reduced to levels at which a grout waste form would meet NRC Class A LLW requirements. The extraction of 99Tc and several nonradioactive metals by the UNEX solvent has also been evaluated.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V. N.; Smirnov, I. V.; Esimantovskiy, V. M.; Zaitsev. B. N.; Babain, V. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Federal Energy Management Year 2001 In Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT YEAR IN REVIEW 2001 United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program YEAR IN REVIEW...

239

Calendar Year 2003 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year 2003 Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan December 22, 2003...

240

Fiscal year 1987 program plan  

SciTech Connect

The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, operation, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY 87 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Operations, and Research Development (R D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of Operations and R D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY 87; outyear budget projections are presented for future years.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The International Year of Chemistry 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry our life our future The International Year of Chemistry 2011 Analytical Chemistry Related associations Marketing ...

242

Pool heating system on island brings year-round enjoyment  

SciTech Connect

The Bahamas is not generally thought of as a place in need of pool heating. However, the remote Bahamian island of Treasure Cay is actually situated north of Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Pool temperatures drop during the winter, thus shortening the swimming season. The Beach Villas Homeowners Association of Treasure Cay investigated pool-heating options some time ago. Energy on Treasure Cay is expensive - about 25 cents/kWh - making cost a major concern for the association as they evaluated their choices. An electric heat pump was rule out as it would place too great a burden on the electricity load of the remote island. Heating the pool with propane gas was deemed far too costly. After evaluating each of these heating methods on the basis of economics, energy efficiency, and comfort, the association concluded that solar would be the best method. They selected a solar pool heating system manufactured by FAFCO, Inc. and installed by SUNWORKS in Ft. Lauderdale. The system requires virtually no daily maintenance, and there have been no problems with the system since its installation. In addition to being trouble-free, the FAFCO solar pool heater has saved Treasure Cay a great deal of money. The equipment cost about $9,500; lumber, PVC, and labor brought the total cost to $13,000. By comparison, a propane-gas system would have cost $4,000 but would have generated a yearly gas bill of $12,000. Therefore, payback on the system began immediately upon installation.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With this testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137 Cs and 90 Sr to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Brewer, Ken Neal; Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Demonstration of the TRUEX process for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP tank waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRUEX is being evaluated at Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for separating actinides from acidic radioactive waste stored at ICPP; efforts have culminated in a recent demonstration with actual tank waste. A continuous countercurrent flowsheet test was successfully completed at ICPP using waste from tank WM-183. This demonstration was performed using 24 states of 2-cm dia centrifugal contactors in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet had 8 extraction stages, 5 scrub stages, 6 strip stages, 3 solvent wash stages, and 2 acid rinse stages. A centrifugal contactor stage in the scrub section was not working during testing, and the scrub feed (aqueous) solution followed the solvent into the strip section, eliminating the scrub section in the flowsheet. An overall removal efficiency of 99.97% was obtained for the actinides, reducing the activity from 457 nCi/g in the feed to 0.12 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste.The 0.04 M HEDPA strip section back-extracted 99.9998% of the actinide from the TRUEX solvent. Removal efficiencies of >99. 90, 99.96, 99.98, >98.89, 93.3, and 89% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 99}Tc. Fe was partially extracted by the TRUEX solvent, resulting in 23% of the Fe exiting in the strip product. Hg was also extracted by the TRUEX solvent (73%) and stripped from the solvent in the 0.25 M Na2CO3 wash section. Only 1.4% of the Hg exited with the high activity waste strip product.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Demonstration of a Universal Solvent Extraction Process for the Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Actual Acidic Tank Waste at the INEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction process is being evaluated for the simultaneous separation of Cs, Sr, and the actinides from acidic high-activity tank waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) with the goal of minimizing the high-activity waste volume to be disposed in a deep geological repository. The universal solvent extraction process is being developed as a collaborative effort between the INEEL and the Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. The process was recently demonstrated at the INEEL using actual radioactive, acidic tank waste in 24 stages of 2-cm-diameter centrifugal contactors located in a shielded cell facility. With the testing, removal efficiencies of 99.95%, 99.985%, and 95.2% were obtained for Cs-137, Sr-90, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of Cs-137 and Sr-90 to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. The total alpha removal efficiency was not sufficient to reduce the activity of the tank waste to below NRC Class A non-TRU requirements. The lower than expected removal efficiency for the actinides is due to loading of the Ph2Bu2CMPO in the universal solvent with actinides and metals (Zr, Fe, and Mo). Also, the carryover of aqueous solution (flooding) with the solvent exiting the actinide strip section and entering the wash section resulted in the recycle of the actinides back to the extraction section. This recycle of the actinides contributed to the low removal efficiency. Significant amounts of the Zr (>97.7%), Ba (>87%), Pb (>98.5%), Fe (>6.9%), Mo (19%), and K (17%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet.

B. N. Zaitsev (Khlopin Radium Institute); D. J. Wood (INEEL); I. V. Smirnov; J. D. Law; R. S. Herbst; T. A. Todd; V. A. Babain; V. M. Esimantovskiy; V. N. Romanovskiy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum View topic -Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12http://www.thunderbolts.info/forum/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=25303&sid=87fbf6c3a5361ee50b143431ee0e553d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 1 of 12 Dark Energy may not actually exist Moderators: arc - On With the New #12;9/18/09 2:44 PMThunderbolts Forum · View topic - Dark Energy may not actually exist Page 2

Temple, Blake

249

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Year 1 third quarter report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. Year 1, fourth quarter report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter`s report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

THE PHILOSOPHY OF INFORMATION: TEN YEARS LATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

," she says. "In my first year I managed to do this to the Chaplain by accident. Fortunately he was very first year I managed to sponge the Chaplain by accident...' #12;14 CAM 64 Mani Aiyar (standing

Floridi, Luciano

252

Citrus Offers Year-Round Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to foliar nutrient sprays (compost, manure teas, guanos, andmanure/ year • 1–2 barrows compost/year • 1–2 barrows horse0.50–0.75% N content for compost and horse manure, 1.5–2.0%

Martin, Orin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advantages of a Three-Year Residency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resident is still in a training program. On balance, givenyear to three-year training programs, there is no data toIn most four-year training programs, the supervision of

Langdorf, Mark; Lotfipour, Shahram

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Animal Science Curriculum (BS) Freshman Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Science Curriculum (BS) Freshman Year Animal Science 111 Sciences (GER) Biological Sciences 130, 131, 132, 133.....................8 Plant Science 101......................................................3 Social/Behavioral Sciences (GER)............................3 32 Sophomore Year Agricultural Business 220

Selmic, Sandra

256

The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's ...  

The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors Awardees. December 11, 2013. On December 10, the Geothermal Energy Association ...

257

OUT Success Stories: Twenty Years of Success  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE's Office of Utility Technologies celebrates 20 years of success in renewable energy research, development, and deployment.

Eber, K.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

OUT Success Stories: Twenty Years of Success  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

DOE's Office of Utility Technologies celebrates 20 years of success in renewable energy research, development, and deployment.

2000-08-00T23:59:59.000Z

259

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007 #12;Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 is to identify and quantify the major sources of greenhouse q y j g gas emissions which result from the operation of the University.y #12;Greenhouse Gas Inventory Academic Years 2001 2007 · Major sources

McConnell, Terry

260

Working natural gas storage capacity grows 3% year-over-year ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The four new facilities accounted for nearly 38 Bcf of the year-on-year ... as a percentage of design ... Report provides access to an interactive query ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is...

262

Natural Gas Year-In-Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Natural gas production grew by 7.9 percent in 2011, with large gains in onshore production offsetting continuing declines in the Gulf of Mexico. Production grew despite a year over year decline in prices. Growth in the electric power and industrial sectors drove overall increases in total consumption. Strength in domestic supplies, as well as mild weather in the fourth quarter of the year, reduced the need for pipeline imports, while pipeline exports from the U.S. to Mexico increased substantially.

Katie Teller

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ombudsman FOIA Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work...

264

Calendar Year 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ombudsman FOIA Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work...

265

Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ombudsman FOIA Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work...

266

International Symposium on the Year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Under the guidance of the Office of Management and Budget, federal agencies are sharing management and technical expertise on year 2000 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Federal Energy Management Year in Review 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT YEAR IN REVIEW 2002 United States Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy...

268

Calendar Year Reports Archive | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Archive Calendar Year Reports Archive October 3, 2013 Special Inquiry: DOEIG-0895 Review of Allegations Regarding Prohibited Personnel Practices at the Bonneville Power...

269

Calendar Year 2009 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

270

Calendar Year 2005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

271

Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

272

Calendar Year 2003 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

273

Calendar Year Reports | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

274

Calendar Year 2004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

275

Calendar Year 2000 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

276

Calendar Year 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

277

Calendar Year 2006 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

278

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2010 Greenhouse Gas Inventory OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY #12;OREGON STATE UNIVERSITYGHG . 2 . Carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied

Escher, Christine

279

EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report provides details on the research conducted at EMSL--the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2008.

Showalter, Mary Ann

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Year to Solve the Climate Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last five years, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) have teamed up to sponsor a member of our community for a year's work in the U.S. Congress. As the 2005/06 AMS–UCAR ...

Paul A. T. Higgins

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Feature: Review of the Year, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 1 of this Review, we got as far as the middle of the year. The economic climate was driving a lot of discussion and technology usage seemed to take second place to what was economically viable. The major event of this year took place in September, ...

Chloë Palmer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Year Constructed  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Constructed Year Constructed Year Constructed More than one-third (37 percent) of the floorspace in commercial buildings was constructed since 1980 and more than one-half (55 percent) after 1969 (Figure 1). Less than one-third of floorspace was constructed before 1960. Detailed tables Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999 Figure 1. Distribution of Floorspace by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble viewing this page, please contact the National Energy Information Center at (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Overall, relatively more buildings than floorspace were represented in the older age categories and more floorspace than buildings in the newer categories (see graphical comparison) because older buildings were smaller than more recently constructed buildings (Figure 2). Buildings constructed prior to 1960 were 11,700 square feet in size on average while those constructed after 1959 were 37 percent larger at 16,000 square feet per building.

283

Facility Representative of the Year Award  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD PROGRAM OBJECTIVE The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE OF THE YEAR AWARD The Facility Representative of the Year Award is determined by a panel representing the Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer and managers from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Office of Environmental Management (EM), the Office of Science (SC), and the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE). The Facility Representative Program Manager in

284

New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy assessment of your home, why wait? Now is a good time to find out if you have cracks, leaks or other places where heat is escaping; you can start making your home more energy efficient today. Have you put off replacing your traditional light bulbs with energy efficient ones? Well, check out our page on lighting and get started! There

285

New Years Revolutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Years Revolutions Years Revolutions New Years Revolutions January 3, 2012 - 9:42am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Happy New Year to all you Energy Savers out there! Now that 2012 calendars are up and we (hopefully) remember to use '12 instead of '11 where necessary (does anyone write checks anymore?), it's time to think about the New Year's resolutions we made and are (hopefully again) still keeping. For instance... if you've been putting off getting an energy assessment of your home, why wait? Now is a good time to find out if you have cracks, leaks or other places where heat is escaping; you can start making your home more energy efficient today. Have you put off replacing your traditional light bulbs with energy efficient ones? Well, check out our page on lighting and get started! There

286

PHMC Year 2000: Status reporting for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Revision 0, Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The PHMC Year 2000 status reporting process is designed to encompass the reporting requirements of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), DOE HQ, RL and the PHMC for mission essential Year 2000 projects. Status reporting is required for all Year 2000 projects. The Year 2000 project list will be maintained current as Year 2000 projects are modified, added or deleted. Reporting is required until a Year 2000 project has completed compliance assurance. Some projects will be identified as DOE HQ reportable. These are projects determined to be the most critical and due the attention of DOE HQ.

Layfield, K.A.

1998-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

287

Fiscal Year 2010 Budget-in-Brief  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2010 Budget-in-Brief www.eere.energy.gov Table of Contents Table of Contents...................................................................................................................................... 2 Preface ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Highlights: ................................................................................................................................................ 5 Program Priorities..................................................................................................................................... 6 Key Accomplishments..............................................................................................................................

288

Lab celebrates 50 years in space  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

celebrates 50 years in space celebrates 50 years in space Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab celebrates 50 years in space National security missions and pure research December 1, 2013 Lab celebrates 50 years in space Lab's instruments have helped detect possible nuclear weapon detonations and led to fundamental scientific discoveries. Contacts Community Programs Office Director Kurt Steinhaus Email Editor Linda Anderman Email Not only does 2013 mark the Lab's 70th anniversary, it also marks the 50th anniversary of its first mission into space. During those five decades, it's been involved in 206 launches-only a few other organizations in the world can claim more-that began with the goal of helping monitor compliance with the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty through

289

THE COLLECTIONS IN FISCAL YEAR 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

articles, reviews, and bibliographies, and three books this year. ¢ Research Associate Silvio A. Bedini Bai Douglas B. Ball Mary W. Ballard Corrine Barsky Joseph Barth Silvio A. Bedini Amy A. Begg Abdallah

Mathis, Wayne N.

