National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for year 2046-50p shipped

  1. LANL shatters records in first year of accelerated shipping effort

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities, sending nearly 60 more shipments than originally planned. Contact Colleen Curran Communications Office (505) 664-0344, (505) 695-6167 Email "Our goal this fiscal year...

  2. Modeling pedestrian evacuation movement in a swaying ship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Juan; Lo, SM

    2015-01-01

    With the advance in living standard, cruise travel has been rapidly expanding around the world in recent years. The transportation of passengers in water has also made a rapid development. It is expected that ships will be more and more widely used. Unfortunately, ship disasters occurred in these years caused serious losses. It raised the concern on effectiveness of passenger evacuation on ships. The present study thus focuses on pedestrian evacuation features on ships. On ships, passenger movements are affected by the periodical water motion and thus are quite different from the characteristic when walking on static horizontal floor. Taking into consideration of this special feature, an agent-based pedestrian model is formulized and the effect of ship swaying on pedestrian evacuation efficiency is investigated. Results indicated that the proposed model can be used to quantify the special evacuation process on ships.

  3. Optimal ship routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avgouleas, Kyriakos

    2008-01-01

    Fuel savings in ship navigation has always been a popular subject in the maritime industry as well as the world's largest Navies. Oil prices and environmental considerations drive the effort for more fuel-efficient navigation. ...

  4. The Merchant Shipping (Dangerous Goods) Rules 1965 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Michael; Mason, Roy

    1965-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1965 No. 1067 MERCHANT Shipping DANGEROUS GOODS The Merchant Shipping (Dangerous Goods) Rules 1965

  5. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping July 8, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal July 8, 2013 Lab breaks another record with three months remaining in fiscal year LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 8, 2013--Los Alamos National Laboratory, which in fiscal year 2013. During the past nine months, Los Alamos shipped 1,074 cubic meters of transuranic (TRU

  6. Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Dangerous Goods Shipping Federal and international shipping rules require that anyone wishing to ship biological materials, infectious substances, or dry ice must complete training in Dangerous Goods. In order to receive the required certification for shipping Dangerous Goods, you must: 1. Review

  7. Shipping - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment Top Scientific Impact SinceServiceShipping To ship

  8. Fuel consumption prediction methodology for early stages of naval ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gheriani, Eran (Eran Y.)

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, fuel consumption has increased in importance as a design parameter in Navy ships. Economical fuel consumption is important not only for operating cost measures but also for ship endurance tankage requirements. ...

  9. Extracting Cultural Information from Ship Timber 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creasman, Pearce

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation is rooted in one general question: what can the wood from ships reveal about the people and cultures who built them? Shipwrecks are only the last chapter of a complex story, and while the last fifty years of nautical archaeology...

  10. Ancient ships of Japan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Hiroaki

    2006-10-30

    The principal objective of this thesis is to clarify the evolution of the main structural and technical aspects of ancient ships of Japan. A comprehensive analysis of shipbuilding technology will be conducted based on the examination of archaeological remains... to the continent via the Iki and Tsushima islands (fig. 1). These composite and extended logboats represent the next stage of development and seem to have been the mainstream of shipbuilding technology until the thirteenth or fourteenth century C.E. It seems...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 65 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 5 EN 04 3 NN (Engineering) 21 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 61 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2011 Males 21 Females 23 YEAR 2011 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    92 YEAR 2012 Males 52 Females 40 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 7 EN 04 13 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 38 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    558 YEAR 2013 Males 512 Females 46 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 220 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321 YEAR 2013...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11 YEAR 2012 Males 78 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 9 EN 05 1 EN 04 33 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    300 YEAR 2011 Males 109 Females 191 YEAR 2011 SES 9 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 2 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 203 NU (TechAdmin Support) 38 NF (Future Ldrs) 47 YEAR 2011 American Indian...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    02 YEAR 2011 Males 48 Females 54 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 13 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  18. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 27 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 15 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2013 Males 20 Females 11 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN,...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    16 YEAR 2012 Males 84 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 26 EJEK 2 EN 05 9 NN (Engineering) 39 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 10 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    34 YEAR 2012 Males 66 Females 68 YEAR 2012 SES 6 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 110 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 1 American Indian Female 2...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    86 YEAR 2012 Males 103 Females 183 YEAR 2012 SES 7 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 1 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 202 NU (TechAdmin Support) 30 NF (Future Ldrs) 45 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80 YEAR 2012 Males 51 Females 29 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 22 EN 04 21 NN (Engineering) 14 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 21 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 YEAR 2012 Males 30 Females 11 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 9 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    96 YEAR 2013 Males 69 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 9 EN 04 27 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    31 YEAR 2012 Males 19 Females 12 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 12 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 YEAR 2013 Males 48 Females 32 YEAR 2013 SES 2 EJEK 7 EN 04 11 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2013 American Indian Alaska...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    40 YEAR 2011 Males 68 Females 72 YEAR 2011 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 115 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 1 American Indian...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    00 YEAR 2012 Males 48 Females 52 YEAR 2012 SES 5 EJEK 1 NN (Engineering) 11 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 80 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    137 YEAR 2013 Males 90 Females 47 YEAR 2013 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 30 EN 04 30 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 45 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Employees 14 GENDER YEAR 2012 Males 9 Females 5 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 2 NN (Engineering) 4 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American Indian Female 0...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3 YEAR 2012 Males 21 Females 22 YEAR 2012 SES 3 EJEK 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 3 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 30 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 0 American...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2014 Males 48 Females 33 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 10 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 29 NU (TechAdmin Support) 5 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2014 Males 18 Females 10 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 9 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2014 Males 61 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 8 EN 04 22 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    69 YEAR 2014 Males 34 Females 35 YEAR 2014 SES 5 EJEK 1 EN 05 8 EN 04 5 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 22 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska...

  17. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    42 YEAR 2014 Males 36 Females 6 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 2 EJEK 5 EN 05 7 EN 04 6 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male...

  18. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift End Shift End A shift ends and theShipping

  19. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species SensitiveSethSharing DataShipping and Receiving

  20. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species SensitiveSethSharing DataShipping and

  1. Analysis of a ship-to-ship collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, V.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is involved in a safety assessment for the shipment of radioactive material by sea. One part of this study is investigation of the consequences of ship-to-ship collisions. This paper describes two sets of finite element analyses performed to assess the structural response of a small freighter and the loading imparted to radioactive material (RAM) packages during several postulated collision scenarios with another ship. The first series of analyses was performed to evaluate the amount of penetration of the freighter hull by a striking ship of various masses and initial velocities. Although these analyses included a representation of a single RAM package, the package was not impacted during the collision so forces on the package could not be computed. Therefore, a second series of analyses incorporating a representation of a row of seven packages was performed to ensure direct package impact by the striking ship. Average forces on a package were evaluated for several initial velocities and masses of the striking ship. In addition to. providing insight to ship and package response during a few postulated ship collisions scenarios, these analyses will be used to benchmark simpler ship collision models used in probabilistic risk assessment analyses.

  2. Progress Update: TRU Waste Shipping

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cody, Tom

    2012-06-14

    A progress update at the Savannah River Site. A continued effort on shipping TRU waste to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Males 139 Females 88 YEAR 2012 SES 13 EX 1 EJEK 8 EN 05 23 EN 04 20 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 91 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 62 NU (TechAdmin Support) 7 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    25 Females 10 YEAR 2014 SES 1 EN 04 11 NN (Engineering) 8 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2014 Males 81 Females 45 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 SL 1 EJEK 25 EN 04 26 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 23 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 44 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2014 American Indian...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    563 YEAR 2012 Males 518 Females 45 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 2 EN 04 1 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 209 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335 YEAR 2012...

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 33 YEAR 2012 SES 2 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 30 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 26 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 32 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2012 Males 37 Females 7 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 17 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 6 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male 2...

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    7 YEAR 2011 Males 38 Females 9 YEAR 2011 SES 1 EJEK 6 EN 05 5 EN 04 7 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 19 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 7 NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 YEAR 2011 American Indian Male 2...

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 YEAR 2013 Males 62 Females 26 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 28 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    6 YEAR 2012 Males 64 Females 32 YEAR 2012 SES 1 EJEK 5 EN 05 3 EN 04 23 EN 03 9 NN (Engineering) 18 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 33 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian...

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 YEAR 2013 Males 58 Females 27 YEAR 2013 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 21 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 16 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 28 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2013 American Indian...

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    78 YEAR 2012 Males 57 Females 21 YEAR 2012 SES 2 SL 1 EJEK 12 EN 04 21 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 12 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 24 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 YEAR 2012 American Indian Male...

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Males 149 Females 115 YEAR 2012 SES 17 EX 1 EJEK 7 EN 05 2 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 56 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 165 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 GS 13 1 YEAR 2012 American...

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9 Females 24 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 4 EN 05 3 EN 04 22 EN 03 8 NN (Engineering) 15 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 27 NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  16. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8 Females 25 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 EJEK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 25 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 25 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 25 NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native...

  17. Systems modeling for electric ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soultatis, Charalambos

    2004-01-01

    Diesel and gas turbine electric ship propulsion are of current interest for several types of vessels that are important for commercial shipping and for the next generation of war ships. During the design process of a ...

  18. Containerized compressed natural gas shipping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skarvelis, Georgios V

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades, the demand for energy is increasing. It is necessary to develop new ways to distribute the energy using economically feasible solutions. In this project an Ultra Large Container Ship is used that can ...

  19. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -9.09% YEAR 2012 2013 SES 1 1 0.00% EN 05 1 1 0.00% EN 04 11 11 0.00% NN (Engineering) 8 8 0.00% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 17 14 -17.65% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2 2...

  20. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 863 YEAR 2013 SES 102 EX 3 SL 1 EJEK 89 EN 05 41 EN 04 170 EN 03 18 NN (Engineering) 448 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1249 NU (TechAdmin Support) 76 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 321...

  1. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females 942 YEAR 2012 SES 108 EX 4 SL 1 EJEK 96 EN 05 45 EN 04 196 EN 03 20 NN (Engineering) 452 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 1291 NU (TechAdmin Support) 106 NV (Nuc Mat Courier) 335...

  2. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    YEAR 2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EN 05 0 1 100.00% EN 04 4 4 0.00% NN (Engineering) 13 12 -7.69% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 13 9 -30.77% NU (TechAdmin Support) 1 1...

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR93

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR93

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26 YEAR9374

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268 YEAR

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268 YEAR17

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268255 YEAR

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 2014 Males 1626

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 2014 Males 16268

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 2014 Males 16268563

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 2014 Males 162685638

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR 2014 Males

  15. Shipping container for fissile material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crowder, H.E.

    1984-12-17

    The present invention is directed to a shipping container for the interstate transportation of enriched uranium materials. The shipping container is comprised of a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical-shaped outer vessel lined with thermal insulation. Disposed inside the thermal insulation and spaced apart from the inner walls of the outer vessel is a rigid, high-strength, cylindrical inner vessel impervious to liquid and gaseous substances and having the inner surfaces coated with a layer of cadmium to prevent nuclear criticality. The cadmium is, in turn, lined with a protective shield of high-density urethane for corrosion and wear protection. 2 figs.

  16. LNG demand, shipping will expand through 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1998-02-09

    The 1990s, especially the middle years, have witnessed a dramatic turnaround in the growth of liquefied-natural-gas demand which has tracked equally strong natural-gas demand growth. This trend was underscored late last year by several annual studies of world LNG demand and shipping. As 1998 began, however, economic turmoil in Asian financial markets has clouded near-term prospects for LNG in particular and all energy in general. But the extent of damage to energy markets is so far unclear. A study by US-based Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL, reveals that LNG imports worldwide have climbed nearly 8%/year since 1980 and account for 25% of all natural gas traded internationally. In the mid-1970s, the share was only 5%. In 1996, the most recent year for which complete data are available, world LNG trade rose 7.7% to a record 92 billion cu m, outpacing the overall consumption for natural gas which increased 4.7% in 1996. By 2015, says the IGT study, natural-gas use would surpass coal as the world`s second most widely used fuel, after petroleum. Much of this growth will occur in the developing countries of Asia where gas use, before the current economic crisis began, was projected to grow 8%/year through 2015. Similar trends are reflected in another study of LNG trade released at year end 1997, this from Ocean Shipping Consultants Ltd., Surrey, U.K. The study was done too early, however, to consider the effects of the financial problems roiling Asia.

  17. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    and with free surface, bow flow, wave hydrodynamics, propulsor hydrodynamics, appendages, and cavitation extensive use of PIV for measurement of ship-hydrodynamic flows. In fact, PIV is fast replacing techniques of micro-scale flow structures so that new physics can be studied such as cavitation. Refinement

  18. Portuguese Ships on Japanese Namban Screens 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamafune, Kotaro

    2012-10-19

    scenes of the first European activities in Japan. Among the subjects depicted on Namban screens, some of the most intriguing are ships: the European ships of the Age of Discovery. Namban screens were created by skillful Japanese traditional painters who...

  19. Stochastic ship fleet routing with inventory limits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yu

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes a stochastic ship routing problem with inventory management. The problem involves finding a set of least costs routes for a fleet of ships transporting a single commodity when the demand for ...

  20. MODELING LONGITUDINAL DAMAGE IN SHIP COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    . Performing Organization Name and Address Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering. 10. Work Unit No made excellent progress towards predicting damage penetration in ship collisions. This project focuses collision data for penetrating collisions. 17. Key Words ship collisions, longitudinal ship damage 18

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory ships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-Eearns threeservicesships last of

  2. Canonical correlation of shipping forward curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The behavior and interrelations between the main shipping forward curves are analyzed using multivariate statistics after removing the volatility distortions dictated by the Samuelson hypothesis. Principal Components ...

  3. Page 1 Page 2 300 GIVE ME A SHIP 'TO SAIL along the ship's sides ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    300 GIVE ME A SHIP 'TO SAIL along the ship's sides and, as long as the weather clew Was well out to Windward (which was contrived as in any other square.

  4. The water street ship: preliminary analysis of an eighteenth-century merchant ship's bow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosloff, Jay Paul

    1986-01-01

    THE WATER STREET SHIP: PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF AN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY MERCHANT SHIP'S BOW A Thesis by JAY PAUL ROSLOFF Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF ARTS May 1986 Major Subject: Anthropology THE WATER STREET SHIP: PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF AN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY MERCHANT SHIP'S BOW A Thesis by JAY PAUL ROSLOFF Approved as to style and content by: J. R. Steffy (Chairman of Co mittee...

  5. BALLISTICS TESTING OF THE 9977 SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-06

    Radioactive materials are stored in a variety of locations throughout the DOE complex. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), materials are stored within dedicated facilities. Each of those facilities has a documented safety analysis (DSA) that describes accidents that the facility and the materials within it may encounter. Facilities at the SRS are planning on utilizing the certified Model 9977 Shipping Package as a long term storage package and one of these facilities required ballistics testing. Specifically, in order to meet the facility DSA, the radioactive materials (RAM) must be contained within the storage package after impact by a .223 caliber round. In order to qualify the Model 9977 Shipping Package for storage in this location, the package had to be tested under these conditions. Over the past two years, the Model 9977 Shipping Package has been subjected to a series of ballistics tests. The purpose of the testing was to determine if the 9977 would be suitable for use as a storage package at a Savannah River Site facility. The facility requirements are that the package must not release any of its contents following the impact in its most vulnerable location by a .223 caliber round. A package, assembled to meet all of the design requirements for a certified 9977 shipping configuration and using simulated contents, was tested at the Savannah River Site in March of 2011. The testing was completed and the package was examined. The results of the testing and examination are presented in this paper.

  6. Pre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pre-Ship Review November 13 &14, 2001 #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 2 Nov 11 Agenda 1 Issues (Sandy) 16. Future Plans (Sandy) #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 3 Nov 11 DEIMOS Front View #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 4 Nov 11 DEIMOS- Side View #12;Pre Ship Review- November 2001 5 Nov 11

  7. NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson June 1527

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    samples show conditions that existed in an area before any impacts from the spill have occurred. The ship and concluded its mission with sampling in the area close to the wellhead. The ship conducted acoustic in the water. Thomas Jefferson sampling to date: 51 CDT casts (510 water samples per cast) ­ water

  8. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE LIFE EXTENSION SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM RESULTS SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, K.; Daugherty, W.; Hackney, B.; Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

    2011-05-27

    Results from the 9975 shipping package Storage and Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized for justification to extend the life of the 9975 packages currently stored in the K-Area Complex (KAC). This justification is established with the stipulation that surveillance activities will continue throughout the extended time to ensure the continued integrity of the 9975 materials of construction and to further understand the currently identified degradation mechanisms. The 10 year storage life justification was developed prior to storage. A subsequent report was later used to validate the qualification of the 9975 shipping packages for 10 years in storage. However the qualification for the storage period was provided by the monitoring requirements of the 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program. This report summarizes efforts to determine a new safe storage limit for the 9975 shipping package based on the surveillance data collected since 2005 when the 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program began. The Program has demonstrated that the 9975 package has a robust design that can perform under a variety of conditions. The primary emphasis of the on-going 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program is an aging study of the 9975 Viton{reg_sign} containment vessel O-rings and the Celotex{reg_sign} fiberboard thermal insulation at bounding conditions of radiation, elevated temperatures and/or elevated humidity.

  9. Design and Control of a Ship Motion Simulation Platform from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Design and Control of a Ship Motion Simulation Platform from an Energy Efficiency Perspective Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Design and Control of a Ship...

  10. Ship wakes: Kelvin or Mach angle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabaud, Marc

    2013-01-01

    From the analysis of a set of airborne images of ship wakes, we show that the wake angles decrease as $U^{-1}$ at large velocities, in a way similar to the Mach cone for supersonic airplanes. This previously unnoticed Mach-like regime is in contradiction with the celebrated Kelvin prediction of a constant angle of $19.47\\degree$ independent of the ship's speed. We propose here a model, confirmed by numerical simulations, in which the finite size of the disturbance explains this transition between the Kelvin and Mach regimes at a Froude number $Fr = U/\\sqrt{gL} \\simeq 0.5$, where $L$ is the hull ship length.

  11. LANL sets waste shipping record for fourth consecutive year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. LANL sets waste shipping record for fourth consecutive year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask2 J.N.open to badgeLANL selects twoWaste

  13. LANL shatters records in first year of accelerated shipping effort

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Volunteer Observing Ship (VOS) Program. The VOS project is coordinated by the UNESCO International Ocean Carbon Coordination Project (IOCCP). The international groups from 14 countries have been outfitting research ships and commercial vessels with automated CO2 sampling equipment to analyze the carbon exchange between the ocean and atmosphere. [copied from http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/genInfo.html] CDIAC provides a map interface with the shipping routes of the 14 countries involved marked in different colors. Clicking on the ship's name on that route brings up information about the vessel, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, and, most important, the links to the data files themselves. The 14 countries are: United States, United Kingdom, Japan, France, Germany, Australia, Canada, Spain, Norway, New Zealand, China (including Taiwan), Iceland, and the Netherlands. Both archived and current, underway data can be accessed from the CDIAC VOS page.

  15. Structural health monitoring for ship structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Angel, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bement, Matthew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWC, CADEROCK

    2009-01-01

    Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.

  16. CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 17. Shipping/Receiving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 17. Shipping/Receiving This Section addresses the process for shipping and receiving tangible items under export license/authorization, transmission of export data. General Shipping and Receiving CUNY requires that Campus Shipping/Receiving personnel evaluate, for export

  17. Estimation of ship construction costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miroyannis, Aristides

    2006-01-01

    Since the end of the Cold War naval procurement for the US Navy has seen a dramatic decrease. This decrease in defense spending has placed existing programs under more scrutiny than previous years. As a result there is ...

  18. An assessment of simplified methods to determine damage from ship-to-ship collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, M.B.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1996-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is studying the safety of shipping, radioactive materials (RAM) by sea, the SeaRAM project (McConnell, et al. 1995), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project is concerned with the potential effects of ship collisions and fires on onboard RAM packages. Existing methodologies are being assessed to determine their adequacy to predict the effect of ship collisions and fires on RAM packages and to estimate whether or not a given accident might lead to a release of radioactivity. The eventual goal is to develop a set of validated methods, which have been checked by comparison with test data and/or detailed finite element analyses, for predicting the consequences of ship collisions and fires. These methods could then be used to provide input for overall risk assessments of RAM sea transport. The emphasis of this paper is on methods for predicting- effects of ship collisions.

  19. LEVERAGING AGING MATERIALS DATA TO SUPPORT EXTENSION OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING PACKAGES SERVICE LIFE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, K.; Bellamy, S.; Daugherty, W.; Sindelar, R.; Skidmore, E.

    2013-08-18

    Nuclear material inventories are increasingly being transferred to interim storage locations where they may reside for extended periods of time. Use of a shipping package to store nuclear materials after the transfer has become more common for a variety of reasons. Shipping packages are robust and have a qualified pedigree for performance in normal operation and accident conditions but are only certified over an approved transportation window. The continued use of shipping packages to contain nuclear material during interim storage will result in reduced overall costs and reduced exposure to workers. However, the shipping package materials of construction must maintain integrity as specified by the safety basis of the storage facility throughout the storage period, which is typically well beyond the certified transportation window. In many ways, the certification processes required for interim storage of nuclear materials in shipping packages is similar to life extension programs required for dry cask storage systems for commercial nuclear fuels. The storage of spent nuclear fuel in dry cask storage systems is federally-regulated, and over 1500 individual dry casks have been in successful service up to 20 years in the US. The uncertainty in final disposition will likely require extended storage of this fuel well beyond initial license periods and perhaps multiple re-licenses may be needed. Thus, both the shipping packages and the dry cask storage systems require materials integrity assessments and assurance of continued satisfactory materials performance over times not considered in the original evaluation processes. Test programs for the shipping packages have been established to obtain aging data on materials of construction to demonstrate continued system integrity. The collective data may be coupled with similar data for the dry cask storage systems and used to support extending the service life of shipping packages in both transportation and storage.

  20. SAFETY MANAGEMENT MANUAL OSU SHIP OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    overboarding operations on the vessel. 7.16.2 Scope This procedure covers the design, installation, maintenance's equipment - is defined as machinery such as crane, winches, capstans, blocks and rigging regularly as machinery such as winches, cranes and blocks owned by OSU groups other than Ship Operations

  1. Xergy Ships First Breakthrough Water Heater Compressor to GE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Xergy Ships First Breakthrough Water Heater Compressor to GE Xergy Ships First Breakthrough Water Heater Compressor to GE September 15, 2015 - 3:41pm Addthis Xergy Inc. and GE...

  2. The bunkering industry and its effect on shipping tanker operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutsikas, Angelos

    2004-01-01

    The bunkering industry provides the shipping industry with the fuel oil that the vessels consume. The quality of the fuel oil provided will ensure the safe operation of vessels. Shipping companies under their fuel oil ...

  3. NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON S-222 The National Oceanic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a plane captured by sidescan sonar Mounted on the hull of the ship and its launches, the multibeam bulbs throughout the ship, low sulfur diesel fuel, 15ppm oily water separators, Halon 1301 aboard

  4. Shipping : is it a high risk low return business?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patitsas, Leon S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the risk and return characteristics of the shipping business. Shipping profitability and returns are evaluated and an analysis is performed to examine whether the returns are ...

  5. New Trans-Arctic shipping routes navigable by midcentury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of additional ice reductions in the future, have fueled speculations of potential new trans-Arctic shippingNew Trans-Arctic shipping routes navigable by midcentury Laurence C. Smith1 and Scott R. Stephenson changes in sea ice will realistically impact ship navigation are lacking. To address this deficiency, we

  6. Particulate emissions from commercial shipping: Chemical, physical, and optical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    regulation of fuel quality or pollution emissions; domestic fleets serve coastal shipping, resource products of fuel combustion from shipping (ranked on a mass basis) include nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfurParticulate emissions from commercial shipping: Chemical, physical, and optical properties Daniel A

  7. DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.

    2013-10-10

    A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

  8. Technique for ship/wake detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-05-01

    An automated ship detection technique includes accessing data associated with an image of a portion of Earth. The data includes reflectance values. A first portion of pixels within the image are masked with a cloud and land mask based on spectral flatness of the reflectance values associated with the pixels. A given pixel selected from the first portion of pixels is unmasked when a threshold number of localized pixels surrounding the given pixel are not masked by the cloud and land mask. A spatial variability image is generated based on spatial derivatives of the reflectance values of the pixels which remain unmasked by the cloud and land mask. The spatial variability image is thresholded to identify one or more regions within the image as possible ship detection regions.

