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1

Peach Bottom and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dramatic and extraordinary instance of state and local government control of nuclear power, the purchase by New York of the Shoreham plant is nonetheless indicative of the political demands that some states confront for additional involvement in the regulation of the radiological hazards associated with commercial nuclear power plants. Although the Supreme Court has appeared to expand, in the eight years since PG&E and Silkwood, the acceptable extent of state regulation, some states, in addition to New York, have acquired, with the acquiescence of the NRC, a degree of involvement that exceeds the role for state and local governments provided by the Court. For example, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania concluded with the Philadelphia Electric Company (PECO) in June 1989 an agreement that commits PECO to various initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, for the safe operation of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania. In July 1991 the State of Vermont and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation (Vermont Yankee) concluded an agreement similar to that concluded between Pennsylvania and PECO. The agreement also commits Vermont Yankee to certain initiatives, not otherwise required under NRC regulations, related to its operation of the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in Vermont. The agreement was precipitated by a challenge to an application, submitted to the NRC by Vermont Yankee in April 1989, to amend the Vermont Yankee plant license to extend its expiration date from December 11, 2007 to March 21, 2012. The amendment would allow the Vermont Yankee plant to operate for forty full years.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Radiological characterization of Yankee Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is the determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. This paper describes the site radiological characterization program that has been implemented for decommissioning the Yankee plant. Radiological scoping surveys were completed to support submittal of a decommissioning plan to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by October 1, 1993. These surveys were designed to provide sufficient detail to estimate the extent of contamination, volume of radiological waste, activity of radiological waste, and personnel dose estimates for removal activities. Surveys were conducted both inside and on the grounds outside of the Yankee plant buildings. Survey results were combined with analytical evaluations to characterize the Yankee site.

Bellini, F.X.; Cumming, E.R.; Hollenbeck, P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The debate over re-licensing the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, the NRC's Atomic Safety and Licensing Board approved a 20-year license extension for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power plant. Less than seven months later, the Vermont State Senate voted 26-4 to block the required certificate for public good. How did a plant seen as likely to be re-licensed become the first in 20 years to be rejected in a public vote? (author)

Watts, Richard; Hines, Paul; Dowds, Jonathan

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Determining Yankee Nuclear Power Station neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is a determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. Included in this effort was determination of the extent of neutron activation of plant components. This paper describes the determination of the neutron activation of the Yankee reactor vessel, associated internals, and surrounding structures. The Yankee reactor vessel is a 600-MW(thermal) stainless steel-lined, carbon steel vessel with stainless steel internal components designed by Westinghouse. The reactor vessel is surrounded and supported by a carbon steel neutron shield tank that was filled with chromated water during plant operation. A 5-ft-thick concrete biological shield wall surrounds the neutron shield tank. A project is under way to remove the reactor vessel internals from the reactor vessel.

Heider, K.J.; Morrissey, K.J. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Auxiliary feedwater system risk-based inspection guide for the Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

In a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Pacific Northwest Laboratory has developed and applied a methodology for deriving plant-specific risk-based inspection guidance for the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at pressurized water reactors that have not undergone probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). This methodology uses existing PRA results and plant operating experience information. Existing PRA-based inspection guidance information recently developed for the NRC for various plants was used to identify generic component failure modes. The information was then combined with plant-specific and industry-wide component information and failure data to identify failure modes and failure mechanisms for the AFW system at the selected plants. Maine Yankee was selected as one of a series of plants for study. ne product of this effort is a prioritized listing of AFW failures which have occurred at the plant and at other PWRs. This listing is intended for use by NRC inspectors in the preparation of inspection plans addressing AFW risk-important components at the Maine Yankee plant.

Gore, B.F.; Vo, T.V.; Moffitt, N.E.; Bumgardner, J.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Yankee nuclear power station license renewal assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants are initially licensed to operate for 40 years. Recent changes to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations allow licenses to be renewed for up to 20 additional years. The new regulations require a comprehensive plant assessment to ensure continued effective aging management of equipment important to license renewal (ILR). Under the industry's lead plant program, Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) has assisted with development and demonstration of a generic license renewal assessment process. The generic assessment process developed under the lead plant program is the Nuclear Management and Resources Council methodology.

Hinkle, W.D. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolten, MA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Chief Nuclear Officer of Maine Yankee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company ("CY"), and Yankee Atomic Electric Company ("YR") (each a "Yankee Company," and together, "the Yankee Companies"), hereby respond to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission ("NRC") Third Request for Additional Information for Application for NRC Consent to Indirect License Transfer/Threshold Determination (TAC Nos. L24496, L24497, and L24498) ("RAI 3") received by the Yankee Companies on August 5, 2011. If you have questions or require additional information, please contact me or Joe Fay at (207) 350-0300. Sincerely, Wayne Norton

The Yankee Companies

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Vermont Yankee  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont Yankee" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

9

VERMONT YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION- NRC LICENSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

your application for a renewed license of your Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. The enclosed report documents the result of the inspection which was discussed with members of your staff on May 24, 2007, at a publicly observed exit meeting conducted at the Latchis Theater in Brattleboro, VY. The purpose of this inspection was to examine the plant activities and documents that supported the application for a renewed license of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station. The inspection reviewed the screening and scoping of non-safety related systems, structures, and components, as required in 10 CFR 54.4(a)(2), and determined whether the proposed aging management programs are capable of reasonably managing the effects of aging. These NRC inspection activities constitute one of several inputs into the NRC review process for license renewal applications. The inspection team concluded screening and scoping of nonsafety-related systems, structures, and components, were implemented as required in 10 CFR 54.4(a)(2), and the aging management portions of the license renewal activities were conducted as described in the License Renewal Application. The inspection results supported a conclusion that the