290

Happy New Year! | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Happy New Year! Happy New Year! Home > Groups > Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 7 January, 2013 - 10:09 analysis BHFS Colorado interface Legal review Texas As we welcome the new year, we are finishing up edits to the roadmap following input from our legal team at [www.bhfs.com BHFS] and are starting to develop mock-ups for the new and improved GRR web interface. We are thrilled to have had so much feedback and input from all of you this past year on what can be done to improve the usability of this tool, and will continue to solicit input and feedback from you as development progresses. We have narrowed our focus of adding additional states for FY13 to include Colorado and Texas. This will allow us more time to focus on some of the

291

Model Year 2014 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 SmartWay Vehicles Updated November 6, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 12 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales...

292

Model Year 2013 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles Updated August 14, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 13 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales...

293

Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

39797,5.87,12.64,11.31,7.84 "Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2008" "Table 9c. U.S. Regional Weather Data" ,2008 ,"Jan","Feb","Mar","Apr","May","Jun","Jul","Aug","Sep","Oct","Nov","De...

294

Geothermal Energy Program Overview: Fiscal Year 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In FY 1990-1991, the Geothermal Energy Program made significant strides in hydrothermal, geopressured brine, hot dry rock, and magma research, continuing a 20-year tradition of advances in geothermal technology.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Last January, we took a look at how ARPA-E performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to...

296

book review: Fifty years of Elton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EIAP.   Indeed,  the  two books now sit side?by? side on my update  ISSN 1948?6596  book review  Fifty years of Elton by  Charles  Elton.   In  this  book,  Elton  examined  the 

DeWalt, Saara J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Mount Washington Observatory—50 Years Old  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mount Washington Observatory celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year. The history of the establishment and of the early days of the Observatory is summarized, and its research programs, instrumentation, and facilities from the early days to ...

Alan A. Smith

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Twenty Years of Energy and Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

its twentieth year on November 1. Established less than two weeks after the first OPEC oil embargo began in 1973, E&E was born into a world that was learning spectacular...

299

Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ten Year Ten Year Site Plans Ten Year Site Plans A Ten Year Site Plan (TYSP) is the essential planning document linking a site's real property requirements to its mission in support of the Department of Energy's overall strategic plan. It is a comprehensive site-wide plan encompassing the needs of tenant activities. The TYSP is integral to and supports the Department's Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Evaluation System (PPBES). The TYSP also describes site-specific actions the programs plans in order to meet stewardship, recapitalization and sustainability goals for their facilities. The Department requires all programs to update their TYSPs at least annually and submitted either concurrently with responses to the field budget call, or as directed to be consistent with the PPBES cycle.

300

Telecommunications in Russia: evolution over 20 years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyses and reviews the rapid transformation of Russian telecommunications and internet operators over the past 20 years, from small town phone service suppliers, to top-10 ranking amongst global players, on its way to adopt electronic finance. ...

L-F. Pau

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Building Energy Software Tools Directory : Weather Year for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year for Energy Calculations 2 Back to Tool Screenshot for Weather Year for Energy Calculations 2...

302

Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is the primary organization within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for research, development, demonstration, technology transfer, and policy development activities for the electric transmission and distribution system. OE has prepared this program plan pursuant to the requirements of Section 925 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), as outlined below. This plan delineates research directions and priorities. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs.

303

Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs. The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is the primary organization within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for research, development, demonstration, technology transfer, and policy development activities for the electric transmission and distribution system. OE has prepared this program plan pursuant to the requirements of Section 925 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT), as outlined below. This plan delineates research directions and priorities. Five-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2008 to 2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs.

304

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 8.13 Electric Utility Demand-Side Management Programs, 1989-2010 Year Actual Peakload Reductions 1 Energy Savings Electric Utility Costs 4 Energy Efficiency 2 Load Management 3 Total Megawatts Million Kilowatthours Thousand Dollars 5 1989 NA NA 12,463 14,672 872,935 1990 NA NA 13,704 20,458 1,177,457 1991 NA NA 15,619 24,848 1,803,773 1992 7,890 9,314 17,204 35,563 2,348,094 1993 10,368 12,701 23,069 45,294 2,743,533 1994 11,662 13,340 25,001 52,483 2,715,657 1995 13,212 16,347 29,561 57,421 2,421,284 1996 14,243 15,650 29,893 61,842 1,902,197 1997 13,327 11,958 25,284 56,406 1,636,020 1998 13,591 13,640 27,231 49,167 1,420,920 1999 13,452 13,003 26,455 50,563 1,423,644 2000 12,873 10,027 22,901 53,701 1,564,901 2001 13,027 11,928 24,955 53,936 1,630,286 2002 13,420 9,516 22,936 54,075 1,625,537 2003 13,581 9,323

305

YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY Research Library Year in Review 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY 2008 1 Research Library Year Message from the Library Director 2 #12;YEAR IN REVIEW Los Alamos National Laboratory RESEARCH LIBRARY early 21st century has presented research libraries with amazing challenges and opportunities. Many

306

They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save Energy?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save Energy? They're Here! Winter, Holidays, and the New Year. How Will You Save Energy? December 22, 2009 - 10:11am Addthis Winter officially hit this week, and those of you on the east coast found out in a big way. Many of you are still shoveling out while trying to take care of those last-minute holiday preparations. (I'm actually kind of jealous. I love shoveling snow. I just hate driving in it.) Anyway, I know you're busy, so before you run off to bake more cookies (send me some?), here are some quick energy-related reminders for the next few weeks: Celebrate Efficiently As you're running through your to-do list, don't forget to think about how you can save energy during all of the hustle and bustle. Our entry from

307

Waste management fiscal year 1998 progress report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Management Program is pleased to issue the Fiscal Year 1998 Progress Report presenting program highlights and major accomplishments of the last year. This year-end update describes the current initiatives in waste management and the progress DOE has made toward their goals and objectives, including the results of the waste management annual performance commitments. One of the most important program efforts continues to be opening the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located near Carlsbad, New Mexico, for the deep geologic disposal of transuranic waste. A major success was achieved this year by the West Valley Demonstration Project in New York, which in June completed the project`s production phase of high-level waste processing ahead of schedule and under budget. Another significant accomplishment this year was the award of two privatization contracts for major waste management operations, one at Oak ridge for transuranic waste treatment, and one at Hanford for the Tank Waste Remediation System privatization project. DOE is proud of the progress that has been made, and will continue to pursue program activities that allow it to safely and expeditiously dispose of radioactive and hazardous wastes across the complex, while reducing worker, public, and environmental risks.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record year for environmental cleanup Record year for environmental cleanup Lab completes record year for environmental cleanup Personnel conducted more field investigations and cleanup campaigns than ever and completed a record number of Lab shipments to WIPP. December 16, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

309

This Year's MEISPP Interns | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This Year's MEISPP Interns This Year's MEISPP Interns This Year's MEISPP Interns August 12, 2010 - 5:56pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Principal Deputy Director One of the key programs of the Department of Energy's Office of Economic Impact and Diversity is our Minority Educational Institution Student Partnership Program (MEISPP). The MEISPP has become a major recruitment program for DOE managers who are committed to building the highest quality workforce at the Department. Students have unique experiences during their 10 weeks at DOE and perform substantive professional and technical work that furthers the Department's missions in energy, environment, national security and scientific discovery. Beyond having the opportunity to add to the mission of DOE, MEISPP interns receive a stipend along with paid

310

ALS History: The First 20 Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History: The First 20 Years Print History: The First 20 Years Print Below is an interactive timeline covering highlights of the first 20 years of ALS history. By no means exhaustive, it is meant to provide a broad overview of the people and events that have helped shape the ALS as well as a sense of the breadth of the science that has been done here. Click on items to see more detail. Slide the blue rectangle at bottom to move forward or backward in time. Color Key: Science Highlights (green); People and Events (orange); Concurrent Events (blue); Facility Facts (purple) Tiki-Toki ALS Timeline: Science, People, and Events About this timeline This timeline shows the history of the Advanced Light Source. Slide the blue rectangle at bottom to move forward or backward in time.;xNLx;;xNLx;Color Key:;xNLx;;xNLx;Green = Science

311

ALS History: The First 20 Years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History: The First 20 Years Print History: The First 20 Years Print Below is an interactive timeline covering highlights of the first 20 years of ALS history. By no means exhaustive, it is meant to provide a broad overview of the people and events that have helped shape the ALS as well as a sense of the breadth of the science that has been done here. Click on items to see more detail. Slide the blue rectangle at bottom to move forward or backward in time. Color Key: Science Highlights (green); People and Events (orange); Concurrent Events (blue); Facility Facts (purple) Tiki-Toki ALS Timeline: Science, People, and Events About this timeline This timeline shows the history of the Advanced Light Source. Slide the blue rectangle at bottom to move forward or backward in time.;xNLx;;xNLx;Color Key:;xNLx;;xNLx;Green = Science

312

Property:StartYear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

StartYear StartYear Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. The allowed values for this property are: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: M Morocco-NREL Energy Activities Pages using the property "StartYear" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A ASEAN-GIZ Regional Environmentally Sustainable Cities Programme - RESCP + 2007 + Afghanistan-NREL Mission + 2009 + Africa - CCS capacity building + 2010 + Algeria-DLR Resource Assessments + 2007 + Asia Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate + 2006 + B Bangladesh-DLR Resource Assessments + 2001 + Bangladesh-GTZ Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Programme + 2007 +

313

EJ first year report.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Environmental Justice Five-Year Implementation Plan First Annual Progress Report ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF 1 Melinda Downing Environmental Justice Program Manager Foreword The Department of Energy's (DOE) (Plan) sets an ambitious Departmental agenda that will guide our environmental justice (EJ) activities for five years. It sets forth an aggressive agenda, and is required to do so if we are to meet the demands that are spelled out in Presidential Executive Order 12898 and the Department's (Strategy). This is the first plan of this nature that the Department has developed. All programs, offices and activities have contributed to the work efforts to insure that we meet the Department's EJ goals and aspirations during the Plan years and beyond. When the Deputy Secretary of Energy released the DOE at the second annual The State of Environmental Justice in America 2008 Conference

314

Photovoltaic energy: Contract list, fiscal year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The federal government has conducted the National Photovoltaics Program since 1975. Its purpose is to provide focus, direction, and funding for the development of terrestrial photovoltaic technology as an energy option for the United States. In the past, a summary was prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. Tasks conducted in-house by participating national laboratories or under contract by industrial, academic, and other research institutes were highlighted. This year's document is more concise than the summaries of previous years. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed by Sandia National Laboratory or the Solar Energy Research Institute during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

RECORDS DISPOSITION SCHEDULE: Year 2000 Project Records | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year 2000 Project Records RECORDS DISPOSITION SCHEDULE: Year 2000 Project Records Year 2000 (Y2K) Project records have been created to document the effort of the Department...

316

This year's gasoline price increase not unusual - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and trends. FAQs ... although in some years, including this year, the price increase ... Over the past 20 years, the average period of rising prices in the ...

317

Fiscal Year 2008 Budget-in-Brief  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2008 Budget-in-Brief www.eere.energy.gov TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Preface...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Biomass and Biorefinery Systems R&D Program.................................................................................. 6 Building Technologies Program ............................................................................................................. 9 Federal Energy Management Program ................................................................................................ 13 Geothermal Technology Program.........................................................................................................

318

New algorithms research for first year students  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated first-year undergraduate students should be exposed to some of the processes of research and some of the latest results. This brings them into the university culture quickly and encourages them to feel part of the development of the computer ... Keywords: CS1/2, approximation algorithms, haskell, research-led teaching, undergraduate research/capstones

Anthony Wirth; Michael Bertolacci

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, such as space heating, space cooling, domestic hot water, etc. DER-CAM reports the optimal between 300-400 kW throughout the year. The hot water loads peak in winter around noon at about 32 kW. 3.S. It is itemized by natural gas engine (GE), gas turbine (GT), microturbine (MT), fuel cell (FC), and photovoltaics

320

www.nasa.gov Fiscal Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representatives. As Administrator, one of my key responsibilities defined in the Space Act of 1958 (as amended Act (Recovery Act). NASA received $1,050 million of Recovery Act funding in fiscal year 2009 ($1 an additional $4 million in Recovery Act Reimbursable Authority in FY 2010. Although NASA was unable to achieve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Editorial: Fifty Years of Marketing Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have observed conspicuous changes in the 25 years after Frank M. Bass, John D. C. Little, and Donald G. Morrison begot Marketing Science. Marketing Science benefited from five subsequent editors and fifty different area editors. New ... Keywords: Marketing Science, citations, electronic journals, impact of the Internet, print journals

Steven M. Shugan

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2007 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Greg Smith Brandon Trelstad OSU Facilities Services June greenhouse gas multiplied by a Global Warming Potential (GWP) factor. (3) "Global Warming Potential factor" (GWP) means the radiative forcing impact of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative

Escher, Christine

323

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2009 Greenhouse Gas Inventory Oregon State University Greg Smith Sustainability Program of oxygen. (2) "Carbon dioxide equivalent" (CO2e) represents the quantity of a greenhouse gas multiplied of one mass-based unit of a given greenhouse gas relative to an equivalent unit of carbon dioxide over

Escher, Christine

324

The first forty years, 1947-1987  

SciTech Connect

This report commemorates the fortieth anniversary of Brookhaven National Laboratory by representing a historical overview of research at the facility. The chapters of the report are entitled: The First Forty Years, Brookhaven: A National Resource, Fulfilling a Mission - Brookhaven's Mighty Machines, Marketing the Milestones in Basic Research, Meeting National Needs, Making a Difference in Everyday Life, and Looking Forward.