  9. Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, C.J.; Warren, S.G.

    1999-08-01

    Surface synoptic weather reports for the entire globe, gathered from various available data sets, were processed, edited, and rewritten to provide a single data set of individual observations of clouds, spanning the 44 years 1952-1995 for ship data and the 26 years 1971-1996 for land station data. In addition to the cloud portion of the synoptic report, each edited report also includes the associated pressure, present weather, wind, air temperature, and dew point (and sea surface temperature over oceans).

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2008-09-14

    A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

  11. Analysis of the impacts of Internet-based business activities on the container shipping industry : the system dynamics modeling approach with the framework of technological evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auh, Jae Hyuck, 1969-

    2003-01-01

    The internet-based business (e-business) activities have become a new technological challenge to the container shipping industry (CSI) in recent years. Despite the growing importance of e-business in the CSI, little ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Shipping Info_2015.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates7In collaboration with theShipping

  13. shipping and Receiving Services | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thI D- 6 0 4 2 r m m mDiurnal Variations of Outgoing7shipping

  14. ANNUAL MAINTENANCE AND LEAK TESTING FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trapp, D.

    2014-08-25

    The purpose of this document is to provide step-by-step instructions for the annual helium leak test certification and maintenance of the 9975 Shipping Package.

  15. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-02028

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Stefek, T.

    2009-12-30

    Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-02028. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. Four conditions were identified that do not meet inspection criteria. These conditions are subject to additional investigation and disposition by the Surveillance Program Authority. The conditions include: (1) The lead shield was covered with a white corrosion layer; (2) The lead shield height exceeds drawing requirements; (3) Mold was observed on the lower fiberboard subassembly; and (4) Fiberboard thermal conductivity in the axial direction exceeded the specified range. The Surveillance Program Authority was notified of these conditions and will document the disposition by surveillance report. All other observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes. The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-02028 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1.

  16. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-02168

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2010-11-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-02028 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1. Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-02168. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. Two conditions were identified that do not meet inspection criteria. These conditions are subject to additional investigation and disposition by the Surveillance Program Authority. The conditions include: (1) The lead shield was covered with a white corrosion layer, and (2) Fiberboard thermal conductivity in the axial direction exceeded the specified range. The Surveillance Program Authority was notified of these conditions and will document the findings by surveillance report. All other observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes.

  17. Ship-in-a-bottle catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haw, James F.; Song, Weiguo

    2006-07-18

    In accordance with the present invention there is provided a novel catalyst system in which the catalytic structure is tailormade at the nanometer scale using the invention's novel ship-in-a-bottle synthesis techniques. The invention describes modified forms of solid catalysts for use in heterogeneous catalysis that have a microporous structure defined by nanocages. Examples include zeolites, SAPOs, and analogous materials that have the controlled pore dimensions and hydrothermal stability required for many industrial processes. The invention provides for modification of these catalysts using reagents that are small enough to pass through the windows used to access the cages. The small reagents are then reacted to form larger molecules in the cages.

  18. EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-05050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-11-06

    Shipping package 9975-05050 was examined in K-Area following its identification as a high wattage package. Elevated temperature and fiberboard moisture content are key parameters that impact the degradation rate of fiberboard within 9975 packages in a storage environment. The high wattage of this package contributes significantly to component temperatures. After examination in K-Area, the package was provided to SRNL for further examination of the fiberboard assembly. The moisture content of the fiberboard was relatively low (compared to packages examined previously), but the moisture gradient (between fiberboard ID and OD surfaces) was relatively high, as would be expected for the high heat load. The cane fiberboard appeared intact and displayed no apparent change in integrity relative to a new package.

  19. Shipping device for heater unit assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaushild, Ronald M. (Export, PA); Abbott, Stephan L. (Monroeville, PA); Miller, Phillip E. (Greensburg, PA); Shaffer, Robert (Swissvale, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A shipping device for a heater unit assembly (23), the heater unit assembly (23) including a cylindrical wall (25) and a top plate (31) secured to the cylindrical wall (25) and having a flange portion which projects radially beyond the outer surface of the cylindrical wall (25), and the shipping device including: a cylindrical container (3) having a closed bottom (13); a support member (47) secured to the container (3) and having an inwardly directed flange for supporting the flange portion of the top plate (31); a supplemental supporting system (1) for positioning the heater unit assembly (23) in the container (3) at a spaced relation from the inner surface and bottom wall (13) of the container (3); a cover (15) for closing the top of the container (3); and a container supporting structure (5,7,8) supporting the container (3) in a manner to permit the container (3) to be moved, relative to the supporting structure (5,7,8 ), between a vertical position for loading and unloading the assembly (23) and a horizontal position for transport of the assembly (23). A seal (57) is interposed between the container (3) and the cover (15) for sealing the interior of the container (3) from the environment. An abutment member (41) is mounted on the container supporting structure (5,7,8) for supporting the container bottom (13), when the container (3) is in the vertical position, to prevent the container (3) from moving past the vertical position in the direction away from the horizontal position, and a retainer member (55) is secured within the cover (15) for retaining the assembly top plate (31) in contact with the support member (47) when the cover (15) closes the top of the container (3).

  20. Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladich, Friedrich

    Ship noise and cortisol secretion in European freshwater fishes Lidia Eva Wysocki*, John P. Dittami October 2005 Accepted 11 October 2005 Available online 28 November 2005 Keywords: Fish Ship noise Stress response Cortisol secretion Hearing A B S T R A C T Underwater noise pollution is a growing problem

  1. Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Page 1 Hazardous Materials Shipping Policy for Laboratories Policy Statement In order to ensure compliance with all regulations governing transportation of hazardous materials, all University faculty, staff, and students who work in laboratories and intend to ship hazardous materials from the University

  2. Hydrogen fuel cells could power ships at port

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joe

    2013-06-27

    Sandia National Laboratories researcher Joe Pratt conducted a study on the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power docked ships at major ports. He found the potential environmental and cost benefits to be substantial. Here, he discusses the study and explains how hydrogen fuel cells can provide efficient, pollution-free energy to ships at port.

  3. Hydrogen fuel cells could power ships at port

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pratt, Joe

    2013-11-22

    Sandia National Laboratories researcher Joe Pratt conducted a study on the use of hydrogen fuel cells to power docked ships at major ports. He found the potential environmental and cost benefits to be substantial. Here, he discusses the study and explains how hydrogen fuel cells can provide efficient, pollution-free energy to ships at port.

  4. High-speed quantum networking by ship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon J. Devitt; Andrew D. Greentree; Ashley M. Stephens; Rodney Van Meter

    2015-12-07

    Quantum communication will improve the security of cryptographic systems and decision-making algorithms, support secure client-server computation, and improve the sensitivity of scientific instruments. As these applications consume quantum entanglement, a method for replenishing networked entanglement is essential. Direct transmission of quantum signals over long distances is prevented by fibre attenuation and the no-cloning theorem. This has motivated the development of quantum repeaters, which are designed to purify entanglement and extend its range. Quantum repeaters have been demonstrated over short distances, but an error-corrected repeater network with sufficient bandwidth over global distances will require new technology. In particular, no proposed hardware appears suitable for deployment along undersea cables, leaving the prospect of isolated metropolitan networks. Here we show that error-corrected quantum memories installed in cargo containers and carried by ship could provide a flexible and scalable connection between local networks, enabling low-latency, high-fidelity quantum communication across global distances. With recent demonstrations of quantum technology with sufficient fidelity to enable topological error correction, implementation of the necessary quantum memories is within reach, and effective bandwidth will increase with improvements in fabrication. Thus, our architecture provides a new approach to quantum networking that avoids many of the technological requirements of undersea quantum repeaters, providing an alternate path to a worldwide Quantum Internet.

  5. Range-based navigation of AUVs operating near ship hulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokko, Michael A. (Michael Andrew)

    2007-01-01

    In-water ship hull inspection is essential for both routine preventative maintenance as well as for timely detection and neutralization of limpet mines planted on military and commercial vessels. While a host of inspection ...

  6. Design space exploration and optimization using modern ship design tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Adam T. (Adam Thomas)

    2014-01-01

    Modern Naval Architects use a variety of computer design tools to explore feasible options for clean sheet ship designs. Under the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division ...

  7. Microsoft Word - SSRL_LCLS_User_Shipping_Request_Form_hazmat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Material) Will this be shipped to a location outside of the U.S.? No Yes If yes, user must complete Power of Attorney and certify concurrence with terms and...

  8. Supply chain management in the dry bulk shipping industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bryan E. (Bryan Edward)

    2006-01-01

    This paper is intended to show the importance of supply chain management in the dry-bulk shipping industry. A hypothetical company, the Texas Grain and Bakery Corporation, was created. The values and calculations used are ...

  9. Idaho Site Completes Cleanup with Help from Workers who Shipped...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    who Shipped Waste Decades Ago From the 1950s until the 1980s, workers at the former Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colo., sent hundreds of thousands of barrels and boxes of...

  10. A decision making framework for cruise ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsoufis, George P. (George Paraskevas)

    2006-01-01

    This thesis develops a new decision making framework for initial cruise ship design. Through review of effectiveness analysis and multi-criteria decision making, a uniform philosophy is created to articulate a framework ...

  11. Ship Rolling Motion Subjected to Colored Noise Excitation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamnongpipatkul, Arada

    2012-02-14

    In this research the stochastic nonlinear dynamic behaviors and probability density function of ship rolling are studied by nonlinear dynamic method and probability theory. The probability density function of rolling response is evaluated through...

  12. Simulation of vertical ship responses in high seas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajendran, Suresh

    2009-05-15

    total responses were reconstructed and compared with the measured responses. This also helped to investigate the contribution of second order part to the total vertical ship responses. In the last stage of the research a new semi- empirical method...

  13. Understanding current environmental issues and their impact on ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, John (John Michael)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is intended to provide recommendations for ship owners and operators on how to prepare for new engine emissions regulations that will be progressively more stringent than current regulations. To provide these ...

  14. Premature cleavage of ship plating under reversed bending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muragishi, Osamu, 1961-

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the thesis is to develop and apply testing methodology for fracture initiation of actual components of a ship's hull and to provide engineering design data to be used by the industry in predicting the ...

  15. Decisionmetrices : dynamic structural estimation of shipping investment decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dikos, George

    2004-01-01

    This dissertation develops structural models for analyzing shipping investment decisions, namely ordering, scrapping and lay-up decisions in the tanker industry. We develop models, based on a microeconomic specification, ...

  16. Market-based approach for improving ship air emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donatelli, Matthew (Matthew Alfred)

    2009-01-01

    This study considered how appropriate different market-based approaches are for the reduction of ship air emissions, particularly CO2. Furthermore, the study also considered which types of market-based tools may be available ...

  17. Factories: The Shipbuilding and Ship-repairing Regulations 1960 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hare, John

    1960-01-01

    These Regulations revoke the Shipbuilding Regulations, 1931, which were designed for the safety, health and welfare of persons employed in the construction and repair of ships in sbipbuilding yards. The present Regulations, ...

  18. Decision-making processes in shipping acquisitions and shipbuilding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroulis, Vasileios

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to expand and analyze the decisions that are constantly being made by shipping companies concerning acquisition of newbuildings, the construction of newbuildings, operational aspects as well ...

  19. Investigation into the feasibility of alternative plutonium shipping forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, J.; Lindsey, C.G.

    1983-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated for the Department of Energy by the Battelle Memorial Institute, is conducting a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the feasibility of altering current plutonium shipping forms to reduce or eliminate the airborne dispersibility of PuO/sub 2/ which might occur during a shipping accident. Plutonium used for fuel fabrication is currently shipped as a PuO/sub 2/ powder with a significant fraction in the respirable size range. If the high-strength container is breached due to stresses imposed during a transportation accident, the PuO/sub 2/ powder could be subject to airborne dispersion. The available information indicated that a potential accident involving fire accompanied by crush/impact forces would lead to failure of current surface shipping containers (no assumptions were made on the possibility of such a severe accident). Criteria were defined for an alternate shipping form to mitigate the effects of such an accident. Candidate techniques and materials were evaluated as alternate shipping forms by a task team consisting of personnel from PNL and Rockwell Hanford Operations (RHO). At this time, the most promising candidate for an alternate plutonium shipping form appears to be pressing PuO/sub 2/ into unsintered (green) pellets. These green pellets satisfy the criteria for a less dispersible form without requiring significant process changes. Discussions of all candidates considered are contained in a series of appendices. Recommendations for further investigations of the applicability of green pellets as an alternate shipping form are given, including the need for a cost-benefit study.

  20. The environmental management of a ship channel-harbor complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reavis, Marvin William

    1976-01-01

    the Environmental Management of a Ship Channel-Harbor Complex 120 12g LIST OF FIGURES ~Fi ure 1 Major Ports of the Texas Gulf Coast Oil Spills by County, January 1973? November 1974 . Causes of Spills by Incident and Volume, January 1973 - November 1974.... Ouantity of Oil Spilled by Cause, January 1973 - November 1974. Expected Shape of 50, 000 Barrel/Day Spill After Four Hours. Dissolved Oxygen Profile Corpus Christi Inner Harbor. Dissolved Oxygen Profile Corpus Christi Ship Channel. Station...

  1. Fireproof impact limiter aggregate packaging inside shipping containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byington, Gerald A. (Knoxville, TN); Oakes, Jr., Raymon Edgar (Kingston, TN); Feldman, Matthew Rookes (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    The invention is a product and a process for making a fireproof, impact limiter, homogeneous aggregate material for casting inside a hazardous material shipping container, or a double-contained Type-B nuclear shipping container. The homogeneous aggregate material is prepared by mixing inorganic compounds with water, pouring the mixture into the void spaces between an inner storage containment vessel and an outer shipping container, vibrating the mixture inside the shipping container, with subsequent curing, baking, and cooling of the mixture to form a solidified material which encapsulates an inner storage containment vessel inside an outer shipping container. The solidified material forms a protective enclosure around an inner storage containment vessel which may store hazardous, toxic, or radioactive material. The solidified material forms a homogeneous fire-resistant material that does not readily transfer heat, and provides general shock and specific point-impact protection, providing protection to the interior storage containment vessel. The material is low cost, may contain neutron absorbing compounds, and is easily formed into a variety of shapes to fill the interior void spaces of shipping containers.

  2. Team China Transforms Shipping Containers into a Solar-Powered House

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Team China is turning shipping containers into their 2011 Solar Deacthlon home design. Check it out!

  3. Report of Beeville Station (Number 4) Cabbage -- Fertilixers, Varieties, Shipping, Cauliflower -- Varities, Shipping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittuck, B. C; McHenry, S. A.

    1900-01-01

    . - c 2d 3% .>a QG " gs 5 8 -? 1.75 1.70 1.59 2.83 3.49 3.31 3.38 3.45 3.53 3.81 ES i.$s e,.$ acs 0 C j cL v; %k- dsi % 107 133 133 144 154 154 153 155 155 15.1 w, : - F4 9 g ' 3 - 13618 13726 12819 23491...TEXAS AGR!-CULTU~LC%S~RI.M~ENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO. 57. REPORT OF BEEVILLE STATION (NUMBER 4.) 1 CABBAGE-Fertilizers, Varieties, S hipping, CAULIFLOWER-Varieties, Shipping. I LC' FROTSCHER'S SUPERIQR LARG1 LATE FLAT DUTCH. f POSTOBBICE...

  4. Freight/Shipping Charges on the Requisition Some suppliers' pricing includes shipping (look for the little cardboard box icon next to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Freight/Shipping Charges on the Requisition Some suppliers' pricing includes shipping (look for the little cardboard box icon next to the supplier name); for these suppliers, you do not need to enter a Freight/Shipping estimate on your requisition

  5. REVIEW OF AGING DATA ON EPDM O-RINGS IN THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, E.

    2012-03-27

    Currently, all H1616 shipping package containers undergo annual re-verification testing, including containment vessel leak testing to verify leak-tightness (<1 x 10{sup -7} ref cc/sec air) as per ANSI N14.5. The purpose of this literature review is to supplement aging studies currently being performed by SRNL on the EPDM O-rings to provide the technical basis for extending annual re-verification testing for the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. The available data suggest that the EPDM O-rings can retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at or below bounding service temperatures (169 F or 76 C) beyond the 1 year maintenance period. Interpretation of available data suggests that a service life of at least 2 years and potentially 4-6 years may be possible at bounding temperatures. Seal lifetimes at lower, more realistic temperatures will likely be longer. Being a hydrocarbon elastomer, EPDM O-rings may exhibit an inhibition period due to the presence of antioxidants. Once antioxidants are consumed, mechanical properties and seal performance could decline at a faster rate. Testing is being performed to validate the assumptions outlined in this report and to assess the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.

  6. Ship Effect Measurements With Fiber Optic Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Kenneth L.; Dean, Rashe A.; Akbar, Shahzad; Kouzes, Richard T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-08-10

    The main objectives of this research project was to assemble, operate, test and characterize an innovatively designed scintillating fiber optic neutron radiation detector manufactured by Innovative American Technology with possible application to the Department of Homeland Security screening for potential radiological and nuclear threats at US borders (Kouzes 2004). One goal of this project was to make measurements of the neutron ship effect for several materials. The Virginia State University DOE FaST/NSF summer student-faculty team made measurements with the fiber optic radiation detector at PNNL above ground to characterize the ship effect from cosmic neutrons, and underground to characterize the muon contribution.

  7. Ship response using a compact wave spectrum model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Larry Donald

    1985-01-01

    SHIP RESPONSE USIM6 A COMPACT HAVE SPECTRUH HODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Submitted to the 6raduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject...: Ocean Engineering SHIP RESPONSE USIN6 A COMPACT 'NAVE SPECTRUN MODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Approved as to style and content by: John M. Niedzwec i (Chairman of Committee) Lee L. Lowery (Member) John M. Klinck (Member) Donald Mc...

  8. Pollution control: A Houston Ship Channel issue. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Edward Barney

    1972-01-01

    ) continuefd]t added carbon dioxide in the air [would] cause a significant rise in the temperature by the year 2000. (4. ) Damage to plants end material, as a result of air pollution, had peen observed in [twenty-seven] states. ~ Of particular concern.... Obviously, both sets of figures represent estimates only. ) annual cost of home repairs for a family of four to be $800. Air pollution can affect food prices significantly when it damages crops. California, Florida, Idaho, Montana, New Jersey, Oregon...

  9. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  10. Separator assembly for use in spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bucholz, James A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A separator assembly for use in a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask has a honeycomb-type wall structure defining parallel cavities for holding nuclear fuel assemblies. Tubes formed of an effective neutron-absorbing material are embedded in the wall structure around each of the cavities and provide neutron flux traps when filled with water.

  11. Shipping and Receiving Dangerous Goods at Georgia Tech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shipping and Receiving Dangerous Goods at Georgia Tech Contacts: Biological Shipments: Shane://industry.gatech.edu/researchers/forms) GENERAL: The transportation of dangerous goods is regulated by a number of national and international of Dangerous Goods (Flash). PROCESS: 1) All shipments must have a Document Id number as well as a People

  12. THERMAL EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE SHIPPING CASK FOR GTRI EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2014-06-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) has many experiments yet to be irradiated in support of the High Performance Research Reactor fuels development program. Most of the experiments will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), then later shipped to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex for post irradiation examination. To date, the General Electric (GE)-2000 cask has been used to transport GTRI experiments between these facilities. However, the availability of the GE-2000 cask to support future GTRI experiments is at risk. In addition, the internal cavity of the GE-2000 cask is too short to accommodate shipping the larger GTRI experiments. Therefore, an alternate shipping capability is being pursued. The Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, Research Reactor (BRR) cask has been determined to be the best alternative to the GE-2000 cask. An evaluation of the thermal performance of the BRR cask is necessary before proceeding with fabrication of the newly designed cask hardware and the development of handling, shipping, and transport procedures. This paper presents the results of the thermal evaluation of the BRR cask loaded with a representative set of fueled and non-fueled experiments. When analyzed with identical payloads, experiment temperatures were found to be lower with the BRR cask than with the GE-2000 cask. From a thermal standpoint, the BRR cask was found to be a suitable alternate to the GE-2000 cask.

  13. Access to and Usage of Offshore Liberty Ship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Access to and Usage of Offshore Liberty Ship Reefs in Texas ROBERT B. DITTON, ALAN R. GRAEFE to establish cover and habitat for fisheries. Offshore artificial reef con- struction began in 1935 led many other states to become interested in deploying offshore artificial reefs. The first reef

  14. PERSPECTIVE Modeling ships' ballast water as invasion threats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Mark

    of individual ships that enter the Great Lakes loaded with cargo and that declare "no ballast on board" (NOBOB) is typically one to two orders of magnitude higher than that of vessels that exchange ballast. Because NOBOB dans les Grands-Lacs chargés de cargo et qui déclarent ne pas avoir de ballast (NOBOB) est généralement

  15. LOGIC BASED DESIGN OF OPTIMAL RECONFIGURATION STRATEGIES FOR SHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwatny, Harry G.

    LOGIC BASED DESIGN OF OPTIMAL RECONFIGURATION STRATEGIES FOR SHIP POWER SYSTEMS Harry G. Kwatny that are supplied. Keywords: applications, hybrid systems, switching, optimal control, feedback design, nonlinear of power flow, loads and energy storage devices. A challenge is the design of a power management system

  16. Ship-based liquid water path estimates in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    October 2005. [1] We examine liquid water paths (LWPs) derived from ship-based microwave radiometer to microwave absorption model differences are 10­25 g mÀ2 , increasing with LWP. The most recent models produce cycle, through the longwave cloud top radiative cooling and liquid water's ability to absorb solar

  17. Simulation of ship motion and deck-wetting due to steep random seas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adil, Adam Mohamed

    2005-02-17

    The extreme motion and load of ships have been assessed using a linear frequency domain method or a linear energy spectral method and RAOs, which may be too approximate to be used for estimation of ship motion in severest ...

  18. The feasibility of residential development in the newly master planned Ship Creek area of Anchorage, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debenham, Shaun T. (Shaun Todd), 1973-

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to determine if a 40 unit condominium complex located in the Ship Creek area in Anchorage, Alaska, is financially feasible. Historically, Ship Creek has been an industrial area but recently the ...

  19. Naval ship propulsion and electric power systems selection for optimal fuel consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarris, Emmanouil

    2011-01-01

    Although propulsion and electric power systems selection is an important part of naval ship design, respective decisions often have to be made without detailed ship knowledge (resistance, propulsors, etc.). Propulsion and ...

  20. LHA(R): Amphibious Assault Ships For The 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bebermeyer, Robert

    2002-05-30

    Amphibious assault ships such as the current LHA and LHD classes are an essential element of the country's ability to exert influence anywhere in the world. The current amphibious assault ships represent the most capable ...

  1. 2006 Industrial Engineering Research Conference 1 WebShipCost -Risk Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Manuel D.