Rowe, M.S. (ed.); Cohen, A.; Petersen, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Computing: 50 Years On Mathai Joseph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Computing: 50 Years On Mathai Joseph TIFR Alumni Association Lecture, 27 July 2007. #12;TAA Fischer became US chess champion at age 14! #12;TAA Lecture 4 Computing in 1957 What was happening in computing? ­ 1000 computers sold worldwide (none in India) ­ New computer series announced (mostly solid

Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

326

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2009 -Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Tables (2006-2030) Reference Case Tables (2006-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2006-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables PDF GIF Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary XLS GIF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption

327

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Calendar Year 2012 RSS December 21, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-L-13-03 The Management of the Plateau Remediation Contract December 21, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0879 Naval Reactors Information Technology System Development Efforts December 17, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-08 Management Letter on the Audit of the Department of Energy's Consolidated Financial Statements for Fiscal Year 2012 December 11, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0878 Follow-up Audit of the Department's Cyber Security Incident Management Program December 3, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-13-02 The Department's Implementation of Financial Incentive Programs under the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program November 30, 2012 Inspection Report: INS-O-13-02 Tactical Response Force Pursuit Operations at Idaho National Laboratory

328

Artificial retina: Invention of the year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1513_retina 1513_retina 11/15/2013 The Argus II artificial retina, in which Lawrence Livermore has played a prominent roll, has enough resolution for people to see the lines of a crosswalk, find objects and read letters a couple of centimeters tall. Image by Dan Foley/Second Sight Argus II. Artificial retina: Invention of the year Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov The artificial retina, in which Lawrence Livermore has played a prominent role, has earned a place in the top 25 best inventions of the year 2013 from Time Magazine. The invention also has garnered a 2013 best innovation designation by Popular Science. This Department of Energy funded project resulted in the creation of the first-ever retinal prosthesis -- or bionic eye -- approved in the United

329

Calendar Year 2011 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Calendar Year 2011 RSS December 21, 2011 Inspection Report: INS-L-12-01 Follow-up Review of Control and Accountability of Emergency Communication Network Equipment December 16, 2011 Inspection Report: INS-RA-L-12-01 Waste Disposal and Recovery Act Efforts at the Oak Ridge Reservation November 28, 2011 Special Report: OAS-RA-L-12-01 Special Inquiry on the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Information Technology Expenditures November 15, 2011 Evaluation Report: OAS-M-12-01 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2011 November 10, 2011 Special Report: IG-0858 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2012 November 9, 2011 Audit Report: OAS-RA-12-02 The State of Nevada's Implementation of the Energy Efficiency and

330

Brookhaven Lecture Series | Archives | 401 - Current Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

401 - Current Year 401 - Current Year Brookhaven Lecture "488th Brookhaven Lecture: Magic Lenses for RHIC: Compensating beam-beam interaction" Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 4 pm Berkner Hall Auditorium Hosted by: Allen Orville During this lecture, Luo will start by discussing some collider fundamentals and the challenges of increasing rates of particle collisions, or luminosity, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab. He will then introduce the electron lens system he helped develop at the Lab as he explains how this tool could help double the luminosity at RHIC and prepare the machine for physicists' future endeavors. Brookhaven Lecture "487th Brookhaven Lecture: 'Why Has Earth NOT Warmed as Much as Expected? And Why Is This So Important?'"

331

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 15, 2012 November 15, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-04 Department of Energy's Fiscal Year 2012 Consolidated Financial Statement November 15, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-03 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Fiscal Year 2012 Financial Statement Audit November 8, 2012 Evaluation Report: IG-0877 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012 November 8, 2012 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-04 The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - Efficiency Maine Trust November 7, 2012 Evaluation Report: OAS-L-13-01 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2012 November 6, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0876 The Department of Energy's Small Business Innovation Research and Small

332

Year 2000 Project Records.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DISPOSITION SCHEDULE DISPOSITION SCHEDULE Year 2000 Project Records 1/22/01 Year 2000 (Y2K) Project records have been created to document the effort of the Department of Energy to ensure that its information systems are Y2K compliant, i.e., able to perform all functions and applications when encountering dates beyond December 31, 1999. The records which document the overall Departmental and Field Office efforts, including design and modification work, are considered to be technologically significant. Some warrant permanent retention. The record keeping copy of the records identified in Item 1a of the schedule will be collected and maintained for the Department at DOE/HQ. Specific computer system documentation for the creation, modification, maintenance and testing of the systems will

333

Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

This document comprises the Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan, and is a follow-up to the `Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Program Crosscut Plans,` dated July 1995. DOE`s natural gas programs are aimed at simultaneously meeting our national energy needs, reducing oil imports, protecting our environment, and improving our economy. The Natural Gas Multi-Year Program Plan represents a Department-wide effort on expanded development and use of natural gas and defines Federal government and US industry roles in partnering to accomplish defined strategic goals. The four overarching goals of the Natural Gas Program are to: (1) foster development of advanced natural gas technologies, (2) encourage adoption of advanced natural gas technologies in new and existing markets, (3) support removal of policy impediments to natural gas use in new and existing markets, and (4) foster technologies and policies to maximize environmental benefits of natural gas use.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Property:EndYear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:EndYear Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. The allowed values for this property are: 2024 2023 2022 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 Pages using the property "EndYear" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A ASEAN-GIZ Regional Environmentally Sustainable Cities Programme - RESCP + 2012 + Africa - CCS capacity building + 2011 + Algeria-DLR Resource Assessments + 2008 + B Bangladesh-DLR Resource Assessments + 2004 + Bangladesh-GTZ Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Programme + 2011 + Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment + 2009 +

335

Hydrogen program summary Fiscal Year 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual program summary provides stakeholders within the hydrogen community with a snapshop of important advances that have occurred in the National Hydrogen Program over the fiscal year, including industry interactions and cooperation. The document will also be used to encourage additional potential industrial partners to join the Hydrogen Program Team. Fiscal Year 1994 marked a turning point for the Hydrogen Program, with a budget that grew significantly. The focus of the program was broadened to include development of hydrogen production technologies using municipal solid waste and biomass, in addition to an increased emphasis on industrial involvement and near-term demonstration projects. In order to maintain its near- and long-term balance, the Hydrogen Program will continue with basic, fundamental research that provides the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff investment in hydrogen as an energy carrier.

Not Available

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Model Year 1999 Fuel Economy Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL FUEL ECONOMY GUIDE MODEL YEAR 1999 DOE/EE-0178 Fuel Economy Estimates October 1998 1 CONTENTS PAGE Purpose of the Guide ..................................................... 1 Interior Volume ................................................................ 1 How the Fuel Economy Estimates are Obtained ........... 1 Factors Affecting MPG .................................................... 2 Fuel Economy and Climate Change ............................... 2 Gas Guzzler Tax ............................................................. 2 Vehicle Classes Used in This Guide. .............................. 2 Annuel Fuel Costs .......................................................... 3 How to Use the Guide .................................................... 4 Where to Re-order Guides

337

Twenty years of diffraction at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

Results on diffractive particle interactions from the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider are placed in perspective through a QCD inspired phenomenological approach, which exploits scaling and factorization properties observed in data. The results discussed are those obtained by the CDF Collaboration from a comprehensive set of single, double, and multigap soft and hard diffraction processes studied during the twenty year period since 1985, when the CDF diffractive program was proposed and the first Blois Workshop was held.

Goulianos, K.; /Rockefeller U.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Year 2 Report: Protein Function Prediction Platform  

SciTech Connect

Upon completion of our second year of development in a 3-year development cycle, we have completed a prototype protein structure-function annotation and function prediction system: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) platform (v.0.5). We have met our milestones for Years 1 and 2 and are positioned to continue development in completion of our original statement of work, or a reasonable modification thereof, in service to DTRA Programs involved in diagnostics and medical countermeasures research and development. The PFP platform is a multi-scale computational modeling system for protein structure-function annotation and function prediction. As of this writing, PFP is the only existing fully automated, high-throughput, multi-scale modeling, whole-proteome annotation platform, and represents a significant advance in the field of genome annotation (Fig. 1). PFP modules perform protein functional annotations at the sequence, systems biology, protein structure, and atomistic levels of biological complexity (Fig. 2). Because these approaches provide orthogonal means of characterizing proteins and suggesting protein function, PFP processing maximizes the protein functional information that can currently be gained by computational means. Comprehensive annotation of pathogen genomes is essential for bio-defense applications in pathogen characterization, threat assessment, and medical countermeasure design and development in that it can short-cut the time and effort required to select and characterize protein biomarkers.

Zhou, C E

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Actual Date of Delivery Deliverable Security Class  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of all NoAH components, defines their requirements and describes the interface between them. The NoAH architecture, as described so far, is a set of individual components that cooperate to form a farm of distributed honeypots. Although the main NoAH components –low- and highinteraction honeypots, signature generation,

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Actual Cost of Food Systems on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs emissions and air quality); infrastructure; energy (fuel); congestion; safety; and user (tax payer) costs ...................................................................................................................16 Table 14: Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Rate Per Capita from County Survey

Beresnev, Igor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Design Parameters Derived from Actual Forgings*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Minimum R f : R c ratio is 1.0 to 1. Maximum R f : R c ratio is 6.8 to 1. Average R f : R c ratio is 2.8 to 1....

342

Definition: Net Actual Interchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interchange, balancing authority, smart grid, Balancing Authority Area References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

343

Might Dark Matter be Actually Black?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been proposals that primordial black hole remnants (BHRs) are the dark matter, but the idea is somewhat vague. We argue here first that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) may prevent black holes from evaporating completely, in a similar way that the standard uncertainty principle prevents the hydrogen atom from collapsing. Secondly we note that the hybrid inflation model provides a plausible mechanism for production of large numbers of small black holes. Combining these we suggest that the dark matter might be composed of Planck-size BHRs and discuss the possible constraints and signatures associated with this notion.

Chen, Pisin

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

344

Attachment Implementation Procedures to Report Deferred, Actual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintenance costs should be reported from asset-level data collected in the Site's Maintenance Management and Financial Management Systems. b. Annual Required Maintenance...

345

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8186 8186 EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report MA Showalter January 2009 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 EMSL-the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2008 Annual Report iii Contents 1 Overview ............................................................................................. 1-1-1 Science Themes ..................................................................................................................... 1-1-5 Proposals and Scientific User Access Modes ................................................................... 1-1-5 EMSL Scientific Grand Challenge ..................................................................................... 1-1-8

347

Accountability report. Fiscal Year 1996, Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report consolidates several performance-related reports into a single financial management report. Information in this report includes information previously reported in the following documents: (1) US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) annual financial statement, (2) NRC Chairman`s annual report to the President and the Congress, and (3) NRC Chairman`s semiannual report to Congress on management decisions and final actions on Office of Inspector General audit recommendations. This report also contains performance measures. The report is organized into the following subtopics: information about the US NRC, program performance, management accountability, and the audited financial statement for Fiscal Year 1996. 19 figs., 4 tabs.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

1988: A good year, if prices hold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes the 1988's North American oil market. Some of the highlights are: average rig count for the year should range between 1,010 and 1,020 units; Canadian survey shows E and P expenditures could be up over 20%; drilling in Canada will also be spurred by government incentives expiring in '88; Pemex will double Mexican activity due to a marked E and P budget increase; and last half U.S. wells/footage should post good gains if prices settle around $15.

Maciej, H.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Property:YearFounded | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

YearFounded YearFounded Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. The allowed values for this property are: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974 1973 1972 1971 1970 1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958 1957 1956 1955 1954 1953 1952 1951 1950 1949 1948 1947 1946 1945 1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 1938 1937 1936 1935 1934 1933 1932 1931 1930 1929 1928 1927 1926 1925 1924 1923 1922 1921 1920 1919 1918 1917 1916 1915 1914 1913 1912 1911 1910 1909 1908 1907 1906 1905 1904 1903 1902 1901 1900 1899 1898 1897 1896 1895 1894 1893 1892 1891 1890 1889 1888 1887 1886 1885 1884 1883 1882 1881 1880 1879 1878 1877 1876 1875 1874 1873 1872 1871 1870 1869 1868 1867 1866 1865 1864 1863 1862 1861 1860 1859 1858 1857 1856 1855 1854

350

Site environmental report for calendar year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Site Environmental Report presents information pertaining to environmental activities conducted during calendar year 1996 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. WASTREN-Grand Junction, the Facility Operations and Support contractor for the GJO, prepared this report in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and supplemental guidance from DOE Headquarters. This report applies specifically to the GJO facility; the Monticello Mill Tailings Site Environmental Summary for Calendar Year 1996 was prepared as a separate document. Primary GJO activities involve laboratory analysis of environmental samples from GJO and other DOE sites and site remediation of contamination caused by previous uranium mill operations. Activities at the GJO are conducted in compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations and requirements and as directed by applicable DOE orders. Environmental monitoring is performed on air emissions, sewer effluent, surface water and groundwater, and wetlands restoration. Wastes are generated from the Analytical Laboratory, site remediation, and facility operation.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Model Year 2012-2013 SmartWay Vans Year Model Displ Cyl Trans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-2013 SmartWay Vans Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score...