    2006 Industrial Engineering Research Conference 1 WebShipCost - Risk Analysis with a Geographical this uncertain data through simulation and sensitivity analysis. WebShipCost-Risk allows online determination system (GIS) integrated, web-based application (WebShipCost-Risk) with the ability to provide cost, time

  2. A Low-Cost Laser Positioning Apparatus and UUV for Ship Hull Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    .D. In the maritime shipping, cruise, and naval industries, vast expenditures are made in fuel costs that couldA Low-Cost Laser Positioning Apparatus and UUV for Ship Hull Analysis By Hunter Crenshaw Brown the attached thesis A Low-Cost Laser Positioning Apparatus and UUV for Ship Hull Analysis by Hunter Crenshaw

  3. Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Shipping Veronika Eyring a,*, Ivar S.A. Isaksen b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, David

    by these emissions. Regulating ship emissions requires comprehensive knowledge of current fuel consumption and emisTransport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Shipping Veronika Eyring a,*, Ivar S.A. Isaksen b Accepted 6 April 2009 Keywords: Transport Oceangoing shipping Ozone Climate change Radiative forcing Air

  4. Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 Dynamic Positioning System as Dynamic Energy Storage on Diesel-Electric Ships Tor A. Johansen in order to implement energy storage in the kinetic and potential energy of the ship motion using the DP in order to relate the dynamic energy storage capacity to the maximum allowed ship position deviation

  5. ES-3100: A New Generation Shipping Container for Bulk Highly Enriched Uranium and Other Fissile Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbital, J.G.; Byington, G.A.; Tousley, D.R.

    2004-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is shipping bulk quantities of surplus fissile materials, primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU), over the next 15 to 20 years for disposition purposes. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container is the package of choice for most of these shipments. However, the 6M does not conform to the Type B packaging requirements in the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10CFR71) and, for that reason, is being phased out for use in the secure transportation system of DOE. BWXT Y-12 is currently developing a package to replace the DOT 6M container for HEU disposition shipping campaigns. The new package is based on state-of-the-art, proven, and patented insulation technologies that have been successfully applied in the design of other packages. The new package, designated the ES-3100, will have a 50% greater capacity for HEU than the 6M and will be easier to use. Engineering analysis on the new package includes detailed dynamic impact finite element analysis (FEA). This analysis gives the ES-3100 a high probability of complying with regulatory requirements.

  6. The introduction of heat recoverable couplings to ship repair and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberatore, D.J.; Backerville, J.E.

    1982-12-01

    Although Heat Recoverable Couplings (HRCs), used to join pipe, may be labeled innovative ''state-of-the-art'' technology for U.S. Naval Shipyards, they have been in use in foreign ships and high technology industries for over a decade. HRCs provide a permanent leak-proof pipe joint in specified applications without the use of high temperature and the inherent hazards of an open flame. Manufactured from NITINOL, a nickel-titanium alloy developed by the U.S. Navy, the couplings exhibit a ''shape memory'' characteristic. That is, they return (shrink) to a specified shape (pipe diameter) thus forming a mechanical seal when the expanded coupling is removed from a cryogenic environment and warmed above approximately-130/sup 0/C. This paper provides background information into the development of NITINOL, technical explanation of shape memory metallurgy, and a summary of results, with specific examples, describing the trial use of HRCs at Pearl Harbor and Norfolk Naval Shipyards. Limited return cost data and recommendations for future use are presented. Then, using the HRC Program as a basis, the Authors discuss the conservative nature of the ship repair and maintenance environment. This environment, in the Authors' opinion, couples with complex contractual constraints and requirements which serve to restrict the introduction of new ideas. An analogy is made to Russian tenacity of recent years which promotes ''exploring and doing'' while we in the U.S. Navy are frequently content to study.

  7. Eighteenth-century colonial American merchant ship construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanHorn, Kellie Michelle

    2005-02-17

    ); and the Charon, Yorktown, Virginia (1778). Finally, two small riverine craft were also considered: the Brown?s Ferry vessel, Black River, South Carolina (pre-1740s) and the Town Point vessel, Pensacola, Florida (1763-1781). Figure 1 shows a map of these vessel...) (Head of Department) December 2004 Major Subject: Anthropology iii ABSTRACT Eighteenth-Century Colonial American Merchant Ship Construction. (December 2004) Kellie Michelle VanHorn, B.S., Indiana University Chair of Advisory...

  8. LANL Sets Waste Shipping Record for Fourth Consecutive Year: Lab has sent

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)ofkitchensKristin .# . L

  9. LANL Shatters Records in First Year of Accelerated TRU Waste Shipping

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)ofkitchensKristin .# .

  10. Analysis of Real Ship Rolling Dynamics under Wave Excitement Force Composed of Sums of Cosine Functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. S. [Department of Scientific Research, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Cai, F. [Department of Navigation, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China); Xu, W. M. [Department of Hydrography and Cartography, Dalian Naval Academy, Dalian 116018 (China)

    2011-09-28

    The ship motion equation with a cosine wave excitement force describes the slip moments in regular waves. A new kind of wave excitement force model, with the form as sums of cosine functions was proposed to describe ship rolling in irregular waves. Ship rolling time series were obtained by solving the ship motion equation with the fourth-order-Runger-Kutta method. These rolling time series were synthetically analyzed with methods of phase-space track, power spectrum, primary component analysis, and the largest Lyapunove exponent. Simulation results show that ship rolling presents some chaotic characteristic when the wave excitement force was applied by sums of cosine functions. The result well explains the course of ship rolling's chaotic mechanism and is useful for ship hydrodynamic study.

  11. Intention to Ship Hazardous Materials Complete and submit this form to EHS if you intend to ship material that may be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intention to Ship Hazardous Materials Complete and submit this form to EHS if you intend to ship material that may be classified as hazardous material. EHS will determine if the shipment is regulated and/supervisor Department Phone Email Description of material (commercial product name, chemical name, etc.): Known hazards

  12. Design and Criticality Considerations for 9977 and 9978 Shipping Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, R; Biswas, D; Abramczyk, G

    2008-11-25

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed two new, Type B, state-of-the-art, general purpose, fissile material Shipping Packages, designated 9977 and 9978, as replacements for the U.S. DOT specification 6M container, phased out in September 30, 2008 due to non-compliance with current requirements 10CFR71 regulation. The packages accommodate plutonium, uranium and other special nuclear materials in bulk quantities and in many forms with capabilities exceeding those of the 6M. These packages provide a high degree of single containment and comply with 10CFR71, Department of Energy (DOE) Order 460.1B, DOE Order 460.2, and 10CFR20 (As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA)). Allowed package contents were determined accounting for nuclear criticality, radiation shielding, and decay heat rate. The Criticality Safety Index (CSI) for the package is 1.0. The package utilizes passive cooling to maintain internal temperatures within limits. Radiation shielding analyses have established the contents for which the packages can be shipped under non-exclusive use in the Safe-Secure Trailer or under exclusive use. The packages are designed to ship radioactive contents in several configurations; Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), nested food-pack cans, site specific containers, and DOE-STD-3013 containers. Each shipping package includes a 35-gallon stainless steel outer drum, insulation, a drum liner, and a single containment vessel (CV). The 9977 includes a 6-inch ID CV while the 9978 includes a 5-inch ID CV. One inch of Fiberfrax{reg_sign} insulation is wrapped around and attached to the sides and bottom of the liner. The volume between the Fiberfrax{reg_sign} and the drum wall is filled with polyurethane foam. Top and bottom aluminum Load Distribution Fixtures (LDFs) within the drum liner cavity, above and below the CV, center the CV in the liner, stiffen the package radially, and distribute loads away from the CV. The 6CV fits directly into the LDFs while honeycomb spacers position the 5CV in the LDFs.

  13. ARM - Evaluation Product - HSRL Corrected for Ship Motion (HSRLSHIPCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected for Ship Motion

  14. Analysis of International Commodity Shipping Data and the Shipment of NORM to the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baciak, James E.; Ely, James H.; Schweppe, John E.; Sandness, Gerald A.; Robinson, Sean M.

    2011-10-01

    As part of the Spreader Bar Radiation Detector project, PNNL analyzed US import data shipped through US ports collected over the 12 months of 2006 (over 4.5 million containers). Using these data, we extracted a variety of distributions that are of interest to modelers and developers of active and passive detection systems used to 'scan' IMCCs for potential contraband. This report expands on some of the analysis presented in an earlier report from LLNL, by investigation the foreign port distribution of commodities shipped to the US. The majority of containers shipped to the United States are 40 ft containers ({approx}70%); about 25% are 20 ft; and about 3.6% are 45 ft containers. A small fraction (<1%) of containers are of other more specialized sizes, and very few ports actually ship these unique size containers (a full distribution for all foreign ports is shown in Appendix A below). The primary foreign ports that ship the largest fraction of each container are shown in the table below. Given that 45 ft containers comprise 1 of out every 27 containers shipped to the US, and given the foreign ports from which they are shipped, they should not be ignored in screening; further testing and analysis of radiation measurements for national security with this size container is warranted. While a large amount of NORM is shipped in IMCCs, only a few specific commodities are shipped with enough frequency to present potential issues in screening IMCCs at ports. The majority of containers with NORM will contain fertilizers (5,700 containers), granite (59,000 containers), or ceramic (225,000 containers) materials. Fertilizers were generally shipping in either 20- or 40 ft containers with equal frequency. While granite is mostly shipped in 20 ft containers, ceramic materials can be shipped in either 20- or 40 ft containers. The size of container depended on the specific use of the ceramic or porcelain material. General construction ceramics (such as floor and roofing tiles) tend to be shipped in 20 ft containers. Consumer products made from ceramic materials (e.g., tableware, sinks, and toilets) are generally shipped in 40 ft containers. This distinct discrepancy is due in large part to the packaging of the commodity. Consumer products are generally shipped packed in a box loaded with Styrofoam or other packing material to protect the product from breakage. Construction ceramic materials are generally shipped in less packing material, many times consisting of only a cardboard or wooden box. Granite is almost always shipped in a 20 ft container, given its very high density.

  15. A comparison of methods for evaluating structure during ship collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Daidola, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    A comparison is provided of the results of various methods for evaluating structure during a ship-to-ship collision. The baseline vessel utilized in the analyses is a 67.4 meter in length displacement hull struck by an identical vessel traveling at speeds ranging from 10 to 30 knots. The structural response of the struck vessel and motion of both the struck and striking vessels are assessed by finite element analysis. These same results are then compared to predictions utilizing the {open_quotes}Tanker Structural Analysis for Minor Collisions{close_quotes} (TSAMC) Method, the Minorsky Method, the Haywood Collision Process, and comparison to full-scale tests. Consideration is given to the nature of structural deformation, absorbed energy, penetration, rigid body motion, and virtual mass affecting the hydrodynamic response. Insights are provided with regard to the calibration of the finite element model which was achievable through utilizing the more empirical analyses and the extent to which the finite element analysis is able to simulate the entire collision event. 7 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Dragon Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2012-01-11

    Broadcast Transcript: Can you believe it? It's New Year again. It seems like only yesterday we were celebrating the advent of the year of the Rabbit and now, here it is, the year of the Dragon. January 22nd is New Year's Eve according to the Lunar...

  17. Flammability Analysis For Actinide Oxides Packaged In 9975 Shipping Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, James E.; Askew, Neal M.; Hensel, Steve J.

    2013-03-21

    Packaging options are evaluated for compliance with safety requirements for shipment of mixed actinide oxides packaged in a 9975 Primary Containment Vessel (PCV). Radiolytic gas generation rates, PCV internal gas pressures, and shipping windows (times to reach unacceptable gas compositions or pressures after closure of the PCV) are calculated for shipment of a 9975 PCV containing a plastic bottle filled with plutonium and uranium oxides with a selected isotopic composition. G-values for radiolytic hydrogen generation from adsorbed moisture are estimated from the results of gas generation tests for plutonium oxide and uranium oxide doped with curium-244. The radiolytic generation of hydrogen from the plastic bottle is calculated using a geometric model for alpha particle deposition in the bottle wall. The temperature of the PCV during shipment is estimated from the results of finite element heat transfer analyses.

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF A BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.

    2010-09-30

    A shipping package for transporting tritium has been developed for use by the National Nuclear Safety Administration as a replacement for the DOE Model UC-609, a tritium package developed and used by the DOE and NRC since the early 1970s. This paper presents the major design features and highlights the improvements made over its predecessor by incorporating new engineered materials and implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability. A discussion will be provided demonstrating how the BTSP complies with the regulatory safety requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper further summarizes the results of testing to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Conditions events. Planned and possible future missions for this packaging will be addressed.

  19. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, J.

    2010-06-02

    The Bulk Tritium Shipping Package was designed by Savannah River National Laboratory. This package will be used to transport tritium. As part of the requirements for certification, the package must be shown to meet the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 71 (10CFR71). The conditions include a sequential 30-foot drop event, 30-foot dynamic crush event, and a 40-inch puncture event. Finite Element analyses were performed to support and expand upon prototype testing. Cases similar to the tests were evaluated. Additional temperatures and orientations were also examined to determine their impact on the results. The peak stress on the package was shown to be acceptable. In addition, the strain on the outer drum as well as the inner containment boundary was shown to be acceptable. In conjunction with the prototype tests, the package was shown to meet its confinement requirements.

  20. COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping Container Handling Procedure Date: November 30, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping Container Handling Procedure Date: November 30, 1999 Document Number: COS-05-0002 Revision: Initial Release Contract No.: NAS5-98043 CDRL No.: N/A Prepared By: Erik. Wilkinson 11-30-99 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: COS/HST FUV Grating Shipping

  1. Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers M. Rossgatterera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüttler, Bert

    Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers M. Rossgatterera , B. J Abstract We present a method for constructing blades of hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers based. Keywords: CAD-model, B-spline representation, hydroelectric turbine blade, propeller blade, medial axis

  2. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, California Institute Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Deep Draft Navigation Planning Peer Review Report of the Sacramento River Deep Water Ship Channel, California Limited Reevaluation

  3. Velocys microchannel reactor small enough to fit in a standard shipping container

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark

    in a standard shipping container The GreenSky London waste-biomass to jet fuel plant will produce 50,000 tonnesVelocys microchannel reactor ­ small enough to fit in a standard shipping container Valuable liquid fuels from waste gas Velocys, an Oxford Chemistry spin-out company, markets smaller-scale reactors

  4. LLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Shipping from NCSU.docx Page 1 of 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    from NCSU: To send mail from NCSU via USPS, affix NC State mailing label to package/envelope and leave-mail notifications that you would like to receive o Print out shipping label, attach to package, and placeLLaannggeerrhhaannss LLaabb PPrroottooccoollss Shipping from NCSU.docx Page 1 of 1 Sending mail/packages

  5. Are you shipping a DOT Hazardous Material? Is your material listed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Are you shipping a DOT Hazardous Material? Is your material listed on the DOT Hazmat Table? http://www.myregs.com/dotrspa/ (select Hazmat Table upper left) Your material is a Hazardous Material and must be shipped following the full regulations. Follow the instructions on the linked page, select the hazard of the material

  6. The Performance of the Container Shipping I/O System Eric Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polyzos, George C.

    1 The Performance of the Container Shipping I/O System Eric Anderson Joseph Pasquale {ewa, pasquale/O system. This paper describes our implementation of this mechanism, called Container Shipping, and its for the DEC 3000 model 800. Sustained copy rates include TLB misses and imperfect cache behavior, plus

  7. Linear "ship waves" generated in stationary flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate past an obstacle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linear "ship waves" generated in stationary flow of a Bose-Einstein condensate past an obstacle Yu-Einstein condensate past an obstacle. It is shown that these "ship waves" are generated outside the Mach cone]). At last, the sta- tionary waves generated by supersonic flow of BEC past obstacles have been recently

  8. Heat transfer model of large shipping containers 1Chemical Engineering Department -Carnegie Mellon University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Forced convective heat transfer Solar radiation heat transfer Atmospheric radiation Natural convective number #12;Solar radiation heat transfer Heat transfer at the wall of the shipping container Direct solarHeat transfer model of large shipping containers 1Chemical Engineering Department - Carnegie Mellon

  9. Measurements of ship-induced flow and its effect on bank erosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hongbin

    1997-01-01

    for prediction of drawdown and return velocity. The ship induced waves model is verified with field measurements. The method of energy computation for ship induced flow is developed in order to determine its relative contribution to bank erosion. In this study...

  10. Diversity and distribution of bacterial communities in dioxin-contaminated sediments from the Houston ship channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hieke, Anne-Sophie Charlotte

    2009-05-15

    ......................................................................................... 17 7 1% agarose gel image showing the PCR results of samples amplified with bacterium-specific primers ......................................................................... 31 8 1% agarose gel image showing the PCR results of samples... amplified with Dehalococcoides-specific primers ............................................................. 32 9 Map of Galveston Bay, TX, showing the Houston Ship Channel .............. 49 10 Map of Sabine Lake, TX, showing the ship channel...

  11. Ship emissions and air pollution in Present situation and future scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ship emissions and air pollution in Denmark Present situation and future scenarios Helge Rørdam.10 RESULTS: SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION 56 3 SHIP EMISSION INVENTORIES FOR AIR POLLUTION MODELLING 61 3-SP" INVENTORY 67 3.5 "AIS-2011" INVENTORY 68 3.6 "AIS-2020" INVENTORY 69 3.7 SUMMARY OF DIFFERENCES 70 4 AIR

  12. Exploring the use of Model-Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) to develop systems architectures in naval ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tepper, Nadia A

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Navy designs and operates the most technologically advanced ships in the world. These ships incorporate the latest in weapons technology, phased array antennas, composite structures, signature reduction, survivability, ...

  13. Design of tool for the optimization of deck area assignments with integration into existing naval ship design programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oslebo, Damian G

    2014-01-01

    Many tasks in the early stages of ship design are manual and repetitive processes. One such task is in the realm of deck area arrangements. The allocation and assignment of areas in early stage ship design involves tracking ...

  14. Investigation of broadband over power line channel capacity of shipboard power system cables for ship communications networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Ayorinde

    2009-05-15

    U.S. Navy ship management concepts geared toward reducing ship manning while improving operational efficiency. This thesis presents an analytical model developed to examine the channel response characteristics and estimated throughput capacity of SPS...

  15. In Intelligent Ship Symposium VI. Villanova, PA. June 1-2, 2005 PNNL-SA-44900 Thomas A Ferryman, Brett D. Matzke, John E. Wilson, Julia Sharp, Frank L. Greitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engine removals/down time for US Navy surface ships. The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used and BACKGROUND The US Navy has over 3500 gas turbine engines used throughout the surface fleet for propulsion over 60 techniques on almost 20 years of data collected from over 3100 gas turbine engine assemblies

  16. An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications6) tracer release experi- ment was conducted in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel (DWSC. Keywords Dissolved oxygen . Sacramento­San Joaquin delta . Stockton deep water ship channel . SF6 . Tracer

  17. The effect of cargo on the crush loading of RAM transportation packages in ship collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radloff, H.D.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Recent intercontinental radioactive material shipping campaigns have focused public and regulatory attention on the safety of transport of this material by ocean-going vessels. One major concern is the response of the vessel and onboard radioactive material (RAM) packages during a severe ship-to-ship collision. These collisions occur at velocities less than the velocity obtained in the Type B package regulatory impact event and the bow of the striking ship is less rigid than the unyielding target used in those tests (Ammerman and Daidola, 1996). This implies that ship impact is not a credible scenario for damaging the radioactive material packages during ship collisions. It is possible, however, for these collisions to generate significant amounts of crush force by the bow of the impacting ship overrunning the package. It is the aim of this paper to determine an upper bound on the magnitude of this crush force taking into account the strength of the radioactive material carrying vessel and any other cargo that may be stowed in the same hold as the radioactive material.

  18. An Analysis of Dual Zone Loading for Shipping Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, William Christopher; Yim, Man-Sung

    2007-07-01

    The bumps current fuel assembly designs can achieve exceeds the fuel assembly burnups the current fleet of shipping casks can ship. One method of handling this situation which has been proposed is regionalized loading. This concept involves administratively separating the fuel basket of a shipping cask into two or more regions and loading fuel with different burnup, cooling times and enrichments into these regions. To evaluate how regionalized loading patterns might affect shipping spent nuclear fuel in comparison to uniform loading, a test case study was performed using fuel assemblies discharged from an actual nuclear plant and a shipping cask licensed by the NRC. Using the same fuel assemblies and shipping cask, results were obtained assuming a uniform loading pattern and compared to the results obtained assuming a dual zone loading pattern. Source terms for the analysis were generated using SAS2 and the dose levels were calculated using MCNPS. The analysis showed that the dual zone loading reduced the amount of time required to ship the given quantity of fuel by roughly thirty percent compared to the uniform loading. The average dose rate to the transportation workers and the public due to the implementation of dual zone loading increased. Implications of these increases are discussed. (authors)

  19. Results from the Solar Hidden Photon Search (SHIPS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthias Schwarz; Ernst-Axel Knabbe; Axel Lindner; Javier Redondo; Andreas Ringwald; Magnus Schneide; Jaroslaw Susol; Günter Wiedemann

    2015-02-16

    We present the results of a search for transversely polarised hidden photons (HPs) with $\\sim 3$ eV energies emitted from the Sun. These hypothetical particles, known also as paraphotons or dark sector photons, are theoretically well motivated for example by string theory inspired extensions of the Standard Model. Solar HPs of sub-eV mass can convert into photons of the same energy (photon$\\leftrightarrow$HP oscillations are similar to neutrino flavour oscillations). At SHIPS this would take place inside a long light-tight high-vacuum tube, which tracks the Sun. The generated photons would then be focused into a low-noise photomultiplier at the far end of the tube. Our analysis of 330 h of data (and {330 h} of background characterisation) reveals no signal of photons from solar hidden photon conversion. We estimate the rate of newly generated photons due to this conversion to be smaller than 25 mHz/m$^2$ at the 95$%$ C.L. Using this and a recent model of solar HP emission, we set stringent constraints on $\\chi$, the coupling constant between HPs and photons, as a function of the HP mass.

  20. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-06100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-11-07

    Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-06100. This package was selected for examination based on several characteristics: - This was the first destructively examined package in which the fiberboard assembly was fabricated from softwood fiberboard. - The package contained a relatively high heat load to contribute to internal temperature, which is a key environmental factor for fiberboard degradation. - The package has been stored in the middle or top of a storage array since its receipt in K- Area, positions that would contribute to increased service temperatures. No significant changes were observed for attributes that were measured during both field surveillance and destructive examination. Except for the axial gap, all observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes. The axial gap met the 1 inch maximum criterion during field surveillance, but was just over the criterion during SRNL measurements. When re-measured at a later date, it again met the criterion. The bottom of the lower fiberboard assembly and the drum interior had two small stains at matching locations, suggestive of water intrusion. However, the fiberboard assembly did not contain any current evidence of excess moisture. No evidence of a degraded condition was found in this package. Despite exposure to the elevated temperatures of this higher-then-average wattage package, properties of the fiberboard and O-rings are consistent with those of new packages.

  1. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2 40 -4.76% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 37 35 -5.41% Females 5 5 0% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 2 2 0% EJEK 5 4 -20.00% EN 05 5 7 40.00% EN 04 6 6 0% EN 03 1 1 0% NN...

  2. Y YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    79 67 -15.19% YEAR 2013 2014 Males 44 34 -22.73% Females 35 33 -5.71% YEAR 2013 2014 SES 6 4 -33.33% EJEK 1 1 0% EN 05 9 8 -11.11% EN 04 6 5 -16.67% NN...

  3. Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st Year Sum. __________ (year)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    . HRS. 2nd Year Fall __________ (year) 2nd Year Spr. _________ (year) 2nd Year Sum. _________ (yearName Major Student ID Advisor 1st Year Fall __________ (year) 1st Year Spr. __________ (year) 1st Year Sum. __________ (year) SUBJECT COURSE # CR. HRS. SUBJECT COURSE # CR. HRS. SUBJECT COURSE # CR

  4. FATE Unified Modeling Method for Spent Nuclear Fuel and Sludge Processing, Shipping and Storage - 13405

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plys, Martin; Burelbach, James; Lee, Sung Jin; Apthorpe, Robert

    2013-07-01

    A unified modeling method applicable to the processing, shipping, and storage of spent nuclear fuel and sludge has been incrementally developed, validated, and applied over a period of about 15 years at the US DOE Hanford site. The software, FATE{sup TM}, provides a consistent framework for a wide dynamic range of common DOE and commercial fuel and waste applications. It has been used during the design phase, for safety and licensing calculations, and offers a graded approach to complex modeling problems encountered at DOE facilities and abroad (e.g., Sellafield). FATE has also been used for commercial power plant evaluations including reactor building fire modeling for fire PRA, evaluation of hydrogen release, transport, and flammability for post-Fukushima vulnerability assessment, and drying of commercial oxide fuel. FATE comprises an integrated set of models for fluid flow, aerosol and contamination release, transport, and deposition, thermal response including chemical reactions, and evaluation of fire and explosion hazards. It is one of few software tools that combine both source term and thermal-hydraulic capability. Practical examples are described below, with consideration of appropriate model complexity and validation. (authors)

  5. Multi-Factor Model of Correlated Commodity - Forward Curves for Crude Oil and Shipping Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellefsen, Per Einar

    2009-01-01

    An arbitrage free multi-factor model is developed of the correlated forward curves of the crude oil, gasoline, heating oil and tanker shipping markets. Futures contracts trading on public exchanges are used as the primary ...

  6. FULLY NON-LINEAR CFD TECHNIQUES FOR SHIP PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    , from the ship's propulsor mechanism to the fluid, required to maintain the wave structure that extends 5 G. Cowles $5 and A. Jameson Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton

  7. A Digital Library Approach to the Reconstruction of Ancient Sunken Ships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroy Cobar, Carlos A.

    2011-10-21

    Throughout the ages, countless shipwrecks have left behind a rich historical and technological legacy. In this context, nautical archaeologists study the remains of these boats and ships and the cultures that created and ...

  8. Waveless ships in the low speed limit: Results for multi-cornered hulls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Philippe H

    2015-01-01

    In the low-speed limit, a blunt ship modeled as two-dimensional semi-infinite body with a single corner can never be made waveless. This was the conclusion of the previous part of our work in Trinh et al. (2011), which focused on the Dagan & Tulin (1972) model of ship waves in the low speed limit. In this accompanying paper, we continue our investigations with the study of more general, piecewise-linear, or multi-cornered ships. The low-speed or low-Froude limit, coupled with techniques in exponential asymptotics allows us to derive explicit formulae relating the geometry of the hull to the form of the waves. Configurations with closely spaced corners present a non-trivial extension of the theory, and we present the general methodology for their study. Lastly, numerical computations of the nonlinear ship-wave problem are presented in order to confirm the analytical predictions.

  9. Development of an early stage ship design tool for rapid modeling in Paramarine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurkins, Eric J., Jr

    2012-01-01

    In early-stage ship design, it is helpful to perform preliminary design and analysis on many configurations to assist in developing and narrowing the trade space. This process is further complicated with the increasing ...

  10. AUTUMNAL BIRD MIGRATION OBSERVED FROM SHIPS IN THE WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    drifted offshore by winds. For three to sixweekseachfall from 1971 through 1974,we and D. Griffin, RAUTUMNAL BIRD MIGRATION OBSERVED FROM SHIPS IN THE WESTERN NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN BY CAROLP

  11. More than a Hull: Religious Ritual and Sacred Space on Board the Ancient Ship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, Carrie E.

    2010-07-14

    Greco-Roman religion in the ancient Mediterranean permeated aspects of everyday life, including seafaring. Besides cargo, ships transported mariners' religious beliefs from port to port, thus disseminating religious culture. ...

  12. Advanced perception, navigation and planning for autonomous in-water ship hull inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hover, Franz S.

    2013-04-24

    Inspection of ship hulls and marine structures using autonomous underwater vehicles has emerged as a unique and challenging application of robotics. The problem poses rich questions in physical design and operation, ...

  13. Real options for naval ship design and acquisition : a method for valuing flexibility under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor, Jeffrey Allen

    2003-01-01

    The United States Navy is facing a need for a novel surface combatant capability. This new system of ships must be deigned to meet the uncertainty associated with constantly changing required mission capabilities, threats, ...

  14. Increasing intermodal transportation in Europe through realizing the value of short sea shipping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenekecioglu, Goksel

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the role of short sea shipping within the transportation network in the European Union. It examines the existence of externalities relating to congestion, infrastructure, air pollution, noise, and ...

  15. Projection of fractures in ships for the evaluation of fatigue resistant designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hadjiyiannis, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Cracks in ships have been of great concern to the maritime industry for a very long time. The problem is controlled by improving design, minimizing operating stresses and through regular inspections and repairs. The big ...

  16. Shipping and nitrogen toning effects on postharvest shelf life of vegetative annuals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beach, Shannon Elizabeth

    2006-10-30

    Vegetative annuals are currently popular in the ornamental horticulture industry. Many crops are newly domesticated species and little is known about how they perform during shipping or in the retail environment. Nine ...

  17. Modeling and simulation of an all electric ship in random seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Kyle (Kyle P.)

    2010-01-01

    This Masters thesis, conducted in support of the All Electric Ship (AES) early design effort, presents two computational programs for analysis and simulation: a full-scale, end-to-end AES simulator and an analytical ...

  18. An applied paleoecology case study: Bahia Grande, Texas prior to construction of the Brownsville Ship Channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lichlyter, Stephen Alvah

    2006-08-16

    . Unfortunately, because very little is known about Bahia Grande prior to isolation, it is difficult to predict whether the results of the restoration will be comparable to the pre-Ship Channel environment. Paleoecological data provide the best opportunity...

  19. Applying lean manufacturing initiatives to naval ship repair centers : implementation and lessons learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Brian P. (Brian Patrick), 1963-

    2004-01-01

    The United States Navy is under pressure to reduce the cost of fleet maintenance in order to redirect funds for the construction of new ships and submarines. The Navy looks to private industry for process improvement ideas ...

  20. The effects of wave groups on the nonlinear simulation of ship motion in random seas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richer, Jeffrey A.

    2006-04-12

    Historically, the analysis of ship motion and loading responses has been performed in the frequency domain with both linear response amplitude operators and wave energy density spectra. This method, therefore, did not account for the nonlinear...

  1. ESRDC ship notional baseline Medium Voltage Direct Current (MVDC) architecture thermal simulation and visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a fast visualization and thermal simulation tool developed as part of the Electric Ship Research and Development Consortium (ESRDC) funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) that is capable of providing ...

  2. Improving the parametric method of cost estimating relationships of naval ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ungtae (Jeremy Ungtae)

    2014-01-01

    In light of recent military budget cuts, there has been a recent focus on determining methods to reduce the cost of Navy ships. A RAND National Defense Research Institute study showed many sources of cost escalation for ...

  3. OHSU Cytogenetics Research Service Laboratory Lab Shipping Address: 2525 SW 3rd Ave Ste. 350,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    OHSU Cytogenetics Research Service Laboratory Lab Shipping Address: 2525 SW 3rd Ave Ste. 350, Portland, OR 97201 Lab Mailing Address: 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Mailstop MP-350, Portland, OR, 97239

  4. Short sea shipping : barriers, incentives and feasibility of truck ferry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darcy, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Many problems plague the United States' transportation infrastructure: congestion, poor roadway conditions, obsolescence, and maintenance cost not the least among these. In recent years, the Department of Transportation, ...

  5. GRADUATE POPULATION: Spring, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Status*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRADUATE POPULATION: Spring, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Program ABX = DCE Absentia *DCE status is assigned to post-5th year enrolled students, whether still 2.5 years) VSRCs: Christine Angel Mc Lauren de Riordan mclderio@princeton.edu (7/31/13 ­ 6

  6. GRADUATE POPULATION: Fall, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Status*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    GRADUATE POPULATION: Fall, 2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year Fifth Year DCE Status Nathaniel (Nat) Tabris Daniel Wolt (Grad Rep) *DCE status is assigned to post-5th year enrolled students Program ABX = DCE Absentia ON LEAVE: Josh O'Rourke (Fall 2014; completed 2.5 years) VSRC: Neil Dewar

  7. Truck and rail charges for shipping spent fuel and nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNair, G.W.; Cole, B.M.; Cross, R.E.; Votaw, E.F.

    1986-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed techniques for calculating estimates of nuclear-waste shipping costs and compiled a listing of representative data that facilitate incorporation of reference shipping costs into varius logistics analyses. The formulas that were developed can be used to estimate costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel or nuclear waste by either legal-weight truck or general-freight rail. The basic data for this study were obtained from tariffs of a truck carrier licensed to serve the 48 contiguous states and from various rail freight tariff guides. Also, current transportation regulations as issued by the US Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were investigated. The costs that will be incurred for shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear waste, as addressed by the tariff guides, are based on a complex set of conditions involving the shipment origin, route, destination, weight, size, and volume and the frequency of shipments, existing competition, and the length of contracts. While the complexity of these conditions is an important factor in arriving at a ''correct'' cost, deregulation of the transportation industry means that costs are much more subject to negotiation and, thus, the actual fee that will be charged will not be determined until a shipping contract is actually signed. This study is designed to provide the baseline data necessary for making comparisons of the estimated costs of shipping spent fuel and/or nuclear wastes by truck and rail transportation modes. The scope of the work presented in this document is limited to the costs incurred for shipping, and does not include packaging, cask purchase/lease costs, or local fees placed on shipments of radioactive materials.

  8. A West Valley Demonstration Project Milestone - Achieving Certification to Ship Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J. P.; Pastor, R. S.

    2002-02-28

    The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) has successfully pretreated and vitrified nearly all of the 600,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive waste that was generated at the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing plant to have operated in the United States. Low-level waste (LLW) generated during the course of the cleanup effort now requires disposal. Currently the WVDP only ships Class A LLW for off-site disposal. It has been shipping Class A wastes to Envirocare of Utah, Inc. since 1997. However, the WVDP may also have a future need to ship Class B and Class C waste, which Envirocare is not currently authorized to accept. The Nevada Test Site (NTS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility, can accept all three waste classifications. The WVDP set a goal to receive certification to begin shipping Class A wastes to NTS by 2001. Formal certification/approval was granted by the DOE Nevada Operations Office on July 12, 2001. This paper discusses how the WVDP contractor, West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO), completed the activities required to achieve NTS certification in 2001 to ship waste to its facility. The information and lessons learned provided are significant because the WVDP is the only new generator receiving certification based on an NTS audit in January 2001 that resulted in no findings and only two observations--a rating that is unparalleled in the DOE Complex.

  9. Venetian ships and seafaring up to the nautical revolution: a study based on artistic representations of ships and boats before ca. 1450 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Lillian Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    . 139 Figure 60 Galley under navigation, from the 15th-century book by Zorzi of Modon, . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . 141 Figure 61 Profile sections of a galley from the 15th-century book of Zorzi of Modon. Note the flat transom stern. 143 Figure... of ships and smaller vessels located during this survey are cataloged and discussed in detail in Chapter III. Specific aspects of each vessel, including construction details, the stern configuration, rigging, and anchors, are topics for discussion...

  10. Each year, millions of cargo containers sail into our country's ports, where cranes lift them off ships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sur, Mriganka

    justafewsecondstoidentifyallthematerialswithin a truck-size container. Passport Sys- tems, founded by physics professor William Bertozzi, in which light reflected from or emit- ted by an object is spread out into a spectrum. Because every element absorbs light of a characteristic wavelength, gaps in the spectrum of the reflected light reveal

  11. Modeling of shippingModeling of shipping NONOxx emissions in globalemissions in global GeertGeert VinkenVinken11,, FolkertFolkert BoersmaBoersma22, and Daniel J. Jacob, and Daniel J. Jacob33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    to ship PM2.5 emissions worldwidePM2.5 emissions worldwide Source: Corbett et al (2007) Pollution from [Skjølsvik et al, 2000] 120-147 3.06 Corbett et al. [1999] 140-147 3.08 Ship emission inventories

  12. STATUS REPORT FOR AGING STUDIES OF EPDM O-RING MATERIAL FOR THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.

    2012-08-31

    This is an interim status report for tasks carried out per Task Technical Plan SRNL-STI-2011-00506. A series of tasks/experiments are being performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory to monitor the aging performance of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) Orings used in the H1616 shipping package. The data will support the technical basis to extend the annual maintenance of the EPDM O-rings in the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. Current expectations are that the O-rings will maintain a seal at bounding normal temperatures in service (152 F) for at least 12 months. The baseline aging data review suggests that the EPDM O-rings are likely to retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at bounding service temperatures to provide a service life of at least 2 years. At lower, more realistic temperatures, longer service life is likely. Parallel compression stress relaxation and vessel leak test efforts are in progress to further validate this assessment and quantify a more realistic service life prediction. The H1616 shipping package O-rings were evaluated for baseline property data as part of this test program. This was done to provide a basis for comparison of changes in material properties and performance parameters as a function of aging. This initial characterization was limited to physical and mechanical properties, namely hardness, thickness and tensile strength. These properties appear to be consistent with O-ring specifications. Three H1616-1 Containment Vessels were placed in test conditions and are aging at temperatures ranging from 160 to 300 F. The vessels were Helium leak-tested initially and have been tested at periodic intervals after cooling to room temperature to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97 (< 1E-07 std cc air/sec at room temperature). To date, no leak test failures have occurred. The cumulative time at temperature ranges from 174 days for the 300 F vessel to 189 days for the 160 F vessel as of 8/1/2012. The compression stress-relaxation (CSR) behavior of H1616 shipping package O-rings is being evaluated to develop an aging model based on material properties. O-ring segments were initially aged at four temperatures (175 F, 235 F, 300 F and 350 F). These temperatures were selected to bound normal service temperatures and to challenge the seals within a reasonable aging period. Currently, samples aging at 300 F and 350 F have reached the mechanical failure point (end of life) which is defined in this study as 90% loss of initial sealing force. As a result, additional samples more recently began aging at {approx}270 F to provide additional data for the aging model. Aging and periodic leak testing of the full containment vessels, as well as CSR testing of O-ring segments is ongoing. Continued testing per the Task Technical Plan is recommended in order to validate the assumptions outlined in this status report and to quantify and validate the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.

  13. An Active Data-aware Cache Consistency Protocol for Highly-Scalable Data-Shipping DBMS Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    An Active Data-aware Cache Consistency Protocol for Highly-Scalable Data-Shipping DBMS overhead for maintaining client directory consistency. We implement ADCC in a page server DBMS architecture. Keywords active control; cache consistency; parallel communication; data- shipping; DBMS 1.INTRODUCTION

  14. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF DOUBLE-SIDED ARC WELDING PROCESS IN SHIP STRUCTURE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF DOUBLE-SIDED ARC WELDING PROCESS IN SHIP STRUCTURE MANUFACTURING Yu Meeting, August 21-22, 2002 #12;Objective o Determine the feasibility of double-sided arc welding process in butt welding of DH-36 plates #12;Background: Process o Double-sided arc welding (DSAW): a novel arc

  15. International Conference on Numerical Ship Hydrodynamics Ann Arbor, Michigan, August 5-8, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameson, Antony

    to the energy contained in the wave structure that extends behind the ship, a fully coupled calcu- lation. In this approach an evaluation of the gradient of a cost function is computed by solving an adjoint sys- tem, and the calculation of the evolution of the wave fields is essential to the determination of the performance. In most

  16. 2005 IEEE ElectricShip Technologies Symposium Parallel Operation of Shunt Active Power Filters for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    for Damping of Harmonic Propagation in Electric Shipboard Power Systems Ting Qian', Brad Lehman', Anindita, and there is a significant deterioration of power quality in the electrical plants of modern warships. Severa1problems can power system, such as in an electric ship. Thus, an alternative approach is to use a Shunt Active Power

  17. Adaptive Phase Adjustment Synchronization Method for Source Voltage Distortion in Electric Ship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    of Electrical & Computer Engineering Mississippi State University Abstract - In any distributed power system such as aeroplanes, vehicles and electric ships. Due to the extensive use of devices with power electronics, there has been deterioration of power quality due to harmonic distortion observed in voltage and current

  18. www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author ­ Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Outline · Introduction · Wind Turbine Operational Conditions · Wind Turbine Operation under Atmospheric Icing · Wind Turbine Operation under Fault Condition · Conclusions www.cesos.ntnu.no M. Etemaddar

  19. CFD Analysis of Container Ship Sinkage, Trim and Resistance Shaun Wortley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methods of obtaining design data are established. Model testing in towing tanks is the past and present possible. Tim your wealth of knowledge and resources on marine design gave me that extra level for my for a container ship. The data that was calculated included squat (sinkage and trim) and resistance. The container

  20. Outbreak of Gastrointestinal Illness Aboard Cruise Ship MS Mercury, San Diego, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inspectors sailed with the ship from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico to San Diego, California, conducting en route 2006 At Sea 8 March 2006 Cabo san Lucas, Mexico 9 March 2006 Mazatlan, Mexico 10 March 2006 Puerto Vallarta, Mexico 11 March 2006 At Sea 12 March 2006 Acapulco, Mexico 13 March 2006 Ixtapa, Mexico 14 March

  1. Prediction of Parametric Roll of Ships in Regular and Irregular Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moideen, Hisham

    2012-02-14

    This research was done to develop tools to predict parametric roll motion of ships in regular and irregular sea and provide guidelines to avoid parametric roll during initial design stage. A post Panamax hull form (modified C11 Hull form, Courtesy...

  2. Western Empire: the deep water wreck of a mid-nineteenth century wooden sailing ship 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Joshua Aaron

    2006-08-16

    with suggestions for remotely operated vehicle operators when performing an on-the-fly survey of shipwrecks in deep water. The official ship logs, crew agreements, and contemporary newspaper articles are used to recreate the life of Western Empire and shed light...

  3. Ship of the God: The Amun-Userhet in New Kingdom Egypt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Megan

    2013-10-30

    to it that can give us insight into its function in New Kingdom religion. Through the review of the surviving iconography, artifacts, and written accounts of the Amun-Userhet, this thesis looks at the role this ship played in the development of New Kingdom...

  4. Monitoring ship noise to assess the impact of coastal developments on marine mammals q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aberdeen, University of

    Renewable energy AIS data Time-lapse Marine mammals Acoustic disturbance a b s t r a c t The potentialMonitoring ship noise to assess the impact of coastal developments on marine mammals q Nathan D impacts of underwater noise on marine mammals are widely recognised, but uncertainty over variability

  5. Roughly 120 years ago, an incon-spicuous pest took a ride on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchininsky, Alexandre

    Roughly 120 years ago, an incon- spicuous pest took a ride on a ship from Europe bound discussed the projects he had avail- able, the horn fly project fit best with my background. Horn Fly First, the cattle use costly energy meant for growth to rid themselves of the flies. Some of the behavioral changes

  6. Multi-tiered sensing and data processing for monitoring ship structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salvino, Liming [NSWCCD; Lynch, Jerome [UNIV. OF MICHIGAN; Brady, Thomas [NSWCCD

    2009-01-01

    A comprehensive structural health monitoring (SHM) system is a critical mechanism to ensure hull integrity and evaluate structural performance over the life of a ship, especially for lightweight high-speed ships. One of the most important functions of a SHM system is to provide real-time performance guidance and reduce the risk of structural damage during operations at sea. This is done by continuous feedback from onboard sensors providing measurements of seaway loads and structural responses. Applications of SHM should also include diagnostic capabilities such as identifying the presence of damage, assessing the location and extent of damage when it does occur in order to plan for future inspection and maintenance. The development of such SHM systems is extremely challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with the missions of high performance ships, the lack of data from known damage conditions, the limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, the management of the vast amounts of data, and the need for continued, real-time data processing. This paper will discuss some of these challenges and several outstanding issues that need to be addressed in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum high-speed catamaran, the HSV-2 Swift. A multi-tiered approach for sensing and data processing will be discussed as potential SHM architecture for future shipboard application. This approach will involve application of low cost and dense sensor arrays such as wireless communications in selected areas of the ship hull in addition to conventional sensors measuring global structural response of the ship. A recent wireless hull monitoring demo on FSF-I SeaFighter will be discussed as an example to show how this proposed architecture is a viable approach for long-term and real-time hull monitoring.

  7. To appear in the Journal of Geophysical Research, 1998, Version Date: September 30, 1998. Comparisons of aircraft, ship, and buoy meteorological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    . Comparisons of aircraft, ship, and buoy meteorological measurements from TOGA COARE Sean P. Burns, 1 Djamal measurements from buoys and ships, led to proposed offsets for the aircrafts' temperature, humidity data to the individual ship and buoy sensor heights for 264 over­flight comparisons. In addition, all

  8. Year 1 Year 2 Anne 3 Anne 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cengarle, María Victoria

    Languages, Sport EP Third Year: - First 2 trimesters of courses (specialization) - Third trimester: researchYear 1 Year 2 Année 3 Année 4 Year 5 Year 6 Year 7Year 3 Year 4 «« INGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIENINGENIEUR POLYTECHNICIEN »» MASTERMASTER PhDPhD Two to three years of undergraduate studies Education

  9. USING A CONTAINMENT VESSEL LIFTING APPARATUS FOR REMOTE OPERATIONS OF SHIPPING PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, Bradley; Koenig, Richard

    2013-08-08

    The 9977 and the 9975 shipping packages are used in various nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy. These shipping packages are often loaded in designated areas with designs using overhead cranes or A-frames with lifting winches. However, there are cases where loading operations must be performed in remote locations where these facility infrastructures do not exist. For these locations, a lifting apparatus has been designed to lift the containment vessels partially out of the package for unloading operations to take place. Additionally, the apparatus allows for loading and closure of the containment vessel and subsequent pre-shipment testing. This paper will address the design of the apparatus and the challenges associated with the design, and it will describe the use of the apparatus.

  10. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-02-24

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  11. Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feister, Uwe; Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

  12. ASSOCIATION PATTERNS OF COMMON BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS (Tursiops truncatus) IN THE GALVESTON SHIP CHANNEL, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kelsey Elizabeth

    2013-09-26

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as an UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR Approved by Research Advisor: Dr. Bernd Würsig May 2014 Major: Marine Biology TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT... Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Galveston Ship Channel, Texas. (May 2013) Kelsey Elizabeth Johnson Department of Marine Biology Texas A&M University at Galveston Research Advisor: Dr. Bernd Würsig Department of Marine Biology Texas A...

  13. BEHAVIOR OF BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS (Tursiops truncatus) RELATIVE TO BOAT TRAFFIC IN THE GALVESTON SHIP CHANNEL, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennacchi, Anna Marie

    2013-02-04

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR Approved by Research Advisor: Dr. Bernd W?rsig May... in the Galveston Ship Channel, Texas. (May 2013) Anna Marie Pennacchi Department of Biomedical Science Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Bernd W?rsig Department of Marine Biology Texas A&M University at Galveston Heavy boat traffic can...

  14. Maintenance manual for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System cask. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronowski, D.R.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1993-05-01

    This document is the Maintenance Manual for the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask. These instructions address requirements for maintenance, inspection, testing, and repair, supplementing general information found in the BUSS Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), SAND 83-0698. Use of the BUSS cask is authorized by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for the shipment of special form cesium chloride or strontium flouride capsules.

  15. The history and development of ships' bilge pumps, 1500-1840 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oertling, Thomas J

    1984-01-01

    sembly f th ~V'cto 's and the Pomone's pumps. 92 95 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Sailing ships played a very important role in the establishment and maintenance of European expansion. They were self-contained societies on the high seas, carrying... and patent information has been limited because of access and cost. ) A brief survey of material available in the U. S. National Archives yielded only one description of pumps and several shipyard account ledgers of repairs, which mentioned the purchase...

  16. Conceptual design of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor spent-fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, R B; Diggs, J M [eds.

    1982-04-01

    Details of a baseline conceptual design of a spent fuel shipping cask for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) are presented including an assessment of shielding, structural, thermal, fabrication and cask/plant interfacing problems. A basis for continued cask development and for new technological development is established. Alternates to the baseline design are briefly presented. Estimates of development schedules, cask utilization and cost schedules, and of personnel dose commitments during CRBR in-plant handling of the cask are also presented.