352

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Annual Performance Results and FYs 2013 and 2014 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2012 actual performance and FYs 2013 and 2014 planned activities.

353

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and FY 2012 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2011 actual performance and FY 2012 planned activities.

354

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 Annual Performance Results and FY 2007 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2006 actual performance and FY 2007 planned activities.

355

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results and FY 2008 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2007 actual performance and FY 2008 planned activities.

356

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2009 actual performance and FY 2010 planned activities.

357

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Annual Performance Results and FY 2011 Annual Performance Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report presents the goals, objectives, and strategies for measuring the OIG’s FY 2010 actual performance and FY 2011 planned activities.

358

Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2007. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. Ames Laboratory is located on the campus of Iowa State University (ISU) and occupies 11 buildings owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). See the Laboratory's Web page at www.external.ameslab.gov for locations and Laboratory overview. The Laboratory also leases space in ISU owned buildings. In 2007, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2007. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2007. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2003. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, styrofoam peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Self Assessment Report, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A' was achieved in 2007 for Integrated Safety, Health, and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts.

Dan Kayser-Ames Laboratory

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Calendar Year 1996 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Calendar Year 1996 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. 1996-11-21 - Report IG-0398: Special Report on the Audit of the Management of Department of Energy Construction Projects 1996-11-15 - Report WR-B-97-03: Audit of Groundwater Monitoring at Hanford 1996-11-07 - Report WR-B-97-02: Audit of Bus Service Subsidies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory 1996-11-06 - Report WR-B-97-01: Audit of Electrical System Construction Projects at the Nevada Operations Office 1996-10-22 - Report ER-B-97-01: Audit of Economic Development Grants and a Cooperative Agreement with East Tennessee Not-For-Profit Organizations 1996-10-13 - Report INS-9601: Report on the Intelligence Oversight Inspection of the Special Technologies Laboratory 1996-10-07 - Report IG-0397:*

360

Calendar Year 2007 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Calendar Year 2007 RSS December 19, 2007 Inspection Report: IG-0784 The Department of Energy's Pandemic Influenza Planning December 18, 2007 Audit Report: OAS-M-08-04 Management Controls over Operations of the Integrated Disposal Facility atthe Hanford Site December 17, 2007 Audit Report: IG-0783 Beryllium Surface Contamination at the Y-12 National Security Complex December 13, 2007 Special Report: IG-0782 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy December 11, 2007 Audit Report: OAS-L-08-03 The Department of Energy's Implementation of Revised OMB Circular No. A-123 December 11, 2007 Audit Report: OAS-M-08-03 Management Controls over Implementation of the Homeland Defense Equipment Reuse Program November 28, 2007 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-08-02 Department's Implementation of the Strategic Integrated Procurement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 26, 2012 October 26, 2012 Special Report: IG-0875 Review of the Compromise of Security Test Materials at the Y-12 National Security Complex October 22, 2012 Audit Report: IG-0873 Management of Western Area Power Administration's Cyber Security Program October 19, 2012 Special Report: IG-0874 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy - Fiscal Year 2013 October 17, 2012 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-03 Community Action Partnership of Orange County - Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 October 16, 2012 Management Alert: IG-0872 The Department of Energy's Management of Foreign Travel October 9, 2012 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-02 County of Los Angeles - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant

362

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

363

Calendar Year 2010 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Calendar Year 2010 RSS December 20, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-11-02 Audit of Environmental Cleanup Projects Funded by the Recovery Act at the Y-12 National Security Complex December 3, 2010 Investigative Report: INV-RA-11-01 Management Alert on the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program November 30, 2010 Audit Report: OAS-RA-11-03 The Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for the City of Phoenix - Agreed-Upon Procedures November 17, 2010 Inspection Letter Report: INS-L-11-01 Letter Report on "Inspection of Allegations Relating to Irregularities in the Human Reliability Program and Alcohol Abuse within the Office of Secure Transportation November 16, 2010 Special Report: IG-0844

364

Calendar Year 1998 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Calendar Year 1998 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. 1998-12-21 - Report ER-B-99-01:* Audit Report on "Decontamination and Decommissioning at the East Tennessee Technology Park" 1998-12-04 - Report WR-B-99-01:* Audit Report on "Transportation Safeguards Division Courier Work Schedule and Escort Vehicle Replacements" 1998-12-18 - Report IG-0434:* Audit Report on "Waste Inventory Data at Oak Ridge and Savannah River" 1998-12-03 - Report IG-0433:* Report on "Inspection of Department of Energy Conference Policies and Practices" 1998-11-20 - Report IG-0432:* Audit Report on "The U.S. Department of Energy's Efforts to Increase The Financial Responsibility Of Its Major For-Profit Operating Contractors"

365

World coal outlook to the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The 1983 edition of the World Coal Outlook to the Year 2000 examines the worldwide impact of lower oil prices and lower economic activity on the demand, production, and international trade in coal. The report includes detailed regional forecasts of coal demand by end-use application. Regions include the US, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, Other Asia, Latin America, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, Communist Europe, and Communist Asia. In addition, regional coal production forecasts are provided with a detailed analysis of regional coal trade patterns. In all instances, the changes relative to Chase's previous forecasts are shown. Because of the current situation in the oil market, the report includes an analysis of the competitive position of coal relative to oil in the generation of electricity, and in industrial steam applications. The report concludes with an examination of the impact of an oil price collapse on the international markets for coal.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following overview and accompanying audited financial statements have been prepared for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 to report the financial position and the results of operations of the Department of Energy. These statements include the consolidated Statement of Financial Position and the consolidated Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position. The statements have been prepared in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 94-01, Form and Content for Agency Financial Statements, and were developed in accordance with the hierarchy of accounting standards described therein. The overview provides a narrative on the Department of Energy`s mission, activities, and accomplishments. Utilizing performance measures as the primary vehicle for communicating Departmental accomplishments and results, this overview discusses the most significant measures while others are discussed in the supplemental information to the financial statements.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Calendar Year 2008 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Calendar Year 2008 RSS December 23, 2008 Special Report: IG-0808 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy December 11, 2008 Inspection Report: INS-O-09-01 Security Clearances at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory-California December 9, 2008 Audit Report: IG-0807 Cyber Security Risk Management Practices at the Bonneville Power Administration November 25, 2008 Inspection Report: IG-0806 40 MM Grenade Launcher Qualification Requirements at Department of Energy Sites November 20, 2008 Audit Report: IG-0805 Cyber Security Risk Management Practice at the Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western AreaPower Administrations November 19, 2008 Inspection Summary Report Issues Related to the Production of Components for the W76 Weapon System

368

Calendar Year 2005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 17, 2005 November 17, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0709 Management of the Department's Isotope Program November 17, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0710 Management of Facility Contractors Assigned to the Washington, D.C. Area November 14, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-FS-06-01 Report o the Department of Energy's Fiscal Year 2005 Consolidated Financial Statements November 9, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-01 The Department of Energy's Radio Communications Systems November 9, 2005 Special Report: IG-0707 The Department of Energy's Response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita November 9, 2005 Inspection Report: IG-0708 Quality Assurance Weaknesses in the Review of Yucca Mountain Electronic Mail for Relevancy to the Licensing Process October 17, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0706 Accelerated Tank Waste Retrieval Activities at the Hanford Site

369

Calendar Year 2006 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Calendar Year 2006 RSS December 18, 2006 Audit Letter Report: OAS-L-07-04 Inquiry to the Hotline Complaint on Possible Design Mistakes and Cost Overruns of the Linac Coherent Light Source Project at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center December 18, 2006 Audit Report: IG-0750 The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Program to Oversee Hydroelectric Dams December 14, 2006 Audit Report: IG-0749 The Department's Energy, Science,and Environment Sites' Implementationof the Design Basis Threat December 13, 2006 Special Report: IG-0748 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy December 5, 2006 Audit Report: IG-0747 The Department of Energy's Use of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve in Response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita November 29, 2006 Inspection Report: IG-0746

370

Calendar Year 2005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Calendar Year 2005 RSS December 30, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-M-06-03 Management Controls over the University of California's Contributions to the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation December 21, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0713 Status of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility December 20, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-04 Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act December 20, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-L-06-03 Defense Waste Processing Facility Operations at the Savannah River Site December 14, 2005 Special Report: IG-0712 Management Challenges at the Department of Energy December 5, 2005 Audit Report: IG-0711 Demolition and Replacement of Hanford's Radiological Calibration Laboratory November 25, 2005 Audit Report: OAS-M-06-02 Management Controls over Assessing Natural Resource Damage at Rocky Flats

371

Calendar Year 2002 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Calendar Year 2002 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. 2002-12-31 - Report IG-0580:* Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy" 2002-12-23 - Report IG-0579:* Audit Report on "The Department's Unclassified Foreign Visits and Assignments Program" 2002-12-19 - Report IG-0578:* Inspection Report on "Inspection of Explosives Safety at Selected Department of Energy Sites" 2002-12-18 - Report IG-0577:* Audit Report on "Planned Characterization Capability At The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant" 2002-12-03 - Report OAS-L-03-03:* Audit Report on "Follow-Up Audit on the Department's Management of Field Contractor Employees Assigned to Headquarters and Other Federal Agencies"

372

NERSC: 40 YEARS AT THE FOREFRONT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALENDAR CALENDAR CSO 0019 NERSC: 40 YEARS AT THE FOREFRONT In 1974, an almost-obsolete supercomputer once used for defense research was made available to support the fusion energy research community, the first time such a powerful computing resource was used for unclassified scientific computing. That start as the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center marked the launch of what today is known as the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1974-96, the center was renamed the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) in 1976, and in 1983 it began providing a fraction of its computing cycles to other research areas. To reflect

373

Calendar Year 1999 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1999 1999 Calendar Year 1999 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. 1999-12-22 - Report IG-0455: * Inspection Report on "Inspection of the Sale of a Paragon Supercomputer by Sandia National Laboratories" 1999-12-16 - Report INS-O-00-02: * Inspection Report on "Inspection of Alleged Improprieties Regarding Issuance of a Contract" 1999-12-15 - Report IG-0454:* Audit Report on "Waste Incineration at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory" 1999-12-10 - Report WR-B-OO-02:* Audit Report on "Properties and Facilities at Grand Junction" 1999-11-30 - Report INS-O-00-01:* Inspection Report on "Inspection of Selected Issues of the Chem-Bio Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory"

374

Calendar Year 1997 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Calendar Year 1997 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. 1997-12-23 - Report IG-0416:* Audit of Support Services Subcontracts at Argonne National Laboratory 1997-12-10 - Report ER-B-98-05:* Audit of the Department of Energy's Contracts with Envirocare of Utah, Inc. 1997-12-05 - Report IG-0414:* Audit of the Department of Energy's Management of Field Contractor Employees Assigned to Headquarters and Other Federal Agencies 1997-12-04 - Report IG-0415:* Audit of Departmental Receipt of Final Deliverables for Grant Awards 1997-11-24 - Report ER-B-98-04:* Audit of Selected Government-Funded Grants and Contracts at Princeton University 1997-11-19 - Report WR-B-98-01:* Audit of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Operations at the

375

Calendar Year 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2012 July 30, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-FS-12-10 Southwestern Federal Power System's Fiscal Year 2010 Financial Statement Audit July 20, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-L-12-07 The Global Threat Reduction Initiative's Molybdenum-99 Program July 20, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-12-06 The Department of Energy's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Missouri State Energy Program July 20, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-L-12-08 Y-12 National Security Complex's Waste Diversion Efforts July 20, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-L-12-06 Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Waste Diversion Efforts July 10, 2012 Audit Report: OAS-RA-L-12-05 Follow-up on the Department of Energy's Implementation of the Advanced Batteries and Hybrid Components Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act July 2, 2012

376

Calendar Year 2004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Calendar Year 2004 RSS December 14, 2004 Audit Report: IG-0669 Use and Management of Mobile Communications Services December 10, 2004 Audit Report: OAS-L-05-01 Federal Managers' Financial Integrity Act Audit Report December 8, 2004 Inspection Report: IG-0668 Concerns Regarding Academic Programs at the Bonneville Power Administration and the Savannah River Operations Office November 30, 2004 Special Report: IG-0667 Management Challenges at the Department November 30, 2004 Audit Report: IG-0666 Audit Report on "The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center October 28, 2004 Audit Report: IG-0665 Restoration of the Monticello Mill Site at Monticello, Utah September 27, 2004 Audit Report: IG-0664 Property Disposals at the Yucca Mountain Project September 24, 2004 Inspection Report: IG-0663

377

Calendar Year 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 17, 2013 January 17, 2013 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-06 Montgomery County Department of Housing and Community Affairs - Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 January 17, 2013 Examination Report: OAS-RA-13-05 Prince George's County Department of Housing and Community Development - Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 January 16, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-L-13-05 The Department of Energy's International Offices and Foreign Assignments January 15, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-FS-13-09 Department of Energy's Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program's Fiscal Year 2010 Balance Sheet Audit January 11, 2013 Audit Report: OAS-L-13-04

378

Environmental monitoring report for Calendar Year 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the 1986 environmental monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. Two of three large tokamak machines, the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) were in operation during the year. The Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX) was shut down in December 1985 to undergo major modifications, and will recommence operations in 1987. PLT was shut down in December 1986. In addition, the S-1 Spheromak and the Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) were operated on a limited basis in 1986. The Environmental Committee became a standing committee of the Executive Safety Board (ESB) and continued to review items of environmental importance. During CY86 no adverse effects to the environment or public resulted from any operational program activities at PPPL, and the Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental regulations.