  17. Test plan/procedure for the SPM-1 shipping container system. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, B.D.

    1995-07-01

    The 49 CFR 173.465 Type A packaging tests will verify that SPM-1 will provide adequate protection and pass as a Type A package. Test will determine that the handle of the Pig will not penetrate through the plywood spacer and rupture the shipping container. Test plan/procedure provides planning, pre-test, setup, testing, and post-testing guidelines and procedures for conducting the {open_quotes}Free Drop Test{close_quotes} procedure for the SPM-1 package.

  18. Credit Points Overview Year 1 Year 2 Year 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manstein, Dietmar J.

    6. Public Presentations / Project Reports (i.e. Retreats) All N/A N/A 10 0 2nd Year Second N/A N/A 5 First N/A N/A 3,33 2nd Year Second N/A N/A 3,33 3rd Year Third N/A N/A 3,33 8. Presentation of Manuscripts at Journal Club All N/A N/A 3 0 1st Year First N/A N/A 1 2nd Year Second N/A N/A 1 3rd Year Third

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF EQUIVALENCY OF CANE AND SOFTWOOD BASED CELOTEX FOR MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R; Jason Varble, J

    2008-05-27

    Cane-based Celotex{trademark} has been used extensively in various Department of Energy (DOE) packages as a thermal insulator and impact absorber. Cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard was only manufactured by Knight-Celotex Fiberboard at their Marrero Plant in Louisiana. However, Knight-Celotex Fiberboard shut down their Marrero Plant in early 2007 due to impacts from hurricane Katrina and other economic factors. Therefore, cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is no longer available for use in the manufacture of new shipping packages requiring the material as a component. Current consolidation plans for the DOE Complex require the procurement of several thousand new Model 9975 shipping packages requiring cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard. Therefore, an alternative to cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is needed. Knight-Celotex currently manufactures Celotex{trademark} fiberboard from other cellulosic materials, such as hardwood and softwood. A review of the relevant literature has shown that softwood-based Celotex{trademark} meets all parameters important to the Model 9975 shipping package.

  20. DOE to ship 20,000 b/d of Elk Hills oil to SPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-11

    This paper reports that the U.S. department of Energy has decided to ship 20,000 b/d of its Elk Hills field production in California to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve on the Gulf Coast. DOE says prices are too low to sell the high quality Elk Hills Stevens zone oil on the California market. It had warned local buyers it might divert the oil to the Gulf Coast. It says shipping the Elk Hills crude to the SPR site at Big Hill, Tex., will save $2/bbl under the price of comparable crude delivered there for storage in the SPR. Pipeline shipments are to begin June 1 and continue for 4 months, totaling about 2.4 million bbl. DOE may or may not continue the shipments, depending on results of the semiannual Elk Hills crude oil sale in September. Reductions in the existing 12 sales contracts will be prorated among buyers. The 20,000 b/d volume is the most that can be shipped from the West Coast to the Gulf Coast through available pipelines.

  1. FastFEM: Breaking Wave Impact on Ships Wave breaking and wave impact on maritime structures are difficult to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    ships to oil rigs, repair vessels for offshore wind farms, rescue vessels, and coast guard vessels with structures. We aim to progress nonlinear and breaking wave interactions on offshore structures, in particular

  2. Bacteria in Ballast Water: The Shipping Industry's Contributions to the Transport and Distribution of Microbial Species in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neyland, Elizabeth B.

    2010-10-12

    The transportation of organisms in the ballast water of cargo ships has been recognized as a source of invasive species despite current control measures. Pathogenic bacteria in the ballast tank have been studied but the total diversity...

  3. An analytic-deliberative process for the selection and deployment of radiation detection systems for shipping ports and border crossings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shattan, Michael B

    2008-01-01

    Combating the threat of nuclear smuggling through shipping ports and border crossings has been recognized as a national priority in defending the US against nuclear terrorism. In light of the SAFE Port act of 2006, the ...

  4. Laboratory Experiments and Hydrodynamic Modeling of a Bed Leveler Used to Level the Bottom of Ship Channels after Dredging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Ephraim Udo

    2011-02-22

    This study was conducted to ascertain the impacts of bed leveling, following ship channel dredging operations, and to also investigate the hydrodynamic flow field around box bed levelers. Laboratory experiments were conducted with bed levelers...

  5. Physical Modeling of the Motions of a Container Ship Moored to a Dock with Comparison to Numerical Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi, Yuanzhe

    2013-07-11

    Container vessel motions need to be small when loading and offloading cargo while moored to wharfs. Waves and their reflections from structures can induce ship motions. These motions are characterized by six degrees of freedom, including...

  6. Fiscal Year 2012 | 1 FISCAL YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Fiscal Year 2012 | 1 NPR ANNUAL REPORT 2012 #12;12 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal Year 2012 | 2 TABLE Supporters Statement of Financial Position Statement of Activities 3 5 6 7 9 14 15 #12;12 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal the most dynamic and informative content to the air and on NPR.org in accordance with our mission

  7. Fiscal Year 2014 | 1 FISCAL YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Fiscal Year 2014 | 1 NPR ANNUAL REPORT 2014 #12;14 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal Year 2014 | 2 TABLE Supporters Statement of Financial Position Statement of Activities 3 6 7 8 10 15 16 #12;14 FISCAL YEAR Fiscal radio news and stories curated for them. Informing, engaging, inspiring and surprising, it's an entirely

  8. Fourth Year Curriculum Fourth Year (IE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    + 2013/14 Fourth Year Curriculum #12;+ Fourth Year (IE) ! Core ! MIE463F Integrated System Design ! CS Elective (1) #12;+ Fourth Year (ME): Fall ! Core ! MIE491Y Capstone ! Stream Courses (2) ! MIE422F * : Students may take only one of MIE422 and AER525; AER525 has limited enrolment. #12;+ Fourth Year (ME

  9. Seismic sequence stratigraphy of Pliocene-Pleistocene turbidite systems, Ship Shoal South Addition, Northwestern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Booyong

    2004-09-30

    STRATIGRAPHY OF PLIOCENE- PLEISTOCENE TURBIDITE SYSTEMS, SHIP SHOAL SOUTH ADDITION, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by BOOYONG KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISMIC SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY OF PLIOCENE- PLEISTOCENE TURBIDITE SYSTEMS, SHIP SHOAL SOUTH ADDITION, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis...

  10. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year Experience (IE) course is a senior year requirement for all students who entered

  11. Compensation of Wave-Induced Motion and Force Phenomena for Ship-Based High Performance Robotic and Human Amplifying Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, LJL

    2003-09-24

    The decrease in manpower and increase in material handling needs on many Naval vessels provides the motivation to explore the modeling and control of Naval robotic and robotic assistive devices. This report addresses the design, modeling, control and analysis of position and force controlled robotic systems operating on the deck of a moving ship. First we provide background information that quantifies the motion of the ship, both in terms of frequency and amplitude. We then formulate the motion of the ship in terms of homogeneous transforms. This transformation provides a link between the motion of the ship and the base of a manipulator. We model the kinematics of a manipulator as a serial extension of the ship motion. We then show how to use these transforms to formulate the kinetic and potential energy of a general, multi-degree of freedom manipulator moving on a ship. As a demonstration, we consider two examples: a one degree-of-freedom system experiencing three sea states operating in a plane to verify the methodology and a 3 degree of freedom system experiencing all six degrees of ship motion to illustrate the ease of computation and complexity of the solution. The first series of simulations explore the impact wave motion has on tracking performance of a position controlled robot. We provide a preliminary comparison between conventional linear control and Repetitive Learning Control (RLC) and show how fixed time delay RLC breaks down due to the varying nature wave disturbance frequency. Next, we explore the impact wave motion disturbances have on Human Amplification Technology (HAT). We begin with a description of the traditional HAT control methodology. Simulations show that the motion of the base of the robot, due to ship motion, generates disturbances forces reflected to the operator that significantly degrade the positioning accuracy and resolution at higher sea states. As with position-controlled manipulators, augmenting the control with a Repetitive Learning Controller has little impact due to the variable nature of the wave period. We then introduce a new approach to HAT control, Ship Motion Compensation for Force Control Systems (SMCFCS). This basic approach uses inclinometer and acceleration information from the base of the robot to compensate for ship motion disturbances. Results of the simulation study show over an order of magnitude decrease in the disturbance force reflected back to the operator and an order of magnitude increase in positioning accuracy and resolution.

  12. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 63 Credits 16 Credits 16

  13. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 63 Credits 16

  14. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of graduation. C O O P 66 Credits

  15. First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall Spring Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    First & Second Years Third Year (Junior) Forth Year (Senior) Fifth Year Fall1 Spring1 Fall Spring Fall For your Freshman and Sophomore years, students should follow the appropriate flow chart based on your year of gaduation. C O O P 66 Credits 16 Credits 13

  16. Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation of the 9965, 9968, 9972, 9973, 9974, and 9975 Shipping Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, R.L.

    1999-02-26

    A Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE) has been performed for the 9965, 9968, 9972, 9973, 9974, and 9975 SRS-designed shipping casks. This was done in support of the recertification effort for the 9965 and 9968, and the certification of the newly designed 9972-9975 series. The analysis supports the use of these packages as Fissile Class I for shipment of fissionable material from the SRS FB-Line, HB-Line, and from Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory. six different types of material were analyzed with varying Isotopic composition, of both oxide and metallic form. The mass limits required to support the fissile Class I rating for each of the envelopes are given in the Table below. These mass limits apply if DOE approves an exception as described in 10 CFR 71.55(c), such that water leakage into the primary containment vessel does not need to be considered in the criticality analysis. If this exception is not granted, the mass limits are lower than those shown below. this issue is discussed in detail in sections 5 and 6 of the report.One finding from this work is important enough to highlight in the abstract. The fire tests performed for this family of shipping casks indicates only minimal charring of the Celotex thermal insulation. Analysis of the casks with no Celotex insulation (assuming it has all burned away), results in values of k-eff that exceed 1.0. Therefore, the Celotex insulation must remain intact in order to guarantee sub criticality of the 9972-9975 family of shipping casks.

  17. Modular axial-flux permanent-magnet motor for ship propulsion drives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caricchi, F.; Crescimbini, F.; Honorati, O.

    1999-09-01

    Original features such as compactness and lightness make slotless axial-flux permanent-magnet machines (AFPMs) eligible for application in large power motor drives devoted to the direct drive of ship propellers. This paper discusses characteristics of AFPMs designed for application in marine propulsion, and machine performances such as efficiency, weight and torque density are evaluated for a comparison with those of conventional synchronous machines. A newly-conceived modular arrangement of the machine stator winding is proposed and experimental results taken from a small-size machine prototype are finally shown.

  18. The development of external sanitary facilities aboard ships of the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Joe J

    1985-01-01

    Centuries. (December 1985) Joe John S1mmons, III, B. A. , Southern Methodist University Chai rman of Advisory Comm1ttee: Dr. George F. Bass This thesis examines the appearance and development of seats-of-ease, roundhouses, pissdales, quarter galleries.... Stern turrets on two vessels drawn by the Master WA; late 15th century. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Figure 13. Battlemented stern turrets on ship from Gozzoli 's The Ra e of Helen; late 15th century. 41 Figure 14. Stern of a 15th-century carrack...

  19. Sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico, based on ship drift 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Johnnie Burdette

    1975-01-01

    The monthly sea-surface topography of the Gulf of Mexico is calculated from ship-drift observations. A correction for wind effect is determined from the part of the surface current velocity field estimated to result from the stress of the wind.... The topo- graphy i. s found to agree qualitatively with results of studies based on in situ measurements. The contribution of the wind effect is significant. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I wish to express my appreciation to Mr. John D. Cochrane for his guidance...

  20. REVIEW OF CLEANING SOLUTIONS FOR USE ON COMPONENTS OF THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30

    Several candidate cleaning products have been reviewed for use as a disinfectant on 9975 shipping package components which contain or have contacted mold. Following review of the compatibility of these products with each component, ammonia (ammonium hydroxide diluted to 1.5 wt% concentration) appears compatible with all package components that it might contact. Each of the other candidate products is incompatible with one or more package components. Accordingly, ammonia is recommended for this purpose. It is further recommended that all components which are disinfected be subsequently rinsed with di-ionized or distilled water.

  1. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173.

  2. AGING BEHAVIOR OF VITON O-RING SEALS IN THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.; Hoffman, E.; Dunn, K.; Bellamy, S.

    2012-01-13

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is storing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility. The Pu materials were packaged according to the DOE-STD-3013 standard and shipped to the SRS in Type B 9975 packages. The robust 9975 shipping package was not designed for long-term product storage, but it is a specified part of the storage configuration and the KAMS facility safety basis credits the 9975 design with containment. Within the 9975 package, nested stainless steel containment vessels are closed with dual O-ring seals based on Viton{reg_sign} GLT or GLT-S fluoroelastomer. The aging behavior of the O-ring compounds is being studied to provide the facility with advanced notice of nonconformance and to develop life prediction models. A combination of field surveillance, leak testing of surrogate fixtures aged at bounding service temperatures, and accelerated-aging methodologies based on compression stress-relaxation and oxygen consumption analysis is being used to evaluate seal performance. A summary of the surveillance program relative to seal aging behavior is presented.

  3. Deployment and Operation of the ES-3100 Type B Shipping Container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arbital, J. G.; Tousley, D. R.: Miller, D. B.

    2006-07-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is shipping, for disposition purposes, bulk quantities of fissile materials, primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU). The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) specification 6M container has been the workhorse for NNSA and many other shippers of radioactive material since the 1980s. However, the 6M does not conform to the packaging requirements in the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 71) and, for that reason, is being phased out for use in the DOE secure transportation system by the end of 2006. BWXT Y-12 developed and licensed the ES-3100 container to replace the DOT 6M. The ES-3100 was certified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in April 2006. The process of deploying the new package began in June 2005 and is planned to be completed in July 2006. The package will be fully operational and completely replace the DOT 6M at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) by October 2006. This paper reviews the deployment process and the mock loading station that was installed at National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Specialized equipment, tools, and instrumentation that support the handling and loading operations of the ES-3100 are described in detail. Loading options for other user sites are explored in preparation for deployment of this new state-of-the-art shipping container throughout the DOE complex and the private sector.

  4. Simulation and analysis of the plutonium shipping container subject to 30-foot drops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, C.; Gupta, N.K.; Gromada, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The shipping container 5320 is a shipping package for radioactive materials. In order to maintain the component in this packaging within the sub-critical state when subjected to any kind of Hypothetical Accident conditions (HAC), this Type B packaging is designed with various impact limiters. The present study is to examine the energy absorbing capacity of the impact limiter design of this container subjected to a 30-foot drop onto a flat unyielding horizontal surface in each of the three critical dropping orientations. This paper presents the results of a three dimensional nonlinear dynamic impact analysis. This analysis shows the deformed configuration of the container caused by the impact and also determines the effects of different stress wave paths in three distinct drops on the stress states in the critical component. The solution to the problem was obtained using the ABAQUS (explicit) finite element computer code. The nonlinearity of this analysis involves large structural deformation, elasto-plastic materials with strain hardening as well as multiple contact interfaces. Three drop orientations were studied, namely, top down impact, bottom down impact and side impact. Results will be compared against actual drop test data.

  5. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.

  6. PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.

    2011-08-23

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels for the 9977 shipping package using the MCNP radiation transport code to develop a set of response multipliers (Green's functions) for 'dose per particle' for each neutron and photon spectral group. The source spectrum for each isotope generated using the ORIGEN-S and RASTA computer codes was folded with the response multipliers to generate the dose rate per gram of each isotope in the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers. The maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped within the regulatory limits contained in 10 CFR 71.47 for dose rate at the surface of the package is determined. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. Furthermore, the results of this analysis can be easily extended to additional radioisotopes by simply evaluating the neutron and/or photon spectra of those isotopes and folding the spectral data with the Green's functions provided.

  7. Fiscal Year 2008 | 1 FISCAL YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Fiscal Year 2008 | 1 SPONSORS 08 FISCAL YEAR $1 million+ Angie's List General Motors Corporation Earth Share Ethanol Promotion and Information Council FOX Broadcasting Company #12;SPONSORS 08 FISCAL Motor Corporation Union of Concerned Scientists Universal Music Group University of Michigan School

  8. PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

    2012-05-09

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for each spectral group. For a given isotope, the source spectrum is folded with the response for each group. The summed contribution from all isotopes determines the total dose from the RAM in the container.

  9. A GREEN'S FUNCTION APPROACH FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan, S.

    2012-06-14

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package in compliance with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. The neutron and photon sources were calculated using both ORIGEN-S and RASTA. The response from a unit source in each neutron and photon group was calculated using MCNP5 with each unshielded and shielded container configuration. Effects of self-shielding on both neutron and photon response were evaluated by including either plutonium oxide or iron in the source region for the case with no shielded container. For the cases of actinides mixed with light elements, beryllium is the bounding light element. The added beryllium (10 to 90 percent of the actinide mass) in the cases studied represents between 9 and 47 percent concentration of the total mixture mass. For beryllium concentrations larger than 50 percent, the increase in the neutron source term and dose rate tend to increase at a much lower rate than at concentrations lower than 50%. The intimately mixed actinide-beryllium form used in these models is very conservative and thus the limits presented in this report are practical bounds on the mass that can be safely shipped. The calculated dose rate from one gram of each isotope was then used to determin the maximum amount of a single isotope that could be shipped in the Model 9977 Package (or packagings having the same or larger external dimensions as well as similar structural materials) and have the external radiation level within the regulatory dose limits at the surface of the package. The estimates of the mass limits presented would also serve as conservative limits for both the Models 9975 and 9978 packages. If a package contains a mixture of isotopes, the acceptability for shipment can be determined by a sum of fractions approach. It should be noted that the SGQ masses presented in this report represent limits that would comply with the external radiation limits under 10CFR Part 71. They do not necessarily bound lower limits that may be required to comply with other factors such as heat load of the package.

  10. Accomplishments Fiscal Year 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yorke, James

    18 Accomplishments Fiscal Year 2012 #12;Office of Information Technology: Providing Computing of MarylandAccomplishment Highlights -- Fiscal Year 2012 For many years, the Office of Information Technology. This publication will inform you about the organization's accomplishments during fiscal year 2012 -- or July 1

  11. MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick J. Migliore

    2009-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

  12. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr.; Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  13. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Buckner, Mark A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Bryan, William L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-05-03

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsha Keister; Kathryn McBride

    2006-08-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge—to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned.

  15. Certification testing of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronowski, D.R.; Madsen, M.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Heat Source/Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generator shipping counter is a Type B packaging currently under development by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Type B packaging for transporting radioactive material is required to maintain containment and shielding after being exposed to normal and hypothetical accident environments defined in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. A combination of testing and analysis is used to verify the adequacy of this packaging design. This report documents the testing portion of the design verification. Six tests were conducted on a prototype package: a water spray test, a 4-foot normal conditions drop test, a 30-foot drop test, a 40-inch puncture test, a 30-minute thermal test, and an 8-hour immersion test.

  16. Solid waste 30-year volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Armacost, L.L.; DeForest, T.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Williams, N.C.

    1994-06-01

    A 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site is described in this report. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste that will require treatment, storage, and disposal at Hanford`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during the 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The data used to complete this document were collected from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently, or are planning to, ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site. An analysis of the data suggests that over 300,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed at Hanford`s SWOC over the next 30 years. An extensive effort was made this year to collect this information. The 1993 solid waste forecast was used as a starting point, which identified approximately 100,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste to be sent to the SWOC. After analyzing the forecast waste volume, it was determined that additional waste was expected from the tank waste remediation system (TWRS), onsite decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities, and onsite remedial action (RA) activities. Data presented in this report establish a starting point for solid waste management planning. It is recognized that forecast estimates will vary (typically increasing) as facility planning and missions continue to change and become better defined, but the information presented still provides useful insight into Hanford`s future solid waste management requirements.

  17. For more information on UC SHIP, visit www.ucop.edu/ucship 1WWW.UCOP.EDU/UCSHIP UC SANTA CRUZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    For more information on UC SHIP, visit www.ucop.edu/ucship 1WWW.UCOP.EDU/UCSHIP UC STUDENT HEALTH information #12;For more information on UC SHIP, visit www.ucop.edu/ucship 3 CONVENIENT, AFFORDABLE, CARING UC for a healthy lifestyle is far easier when Student Health Services (SHS) is right on campus and outstanding

  18. Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube-Oil-Consumption Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    are strongly related to NOx emissions, and in order to reach extremely low emission levels, reduction1 Prevention of Air Pollution from Ships: Diesel Engine Particulate Emission Reduction via Lube of the consumed lube-oil. Significant reductions in particulate emission rate could be obtained by controlling

  19. On the Influence of Ship Motion Prediction Accuracy on Motion Planning and Control of Robotic Manipulators on Seaborne Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    the manipulator and, when not anticipated and accounted for, can make the operation inaccurate, extremely energy acting on the ship due to the interaction with the waves and the wind are very complex and one cannot predictions thus directly determines how well we can com- pensate for or take advantage of the inertial forces

  20. Personal revised version of: Howitt, O. J. A., et al., Carbon emissions from international cruise ship passengers travel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    shipping (Buhaug et al., 2009). The burning of oil (mostly in the form of heavy fuel oil, as well as marine as 1600 MJ per visitor night, 12 times larger than the value for a land-based hotel. Using a simple price relative decrease in demand than plane journeys when the impact of carbon pricing was analysed

  1. Steven Soltysik, Maritime Educator, Kaua`i, Hawai`i Science Teachers Aboard Research Ships (STARS) Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The sunrise, and sunsets at sea, the brilliant stars clear and amazing offshore, wind and wave, the gentle place! I soon found the common bond of scientists, educators, crew and officers working offshore for 5 imagine. I have crossed oceans on "yachts," worked commercially on large cruise ships, and lived aboard

  2. Operator Centered Design of Ship Systems Susan F. Chipman, Ph.D., U. S. Office of Naval Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kieras, David E.

    1 Operator Centered Design of Ship Systems Susan F. Chipman, Ph.D., U. S. Office of Naval Research science research, much of it supported by the Office of Naval Research, is bringing about a scientific revolution in our understanding of the human operator. It is yielding computational theories of human

  3. Transportation of Dangerous Goods Anyone involved with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be trained. This includes shipping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TDG Transportation of Dangerous Goods Anyone involved with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be trained. This includes shipping and receiving. All receiving of Dangerous Goods for the Science in Departmental Offices or labs. How do you know if the package is a dangerous goods shipment? Parcels containing

  4. If you are intrigued by the technologies that allow for the construction of highly complex modern ships, the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    of hydrodynamics and structural materials. This is necessary as such work generally cannot be based on past with the study of mathematics, advanced hydrodynamics, properties of new materials, advanced, methods. Courses cover topics such as cavitation of propellers and sailing yacht performance. Specialisation Ship

  5. Multi-Agent Based Federated Control of Large-Scale Systems with Application to Ship Roll Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Multi-Agent Based Federated Control of Large-Scale Systems with Application to Ship Roll Control of many interconnected local systems. Conventional centralized control schemes are not suitable, a multi-agent based federated control system is composed of local autonomous subsystems (agent

  6. Zhiyu Jiang, Department of Marine Technology & Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Dynamic response of wind turbines in fault and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    response of wind turbines in fault and shutdown conditions Zhiyu Jiang Deptartment of Marine Technology://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/12/why-did-a-wind-turbine-self-co.html #12;3 Zhiyu Jiang, Department of Marine Technology & Centre & Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Control and protection of wind turbines Emergency shutdown Pitch

  7. A Training Simulation System with Realistic Autonomous Ship Control Monica Nicolescu, Ryan Leigh, Adam Olenderski, Lt. Ryan Aleson (Retd.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dascalu, Sergiu

    1 A Training Simulation System with Realistic Autonomous Ship Control Monica Nicolescu, Ryan Leigh In this paper we present a computational approach to developing effective training systems for virtual simulation environments. In particular, we focus on a Naval simulation system, used for training of conning

  8. A sound budget for the southeastern Bering Sea: measuring wind, rainfall, shipping and other sources of underwater sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by wind-driven breaking waves and precipitation. These physical processes generate sound principally,6 . Because wind-driven breaking waves and raindrop splashes generate different distributions of bubbles sizesA sound budget for the southeastern Bering Sea: measuring wind, rainfall, shipping and other

  9. VTRA 2010 2013 Preventing Oil Spills from Large Ships and Barges in Northern Puget Sound & Strait of Juan de Fuca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    VTRA 2010 2013 Preventing Oil Spills from Large Ships and Barges in Northern Puget Sound & Strait Oil Spill Maritime Simulation Incident Data Expert Judgment & Accident Data Oil Outflow Model TOTAL 2010 TRAFFIC DENSITY 75.2% - NON Focus Vessel 17.0% - CARGO Focus Vessel 7.8% - OIL Focus Vessel + 100

  10. Shipping to Streaming: Is this shift green? Manikandan Somasundaram, Anand Seetharam, Jim Kurose, Don Towsley, Prashant Shenoy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ), allowing us to de- termine the extent to which streaming can green this service. We find that non-energyShipping to Streaming: Is this shift green? Manikandan Somasundaram, Anand Seetharam, Jim Kurose. In this paper we investigate the environmental- and energy-related impacts of these two methods of movie content

  11. Shipping to Streaming: Is this shift green? Anand Seetharam, Manikandan Somasundaram, Don Towsley, Jim Kurose, Prashant Shenoy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to determine the extent to which streaming can "green" this service. We find that non- energy optimizedShipping to Streaming: Is this shift green? Anand Seetharam, Manikandan Somasundaram, Don Towsley. In this paper we investigate the environmental- and energy-related impacts of these two methods of movie content

  12. EXAMINE AND EVALUATE A PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; D. Braxton Scherz

    2003-04-24

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy cooperative research project is to define, describe, and validate, a process to utilize salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships. The project defines the process as receiving LNG from a ship, pumping the LNG up to cavern injection pressures, warming it to cavern compatible temperatures, injecting the warmed vapor directly into salt caverns for storage, and distribution to the pipeline network. The performance of work under this agreement is based on U.S. Patent 5,511,905, and other U.S. and Foreign pending patent applications. The cost sharing participants in the research are The National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. Department of Energy), BP America Production Company, Bluewater Offshore Production Systems (U.S.A.), Inc., and HNG Storage, L.P. Initial results indicate that a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at about half the capital cost, less than half the operating costs and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. There is a significant body of knowledge and practice concerning natural gas storage in salt caverns, and there is a considerable body of knowledge and practice in handling LNG, but there has never been any attempt to develop a process whereby the two technologies can be combined. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or terrorist acts, and much more acceptable to the community. The project team developed conceptual designs of two salt cavern based LNG terminals, one with caverns located in Calcasieu Parish Louisiana, and the second in Vermilion block 179 about 50 miles offshore Louisiana. These conceptual designs were compared to conventional tank based LNG terminals and demonstrate superior security, economy and capacity. The potential for the development of LNG receiving terminals, utilizing salt caverns for storage and the existing comprehensive pipeline system has profound implications for the next generation of LNG terminals. LNG imports are expected to become an increasingly more important part of the U.S. energy supply and the capacities to receive LNG securely, safely, and economically must be expanded. Salt cavern LNG receiving terminals both in onshore and offshore locations can be quickly built and provide additional import capacity into the U.S. exceeding 6-10 Bcf/day in the aggregate.

  13. Robust Solution to Difficult Hydrogen Issues When Shipping Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Countiss, S. S.; Basabilvazo, G. T.; Moody, D. C. III; Lott, S. A.; Pickerell, M.; Baca, T.; CH2M Hill; Tujague, S.; Svetlik, H.; Hannah, T.

    2003-02-27

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been open, receiving, and disposing of transuranic (TRU) waste since March 26, 1999. The majority of the waste has a path forward for shipment to and disposal at the WIPP, but there are about two percent (2%) or approximately 3,020 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) of the volume of TRU waste (high wattage TRU waste) that is not shippable because of gas generation limits set by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This waste includes plutonium-238 waste, solidified organic waste, and other high plutonium-239 wastes. Flammable gases are potentially generated during transport of TRU waste by the radiolysis of hydrogenous materials and therefore, the concentration at the end of the shipping period must be predicted. Two options are currently available to TRU waste sites for solving this problem: (1) gas generation testing on each drum, and (2) waste form modification by repackaging and/or treatment. Repackaging some of the high wattage waste may require up to 20:1 drum increase to meet the gas generation limits of less than five percent (5%) hydrogen in the inner most layer of confinement (the layer closest to the waste). (This is the limit set by the NRC.) These options increase waste handling and transportation risks and there are high costs and potential worker exposure associated with repackaging this high-wattage TRU waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is pursuing a twofold approach to develop a shipping path for these wastes. They are: regulatory change and technology development. For the regulatory change, a more detailed knowledge of the high wattage waste (e.g., void volumes, gas generation potential of specific chemical constituents) may allow refinement of the current assumptions in the gas generation model for Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging for Contact-Handled (CH) TRU waste. For technology development, one of the options being pursued is the use of a robust container, the ARROW-PAK{trademark} System. (1) The ARROW-PAK{trademark} is a macroencapsulation treatment technology, developed by Boh Environmental, LLC, New Orleans, Louisiana. This technology has been designed to withstand any unexpected hydrogen deflagration (i.e. no consequence) and other benefits such as criticality control.

  14. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE SUBJECTED TO CLOSURE TORQUES AND SEQUENTIAL IMPACTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, T; Paul Blanton, P; Kurt Eberl, K

    2007-07-09

    This paper presents a finite-element technique to simulate the structural responses and to evaluate the cumulative damage of a radioactive material packaging requiring bolt closure-tightening torque and subjected to the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 part 71 (10CFR71). Existing finite-element methods for modeling closure stresses from bolt pre-load are not readily adaptable to dynamic analyses. The HAC events are required to occur sequentially per 10CFR71 and thus the evaluation of the cumulative damage is desirable. Generally, each HAC event is analyzed separately and the cumulative damage is partially addressed by superposition. This results in relying on additional physical testing to comply with 10CFR71 requirements for assessment of cumulative damage. The proposed technique utilizes the combination of kinematic constraints, rigid-body motions and structural deformations to overcome some of the difficulties encountered in modeling the effect of cumulative damage. This methodology provides improved numerical solutions in compliance with the 10CFR71 requirements for sequential HAC tests. Analyses were performed for the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) designed by Savannah River National Laboratory to demonstrate the applications of the technique. The methodology proposed simulates the closure bolt torque preload followed by the sequential HAC events, the 30-foot drop and the 30-foot dynamic crush. The analytical results will be compared to the package test data.

  15. Alternate approaches to verifying the structural adequacy of the Defense High Level Waste Shipping Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmer, A.; Koploy, M.

    1991-12-01

    In the early 1980s, the US Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) initiated a project to develop a safe and efficient transportation system for defense high level waste (DHLW). A long-standing objective of the DHLW transportation project is to develop a truck cask that represents the leading edge of cask technology as well as one that fully complies with all applicable DOE, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations. General Atomics (GA) designed the DHLW Truck Shipping Cask using state-of-the-art analytical techniques verified by model testing performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The analytical techniques include two approaches, inelastic analysis and elastic analysis. This topical report presents the results of the two analytical approaches and the model testing results. The purpose of this work is to show that there are two viable analytical alternatives to verify the structural adequacy of a Type B package and to obtain an NRC license. It addition, this data will help to support the future acceptance by the NRC of inelastic analysis as a tool in packaging design and licensing.

  16. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  17. An analysis of the qualification criteria for small radioactive material shipping packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClure, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    The RAM package design certification process has two important elements, testing and acceptance. These terms sound very similar but they have specific meanings. Qualification testing in the context of this study is the imposition of simulated accident test conditions upon the candidate package design. (Normal transportation environments may also be included.) Following qualification testing, the acceptance criteria provide the performance levels which, if demonstrated, indicate the ability of the RAM package to sustain the severity of the qualification testing sequence and yet maintain specified levels of package integrity. This study has used Severities of Transportation Accidents as a data base to examine the regulatory test criteria which are required to be met by small packages containing Type B quantities of radioactive material (RAM). The basic findings indicate that the present regulatory test standards provide significantly higher levels of protection for the surface transportation modes (truck, rail) than for RAM packages shipped by aircraft. It should also be noted that various risk assessment studies have shown that the risk to the public due to severe transport accidents by surface and air transport modes is very low. A key element in this study was the quantification of the severity of the transportation accident environment and the severity of the present qualification test standards (called qualification test standards in this document) so that a direct comparison could be made between them to assess the effectiveness of the existing qualification test standards. The manner in which this was accomplished is described.

  18. Implications of the Baltimore Rail Tunnel Fire for Full-Scale Testing of Shipping Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halstead, R. J.; Dilger, F.

    2003-02-25

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) does not currently require full-scale physical testing of shipping casks as part of its certification process. Stakeholders have long urged NRC to require full-scale testing as part of certification. NRC is currently preparing a full-scale casktesting proposal as part of the Package Performance Study (PPS) that grew out of the NRC reexamination of the Modal Study. The State of Nevada and Clark County remain committed to the position that demonstration testing would not be an acceptable substitute for a combination of full-scale testing, scale-model tests, and computer simulation of each new cask design prior to certification. Based on previous analyses of cask testing issues, and on preliminary findings regarding the July 2001 Baltimore rail tunnel fire, the authors recommend that NRC prioritize extra-regulatory thermal testing of a large rail cask and the GA-4 truck cask under the PPS. The specific fire conditions and other aspects of the full-scale extra-regulatory tests recommended for the PPS are yet to be determined. NRC, in consultation with stakeholders, must consider past real-world accidents and computer simulations to establish temperature failure thresholds for cask containment and fuel cladding. The cost of extra-regulatory thermal testing is yet to be determined. The minimum cost for regulatory thermal testing of a legal-weight truck cask would likely be $3.3-3.8 million.

  19. Design, construction, and use of a shipping case for radioactive sources used in the calibration of portal monitors in the radiation portal monitoring project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, Elwood A.; Hensley, Walter K.

    2009-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is working with US Customs and Border Protection to assist in the installation of radiation portal monitors. We need to provide radioactive sources – both gamma- and neutron-emitting – to ports of entry where the monitors are being installed. The monitors must be calibrated to verify proper operation and detection sensitivity. We designed a portable source-shipping case using numerical modeling to predict the neutron dose rate at the case’s surface. The shipping case including radioactive sources meets the DOT requirements for “limited quantity.” Over 300 shipments, domestic and international, were made in FY2008 using this type of shipping case.

  20. Final Year Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubsch, Tristan

    2013-06-20

    In the last years of this eighteen-year grant project, the research efforts have focused mostly on the study of off-shell representations of supersymmetry, both on the worldline and on the world- sheet, i.e., both in supersymmetric quantum mechanics and in supersymmetric field theory in 1+1-dimensional spacetime.

  1. The Second Year Progression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Second Year Progression Looking forward In the Second Year You Learn: The Nuts and Bolts of Computer Floor/via email/ (on Blackboard). Support of group work in Software Engineering! Discussion of work Floor/via email/ (on Blackboard). Support of group work in Software Engineering! Discussion of work

  2. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-02-01

    The structural properties of spent nuclear fuel shipping containers vary as a function of the cask wall temperature. An analysis is performed to determine the effect of a realistic, though bounding, hot day environment on the thermal behavior of spent fuel shipping casks. These results are compared to those which develop under a steady-state application of the prescribed normal thermal conditions of 10CFR71. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by using the steady-state application of the regulatory boundary conditions. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the regulatory condition. This is due to the conservative assumptions present in the ambient conditions used. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations which penetrate the cask wall have maxima substantially less than the corresponding temperatures obtained when applying the steady-state regulatory boundary conditions. Therefore, it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the steady-state interpretation of the 10CFR71 normal conditions.

  3. PROVISIONAL TERM & VACATION -2014 First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth and Fifth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarrett, Thomas H.

    January 2014 BSc AUDIOLOGY AND BSc SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY 1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 17 Feb 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 17 Feb ­ 04 Apr 13 Jan ­ 04 Apr 14 Apr ­ 13 Jun 21 Jul ­ 29 Aug 08 Sep 2014 13 January 2014 BSc PHYSIOTHERAPY 1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 17 Feb ­ 04 Apr 13 Jan ­ 04

  4. A NOVEL PROCESS TO USE SALT CAVERNS TO RECEIVE SHIP BORNE LNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael M. McCall; William M. Bishop; Marcus Krekel; James F. Davis; D. Braxton Scherz

    2005-05-31

    This cooperative research project validates use of man made salt caverns to receive and store the cargoes of LNG ships in lieu of large liquid LNG tanks. Salt caverns will not tolerate direct injection of LNG because it is a cryogenic liquid, too cold for contact with salt. This research confirmed the technical processes and the economic benefits of pressuring the LNG up to dense phase, warming it to salt compatible temperatures and then directly injecting the dense phase gas into salt caverns for storage. The use of salt caverns to store natural gas sourced from LNG imports, particularly when located offshore, provides a highly secure, large scale and lower cost import facility as an alternative to tank based LNG import terminals. This design can unload a ship in the same time as unloading at a tank based terminal. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve uses man made salt caverns to securely store large quantities of crude oil. Similarly, this project describes a novel application of salt cavern gas storage technologies used for the first time in conjunction with LNG receiving. The energy industry uses man made salt caverns to store an array of gases and liquids but has never used man made salt caverns directly in the importation of LNG. This project has adapted and expanded the field of salt cavern storage technology and combined it with novel equipment and processes to accommodate LNG importation. The salt cavern based LNG receiving terminal described in the project can be located onshore or offshore, but the focus of the design and cost estimates has been on an offshore location, away from congested channels and ports. The salt cavern based terminal can provide large volumes of gas storage, high deliverability from storage, and is simplified in operation compared to tank based LNG terminals. Phase I of this project included mathematical modeling that proved a salt cavern based receiving terminal could be built at lower capital cost, and would have significantly higher delivery capacity, shorter construction time, and be much more secure than a conventional liquid tank based terminal. Operating costs of a salt cavern terminal are lower than tank based terminals because ''boil off'' is eliminated and maintenance costs of caverns are lower than LNG tanks. Phase II included the development of offshore mooring designs, wave tank tests, high pressure LNG pump field tests, heat exchanger field tests, and development of a model offshore LNG facility and cavern design. Engineers designed a model facility, prepared equipment lists, and confirmed capital and operating costs. In addition, vendors quoted fabrication and installation costs, confirming that an offshore salt cavern based LNG terminal would have lower capital and operating costs than a similarly sized offshore tank based terminal. Salt cavern storage is infinitely more secure than surface storage tanks, far less susceptible to accidents or purposeful damage, and much more acceptable to the community. More than thirty industry participants provided cost sharing, technical expertise, and guidance in the conduct and evaluation of the field tests, facility design and operating and cost estimates. Their close participation has accelerated the industry's acceptance of the conclusions of this research. The industry participants also developed and submitted several alternative designs for offshore mooring and for high pressure LNG heat exchangers in addition to those that were field tested in this project. HNG Storage, a developer, owner, and operator of natural gas storage facilities, and a participant in the DOE research has announced they will lead the development of the first offshore salt cavern based LNG import facility. Which will be called the Freedom LNG Terminal. It will be located offshore Louisiana, and is expected to be jointly developed with other members of the research group yet to be named. An offshore port license application is scheduled to be filed by fourth quarter 2005 and the terminal could be operational by 2009. This terminal allows the large volume importa

  5. Evaluation of Ships' Ballast Water as a Vector for Transfer of Pathogenic Bacteria to Marine Protected Areas in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Theresa L

    2013-05-10

    . These organisms have moved to the forefront of ballast water management (BWM) trepidations because they compose serious threats to human health as well as Marine Protected Area (MPA) ecosystems such as coral reefs. Ballasting activities of ships calling...

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30

    The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

  7. Determing Degradation Of Fiberboard In The 9975 Shipping Package By Measuring Axial Gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackney, E. R.; Dougherty, W. L.; Dunn, K. A.; Stefek, T. M

    2013-08-01

    Currently, thousands of model 9975 transportation packages are in use by the US Department of Energy (DOE); the design of which has been certified by DOE for shipment of Type B radioactive and fissile materials in accordance with Part 71, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), or 10 CFR 71, Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. These transportation packages are also approved for the storage of DOE-STD-3013 containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As such, the 9975 has been continuously exposed to the service environment for a period of time greater than the approved transportation service life. In order to ensure the material integrity as specified in the safety basis, an extensive surveillance program is in place in K-Area Complex (KAC) to monitor the structural and thermal properties of the fiberboard of the 9975 shipping packages. The surveillance approach uses a combination of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) field surveillance and Destructive Examination (DE) lab testing to validate the 9975 performance assumptions. The fiberboard in the 9975 is credited with thermal insulation, criticality control and resistance to crushing. During surveillance monitoring in KAC, an increased axial gap of the fiberboard was discovered on selected items packaged at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Many of these packages were later found to contain excess moisture. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the fiberboard under storage conditions and during transport. In laboratory testing, the higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction of fiberboard material and compaction rate. The fiberboard height is reduced by compression of the layers. This change is observed directly in the axial gap between the flange and the air shield. The axial gap measurement is made during the pre-use inspection or during the annual recertification process and is a screening measurement for changes in the fiberboard.

  8. FISCAL YEAR ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    FISCAL YEAR 2013 -2014 #12;1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Report completed by Daniel Newell Program Manager Workforce & Economic Development SJSU Career Center Staff Thank you for providing expertise and information Staffing ....................................................................... 9 Information Sessions

  9. Biochemistry Biochemist 6 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groisman, Pablo

    Biochemistry Biochemist ­ 6 years Objective To train professionals of a high scientific of studies has the following orientations: Vegetal and Ground Biochemistry; Microbiology and Inmunobiology ; Basic Biochemistry, Biotechnology; Clinic Biochemistry; Food Science and Nutrition. Besides, students

  10. Welcome Year in Review

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Training Meeting Orlando, Florida-May 23-25, 2006 Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy & the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Welcome & Year In Review Peter Dessaules...

  11. Project Year Project Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Grace Brush, Geography & Environmental Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Dan Bain, Geography & Environmental Engineering, Whiting School. Through this project, the team proposes to develop a variety of resources: a set of general, web

  12. A yearly review of noteworthy events 2012-13 Milestones2012-13 Quick Stats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrel, a partner- ship between Mason's Arlington Campus and Office of Sustainability, and the Arling

  13. Status Report - Cane Fiberboard Properties and Degradation Rates for Storage of the 9975 Shipping Package in KAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W. L.

    2013-01-31

    Thermal, mechanical and physical properties have been measured on cane fiberboard samples following accelerated aging for up to approximately 7 years. The aging environments have included elevated temperature < 250 ?F (the maximum allowed service temperature for fiberboard in 9975 packages) and elevated humidity. The results from this testing have been analyzed, and aging models fit to the data. Correlations relating several properties (thermal conductivity, energy absorption, weight loss and height decrease) to their rate of change in potential storage environments have been developed. Combined with an estimate of the actual conditions the fiberboard experiences in KAMS, these models allow development of service life predictions. Some of the predicted degradation rates presented in this report are relatively extreme. However, these relate to environments that do not exist within KAMS, or would be postulated only as upset conditions that would not likely persist for an extended period. For a typical package with ~10 watts internal heat load or less, and ambient temperatures below 90 ?F, the fiberboard experiences storage conditions less severe than any of the aging environments. Little or no degradation of the fiberboard is expected for typical storage conditions. It should be noted that the ultimate service life will be determined by the cumulative effect of degradation from all the conditions these packages might encounter. The assumptions and inputs behind the models in this report should be well understood before attempting to identify an actual service life in KAMS. Additional data continue to be collected to permit future refinements to the models and assumptions. For developing service life predictions, the ambient conditions within KAMS can be reasonably identified, and the temperature profiles within the various packages (with a range of heat loads and at varying locations within an array of packages) can be calculated. However, the humidity within the package is not as well characterized. While the outer drum does not provide an air-tight seal, it does greatly restrict the gain or loss of moisture in the fiberboard. Preliminary efforts have identified a relationship between the moisture content of fiberboard samples and the relative humidity of the surrounding air, but further work is needed in this area. Improvement in understanding this relationship might be realized with a change in the way humidity data are collected during field surveillances. It is recommended that the humidity be measured through a caplug hole before the package is removed from its storage location. The package would remain in thermal equilibrium, and anomalous humidity changes could be avoided. Further work should be performed to better define KAMS storage conditions and the environment within the 9975 shipping packages, and to identify appropriate limits for each property. This should be a joint effort by SRNL and NMM personnel. The results and model predictions presented in this report are applicable to 9975 packages with cane fiberboard overpack assemblies. A separate effort is underway to identify whether softwood fiberboard would behave similarly. In addition, the degradation models do not address the effects of non-conforming conditions such as the presence of excess moisture and mold, or beetle infestations.

  14. Outlook: The Next Twenty Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    all this discussion, the outlook for the next twenty yearsLBNL-54470 OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H. MURAYAMAUniversity of California. OUTLOOK: THE NEXT TWENTY YEARS H.

  15. A Study of Stranding of Juvenile Salmon by Ship Wakes Along the Lower Columbia River Using a Before-and-After Design: Before-Phase Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearson, Walter H.; Skalski, J R.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Miller, Martin C.; Johnson, Gary E.; Williams, Greg D.; Southard, John A.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.

    2006-02-01

    Ship wakes produced by deep-draft vessels transiting the lower Columbia River have been observed to cause stranding of juvenile salmon. Proposed deepening of the Columbia River navigation channel has raised concerns about the potential impact of the deepening project on juvenile salmon stranding. The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory design and conduct a study to assess stranding impacts that may be associated with channel deepening. The basic study design was a multivariate analysis of covariance of field observations and measurements under a statistical design for a before and after impact comparison. We have summarized field activities and statistical analyses for the ?before? component of the study here. Stranding occurred at all three sampling sites and during all three sampling seasons (Summer 2004, Winter 2005, and Spring 2005), for a total of 46 stranding events during 126 observed vessel passages. The highest occurrence of stranding occurred at Barlow Point, WA, where 53% of the observed events resulted in stranding. Other sites included Sauvie Island, OR (37%) and County Line Park, WA (15%). To develop an appropriate impact assessment model that accounted for relevant covariates, regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationships between stranding probability and other factors. Nineteen independent variables were considered as potential factors affecting the incidence of juvenile salmon stranding, including tidal stage, tidal height, river flow, current velocity, ship type, ship direction, ship condition (loaded/unloaded), ship speed, ship size, and a proxy variable for ship kinetic energy. In addition to the ambient and ship characteristics listed above, site, season, and fish density were also considered. Although no single factor appears as the primary factor for stranding, statistical analyses of the covariates resulted in the following equations: (1) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height + Salmonid Density + Kinetic energy proxy ? Tidal Height + Tidal Height x Salmonid Density. (2) Stranding Probability {approx} Location + Total Wave Distance + Salmonid Density Index. (3) Log(Total Wave Height) {approx} Ship Block + Tidal Height + Location + Ship Speed. (4) Log(Total Wave Excursion Across the Beach) {approx} Location + Kinetic Energy Proxy + Tidal Height The above equations form the basis for a conceptual model of the factors leading to salmon stranding. The equations also form the basis for an approach for assessing impacts of dredging under the before/after study design.