Stencel, J.R.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Assessment of synfuel transportation to year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies and discusses potential problems in the transportation of synthetic fuels (synfuels) which if allowed to persist unresolved will hamper the development of these energy materials between now and the year 2000. The emergence of transportation-related problems in shale oil and coal synfuel development will be highly dependent upon their chemical similitude with analagous fossil fuels. Hence, definitive resolution of the question of whether new transportation problems exist is dependent upon clear characterization of the synfuels chemical composition. Hydrogen and methanol represent unique cases since these materials are already in commercial production. The major transportation problem identified with fuel economics based on these materials is related to bulk use. To date, shipment volumes have been relatively small and, in the case of hydrogen, can be accommodated with costly, more specialized packaging. Scale-up for major energy use may introduce a new set of transportation problems.

Wakamiya, W.; Sebelien, K.B.; Parkhurst, M.A.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Calendar Year 2001 | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Calendar Year 2001 Documents marked with the * are published in Adobe PDF format. 2001-12-21 - Report IG-0537:* Audit Report on "Telecommunications Infrastructure" 2001-12-20 - Report IG-0536:* Inspection Report on "Follow-on Inspection of the Department of Energy's Value Engineering Program" 2001-12-21 - Report IG-0538:* Special Report on "Management Challenges at the Department of Energy" 2001-12-18 - Report IG-0535:* Audit Report on "Management of the Stockpile Surveillance Program's Significant Finding Investigations" 2001-12 - Report IG-0534:* Inspection Report on "Inspection of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Protective Force and Special Response Team " 2001-12-07 - Report IG-0533:* Inspection Report on "Inspection of the Department of Energy's Automated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) The Year-in-Review (YIR):...

382

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Weather Year for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculations 2 Weather Year for Energy Calculations 2 logo. Contains typical year hourly weather data for 77 locations in the United States and Canada. The Weather Year for Energy...

383

Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP YEaR in REviEw 2009 Year in Review 2009 Federal Energy Management Program YEar in rEviEw 2009 Table of Contents Introduction 2 Project Transaction Services 3 Applied...

384

Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year in Review 2007 YEAR IN REVIEW 2007 FEdERAl ENERgY MANAgEMENt PRogRAM 2007 Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2007 Table of Contents Introduction 1 Technical...

385

Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year in Review 2006 Federal energy ManageMent PrograM year In reVIeW 2006 2006 Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2006 Table of Contents Introduction 1 Technical...

386

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Page B - 1 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page B - 2 Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page B - 3 Multi-Year Research,...

387

Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the environmental status of Ames Laboratory for calendar year 2010. It includes descriptions of the Laboratory site, its mission, the status of its compliance with applicable environmental regulations, its planning and activities to maintain compliance, and a comprehensive review of its environmental protection, surveillance and monitoring activities. In 2010, the Laboratory accumulated and disposed of waste under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued generator numbers. All waste is handled according to all applicable EPA, State, Local regulations and DOE Orders. In 2006 the Laboratory reduced its generator status from a Large Quantity Generator (LQG) to a Small Quantity Generator (SQG). EPA Region VII was notified of this change. The Laboratory's RCRA hazardous waste management program was inspected by EPA Region VII in April 2006. There were no notices of violations. The inspector was impressed with the improvements of the Laboratory's waste management program over the past ten years. The Laboratory was in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and DOE regulations and orders in 2010. There were no radiological air emissions or exposures to the general public due to Laboratory activities in 2010. See U.S. Department of Energy Air Emissions Annual Report in Appendix B. As indicated in prior SERs, pollution awareness, waste minimization and recycling programs have been in practice since 1990, with improvements implemented most recently in 2010. Included in these efforts were battery and CRT recycling, miscellaneous electronic office equipment, waste white paper and green computer paper-recycling and corrugated cardboard recycling. Ames Laboratory also recycles/reuses salvageable metal, used oil, foamed polystyrene peanuts, batteries, fluorescent lamps and telephone books. Ames Laboratory reported to DOE-Ames Site Office (AMSO), through the Laboratory's Performance Evaluation Measurement Plan, on its Affirmative Procurement Performance Measure. A performance level of 'A-' was achieved in 2010 for Integrated Safety, Health and Environmental Protection. As reported in Site Environmental Reports for prior years, the Laboratory's Environmental Management System (EMS) has been integrated into the Laboratory's Integrated Safety Management System since 2005. The integration of EMS into the way the Laboratory does business allows the Laboratory to systematically review, address and respond to the Laboratory's environmental impacts. The Laboratory's EMS was audited in April 2009 by DOE-CH. There were four 'Sufficiently in Conformity' findings as a result of the audit. All four findings were tracked in the Laboratory's corrective action database for completion. Beryllium was used routinely at Ames Laboratory in the 1940's and 1950's in processes developed for the production of highly pure uranium and thorium in support of the historic Manhattan Project. Laboratory metallurgists also worked on a process to produce pure beryllium metal from beryllium fluoride. In the early 1950's, beryllium oxide powder was used to produce shaped beryllium and crucibles. As a result of that work, beryllium contamination now exists in many interstitial spaces (e.g., utility chases) and ventilation systems in Wilhelm, Spedding and Metals Development buildings. Extensive characterization and remediation efforts have occurred in 2009 and 2010 in order to better understand the extent of the contamination. Analysis of extensive sampling data suggests that a fairly wide dispersion of beryllium occurred (most likely in the 1950's and 60's) in Wilhelm Hall and in certain areas of Spedding Hall and Metals Development. Area air-sampling results and work-area surface characterizations indicate the exposure potential to current workers, building visitors and the public remains extremely low. This information is now used to guide cleaning efforts and to provide worker protection during remodeling and maintenance activities. Results were shared with the DOE's Former Worker Program to support former worker medical test

Kayser, Dan

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP January 18, 2005 -...

389

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preface Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page i Preface The Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan (MYRD&D...

390

Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Now Available (July 2013) Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Now Available (July...

391

Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response in Commercial Buildings Title Findings from Seven Years of Field Performance Data for Automated Demand Response...

392

Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year in Review 2008 Federal Energy Management Program Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2008 Table of Contents Introduction 1 Project Transaction Services 2 Applied...

393

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Renewable Electricity Generation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...

394

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Sustainable Transportation Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014...

395

NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2000 NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000 An Act to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2000 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for...

396

Working natural gas inventories below last year's level at ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Despite inventory levels at the end of March above the 5-year average, cumulative net injections this year are over 20% lower than in 2010.

397

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results and FY 2010 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2009 Annual Performance Results...

398

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results and FY 2008 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 Annual Performance Results...

399

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results and FY 2012 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Annual Performance Results...

400

Model Year 2013 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Updated August 14, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 13 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Air Pollution Score City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Score SmartWay ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2 small car 7 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 8 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.0CB2 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.4DB3 small car 6 22 31 26 7 yes AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Site Environmental Report-Calendar Year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory's mission is to conduct fundamental research in the physical, chemical, materials, mathematical sciences and engineering which underlie energy generating, conversion, transmission and storage technologies, environmental improvement, and other technical areas essential to national needs. These efforts will be maintained so as to contribute to the achievement of the Department of Energy's Missions and Goals; more specifically, to increase the general levels of scientific knowledge and capabilities, to prepare engineering and physical sciences students for future scientific endeavors, and to initiate nascent technologies and practical applications arising from our basic scientific programs. The Laboratory will approach all its operations with the safety and health of all workers as a constant objective and with genuine concern for the environment. Ames Laboratory does not conduct classified research. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the performance of Ames Laboratory's environmental programs, present highlights of significant environmental activities, and confirm compliance with environmental regulations and requirements for calendar year 2001. This report is a working requirement of Department of Energy Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''.

Dan Kayser

2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Photovoltaic energy: Program overview, fiscal year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This summary is prepared each year to provide an overview of the government-funded activities within the National Photovoltaics Program. The 1990 PV Program Achievements are listed. Launched the PV Manufacturing Technology initiative, designed to systematically lower PV module costs. Inaugurated the PV Concentrator Technologies Initiative by signing eight multiyear, cost-shared technology development subcontracts with concentrator companies. Established the PV Polycrystalline Thin-Film Initiative by signing six multiyear, cost-shared technology development subcontracts with six polycrystalline thin-film companies. Continued the Amorphous Silicon Project by awarding three new research and development contracts. Focused the resources of three program laboratories on finding solutions to industry's manufacturing problems: the Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories and the Module Failure Analysis Laboratory and the Encapsulant Research Laboratory at SERI. Established an ongoing program to assist utilities in using PV for cost-effective, high-value applications. Completed nearly all of the construction planned for the first phase of PVUSA at Davis, California. Worked with the crystalline silicon PV industry on novel, low-cost cell fabrication processes and on resolving encapsulant problems. Took part in the development of qualification procedures tests for thin- and thick-film flat-plate modules and concentrator modules.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Geothermal Energy Contract List: Fiscal Year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is charged with the lead federal role in the research and development (R D) of technologies that will assist industry in economically exploiting the nation's vast geothermal resources. The Geothermal Energy R D Program represents a comprehensive, balanced approach to establishing all forms of geothermal energy as significant contributors to the nation's energy supply. The program is structured both to maintain momentum in the growth of the existing hydrothermal industry and to develop long-term options offering the greatest promise for practical applications. The Geothermal Energy Contract List, Fiscal Year 1990 is a tabulation of geothermal R D contracts that were begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990). The R D activities are performed by national laboratories or industrial, academic, and nonprofit research institutions. The contract list is organized in accordance with the Geothermal Division R D work breakdown structure. The structure hierarchy consists of Resource Category (hydrothermal, geopressured-geothermal, hot dry rock, and magma energy), Project (hard rock penetration, reservoir technology, etc.), and Task (lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, etc.). For each contract, the contractor, the FY 1990 funding, and a brief description of the milestones planned for FY 1991 are provided.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

FY 1987 current fiscal year work plan  

SciTech Connect

This Current Year Work Plan presents a detailed description of the activities to be performed by the Joint Integration Office during FY87. It breaks down the activities into two major work areas: Program Management and Program Analysis. Program Management is performed by the JIO by providing technical planning and guidance for the development of advanced TRU waste management capabilities. This includes equipment/facility design, engineering, construction, and operations. These functions are integrated to allow transition from interim storage to final disposition. JIO tasks include program requirements identification, long-range technical planning, budget development, program planning document preparation, task guidance, task monitoring, information gathering and task reporting to DOE, interfacing with other agencies and DOE lead programs, integrating public involvement with program efforts, and preparation of program status reports for DOE. Program Analysis is performed by the JIO to support identification and assessment of alternatives, and development of long-term TRU waste program capabilities. This work plan includes: system analyses, requirements analyses, interim and procedure development, legislative and regulatory analyses, dispatch and traffic analyses, and data bases.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

DURABLE GLASS FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS  

SciTech Connect

The durability of natural glasses on geological time scales and ancient glasses for thousands of years is well documented. The necessity to predict the durability of high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses on extended time scales has led to various thermodynamic and kinetic approaches. Advances in the measurement of medium range order (MRO) in glasses has led to the understanding that the molecular structure of a glass, and thus the glass composition, controls the glass durability by establishing the distribution of ion exchange sites, hydrolysis sites, and the access of water to those sites. During the early stages of glass dissolution, a 'gel' layer resembling a membrane forms through which ions exchange between the glass and the leachant. The hydrated gel layer exhibits acid/base properties which are manifested as the pH dependence of the thickness and nature of the gel layer. The gel layer ages into clay or zeolite minerals by Ostwald ripening. Zeolite mineral assemblages (higher pH and Al{sup 3+} rich glasses) may cause the dissolution rate to increase which is undesirable for long-term performance of glass in the environment. Thermodynamic and structural approaches to the prediction of glass durability are compared versus Ostwald ripening.

Jantzen, C.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

120 Years of Accelerators that Heal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of X rays was made possible by the intelligent use of the best accelerator of the time. Since then, the development of particle accelerators has been at the root of both fundamental discoveries in physics and unforeseeable medical applications. The lecture will describe the major steps in this 120-year history of diagnostics and tumour therapy.   The first attempts to heal tumours with X rays were made only one month after Röntgen’s discovery, but the understanding of the mechanisms by which the radiation kills the cells and the introduction of dose fractionation took much longer. The use of X rays in diagnostics developed much faster and its benefits were very visible during the First World War. Today no tumour could be treated and no patient could be operated without a CT scan, which employs an X ray tube that is not very different from the one introduced by William Coolidge in 1912.   On the particle therapy frontier, more sophisticated and larger pa...

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Biomass Multi-Year Program Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, biomass-derived fuels have received increasing attention as one solution to our nation’s continued and growing dependence on imported oil, which exposes the country to critical disruptions in fuel supply, creates economic and social uncertainties for businesses and individuals, and impacts our national security. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) aims to increase the supply of alternative fuels by setting a mandatory Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requiring transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum of 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels, including advanced and cellulosic biofuels and biomass-based diesel, by 2022. President Obama has affirmed his support for advanced biofuels as part of his commitment to “invest in a clean energy economy that will lead to new jobs, new businesses and reduce our dependence on foreign oil. " 1 Program Goals The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the importance of a diverse energy portfolio in meeting the nation’s energy security challenges. DOE has, therefore, set a goal in its Strategic Plan to promote energy security through a diverse energy supply that is reliable, clean, and affordable. As a key strategy for attaining both EISA and Department goals, the DOE Office of

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Biomass Multi-Year Program Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, biomass-derived fuels have received increasing attention as one solution to our nation’s continued and growing dependence on imported oil, which exposes the country to critical disruptions in fuel supply, creates economic and social uncertainties for businesses and individuals, and impacts our national security. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) aims to increase the supply of alternative fuels by setting a mandatory Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requiring transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum of 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels, including advanced and cellulosic biofuels and biomass-based diesel, by 2022. President Obama has affirmed his support for advanced biofuels as part of his commitment to “invest in a clean energy economy that will lead to new jobs, new businesses and reduce our dependence on foreign oil. " 1 Program Goals The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the importance of a diverse energy portfolio in meeting the nation’s energy security challenges. DOE has, therefore, set a goal in its Strategic Plan to promote energy security through a diverse energy supply that is reliable, clean, and affordable. As a key strategy for attaining both EISA and Department goals, the DOE Office of

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Model Year 2014 SmartWay Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SmartWay Vehicles SmartWay Vehicles Updated December 20, 2013* *Vehicles may be added throughout the model year. Please check back for updates. Page 1 of 14 Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 EHNXV01.58D2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV EHNXV01.58D2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV EHNXV02.0EB3 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes ACURA RLX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-7 4WD Gasoline FA B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 EHNXV03.52G2 midsize car 7 28 32 30 8 yes ACURA RLX 3.5 6 SemiAuto-7 4WD Gasoline CA L3SULEV30 California LEV-III SULEV30 EHNXV03.52G2 midsize car 8 28 32 30 8 yes ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5

410

FY 2010 Year End Closing Action Plan Page 1 of 12 Fiscal Year 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information menu item. The first screen is the search page. Enter your department number and click the search documents. Your Worklist should be reviewed daily. Following are the definitions of several terms used of the fiscal year (June 30, 2010), the system will come up at 7:00 a.m. All documents MUST BE ENTERED

411

Our 50-year odyssey with fission: Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On the occasion of this International Conference on Fifty Years Research in Nuclear Fission, we summarize our present understanding of the fission process and the challenges that lie ahead. The basic properties of fission arise from a delicate competition between disruptive Coulomb forces, cohesive nuclear forces, and fluctuating shell and pairing forces. These static forces are primarily responsible for such experimental phenomena as deformed ground-state nuclear shapes, fission into fragments of unequal size, sawtooth neutron yields, spontaneously fissioning isomers, broad resonances and narrow intermediate structure in fission cross sections, and cluster radioactivity. However, inertial and dissipative forces also play decisive roles in the dynamical evolution of a fissioning nucleus. The energy dissipated between the saddle and scission points is small for low initial excitation energy at the saddle point and increases with increasing excitation energy. At moderate excitation energies, the dissipation of collective energy into internal single-particle excitation energy proceeds largely through the interaction of nucleons with the mean field and with each other in the vicinity of the nuclear surface, as well as through the transfer of nucleons between the two portions of the evolving dumbell-like system. These unique dissipation mechanisms arise from the Pauli exclusion principle for fermions and the details of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which make the mean free path of a nucleon near the Fermi surface at low excitation energy longer than the nuclear radius. With its inverse process of heavy-ion fusion reactions, fission continues to yield surprises in the study of large-amplitude collective nuclear motion. 87 refs., 12 figs.

Nix, J.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Solar thermal electric: Program overview fiscal years 1993--1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Electric Program Overview and Accomplishments for Fiscal Years 1993--1994 are documented.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

414

DOE/KEURP site operator program. Year 3, Second Quarter Report, October 1--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy`s Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation in this program, Kansas State is displaying, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU has purchased several electric cars and proposes to purchase additional electric vehicles. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has procured two (2) Soleq 1993 Ford EVcort station wagons. During calendar year 1994, the Kansas` electric vehicle program expects to purchase a minimum of four and a maximum of eleven additional electric vehicles. The G-Van was signed in order for the public to be aware that it was an electric vehicle. Financial participants` names have been stenciled on the back door of the van. The Soleq EvCorts have not been signed. In order to demonstrate the technology as feasible, the EvCorts were deliberately not signed. The goal is to generate a public perception that this vehicle is no different from any similar internal combustion engine vehicle. Magnetic signs have been made for special functions to ensure sponsor support is recognized and acknowledged.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2006-2030) High Macroeconomic Growth Case Tables (2006-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 XLS GIF Spreadsheets are provided in Excel Year-by-Year High Economic Growth Case Tables (2006-2030) Table Title Formats Summary High Economic Growth Case Tables PDF GIF High Economic Growth Case Tables XLS GIF Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary XLS GIF Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source XLS GIF Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 6. Industrial Sector Key Indicators and Consumption XLS GIF Table 7. Transportation Sector Key Indicators and Delivered Energy Consumption XLS GIF Table 8. Electricity Supply, Disposition, Prices, and Emissions

416

Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam  

SciTech Connect

In Denmark, straw is utilised for the generation of energy and district heating in power plants. Combustion of straw gives rise to high contents of potassium chloride and some sulphur dioxide in the flue gas. These compounds can lead to deposits with high content of potassium chloride and potassium sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes, the corrosion during these experiments was monitored. Various ferritic and austenitic materials were investigated at steam temperatures ranging from 520 to 580{degree}C and flue gas temperatures ranging from 925 to 1100{degree}C. The results obtained in the demonstration program led to the rebuilding of the 350 MW pulverized coal fired boiler, Studstrup unit 4, into a co-firing boiler with straw in 2002. During the rebuilding, test tube sections of X20CrMoV12 1 and TP347H FG were built into the superheater and the reheater loops. The temperature ranges during these exposures was for the steam from 470 to 575{degree}C and for the flue gas from 1025 to 1300{degree}C. All these test tubes have been removed during the last three years at one year intervals for corrosion studies. The corrosion studies performed on all investigated tubes included measurements of the corrosion attack, light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the corrosion products.

Frandsen, R.B.; Montgomery, M.; Larsen, O.H. [Elsam Engineering, Kolding (Denmark)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Analytical Services Fiscal Year 1996 Multi-year Program Plan Fiscal Year Work Plan WBS 1.5.1, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the Fiscal Year 1996 Work Plan and Multi-Year Program Plan for the Analytical Services Program at the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The Analytical Services Program provides vital support to the Hanford Site mission and provides technically sound, defensible, cost effective, high quality analytical chemistry data for the site programs. This report describes the goals and strategies for continuance of the Analytical Services Program through fiscal year 1996 and beyond.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclide Emissions, Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office operates the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site) and North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF). From 1951 through 1992, the NNSS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NNSS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to underground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NNSS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NNSS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by wind) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium are also emitted to air at the NLVF, an NNSS support complex in North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2010a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility to that which would cause 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation unrelated to NNSS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements, from sources such as medically or commercially used radionuclides, or from sources outside of the United States, such as those from the damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan. Because this report is intended to discuss radioactive air emissions during calendar year 2010, data on radionuclides in air from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant releases are not presented but will be included in the report for calendar year 2011. The NNSS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] and DOE, 1995). This method was approved by the EPA for use on the NNSS in 2001(EPA, 2001a) and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NNSS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo-critical receptor stations, because no member of the public actually resides at these onsite locations. Compliance is demonstrated if the measured annual average concentration is less than the NESHAP Concentration Levels (CLs) for Environmental Compliance listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2 (CFR, 2010a). For multiple radionuclides, compliance is demonstrated when the sum of the fractions (determined by dividing each radionuclide's concentration by its CL and then adding the fractions together) is less than 1.0. In 2010, the potential dose from radiological emissions to air, resulting from both current and past NNSS activities, at onsite compliance monitoring stations was well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected at all air monitoring stations had average concentrations of radioactivity that were a fraction of the CL values. Concentrations ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 17 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides about 20 kilometers from potential release points on the NNSS, dose to the public would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NNSS. The potential dose to the public from NLVF emissions was also very low at 0.000032 mrem/yr, more than 300,000 times lower than the 10 mrem/yr limit.

NSTec Ecological and Environmental Monitoring

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

419

How much money does it cost a year to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How much money does it cost a year to run Jefferson Lab? Do you get funds from an entrepreneurship? The budget for Jefferson Lab is around 70 million dollars per year. That comes...

420

Six-Year Review of Covered Products | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Six-Year Review of Covered Products Six-Year Review of Covered Products This memorandum explains that the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) requires the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at Iowa Wind Turbine Facility Energy Secretary Highlights One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 at...

422

Secretary Bodman Joins Congress to Celebrate One-Year Anniversary...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joins Congress to Celebrate One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Secretary Bodman Joins Congress to Celebrate One-Year Anniversary of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...

423

Rebuttal: Advantages of a Four-Year Residency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

year primary care training programs. In summary, although wedependent on individual training programs, are of interest3 and 2-4 programs. Only true four- year EM training was

Langdorf, Mark; Lotfipour, Shahram

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

DOE OIG Strategic Plan Fiscal Years 2014 - 2019 | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

14 - 2019 DOE OIG Strategic Plan Fiscal Years 2014 - 2019 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General, Strategic Plan, Fiscal Years 2014 - 2019 The Office of Inspector...

425

Web Site Highlights 50 Years of NIST Contributions to Laser ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Web Site Highlights 50 Years of NIST Contributions to Laser Science. For Immediate Release: December 15, 2009. ...

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes environmental information for the Hanford Site in Washington State for the calendar year 2001.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advances In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper:...

428

Technical Standards, Fiscal Year 2007 Agency Report - February...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

research, energy efficency, oil storage, hydroelectric power, accelerator operations, nuclear facility decommissioning, and fusion experiments. Technical Standards, Fiscal Year...

429

Results of 1992–2001 Baldrige Award Recipients 10-Year ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of 1992–2001 Baldrige Award Recipients 10-Year Common Stock Comparison. Methodology: A hypothetical sum ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

Results of 1993–2002 Baldrige Award Recipients 10-Year ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of 1993–2002 Baldrige Award Recipients 10-Year Common Stock Comparison. Methodology: A hypothetical sum ...

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

431

NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

433

COLD FUSION ONE YEAR AFTER R. Battiston and C. Presilla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

230 COLD FUSION ONE YEAR AFTER R. Battiston and C. Presilla Dipartimento di Fi$ica dell The one year long history of cold fusion is critically reviewed on the basis of the more recent results has of science. In this lecture we will discuss of the status of the cold fusion searches one year

Presilla, Carlo

434

Hello from Google! Are you a current first year undergraduate of a 3 year programme or a first or second year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hello from Google! Are you a current first year undergraduate of a 3 year programme or a first London Google Office this summer? Apply for Android Camp today! How to apply: Visit www.google: www.google.com/students/androidcampeurope. If you have any questions about the application, please

435

Microsoft Word - S08237_FY11 Year-End AST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report September 2011 LMS/ESL/S08237 ESL-RPT-2011-04 This page intentionally left blank LMS/ESL/S08237 ESL-RPT-2011-04 Applied Science and Technology Task Order Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Summary Report September 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Applied Science and Technology Task Order FY 2011 Year-End Summary Report September 2011 Doc. No. S08237 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

436

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to time-of-day electricity pricing: first empirical results.S. The trouble with electricity markets: understandingresidential peak-load electricity rate structures. Journal

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

residential peak-load electricity rate structures. Journalefficiency efforts. Keywords: electricity rates, residentialmust suffer higher electricity rates to pay for the bill

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricity rateKeywords: electricity rates, residential electricity, demandrates be targeted to the largest residential users of electricity,

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Multi-Function Fuel-Fired Heat Pump Research Project | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

demand. Peak-load conditions can lead to high electricity prices, power quality problems, grid system inefficiencies, and eventually brown outs. Project Description This project...