  16. BSME Curriculum Freshman Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Manufacturing Practices 3 ME 350 Static Machine Components 3 ME 360 Control and Instrumentation Components (W) 3 Year First Semester Hours ME 415 Energy Systems Design OR ME 407 Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning 2 or 3 ME 450 Dynamic Machine Components 3 ME 460 Thermal Systems Instrumentation (W) 3 ME 489

  17. Future naval ship procurement : a case study of the Navy's next-generation destroyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaglom, Peter Stampfl

    2006-01-01

    Cost growth and inefficiencies are a serious problem in almost all major U.S. defense procurement programs, and have existed for many years despite repeated efforts to control them. These problems are particularly virulent ...

  18. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL SHIPPING PACKAGINGS AND METAL TO METAL SEALS FOUND IN THE CLOSURES OF CONTAINMENT VESSELS INCORPORATING CONE SEAL CLOSURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Allen Smith, A

    2007-06-06

    The containment vessels for the Model 9975 radioactive material shipping packaging employ a cone-seal closure. The possibility of a metal-to-metal seal forming between the mating conical surfaces, independent of the elastomer seals, has been raised. It was postulated that such an occurrence would compromise the containment vessel hydrostatic and leakage tests. The possibility of formation of such a seal has been investigated by testing and by structural and statistical analyses. The results of the testing and the statistical analysis demonstrate and procedural changes ensure that hydrostatic proof and annual leakage testing can be accomplished to the appropriate standards.

  19. Scripps Stories: Days to Remember, In Celebration of 90 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhns, Kittie Kerr; Shor, Betty

    1993-01-01

    and myself were approaching the shipyard by car. Crossingthe channel next to the shipyard, we noticed that a ship onwe proceeded to the shipyard, where Dr. Scholander, with

  20. Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  1. 2013 Year in Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i sEnergy ItMisc.theTechnology LaboratoryYear

  2. Planning for Years to Come

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Planning for Years to Come Planning for Years to Come LANL's Governing Policy on the Environment August 1, 2013 Water sampling tour for the Association of Experiential Education...

  3. Reliability of the LaCoste-Romberg Surface Ship Gravity Meter S-9 during cruise 60-H-13 of the Texas A. & M. Research Vessel "Hidalgo" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiburis, Edward Frank

    1962-01-01

    RELIABILITY OF THE LaCOSTE-ROMBERG SURFACE SH'IP GRAVITY METER S -9 DURING C R U I S E 60-8-13 0 F T H E T E R A S A. & M. R E S E . A R C 8 V E S S . E . L " HIDALGO " A Thesis By EDWARD F. CHIBURIS Submitted to the Graduate School... of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1962 Major Sub)ect: Geophysics RELIABILITY OF THE LaCOSTE-ROMBERG SURFACE SHIP GRAVITY METERS-9 DURING C R U I S E 60-H...

  4. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  5. A comparison of spent fuel shipping cask response to 10 CFR 71 normal conditions and realistic hot day extremes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, S.J.; Gianoulakis, S.E.

    1994-04-01

    An examination of the effect of a realistic (though conservative) hot day environment on the thermal transient behavior of spent fuel shipping casks is made. These results are compared to those that develop under the prescribed normal thermal condition of 10 CFR 71. Of specific concern are the characteristics of propagating thermal waves, which are set up by diurnal variations of temperature and insolation in the outdoor environment. In order to arrive at a realistic approximation of these variations on a conservative hot day, actual temperature and insolation measurements have been obtained from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for representatively hot and high heat flux days. Thus, the use of authentic meteorological data ensures the realistic approach sought. Further supporting the desired realism of the modeling effort is the use of realistic cask configurations in which multiple laminations of structural, shielding, and other materials are expected to attenuate the propagating thermal waves. The completed analysis revealed that the majority of wall temperatures, for a wide variety of spent fuel shipping cask configurations, fall well below those predicted by enforcement of the regulatory environmental conditions of 10 CFR 71. It was found that maximum temperatures at the cask surface occasionally lie above temperatures predicted under the prescribed regulatory conditions. However, the temperature differences are small enough that the normal conservative assumptions that are made in the course of typical cask evaluations should correct for any potential violations. The analysis demonstrates that diurnal temperature variations that penetrate the cask wall all have maxima substantially less than the corresponding regulatory solutions. Therefore it is certain that vital cask components and the spent fuel itself will not exceed the temperatures calculated by use of the conditions of 10 CFR 71.

  6. Refurbishment and modification of existing protective shipping packages (for 30-inch UF{sub 6} cylinders) per USDOT specification No. USA-DOT-21PF-1A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Housholder, W.R. [Nuclear Containers, Incorporated, Elizabethton, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    This paper addresses the refurbishment procedures for existing shipping containers for 30-inch diameter UF{sub 6} cylinders in accordance with DOT Specification 21PF-1 and the criteria used to determine rejection when such packages are unsuitable for refurbishment.

  7. A Bio-Inspired Multi-Agent System Framework for Real-Time Load Management in All-Electric Ship Power Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Xianyong

    2012-07-16

    the impact of pulse loads on the power quality of all-electric ship power systems. Further, the switch status or power set-point of loads in DC zones can be optimally determined to dynamically balance the generation and load while satisfying the operational...

  8. Ship Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C. W. FAIRALL, AND SERGIO PEZOA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    of upwelling, surface fluxes, and transport, which in turn depend on the wind and solar forcing at the ocean surface. Southeasterly winds blow parallel to the coast in the Southern Hemisphere, causing offshore EkmanShip Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C

  9. FedEx Ship Manager Overview Copyright 2014 Federal Express Corporation. All rights reserved. No portion of this document may be copied,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    to print your label. Please note, every package requires a unique tracking number. You must create a separate label for each package. This is critical to ensure your packages are delivered in a timely manner a Shipment" from the drop down. #12;5 Creating a Shipping Label In Box 2, enter the Contact Name, Company

  10. InternatIonal student plan summary of benefIts* SHIP members must use University Health Services (UHS) for allavailableprimary,urgent,andpreventivecare.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emshwiller, Eve

    InternatIonal student plan summary of benefIts* SHIP members must use University Health Services members with no out-of-pocket expense, including travel and meningococcal vaccines, the HPV vaccine/15/2015 TO 8/14/2015 Student only (age 25 and under) $1,344 $560 $784 Student only (age 26 and above) $1

  11. Experimental Measurements and Numerical Prediction of the Effect of Waves on Mooring Line Forces for a Container Ship Moored to Pile Supported and Solid Wall Docks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luai, Andres B

    2013-05-03

    The conditions of a moored container ship are examined by a physical model in a wave basin and by a numerical simulation. Each condition, wave period, significant wave height and wave direction, was isolated and tested for a 50:1 scale model of a...

  12. *Corresponding author: pawel.woelke@wai.com; Tel.: +1 212 367 2983; Fax: +1 212 497 2483 SIMULATIONS OF DUCTILE FRACTURE IN AN IDEALIZED SHIP GROUNDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    SIMULATIONS OF DUCTILE FRACTURE IN AN IDEALIZED SHIP GROUNDING SCENARIO USING PHENOMENOLOGICAL DAMAGE methodologies for ductile fracture in large sheet metal components are presented and evaluated in this paper-separation law is employed to simulate the same ductile fracture problems accounting for significant variation

  13. Battery: Collection, Storage and Shipping Procedure: 8.41 Created: 09/16/2013 Version: 1.4 Revised: 1/17/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Battery: Collection, Storage and Shipping Procedure: 8.41 Created: 09/16/2013 Version: 1.4 Revised: 1/17/2014 Environmental Health & Safety Page 1 of 8 A. Purpose To ensure that all spend batteries and Columbia University Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures. B. Applicability/Scope 1. Use of battery

  14. 2004 YEAR IN TORNADOES: WHAT A YEAR IT WAS!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004 YEAR IN TORNADOES: WHAT A YEAR IT WAS! Daniel McCarthy and Joseph Schaefer NOAA/NWS Storm Prediction Center, Norman, OK 1. INTRODUCTION 2004 will be known as the biggest tornado year since to remain the last tornado to cause such devastation. In 2004, there were 1,688 weak tornadoes (F0 and F1

  15. YEAR 2 BIOMASS UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke

    2004-11-01

    This Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) Year 2 Biomass Utilization Final Technical Report summarizes multiple projects in biopower or bioenergy, transportation biofuels, and bioproducts. A prototype of a novel advanced power system, termed the high-temperature air furnace (HITAF), was tested for performance while converting biomass and coal blends to energy. Three biomass fuels--wood residue or hog fuel, corn stover, and switchgrass--and Wyoming subbituminous coal were acquired for combustion tests in the 3-million-Btu/hr system. Blend levels were 20% biomass--80% coal on a heat basis. Hog fuel was prepared for the upcoming combustion test by air-drying and processing through a hammer mill and screen. A K-Tron biomass feeder capable of operating in both gravimetric and volumetric modes was selected as the HITAF feed system. Two oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys that would be used in the HITAF high-temperature heat exchanger were tested for slag corrosion rates. An alumina layer formed on one particular alloy, which was more corrosion-resistant than a chromia layer that formed on the other alloy. Research activities were completed in the development of an atmospheric pressure, fluidized-bed pyrolysis-type system called the controlled spontaneous reactor (CSR), which is used to process and condition biomass. Tree trimmings were physically and chemically altered by the CSR process, resulting in a fuel that was very suitable for feeding into a coal combustion or gasification system with little or no feed system modifications required. Experimental procedures were successful for producing hydrogen from biomass using the bacteria Thermotoga, a deep-ocean thermal vent organism. Analytical procedures for hydrogen were evaluated, a gas chromatography (GC) method was derived for measuring hydrogen yields, and adaptation culturing and protocols for mutagenesis were initiated to better develop strains that can use biomass cellulose. Fly ash derived from cofiring coal with waste paper, sunflower hulls, and wood waste showed a broad spectrum of chemical and physical characteristics, according to American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C618 procedures. Higher-than-normal levels of magnesium, sodium, and potassium oxide were observed for the biomass-coal fly ash, which may impact utilization in cement replacement in concrete under ASTM requirements. Other niche markets for biomass-derived fly ash were explored. Research was conducted to develop/optimize a catalytic partial oxidation-based concept for a simple, low-cost fuel processor (reformer). Work progressed to evaluate the effects of temperature and denaturant on ethanol catalytic partial oxidation. A catalyst was isolated that had a yield of 24 mole percent, with catalyst coking limited to less than 15% over a period of 2 hours. In biodiesel research, conversion of vegetable oils to biodiesel using an alternative alkaline catalyst was demonstrated without the need for subsequent water washing. In work related to biorefinery technologies, a continuous-flow reactor was used to react ethanol with lactic acid prepared from an ammonium lactate concentrate produced in fermentations conducted at the EERC. Good yields of ester were obtained even though the concentration of lactic acid in the feed was low with respect to the amount of water present. Esterification gave lower yields of ester, owing to the lowered lactic acid content of the feed. All lactic acid fermentation from amylose hydrolysate test trials was completed. Management activities included a decision to extend several projects to December 31, 2003, because of delays in receiving biomass feedstocks for testing and acquisition of commercial matching funds. In strategic studies, methods for producing acetate esters for high-value fibers, fuel additives, solvents, and chemical intermediates were discussed with several commercial entities. Commercial industries have an interest in efficient biomass gasification designs but are waiting for economic incentives. Utility, biorefinery, pulp and paper, or o

  16. Year's End 2012 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    year from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30. So, this is the last week of Fiscal Year 2012, and all books must be brought into balance. Of course, there are several books - the federal books,...

  17. MSU Bozeman Year Founded: 1893

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    : Frontier Conference MSU Great Falls College of Tecnology Year Founded: 1969 Fall 2012 Headcount: 1,873 2010

  18. Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Transfer Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007 (July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007) #12;CONTENTS as the primary source of quantitative data to report. This survey collects yearly information on the number for new ways to foster and encourage industry. This report shows the results achieved in Fiscal Year 2007

  19. FOURTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-03-05

    Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAMS environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Further understanding of the variability of softwood fiberboard properties will require testing of additional material.

  20. Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Compost 101Turn this year's trash into next year's treasure Filling and Maintaining Compost Georgia://ceps.georgiasouthern.edu/garden This brochure is funded in part by a grant from a Museums for America Grant. Types of Composting Bins To fill your compost bin, alternate brown and green materials. Keep in mind that the ideal ratio is three

  1. Fiscal Year 2004 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    NTID Fiscal Year 2004 Annual Report (Click here to jump to the Table of Contents) #12;#12;-1- FY ................... 17 Assessment Information on Entering Class

  2. Fiscal Year 2012 Peer Institution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiscal Year 2012 Highlights Peer Institution Comparisons Cost to Students Economic Impact access to the University's audited financial information and openly share how we deploy resources

  3. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 2013 SES 2 1 -50.00% EJEK 10 9 -10.00% EN 04 27 24 -11.11% NN (Engineering) 28 24 -14.29% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 31 29 -6.45% NU (TechAdmin Support) 4...

  4. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SES 1 2 100.00% EJEK 2 2 0.00% EN 04 1 1 0.00% EN 03 1 0 -100.00% NN (Engineering) 12 11 -8.33% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 216 218 0.93% NU (TechAdmin Support) 2...

  5. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2013 SES 2 2 0.00% EJEK 7 8 14.29% EN 04 11 11 0.00% EN 03 1 1 0.00% NN (Engineering) 23 24 4.35% NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 35 32 -8.57% NU (TechAdmin Support) 3 2...

  6. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26

  7. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26825

  9. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National268255

  10. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National2682559

  11. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26825595

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National2682559589

  13. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3 6370-Rev.National26825595893

  14. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3

  15. Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 Cooling Degree-Days by038.2Natural gas

  16. FISCAL YEAR 20042005 FINANCIAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    FISCAL YEAR 2004­2005 FINANCIAL REPORT to the board of overseers of HARVARD COLLEGE #12;2 Letter Financial statements 55 Supplemental information #12;renovations at schlesinger library The Radcliffe Harvard University's financial report for fiscal 2005. It was a strong year financially. The University

  17. M1 Year -Regular Curriculum ^

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    M1 Year - Regular Curriculum ^ Satisfactorily complete all requirements Pass at least 67% of weighted curriculum Take make-up exam(s) or approved summer course Satisfactorily complete all requirements ¹ Fail any requirement ² If No Previous Repeat Year Pass 40% to 66% of weighted curriculum * Students who

  18. University Housing! First Year Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    community -Committed faculty member for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant for academic success -Group Work focused -Learning Community Assistant (LCA) Living Learning Communities (LLCs) + + The choice is yours! First Year Experience Thematic First Year Student Housing focused around development

  19. GLOBE Presentations YEARS 1995 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    GLOBE Presentations YEARS 1995 ­ 2000 YEAR 97-98 "Science on Wheels", National Chemistry Week, UPR Ponce, PR, Nov.1995. "Science on Wheels: A Link between Educational Cultures", J. Lopez- Garriga, I. Muñoz, and Y. Echevarria. Chem. Ed. 1995, Old Dominion Univ. Norfolk, Virginia, August 1995. "Importance

  20. NETL: The First 100 Years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-07-21

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory celebrates 100 years of innovative energy technology development. NETL has been a leader in energy technology development. This video takes a look back at the many accomplishments over the past 100 years. These advances benefit the American people, enhance our nation's energy security and protect our natural resources.

  1. Queen's Engineering First Year Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    Queen's Engineering First Year Handbook First year program structure Faculty regulations Academic & Engineering Johana Ng johana@mast.queensu.ca Dr. Andrew Lewis andrew@mast.queensu.ca Mechanical & Materials selection in soLUs · February 17-21: extended Program (J-section) course examinations · February 17-21: Mid

  2. Visualizing Twenty Years of Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potel, Mike; Wong, Pak C.

    2014-11-01

    This issue of IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications marks the 20th anniversary of the Applications department as a regular feature of the magazine. We thought it might be interesting to look back at the 20 years of Applications department articles to assess its evolution over that time. By aggregating all twenty years of articles and applying a little statistical and visual analytics, we’ve uncovered some interesting characteristics and trends we thought we’d share to mark this 20 year milestone.

  3. Chapeau! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Kernen, Madeleine

    1989-01-01

    Chapeau! is a first-year college text. Although it may appear, at first glance, o move very fast and introduce a large amount of material early, the vocabulary and grammatical structures that we expect students to control ...

  4. String Theory: The Early Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2000-07-26

    Lenny Susskind has made many important contributions to theoretical physics during the past 35 years. In this talk I will discuss the early history of string theory (1968-72) emphasizing Susskind's contributions.

  5. An International Year of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faure, Claudie

    of light-based technologies for the equitable development of global society. The project received, renewable energy and energy efficiency, and for PROSPECTUS An International Year of Light Science ­ Technology ­ Nature ­ Culture ­ Development

  6. SMESA PUBLICATIONS YEARS 2000 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    SMESA PUBLICATIONS YEARS 2000 ­ 2004 YEAR 00-01 S.B. Majumder, S. Bhaskar, P.S. Dobal, A.L. Morales-Gel Derived Lead Lanthanum Titanate Thin Films", Proceedings of Materials Research Society, 596, 375 (2000). P Studies of (Ta2O5)1-x(TiO2)x Ceramics", Journal of Applied Physics, 87, 8688 (2000). S.B. Majumder, S

  7. Bahamian ship graffiti 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Grace Sandrena Rosita

    2005-02-17

    The Bahamian archipelago covers over 5,000 square miles of the Atlantic Ocean at the northwestern edge of the Caribbean Sea. In the Age of Sail, from the late 15th to early 20th centuries, these islands were on major ...

  8. Bulk Tritium Shipping Package

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 32nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Germantown, Maryland on April 23-25, 2013.

  9. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift End Shift End A shift ends and the

  10. Shipping and Receiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShift End Shift End A shift ends and

  11. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Model Years Model Year

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948CaliforniaFeet) (Million CubicYear Jan. U.S.

  12. LNG to the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davenport, S.T.

    1984-04-01

    By 2000, about 190 MM metric-tpy of LNG will be moving in world trade, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer By the year 2000, approximately 190 million metric tons per year of LNG will be moving in worldwide trade. Production of LNG will be spread throughout most of the world, with Asia-Pacific as the dominant producer. LNG will be delivered only to the heavily industrialized areas of North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific. The success of any LNG project will be dependent on its individual economics, market needs, financial planning, and governmental permit processes. We hope industry will be able to put together the LNG projects required to meet the quanitities of production forecast here for the year 2000.

  13. Upper Year Progression YWA 5059% for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    5059% for 2nd time YWA >60% Continue to next year Adjudication comments: Failed year Must Upper Year Progression YWA repeat all courses under 60% (including labs and tutorials) Leave UWO for one year ­ reapply

  14. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20___/___

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/10 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20 take either 112 or 122 second year and the other, third year. 309 Instrumentation 2 310 Orchestration 2

  15. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

  16. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20___/___

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20

  17. Hydrography Goals Fiscal Year 201520162017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrography Goals Fiscal Year 201520162017 Future Vision To drive new discoveries Elevation Program (3DEP) will provide a geospatial framework for a National water information system that will provide interoperable water data and information through easily accessible outlets. The NHD and WBD

  18. Education, Early Years, Childhood, Youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Education, Early Years, Childhood, Youth and Community Postgraduate 2013 #12;Welcome Manchester childhood specialists, careers advisors and education managers. We also offer an extensive and flexible of Education has a global vision which can help you realise your ambitions. Studying within a lively

  19. HAPPY NEW YEAR! Semiconductor Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolic, Branislav K.

    HAPPY NEW YEAR! #12;Semiconductor Spintronics Niu Burkov Culcer Nunez Nomura Yao Sinova Sinitsyn Dietl Koenig Lin Timm Jungwirth Lee Fernandez-Rossier U. Texas at Austin 2005 Taiwan Spintronics Workshop #12;Spintronics Toolbag Ferromagnetic Semiconductors (Ga,Mn)As .... others Coupled Spin Charge

  20. FEMP Year in Review 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-01

    In 2009, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)undertook an ambitious reorganization of its program structure to be more responsive to the needs of its Federal agency customers. In this Year in Review 2009, you will learn more about FEMP achievements under its new program areas.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FRESHMAN YEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Second Semester MATH 1131Q Elective (3) (Take as an on-line course) CE 2110 ­ Applied Mechanics I (3) ENVE 2310 ­ Environmental Engineering (3) ENVE 2330 ­ Decision Analysis in Civil & Environmental Engineering (3) ENVE 3200

  2. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Elizabeth Chilcote

    2002-05-01

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  3. Nuclear Materials Focus Area Fiscal Year 2002 Mid Year Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, E.C.; Fuhrman, P.W.

    2002-05-30

    The Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) held its annual mid-year review on February 12 and 14, 2002, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The purpose of this review was to examine both the technical aspects and the programmatic aspects of its technology development program. The focus area activities were reviewed by a panel consisting of personnel representing the end users of the technologies, and technical experts in nuclear materials. This year's review was somewhat different than in the past, as the stress was on how well the various projects being managed through the NMFA aligned with the two thrust areas and nine key goals and priorities recently issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  4. AREVA NP next generation fresh UO{sub 2} fuel assembly shipping cask: SCALE - CRISTAL comparisons lead to safety criticality confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucet, M.; Landrieu, M.; Montgomery, R.; O' Donnell, B.

    2007-07-01

    AREVA NP as a worldwide PWR fuel provider has to have a fleet of fresh UO{sub 2} shipping casks being agreed within a lot of countries including USA, France, Germany, Belgium, Sweden, China, and South Africa - and to accommodate foreseen EPR Nuclear Power Plants fuel buildings. To reach this target the AREVA NP Fuel Sector decided to develop an up-to-date shipping cask (so called MAP project) gathering experience feedback of the today fleet and an improved safety allowing the design to comply with international regulations (NRC and IAEA) and local Safety Authorities. Based on pre design features a safety case was set up to highlight safety margins. Criticality hypothetical accidental assumptions were defined: - Preferential flooding; - Fuel rod lattice pitch expansion for full length of fuel assemblies; - Neutron absorber penalty; -... Well known computer codes, American SCALE package and French CRISTAL package, were used to check configurations reactivity and to ensure that both codes lead to coherent results. Basic spectral calculations are based on similar algorithms with specific microscopic cross sections ENDF/BV for SCALE and JEF2.2 for CRISTAL. The main differences between the two packages is on one hand SCALE's three dimensional fuel assembly geometry is described by a pin by pin model while an homogenized fuel assembly description is used by CRISTAL and on the other hand SCALE is working with either 44 or 238 neutron energy groups while CRISTAL is with a 172 neutron energy groups. Those two computer packages rely on a wide validation process helping defining uncertainties as required by regulations in force. The shipping cask with two fuel assemblies is designed to maximize fuel isolation inside a cask and with neighboring ones even for large array configuration cases. Proven industrial products are used: - Boral{sup TM} as neutron absorber; - High density polyethylene (HDPE) or Nylon as neutron moderator; - Foam as thermal and mechanical protection. The cask is designed to handle the complete AREVA NP fuel assembly types from the 14x14 to the 18x18 design with a {sup 235}U enrichment up to 5.0% enriched natural uranium (ENU) and enriched reprocessed uranium (ERU). After a brief presentation of the computer codes and the description of the shipping cask, calculation results and comparisons between SCALE and CRISTAL will be discussed. (authors)

  5. Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2013-11-01

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2013 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: Summary of each site Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location Actions and Resolutions for each site. Six disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. One has achieved final stabilization. The remaining five sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  6. Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom

    2012-11-01

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2012 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Ten disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Six have achieved final stabilization. The remaining four sites not meeting the criteria for final stabilization will be evaluated again in the next fiscal year.

  7. Quantum Tomography twenty years later

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asorey; A. Ibort; G. Marmo; F. Ventriglia

    2015-10-28

    A sample of some relevant developments that have taken place during the last twenty years in classical and quantum tomography are displayed. We will present a general conceptual framework that provides a simple unifying mathematical picture for all of them and, as an effective use of it, three subjects have been chosen that offer a wide panorama of the scope of classical and quantum tomography: tomography along lines and submanifolds, coherent state tomography and tomography in the abstract algebraic setting of quantum systems.

  8. Earth: 15 Million Years Ago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masataka Mizushima

    2008-10-13

    In Einstein's general relativity theory the metric component gxx in the direction of motion (x-direction) of the sun deviates from unity due to a tensor potential caused by the black hole existing around the center of the galaxy. Because the solar system is orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s, the theory shows that the Newtonian gravitational potential due to the sun is not quite radial. At the present time, the ecliptic plane is almost perpendicular to the galactic plane, consistent with this modification of the Newtonian gravitational force. The ecliptic plane is assumed to maintain this orientation in the galactic space as it orbits around the galactic center, but the rotational angular momentum of the earth around its own axis can be assumed to be conserved. The earth is between the sun and the galactic center at the summer solstice all the time. As a consequence, the rotational axis of the earth would be parallel to the axis of the orbital rotation of the earth 15 million years ago, if the solar system has been orbiting around the galactic center at 200 km/s. The present theory concludes that the earth did not have seasons 15 million years ago. Therefore, the water on the earth was accumulated near the poles as ice and the sea level was very low. Geological evidence exists that confirms this effect. The resulting global ice-melting started 15 million years ago and is ending now.

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  10. Fourth Year -34 Credits Cr FA SP Fifth Year 29 Credits Cr FA SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fourth Year - 34 Credits Cr FA SP Fifth Year ­ 29 Credits Cr FA SP Students: Please note Credits First Year - 28 Credits ­ Courses (prereqs) Cr FA SP Third Year ­ 35 Credits Cr FA SP Second Year

  11. Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenifer Nordstrom; Mike Lewis

    2010-11-01

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2010 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  12. Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Lewis

    2009-10-01

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2009 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to supplement documentation related to the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan for Construction Activities and to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Recommendation(s) for each site.

  13. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998

  14. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29 - - -

  15. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29 - -

  16. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29 - -20

  17. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29 -

  18. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29 -41 -

  19. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29 -41

  20. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan3Additions (Million2.8 2.6103.5 91.8 91.91998$11.15 - $12.29

  1. Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnologyTel:FebruaryEIA'sTrainingActivity Historical Yearly

  2. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20___/___

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    be waived when Minimum Achievements for 2 nd year secondary piano have already been met. 153 or 154 Large be completed by end of 2nd year. #12;Rev.05/11 ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1

  3. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20__/__

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Minimum Achievements for 2 nd year secondary piano have already been met. Note: Secondary Piano credits Requirement must be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20

  4. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20___/___

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    for 2 nd year secondary piano have already been met. 150 Large Instrumental Ensemble 4 150 Large Requirement must be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20

  5. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20__/__

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Minimum Achievements for 2 nd year secondary piano have already been met. Large Ensemble at least 3 Large Requirement must be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20

  6. Ten Year Site Plans | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ten Year Site Plans Ten Year Site Plans A Ten Year Site Plan (TYSP) is the essential planning document linking a site's real property requirements to its mission in support of the...

  7. Fourth Year Pure Mathematics 2011 Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Jie

    Fourth Year Pure Mathematics 2011 Handbook School of Mathematics and Statistics University descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.1. Fourth Year Courses -- Semester I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3.2. Fourth Year Courses -- Semester II

  8. Happy New Year - First Blog Entry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Happy New Year Happy New Year - First Blog Entry January 2, 2015 by Richard Gerber (0 Comments) Happy New Year to all Some users have asked for NERSC staff blogs on current...

  9. 2014 THIRD YEAR THEME PAPER GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    2014 THIRD YEAR THEME PAPER GUIDELINES Students will complete a Theme Paper requirement in their third year of study. The Theme Paper can take. SUBMISSION GUIDELINES Students may submit their Third Year Theme Paper anytime from

  10. Third Year Projects (~40 credits) MEng Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    Third Year Projects (~40 credits) MEng Students For a number of years the Royal Academy that although completed at third year they are set at level M. BEng Students All final stage BEng students

  11. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20__/__

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    The Writing Requirement must be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20

  12. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay C. Theilacker

    2004-07-15

    The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

  13. Fiscal Year 2014 Revegetation Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordstrom, Jenifer

    2015-03-01

    This report summarizes the Fiscal Year 2014 Revegetation Assessment by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. This assessment was conducted to document revegetation efforts at Idaho National Laboratory to ensure that disturbed vegetation and soil at various locations are being restored. This report provides the following information for each site being monitored by the Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Support and Services: • Summary of each site • Assessment of vegetation status and site stabilization at each location • Actions and Resolutions for each site. Five disturbed sites were evaluated for this assessment. Four sites are recommended to be removed from the annual assessment, and one is recommended for continued evaluation. New sites are also identified for future monitoring as part of the annual assessment.

  14. Annual Report for the Year 2001-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge University Library

    2002-01-01

    …???? #2; A survey of the entrance of Sierra Leona River, by Capt’n Thompson, of His Majesty’s Ship Nautilas (London ????) #2; A new map of Ireland. Drawn from the survey made by Sr Wm Petty… [????] Music #2; Mendelssohn, An anthem… to Charles Bayles...

  15. Dear Colleagues, Looking back over Fiscal Year 2010, I am struck by the volume of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    automation of many processes including shipping and receiving; the handling of a $7.6M increase in sponsored-day policy in Procure-to-Pay. Information about the extra personal day for HUCTW employees, shipping is a good time to: Shut down your computers & printers at night to conserve energy. https://intranet.seas.harvard.edu/offices-services/facilities/sustainability

  16. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20___/___

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Requirement must be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20 Woodwinds 2 Note: Must take either 112 or 122 second year and the other, third year. 309 Instrumentation 2

  17. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Geothermal Technologies Office, Webtrends archives by fiscal year.

  18. HMS Second-Year Financial Aid Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    /BS Waivers Resident Tutors #12;3rd Year Budget 2014-15 3rd Year Budget is 12 months! Complete cash advance NOTE: Step2b Clinical Skills Exam fee included in 3rd year budget with travel expenses added in 4thHMS Second-Year Financial Aid Update February 2014 #12;Today's Agenda 2014-15 Financial Aid

  19. SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ Year #1 Year #2 Year #3 Year #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    . (if needed) Events During Defense-Semester ECE PhD Time-LinePost-MS 3rd Week Week N - 7 Week N - 1SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ SpringFall Summ Year #1 Year #2 Year #3 Year #4

  20. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — FEMP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Federal Energy Management Program, Webtrends archives by fiscal year.

  1. 2014 THIRD YEAR THEME PAPER Scoring Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    2014 THIRD YEAR THEME PAPER Scoring Policy SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 4/8/2014 Ph.D. in Education FIRST ROUND SUBMISSION: Rolling Deadline from passing SYRP to September 15, 2014 of Year 4 Third Year Theme the student's paper advisor and an anonymous faculty reader, shall grade each Third Year Theme Paper and each

  2. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Bioenergy Technologies Office, Webtrends archives by fiscal year.

  3. Fiscal year 1987 program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, operation, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY 87 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Operations, and Research Development (R D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of Operations and R D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY 87; outyear budget projections are presented for future years.

  4. Year in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    -time paid employment, returning to the University for a final fourth year. You are awarded a BSc (IndustryYear in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend your third year in full second year. To be allowed to make the transfer, you must do sufficiently well in your year 1 and 2

  5. Working Gas % Change from Year Ago

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2YearWesternYear Jan1,29823

  6. Working Gas Volume Change from Year Ago

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2YearWesternYear Jan1,29823751,045

  7. Program Year 2008 State Energy Program Formula

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) State Energy Program (SEP), SEP Program Guidance Fiscal Year 2008, Program Year 2008, energy efficiency and renewable energy programs in the states, DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  8. Budget estimates, fiscal year 1997. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report contains the fiscal year budget justification to Congress. The budget provides estimates for salaries and expenses and for the Office of the Inspector General for fiscal year 1997.

  9. Fiscal Year 2007 budget-in-brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Fiscal Year 2007 budget request from the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  10. Fiscal Year 2009 budget-in-brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Fiscal Year 2009 budget request from the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  11. HMS Second-Year Financial Aid Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahav, Galit

    for institutional funds) IRS Data Retrieval Process on FAFSA ­ Do it! Stafford Subsidy ­ available next year for 3rd-Need-Based Funding with FAO #12;3rd Year Budget 2012-13 3rd Year Budget is 12 months! Complete cash advance form Residency Loans NOTE: Step2b Clinical Skills Exam fee included in 3rd year budget with travel expenses added

  12. Fiscal Year 2008 budget-in-brief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Fiscal Year 2008 budget request from the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Education

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Education site by fiscal year.

  14. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Business Administration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Office of Business Administration (later renamed to Business Operations), Webtrends archives by fiscal year.

  15. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Solar Energy Technologies Office, retired Google Analytics profiles for the sites by fiscal year.

  16. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — FEMP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Federal Energy Management Program, retired Google Analytics profiles for the sites by fiscal year.

  17. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Energy Saver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profiles for the Energy Saver sites by fiscal year.

  18. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Building Technologies Office, retired Google Analytics profiles for the sites by fiscal year.

  19. Secretary Chu Celebrates NNSA's 10-Year Anniversary

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu

    2010-09-01

    Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu speaks at NNSA's 10-year anniversary celebration on April 28, 2010.

  20. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Financial Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Financial Opportunities site by fiscal year.

  1. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Earth Day

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Earth Day site by fiscal year.

  2. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Communication Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Communication Standards site by fiscal year.

  3. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Solar Energy Technologies Office / Sunshot sites, Webtrends archives by fiscal year.

  4. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — International Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the International Activities site for fiscal year 2011.

  5. ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20___/___

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Requirement must be completed by end of 2nd year. Rev.05/11 #12;ADVISOR YEAR NAME OF STUDENT __________________________________ ___________________ (1) 20 Composition IV (Arts Research Requirement) 6 Note: In each year of the program, there must be at least one

  6. ** Attention 3rd Year Psychology Majors**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, S. Murray

    ** Attention 3rd Year Psychology Majors** SUMMER RESEARCH SUPPORT Earl R. Franklin Research Fellowship Summer 2012 This research award will provide $3,000-$4,000 to support third year students majoring in Psychology to carry out psychological research during the summer before their fourth year. The stipend

  7. Final Year Project Report Supervisor: Dr. MWMak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mak, Man-Wai

    98/99 Final Year Project Report Supervisor: Dr. MWMak Co­examiner: Dr. Vincent Ng Student: Kwok Kin #12; 98/99 Final Year Project Report Internet Phone Abstract This project is to develop a software. #12; 98/99 Final Year Project Report Internet Phone Acknowledgments While I retrospect the time

  8. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    BA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Second Year · ART 101 Art Studio Foundations I · ART 324 Renaissance Art · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Third Year · ART 328 Art of Greece & Rome

  9. BA: Art History Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    · ART 3/4xx (Art History) · Elective(s) (advisor approval) and/or LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · ART(s) and/or LSP coursework Spring--Fourth Year · ART 437 Senior Thesis II OR ART 3/4xx (Art HistoryBA: Art History Fall--First Year · ART 127 New Major Seminar · ART 222 Caves to Cathedrals

  10. Marr's vision: 25 years on Andrew Glennerster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennerster, Andrew

    Marr's vision: 25 years on Andrew Glennerster It is 25 years since the posthumous publication of David Marr's book on Vision [1]. Only 35 years old when he died, Marr had already dramatically that "Even if no single one of Marr's detailed hypotheses ultimately survives...[his] lifework will have been

  11. QUARTER Year 2: Understanding Civic Engagement Year 3: Developing Individual Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Allen P.

    year, total is 14 units 2 units* of required UH core course + any UH electives not completed by 2nd *Note: 0 units if HNPG151 taken in 2nd year Required UH core courses (0) + any UH electives : 22 Units 2nd year entry cohort: 14 Units 3rd year entry cohort: 4 Units 4th year entry cohort: UH

  12. Fifth Year -29 Credits Cr FA SP Fourth Year 32 Credits Cr FA SP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fifth Year - 29 Credits Cr FA SP Fourth Year ­ 32 Credits Cr FA SP Students: Please note Engineering First Year - 31 Credits ­ (prereqs) CR FA SP Third Year - 32 Credits Cr FA SP 3B Arts _____________ _______________ 6 Second Year - 34 Credits Cr FA SP Rev 5/18/2012 Courses are planned to be first be offered: BIOM

  13. First Year SAMPLE FOUR YEAR SCHEDULE FOR POLITICS MAJOR FALL SPRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galles, David

    FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Third Year FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Fourth Year FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3First Year SAMPLE FOUR YEAR SCHEDULE FOR POLITICS MAJOR FALL SPRING 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 Second Year

  14. FIRST YEAR-FALL HOURS FIRST YEAR-SPRING HOURS GT 1000 FRESHMAN SEMINAR* 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaucher, Eric

    ELECTIVE(S) 3 TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS 15 or 16 TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS 15 or 16 FOURTH YEAR-FALL HOURS FOURTHFIRST YEAR-FALL HOURS FIRST YEAR-SPRING HOURS GT 1000 FRESHMAN SEMINAR* 1 ENGL 1101 ENGLISH YEAR-FALL HOURS SECOND YEAR-SPRING HOURS BIOL 2335 ECOLOGY OR BIOL 2354 HONORS GENETICS 3 BIOL 2337

  15. Year in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Year in Industry Scheme The Year in Industry Scheme allows you to spend your third year in full whether or not to transfer to this scheme during your second year. To be allowed to make the transfer, you must do sufficiently well in your year 1 and 2 examinations; a typical grade average of at least 55

  16. Harmonization - Two Years' of Transportation Regulation Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colborn, K.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation issued modifications to the Hazardous Materials Regulations in October, 2004 as part of an ongoing effort to 'harmonize' U.S. regulations with those of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The harmonization effort had several predictable effects on low level radioactive materials shipment that were anticipated even prior to their implementation. However, after two years' experience with the new regulations, transporters have identified several effects on transportation which were not entirely apparent when the regulations were first implemented. This paper presents several case studies in the transportation of low level radioactive materials since the harmonization rules took effect. In each case, an analysis of the challenge posed by the regulatory revision is provided. In some cases, more than one strategy for compliance was considered, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. In several cases, regulatory interpretations were sought and obtained, and these are presented to clarify the legitimacy of the compliance approach. The presentation of interpretations will be accompanied by reports of clarifying discussions with the U.S. DOT about the interpretation and scope of the regulatory change. Specific transportation issues raised by the revised hazardous materials regulations are reviewed, including: The new definition of radioactive material in accordance with isotope-specific concentration and total activity limits. The new hazardous materials regulations (HMR) created a new definition for radioactive material. A case study is presented for soils contaminated with low levels of Th-230. These soils had been being shipped for years as exempt material under the old 2,000 pCi/g concentration limit. Under the new HMR, these same soils were radioactive material. Further, in rail-car quantities their activity exceeded an A2 value, so shipment of the material in gondolas appeared to require an IP-2 package. Interpretations, discussions, and an exemption were obtained to secure the continued shipment of this material. A provision to allow 'natural' radioactive materials to be exempt from the requirements of the HMR at up to 10x the listed isotopic concentrations. The revised HMR exempts certain natural materials and ores from regulation as radioactive material at concentrations up to 10x that allowed if the materials are not natural. The term 'natural' is not well defined, and initial attempts to qualify for this exemption were thwarted by concerns over what degree of material processing, if any, materials could experience and still be considered 'natural'. The presentation includes an example from a project involving post-processed tungsten ore, and includes interpretations from the US DOT as well as clarifying language from current and drafted IAEA regulation and guidance. New packaging descriptions allowing the use of cargo containers as IP-2 and IP-3 packages in some applications. The revised HMR provides an alternate certification procedure under which standard cargo containers can be used as IP-2 and IP-3 containers. There has been some confusion about how this high level of certification can apply to standard cargo containers when other sections of the regulations make this certification available only to considerably more stout containers after rigorous testing. The discussion includes interpretive guidance from the US DOT, and from the UK Department of Transport clarifying the same provision in IAEA regulations. A new definition of contamination with apparently broad impact on the shipment of empty containers and conveyances. The revised HMR presented a definition of contamination not referenced by any other part of the HMR. The preamble to the revised HMR provides confusing guidance on the application of the definition to shipment of empty containers, and subsequent interpretive guidance letters appear to conflict with the preamble as well as with each other. The definition also has the effect of regulating materials for transport as radioactive even when US

  17. Examination of spent PWR fuel rods after 15 years in dry storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Tsai, H.C.; Billone, M.C.; Hilton, B.A.

    2002-02-11

    Virginia Power Surry Nuclear Station Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel was stored in a dry inert atmosphere Castor V/21 cask at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) for 15 years at peak cladding temperatures decreasing from about 350 to 150 C. Prior to the storage, the loaded cask was subjected to extensive thermal benchmark tests. The cask was opened to examine the fuel for degradation and to determine if it was suitable for extended storage. No rod breaches had occurred and no visible degradation or crud/oxide spallation were observed. Twelve rods were removed from the center of the T11 assembly and shipped from INEEL to the Argonne-West HFEF for profilometric scans. Four of these rods were punctured to determine the fission gas release from the fuel matrix and internal pressure in the rods. Three of the four rods were cut into five segments each, then shipped to the Argonne-East AGHCF for detailed examination. The test plan calls for metallographic examination of six samples from two of the rods, microhardness and hydrogen content measurements at or near the six metallographic sample locations, tensile testing of six samples from the two rods, and thermal creep testing of eight samples from the two rods to determine the extent of residual creep life. The results from the profilometry (12 rods), gas release measurements (4 rods), metallographic examinations (2 samples from 1 rod), and microhardness and hydrogen content characterization (2 samples from 1 rod) are reported here. The tensile and creep studies are just starting and will be reported at a later date, along with the additional characterization work to be performed. Although only limited prestorage characterization is available, a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn based on comparison with characterization of Florida Power Turkey Point rods of a similar vintage. Based on this comparison, it appears that little or no cladding thermal creep and fission gas release from the fuel pellets occurred during the thermal benchmark tests or storage. Measurements of the cladding outer-diameter, oxide thickness and wall thickness are in the expected range for cladding of the Surry exposure. The measured hydrogen content is consistent with the oxide thickness. The volume of hydrides varies azimuthally around the cladding, but there is little variation across the thickness, of the cladding. It is most significant that all of the hydrides appear to have retained the circumferential orientation typical of prestorage PWR fuel rods.

  18. Examination of Spent PWR Fuel Rods After 15 Years in Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R.E.; Tsai, H.C.; Billone, M.C.; Hilton, B.A.

    2002-07-01

    Virginia Power Surry Nuclear Station Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel was stored in a dry inert atmosphere Castor V/21 cask at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) for 15 years at peak cladding temperatures decreasing from about 350 to 150 deg. C. Prior to the storage, the loaded cask was subjected to extensive thermal benchmark tests. The cask was opened to examine the fuel for degradation and to determine if it was suitable for extended storage. No rod breaches had occurred and no visible degradation or crud/oxide spallation were observed. Twelve rods were removed from the center of the T11 assembly and shipped from INEEL to the Argonne-West HFEF for profilometric scans. Four of these rods were punctured to determine the fission gas release from the fuel matrix and internal pressure in the rods. Three of the four rods were cut into five segments each, then shipped to the Argonne-East AGHCF for detailed examination. The test plan calls for metallographic examination of six samples from two of the rods, microhardness and hydrogen content measurements at or near the six metallographic sample locations, tensile testing of six samples from the two rods, and thermal creep testing of eight samples from the two rods to determine the extent of residual creep life. The results from the profilometry (12 rods), gas release measurements (4 rods), metallographic examinations (2 samples from 1 rod), and microhardness and hydrogen content characterization (2 samples from 1 rod) are reported here. The tensile and creep studies are just starting and will be reported at a later date, along with the additional characterization work to be performed. Although only limited pre-storage characterization is available, a number of preliminary conclusions can be drawn based on comparison with characterization of Florida Power Turkey Point rods of a similar vintage. Based on this comparison, it appears that little or no cladding thermal creep and fission gas release from the fuel pellets occurred during the thermal benchmark tests or storage. Measurements of the cladding outer-diameter, oxide thickness and wall thickness are in the expected range for cladding of the Surry exposure. The measured hydrogen content is consistent with the oxide thickness. The volume of hydrides varies azimuthally around the cladding, but there is little variation across the thickness, of the cladding. It is most significant that all of the hydrides appear to have retained the circumferential orientation typical of pre-storage PWR fuel rods. (authors)

  19. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credit hours per academic year 32-33 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS UpperBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND hours per academic year 30 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS BIOL 0203

  20. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MATH EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits Per Academic Year 32 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS EDUC 1307BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MATH EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR 19 Total Credits Per Academic Year 36 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS

  1. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (Suggested 4 Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Academic Year 30 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS Major Elective 3 ANTH, ECONBACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (Suggested 4 Year Plan FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR Term 15 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Academic Year 30 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND

  2. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Year...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Constructed > Detailed Tables-Year Constructed Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables-Year Constructed Table B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings...

  3. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — EERE Totals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Historical EERE office total reports include only Webtrends archives by fiscal year. EERE total reports dating after FY11 can be accessed in EERE's Google Analytics account.

  4. EMSL Fiscal Year 2008 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Showalter, Mary Ann

    2009-01-23

    This annual report provides details on the research conducted at EMSL--the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2008.

  5. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Mobile Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Mobile site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  6. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — WIP

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: WIP, Webtrends archives for the site, including EECBG, Solution Center, and Weatherization Assistance Program, by fiscal year.

  7. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Commercialization | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year - Commercialization From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Commercialization site by...

  8. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Fuel Cell Technologies Office, Webtrends archives for the site, including the Annual Merit Review and DOE Hydrogen Program, by fiscal year.

  9. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Earth Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profiles for the Earth Day site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  10. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — ERAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Efficiency and Renewables Advisory Committee site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  11. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Information Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profiles for the Information Center site for fiscal year 2012.

  12. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Multimedia Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Multimedia site for fiscal years 2012-14.

  13. After 5 Years, NERSC's Franklin Retires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are some science highlights from five years in production: Refining and Designing Clean Coal Technology This is an image of predicted coal particle concentration in a coal gasifier...

  14. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative, Fiscal Year...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Area: Reactor Concepts RD&D Project Start Date: January 2011 Project End Date: December 2013 38 | International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Fiscal Year 2011...

  15. Google Archives by Fiscal Year — Kids Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, retired Google Analytics profile for the Kids site for fiscal year 2012-13.

  16. Fiscal Year-End Closing Information and Dates for Fiscal Year 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    Fiscal Year-End Closing Information and Dates for Fiscal Year 2015 General Information All reallocations should be submitted in a timely manner throughout the fiscal year. Adjustments, if necessary Requisitions ­ May 29 Departments that would like supply requisitions processed during the current fiscal year

  17. QUARTER Year 2: Understanding Civic Engagement Year 3: Developing Individual Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Allen P.

    ) *Note: if HNPG151 taken in 2nd year, total is 14 units 2 units* of required UH core course + any UH electives not completed by 2nd year for continuing UH students taken in 2nd year Required UH core courses (0) + any UH electives not completed by 3rd year

  18. Appendix 5 Handling of Fourth-Year Appraisals Appendix 5 Handling of Fourth-Year Appraisals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Appendix 5 Handling of Fourth-Year Appraisals App. 5-1 Appendix 5 ­ Handling of Fourth-Year Appraisals An appraisal is normally conducted in the fourth year of an Assistant-level candidate votes, click "Vote" to open the Department Vote form. #12;Appendix 5 Handling of Fourth-Year Appraisals

  19. Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Every year the number of trucks on the road, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    carrier/coach USDOT number Shipping document ID Equipment (e.g., trailer) ID Vehicle Measures Brakes Tire warning Container Coupling Driver performance Emissions Exhaust system Fuel system Steering Suspension

  20. Rainwater Harvesting: Guidance for Homeowners Although rainwater harvesting has been practiced for thousands of years,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    treated drinking water, we reduce the demand on municipal water supplies and increase the sustainability will be required. #12;2 CISTERN SELECTION For most systems, the cistern will have to be ordered and shipped