440

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

Herter, Karen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

other biomass, solar, and wind power. Facilities co-firing biomass and coal are classified as coal. 7/ Primarily peak-load capacity fueled by natural gas.

442

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 The 2011 Year-in-Review (YIR) provides a summary of significant energy disruptions and infrastructure changes that occurred in the United States throughout 2011. The focus is on the United States, but international events that impacted the United States are also reported. The 2011 YIR is based primarily on information reported in the Energy Assurance Daily (EAD) between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011. Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011.pdf More Documents & Publications Year-in-Review: 2012 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions (July 2013) Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010

443

102-year-old retiree continues to make a difference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

102-year-old continues to make a difference 102-year-old continues to make a difference 102-year-old LANL volunteer continues to make a difference Virginia Stovall, will be honored for volunteering 1,470 hours last year - she will also be celebrating her 103rd birthday in September. April 3, 2012 Virginia Stoval: Volunteered over 1,000 hours last year LANL Vecinos retiree volunteer keeps on making a difference at 102 years old! Contact Kurt Steinhaus Community Programs Office (505) 665-7370 Email In the outstanding retiree category, one of most "seasoned" volunteers, Virginia Stovall, will be honored for volunteering 1,470 hours last year. Virginia Stovall: Vecinos' most "seasoned" volunteer at 102 continues to help others On June 28, Los Alamos National Security, LLC and Los Alamos National

444

Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: DOE Five Year Commercialization Support Plan on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos

445

Resolve to Save Energy This Year | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resolve to Save Energy This Year Resolve to Save Energy This Year Resolve to Save Energy This Year January 2, 2013 - 10:52am Addthis Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips that every homeowner should try. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips that every homeowner should try. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Looking for more ways to save energy? Check out Energy Saver for tips that save energy and money. At the beginning of every new year, millions of Americans make New Year's resolutions, which inevitably are forgotten by the end of January. This year, forget making a New Year's resolution. Instead make a home energy

446

FREE Name Tags for 1st year Students FREE Selected Course Packs for 2nd year Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· FREE Name Tags for 1st year Students · FREE Selected Course Packs for 2nd year Students Process · Discounts & Free Registration to Events · Financial Support for Student Projects & Groups (up to $11,000 each year!) · Discounts on Insurance, Rental Cars, and more! · FREE Legal Advice · Expanded

Liu, Taosheng

447

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year 1994. To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Naturita, Gunnison, and Rifle, Colorado. Economic data were requested from each site prime subcontractor, as well as from the Remedial Action Contractor. The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized. This study assesses benefits associated with the Grand Junction, Gunnison, Naturita, and Rifle UMTRA Projects sites for the 1-year period under study. Work at the Naturita site was initiated in April 1994 and involved demolition of buildings at the processing site. Actual start-up of remediation of Naturita is planned to begin in the spring of 1995. Work at the Slick Rock and Maybell sites is expected to begin in 1995. The only current economic benefits associated with these sites are related to UMTRA Project support work.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Kootenay Lake Fertilization Experiment, Year 15 (North Arm) and Year 3 (South Arm) (2006) Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from the fifteenth year (2006) of nutrient additions to the North Arm of Kootenay Lake and three years of nutrient additions to the South Arm. Experimental fertilization of the lake has been conducted using an adaptive management approach in an effort to restore lake productivity lost as a result of nutrient uptake in upstream reservoirs. The primary objective of the experiment is to restore kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations, which are the main food source for Gerrard rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). The quantity of agricultural grade liquid fertilizer (10-34-0, ammonium polyphosphate and 28-0-0, urea ammonium nitrate) added to the North Arm in 2006 was 44.7 tonnes of P and 248.4 tonnes of N. The total fertilizer load added to the South Arm was 257 tonnes of nitrogen; no P was added. Kootenay Lake has an area of 395 km{sup 2}, a maximum depth of 150 m, a mean depth of 94 m, and a water renewal time of approximately two years. Kootenay Lake is a monomictic lake, generally mixing from late fall to early spring and stratifying during the summer. Surface water temperatures generally exceed 20 C for only a few weeks in July. Results of oxygen profiles were similar to previous years with the lake being well oxygenated from the surface to the bottom depths at all stations. Similar to past years, Secchi disc measurements at all stations in 2006 indicate a typical seasonal pattern of decreasing depths associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, followed by increasing depths as the bloom gradually decreases by the late summer and fall. Total phosphorus (TP) ranged from 2-7 {micro}g/L and tended to decrease as summer advanced. Over the sampling season dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations decreased, with the decline corresponding to nitrate (the dominant component of DIN) being utilized by phytoplankton during summer stratification. Owing to the importance of epilimnetic nitrate that is required for optimal phytoplankton growth discrete depth water sampling occurred in 2006 to measure more accurately changes in the nitrate concentrations. As expected there was a seasonal decline in nitrate concentrations, thus supporting the strategy of increasing the nitrogen loading in both arms. These in-season changes emphasize the need for an adaptive management approach to ensure the nitrogen to phosphorus (N:P) ratio does not decrease below 15:1 (weight:weight) during the fertilizer application period. Phytoplankton composition determined from the integrated samples (0-20m) was dominated by diatoms, followed by cryptophytes and chrysophytes. The contribution of cryptophytes to total biomass was higher in 2006 than in 2005. Cryptophytes, considered being edible biomass for zooplankton and Daphnia spp., increased in 2006. Phytoplankton in the discrete depth samples (2, 5, 10, 15 and 20m) demonstrated a clear north to south gradient in average phytoplankton density and biomass among the three stations sampled, with highest values at the North Arm station (KLF 2) and lowest values in the most southern station in the South Arm (KLF 7). Populations were dominated by flagellates at all stations and depths in June and July, then dominated by diatoms in August and September in the North and South arms of the lake. There were no large bluegreen (cyanobacteria) populations in either arm of the lake in 2006. Seasonal average zooplankton abundance and biomass in both the main body of the lake and in the West Arm increased in 2006 compared to 2005. Zooplankton density was numerically dominated by copepods and biomass was dominated by Daphnia spp. The annual average mysid biomass data at deep stations indicated that the North Arm of Kootenay Lake was more productive than the South Arm in 2006. Mysid densities increased through the summer and declined in the winter; mean whole lake values remain within prefertilization densities. Kokanee escapement to Meadow Creek declined in 2006 to approximately 400,000 spawners. The Lardeau River escapement also declined wit

Schindler, E.U.; Sebastian, D.; Andrusak, G.F. [Fish and Wildlife Science and Allocation, Ministry of Environment, Province of British Columbia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. There are six critical receptor locations on the NTS that are actually pseudocritical receptor locations because they are hypothetical receptor locations; no person actually resides at these onsite locations. Annual average concentrations of detected radionuclides are compared with Concentration Levels (CL) for Environmental Compliance values listed in 40 CFR 61, Appendix E, Table 2. Compliance is demonstrated if the sum of fractions (CL/measured concentrations) of all detected radionuclides at each pseudo-critical receptor location is less than one. In 2007, as in all previous years for which this report has been produced, the NTS has demonstrated that the potential dose to the public from radiological emissions to air from current and past NTS activities is well below the 10 mrem/yr dose limit. Air sampling data collected onsite at each of the six pseudo-critical receptor stations on the NTS had average concentrations of nuclear test-related radioactivity that were a fraction of the limits listed in Table 2 in Appendix E of 40 CFR 61. They ranged from less than 1 percent to a maximum of 20 percent of the allowed NESHAP limit. Because the nearest member of the public resides approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles) from the NTS boundary, concentrations at this location would be only a small fraction of that measured on the NTS.

Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Large Cars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Cars Large Cars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 BMW X1 sDrive28i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 large car 6 24 34 28 7 yes 2013 BMW X1 xDrive28i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 large car 6 22 33 26 7 yes 2013 FORD C-MAX Hybrid 2 4 CVT 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DFMXV02.0VZL large car 7 45 40 43 10 yes 2013 FORD Taurus 2 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DFMXV02.0VE6 large car 6 22 32 26 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata 2 4 Auto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHYXV02.01FE large car 6 22 34 26 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata 2.4 4 Auto-6 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHYXV02.41GE large car 6 24 35 28 7 yes 2013 HYUNDAI Sonata

451

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay MidsizeCars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MidsizeCars MidsizeCars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI A6 2 4 SCV-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB midsize car 6 25 33 28 7 yes 2013 BMW 528i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 midsize car 6 22 33 26 7 yes 2013 BMW 528i 2 4 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXJ02.0N20 midsize car 6 24 34 28 7 yes 2013 BMW ActiveHybrid 5 3 6 SemiAuto-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DBMXV03.0AH5 midsize car 6 23 30 26 7 yes 2013 BUICK Lacrosse 2.4 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DGMXV02.4060 midsize car 5 25 36 29 8 yes 2013 BUICK Lacrosse 2.4 4 SemiAuto-6 2WD Gasoline CA L2 California LEV-II LEV DGMXV02.4060 midsize car 5 25 36 29 8 yes 2013 BUICK Regal

452

Eigenoscillations of the Differentially Rotating Sun: I. 22-year, 4000-year, and quasi-biennial modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrograde waves with frequencies much lower than the rotation frequency become trapped in the solar radiative interior. The eigenfunctions of the compressible, nonadiabatic, Rossby-like modes ($\\epsilon$-mechanism and radiative losses taken into account) are obtained by an asymptotic method assuming a very small latitudinal gradient of rotation, without an arbitrary choice of other free parameters. An integral dispersion relation for the complex eigenfrequencies is derived as a solution of the boundary value problem. The discovered resonant cavity modes (called R-modes) are fundamentally different from the known r-modes: their frequencies are functions of the solar interior structure, and the reason for their existence is not related to geometrical effects. The most unstable R-modes are those with periods of 1--3 yr, 18--30 yr, and 1500--20000 yrs; these three separate period ranges are known from solar and geophysical data. The growing times of those modes which are unstable with respect to the $\\epsilon$-mechanism are $\\approx 10^2, 10^3,$ and $10^5$ years, respectively. The amplitudes of the R-modes are growing towards the center of the Sun. We discuss some prospects to develop the theory of R-modes as a driver of the dynamics in the convective zone which could explain, e.g., observed short-term fluctuations of rotation, a control of the solar magnetic cycle, and abrupt changes of terrestrial climate in the past.

N. S. Dzhalilov; J. Staude; V. N. Oraevsky

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

None

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Station Wagons Year Model Displ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Station Wagons Station Wagons Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 5 30 42 34 8 yes 2013 AUDI A3 2 4 AMS-6 2WD Diesel CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DVWXV02.0U5N station wagon 6 30 42 34 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit N/A N/A Auto-1 2WD Electricity FA B1 Federal Tier 2 Bin 1 DHNXV00.05ET station wagon 10 132 105 118 10 yes 2013 HONDA Fit N/A N/A Auto-1 2WD Electricity CA ZEV California ZEV DHNXV00.05ET station wagon 10 132 105 118 10 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Auto-5 2WD Gasoline FA B5 Federal Tier 2 Bin 5 DHNXV01.5JB2 station wagon 5 28 35 31 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Auto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV01.5JB2 station wagon 6 28 35 31 8 yes 2013 HONDA Fit 1.5 4 Man-5 2WD

455

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Weather Year for Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Year for Energy Calculations 2 Year for Energy Calculations 2 Weather Year for Energy Calculations 2 logo. Contains typical year hourly weather data for 77 locations in the United States and Canada. The Weather Year for Energy Calculations 2 (WYEC2) format updates and replaces the earlier WYEC format weather data files and was developed specifically for use with building energy simulation programs. A manual for the WYEC2 weather files and the software toolkit for manipulating and viewing the data is provided. Create multiple reports using a software toolkit on the CD-ROM. WYEC2 weather files consist of 8760 or 8784 identical fixed format records, one for each hour of a 365 or 366 day year. Each record is 116 characters in length. The WYEC2 format is derived from the NOAA TD 9734 Typical Meteorological

456

Wind Farm Growth Through the Years | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Farm Growth Through the Years Wind Farm Growth Through the Years Wind Farm Growth Through the Years August 6, 2013 - 8:32am Addthis 1975 Start Slow Stop Year Wind Farms Homes Powered Added Current Year 815 Wind Farms Online. Enough to Power 15 M Homes Data provided by the EIA. The number of homes powered is estimated through conversion factors provided by the EIA. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Integration Specialist As we publish the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report, we are excited to break down some recent EIA data not included in the report that shows significant wind farm growth across the nation. 2012 was a big year for wind energy. In total, 143 wind farms either came on line or added capacity in 2012, bringing the total number to 815. This brought the country's total wind capacity to more than 60 GW, enough energy to power about 15

457

Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010 The Year-in-Review provides an overview of the events that occurred in 2010: disruptions and additions to energy infrastructure in the United States as well as international events of importance to U.S. energy supplies. The report is the culminating analysis of all of the 2010 issues of the Energy Assurance Daily (EAD). Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Energy Infrastructure Events and Expansions Year-in-Review 2011 Hardening and Resiliency: U.S. Energy Industry Response to Recent Hurricane Seasons - August 2010 Comparing the Impacts of the 2005 and 2008 Hurricanes on U.S. Energy

458

Four-Year Plan | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Four-Year Plan | National Nuclear Security Administration Four-Year Plan | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Four-Year Plan Home > content > Four-Year Plan Four-Year Plan Click here to read highlights of GTRI's contributions to President Obama's Four-Year Effort to secure vulnerable nuclear material around the world. Javascript is required to view this map.

459

Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program ID Selects Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy recognizes the Facility Representative whose achievements during the calendar year are most exemplary. A panel of senior personnel representing the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Environmental Management (EM), Science (SC), Nuclear Energy (NE) and at least five

460

Resolve to Save Energy This Year | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resolve to Save Energy This Year Resolve to Save Energy This Year Resolve to Save Energy This Year January 2, 2014 - 8:50am Addthis Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips that every homeowner should try. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Updated January 2, 2014. Looking for ways to save energy? Check out these tips that every homeowner should try. | Infographic by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Updated January 2, 2014. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Looking for more ways to save energy? Check out Energy Saver for tips that save energy and money. Editor's Note: It's a new year, and that means new resolutions. Whether this is the first year you're looking for ways to save energy or you want to lower your energy bills even more than last year, check out our eight

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years Southwest U.S. undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years Sediment core 260-feet long peers back in climatological time. February 28, 2012 Desert landscape According to their findings, the Southwestern region of the United States apparently undergoes "megadroughts"-warmer, drier periods lasting hundreds of years or more. These megadroughts appear in cycles, with the most recent one comprising a present-day period that included the historic Dust Bowl. According to their findings, the Southwestern region of the United States apparently undergoes "megadroughts"-warmer, drier periods lasting hundreds of years or more. Southwest undergoes megadroughts lasting hundreds of years

462

Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research Talk explores Laboratory's 50 years of space research The talk, titled "Los Alamos National Laboratory's 50 Years in Space," will highlight the Laboratory's significant discoveries and events in the field. October 3, 2013 Laboratory fellow and astrophysicist Ed Fenimore, and Laboratory planetary scientist and principal investigator of the ChemCam team Roger Wiens, will talk about Los Alamos National Laboratory's 50 years of space research and exploration. Laboratory fellow and astrophysicist Ed Fenimore, and Laboratory planetary scientist and principal investigator of the ChemCam team Roger Wiens, will talk about Los Alamos National Laboratory's 50 years of space research and exploration.

463

OCRWM annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the progress in the activities of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. Chapters include: Yucca Mountain site characterization project; Waste acceptance, storage and transportation project; Program management; Working with external parties; and Financial management. Also included in five appendices are: financial statements; key federal laws and regulations; fiscal year 1997 Congressional testimony and meetings with regulators and oversight bodies; OCREM publications for fiscal year 1997; and selected publications from other organizations during fiscal year 1997.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Recovery Act Funding Leads to Record Year for Transuranic Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) received the most transuranic waste shipments in a single year since waste operations...

465

TWENTY YEARS OF SAVING MONEY AND PROTECTING OUR CLIMATE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TWENTY YEARS OF SAVING MONEY AND PROTECTING OUR CLIMATE Climate change continues to be one of the nation's most important environmental challenges, and improving energy efficiency...

466

The Office of Environmental Management Celebrates 20 years (1989...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactors. Over the years, the facility recovered over 1 billion worth of highly enriched uranium, which was returned to the government fuel cycle. In 1992 the Department of...

467

Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Speeches > Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration Speech Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration Apr 28, 2010

468

FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 FTCP Annual Report - Fiscal Year 2004 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to ensuring employees are trained and technically capable of performing their duties. In pursuit of this objective, the Secretary of Energy issued DOE Policy 426.1, Federal Technical Capability Policy for Defense Nuclear Facilities, to institutionalize the Federal Technical Capability Program. Report summarizes the yearly actions taken to ensure organizations maintain their critical technical capabilities needed for the safe operations of defense nuclear facilities. FTCP 2004 Annual Report More Documents & Publications FTCP Annual Plan - Fiscal Year 2005 Technical Qualification Program Self-Assessment Report - Sandia Site Office FTCP Annual Report - Calendar Year 2007

469

Win ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Win ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new...

470

ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partner of the Year profiles in leadership ENERGY STAR plant certification ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Success stories: Industrial energy management Market impacts:...

471

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix D - Project Evaluation Form Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page D- 1 DOE Hydrogen Program 2011 Annual Merit Review Project Evaluation Form...

472

Alaska Subsistence Use Combined 10 Years | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsistence Use Combined 10 Years Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Alaska...

473

"ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY", Dr. Michael Norman...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 10, 2012, 9:30am Science On Saturday "ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SUPERCONDUCTIVITY", Dr. Michael Norman, Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory http:...

474

Federal Energy Management Program Year in Review 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM YEAR IN REVIEW 2005 PRESIDENTIAL AWARDS FOR LEADERSHIP IN FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT FEDERAL ENERGY AND WATER MANAGEMENT AWARDS SHOWCASE AWARDS...

475

Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report, fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of the several research and development programs having been performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the fiscal year 1995.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Twenty Years of Airborne Research at the University of Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wherein is revealed the trials, tribulations, and triumphs of operating an aircraft for atmospheric research at a university over the past 20 years.

Peter V. Hobbs

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Administrator D'Agostino's Remarks at NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary Celebration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency...

478

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Saving Homes, Buildings, and Manufacturing Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Rollout - Energy Saving Homes, Buildings, and...

479

Highlights Year in Review - 2004 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Highlights Year in Review - 2004 International crude oil prices rose considerably dur-ing 2004. While many issues contributed to higher prices, perhaps the most ...

480

Procurement Organization, Sandia National Laboratories. Annual report, fiscal year 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Procurement Organization for Fiscal Year 1995. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

Stimak, D.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "year actual peakload" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Natural Gas Year-in-Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

12 'Demonstrated peak working gas capacity' is the sum of the highest storage inventory level of working gas observed in each facility over the prior 5-year period ...

482

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2006 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About Us...

483

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Annual Performance Results and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOIA Reports Calendar Year Reports Recovery Act Peer Reviews DOE Directives Performance Strategic Plan Testimony Financial Statements Semiannual Reports Work Plan Mission About...

484

Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Federal Performance Report On Executive...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Federal Performance Report On Executive Agency Actions To Assist Historically Black Colleges And Universities Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Federal Performance Report On...

485

NIF Warehouse Group celebrates 15 injury-free years | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Warehouse Group celebrates 15 injury-free years | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

486

Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use > Figure 2 Figure 2. Energy Consumption of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years...

487

EMSL Quarterly Highlights Report: 1st Quarter, Fiscal Year 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the science, awards and honors, and publications that resulted during the first quarter of Fiscal Year 2010 at EMSL.

Showalter, Mary Ann; Kathmann, Loel E.; Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.; Reed, Jennifer R.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

488

Appendix E: Scholarship Projections for the School Year  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appendix E: Scholarship Projections for the 2013-2014 School Year. # in Family, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, Award %. Family (unadjusted ...

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

2013 Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA | National Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > 2013 Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA Press Release 2013 Year of Important Accomplishments, Improvements for NNSA

490

Combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Annual Performance Results and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2012 Annual Performance Results and FYs 2013 and 2014 Annual Performance Plan Subject: Office of Inspector General's combined Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Annual Performance Results...

491

Northwest hydroelectric output above five-year range for much ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The 2011 hydro season began earlier and lasted significantly longer than in recent years, well into the summer months (see chart above). Hydroelectric generation in ...

492

Profiling 1366 Technologies: One Year Later | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

performer, 1366 Technologies is working to dramatically reduce the cost of solar energy. A year later, we revisited their headquarters in Lexington, MA to see the progress...

493

Model Year 2013-2014 SmartWay Small Cars Year Model Displ Cyl  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Cars Small Cars Year Model Displ Cyl Trans Drive Fuel Sales Area Stnd Stnd Description Underhood ID Veh Class Smog Rating City MPG Hwy MPG Cmb MPG Greenhouse Gas Rating SmartWay 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FC B3 Federal Tier 2 Bin 3 DHNXV01.5WF2 small car 7 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline FA B2 Federal Tier 2 Bin 2 DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 8 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 1.5 4 SCV-7 2WD Gasoline CA PZEV California PZEV DHNXV01.5YD2 small car 9 39 38 38 9 yes 2013 ACURA ILX 2 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.0CB2 small car 6 24 35 28 7 yes 2013 ACURA TSX 2.4 4 SemiAuto-5 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DHNXV02.4DB3 small car 6 22 31 26 7 yes 2013 AUDI A4 2 4 Man-6 4WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB small car 6 22 32 26 7 yes 2013 AUDI A4 2 4 SCV-8 2WD Gasoline CA U2 California LEV-II ULEV DADXV02.03UB

494

Facility stabilization project fiscal year 1997 multi-year work plan (MYWP) for WBS 7.1  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the technical baseline, work breakdown structure, schedule baseline, cost baseline, and execution year for the facility stabilization project.

Cartmell, D.B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Proposal Budget Form for(Project Number), Year 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

,,,"Year 1",,,"Year 2","Cummulative" "Budget Category (add categories if needed)",,,"Total",,,"Total","Total" "Labor (# hrs/hourly rate required) by job category","# hrs","$ / hr",,"# hrs","$ / hr" " Faculty" " Name" " Name" " Name " " Post Doc " " Grad Student " " Undergrad" " Other Professional " "Fringe Benefit Cost and %" " PI/Faculty, %" " Post Docs, %" " Graduate Students, %" " Undergraduate Students, %" " Other Professional, %" "Travel (designate if travel to INL)"

496

Predictions for Scientific Computing Fifty Years From Now  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

century of radio, television, light bulbs, telephones, phonographs, lasers, refrigerators, 1 #12 doesn't, another will replace it.) Yet in 100,000 years of expanding at one hundredth the speed of light, a civilisation can spread one thousand light years, a distance encompassing millions of stars. Is it plausible

Li, Tiejun

497

Shock Therapy in Poland: Perspectives of Five Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shock Therapy in Poland: Perspectives of Five Years JEFFREY SACHS THE TANNER LECTURES O N HUMAN to a market economy.This strategy has subsequently won the somewhat misleading sobriquet of "shock therapy of "shock therapy," see Sachs 1994c.) With five years of experience of economic reform in Eastern Europe

498

702AZ aging waste ventilation facility year 2000 test procedure  

SciTech Connect

This test procedure was developed to determine if the 702AZ Tank Ventilation Facility system is Year 2000 Compliant. The procedure provides detailed instructions for performing the operations necessary and documenting the results. This verification procedure will document that the 702AZ Facility Systems are year 2000 compliant and will correctly meet the criteria established in this procedure.

Winkelman, W.D.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

499

Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2011. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Innovation and Development's (OTID) mission is to transform science into viable solutions for environmental cleanup. In 2010, OTID developed the Impact Plan, Science and Technology to Reduce the Life Cycle Cost of Closure to outline the benefits of research and development of the lifecycle cost of cleanup across the DOE complex. This plan outlines OTID's ability to reduce by $50 billion, the $200 billion life-cycle cost in waste processing, groundwater and soil, nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning. The projected life-cycle costs and return on investment are based on actual savings realized from technology innovation, development, and insertion into remedial strategies and schedules at the Fernald, Mound, and Ashtabula sites. To achieve our goals, OTID developed Applied Field Research Initiatives to facilitate and accelerate collaborative development and implementation of new tools and approaches that reduce risk, cost and time for site closure. The primary mission of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI) is to protect our nation's water resources, keeping them clean and safe for future generations. The DVZ-AFRI was established for the DOE to develop effective, science-based solutions for remediating, characterizing, monitoring, and predicting the behavior and fate of deep vadose zone contamination. Subsurface contaminants include radionuclides, metals, organics, and liquid waste that originated from various sources, including legacy waste from the nation's nuclear weapons complexes. The DVZ-AFRI project team is translating strategy into action by working to solve these complex challenges in a collaborative environment that leverages technology and scientific expertise from DOE, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, and the broad scientific research community. As project manager for the DVZ-AFRI, I have had the privilege this past year to team with creative, talented members of the scientific community nationwide to develop effective long-term solutions to address deep vadose zone contamination. This report highlights how the DVZ-AFRI project team is delivering results by achieving significant programmatic accomplishments, and developing and field-testing transformational technologies to address the nation's most pressing groundwater and vadose zone contamination problems.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Smith, Ronald M.; Truex, Michael J.; Matthews, Hope E.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z