Mr. Theodore; A. Sullivan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Confirmatory Survey Results for the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant, Haddam, Connecticut  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut

W. C. Adams

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Yankee Nuclear Power Station - analysis of decommissioning costs  

SciTech Connect

The preparation of decommissioning cost estimates for nuclear power generating stations has received a great deal of interest in the last few years. Owners are required by regulation to ensure that adequate funds are collected for the timely decommissioning of their facilities. The unexpected premature shutdown of several facilities and uncertainties associated with radioactive waste disposal and long-term spent-fuel storage, when viewed in the light of a deregulated electric utility industry, has caused many companies to reevaluate their decommissioning cost estimates. The decommissioning of the Yankee Nuclear Power Station represents the first large-scale project involving the complete decontamination and dismantlement of a commercial light water nuclear power generation facility in the United States. Since this pressurized water reactor operated for 32 yr at a respectable 74% lifetime capacity factor, the actual costs and resources required to decommission the plant, when compared with decommissioning estimates, will yield valuable benchmarking data.

Lessard, L.P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

"1. Vermont Yankee","Nuclear","Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee",620  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "1. Vermont Yankee","Nuclear","Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee",620 "2. J C McNeil","Other Renewables","City of Burlington-Electric",52 "3. Bellows Falls","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",48 "4. Wilder","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",41 "5. Harriman","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",41 "6. Berlin 5","Petroleum","Green Mountain Power Corp",35 "7. Vernon","Hydroelectric","TransCanada Hydro Northeast Inc.,",34 "8. Sheldon Springs Hydroelectric","Hydroelectric","Sheldon Vermont Hydro Co., Inc.",24

13

Maine Yankee: Making the Transition from an Operating Plant to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe the challenges faced by Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company in making the transition from an operating nuclear power plant to an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Maine Yankee (MY) is a 900-megawatt Combustion Engineering pressurized water reactor whose architect engineer was Stone & Webster. Maine Yankee was put into commercial operation on December 28, 1972. It is located on an 820-acre site, on the shores of the Back River in Wiscasset, Maine about 40 miles northeast of Portland, Maine. During its operating life, it generated about 1.2 billion kilowatts of power, providing 25% of Maine's electric power needs and serving additional customers in New England. Maine Yankee's lifetime capacity factor was about 67% and it employed more than 450 people. The decision was made to shutdown Maine Yankee in August of 1997, based on economic reasons. Once this decision was made planning began on how to accomplish safe and cost effective decommissioning of the plant by 2004 while being responsive to the community and employees.

Norton, W.; McGough, M. S.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic's experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume presents lessons learned during work finished by September 1997. A second volume, to be published in 1998, will complete the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown plants.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Reload design process at Yankee Atomic Electric Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) performs reload design and licensing for their nuclear power plants: Yankee Rowe, Maine Yankee, and Vermont Yankee. Significant savings in labor and computer costs have been achieved in the reload design process by the use of the SIMULATE nodal code using the CASMO assembly burnup code or LEOPARD pin cell burnup code inputs to replace the PDQ diffusion theory code in many required calculations for the Yankee Rowe and Maine Yankee pressurized water reactors (PWRs). An efficient process has evolved for the design of reloads for the Vermont Yankee boiling water reactor (BWR). Due to the major differences in the core design of the three plants, different reload design processes have evolved for each plant.

Weader, R.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Decommissioning Yankee Rowe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the process and progress of the decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Plant in Massachusetts. In 32 years Yankee Rowe was a safe, reliable and economical power source for New England. The uncertain near-term availability of disposal facilities for low-level waste, spent fuel, and other high level waste presents special challenges to the decommissioning. The decommissioning plan was submitted to the USNRC in December 1993 with final approval anticipated in 1994. Topics highlighted in this article are the decommissioning plan and the component removal program.

Heider, K.J.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Connecticut Yankee Decommissioning Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants entered decommissioning in the 1990's. Based on current information, the next group of plants whose license will expire will not begin decommissioning for nearly a decade. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor - Connecticut Yankee, in order to provide their experience for future plants.

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Yankee links computing needs, increases productivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yankee Atomic Electric Company provides design and consultation services to electric utility companies that operate nuclear power plants. This means bringing together the skills and talents of more than 500 people in many disciplines, including computer-aided design, human resources, financial services, and nuclear engineering. The company was facing a problem familiar to many companies in the nuclear industry.Key corporate data and applications resided on UNIX or other types of computer systems, but most users at Yankee had personal computers on their desks. How could Yankee enable the PC users to share the data, applications, and resources of the larger computing environment such as UNIX, while ensuring they could still use their favorite PC applications? The solution was PC-NFS from Sunsoft, of Chelmsford, Mass., which links PCs to UNIX and other systems. The Yankee computing story is an example of computer downsizing-the trend of moving away from mainframe computers in favor of lower-cost, more flexible client/server computing. Today, Yankee Atomic has more than 350 PCs on desktops throughout the company, using PC-NFS, which enables them t;o use the data, applications, disks, and printers of the FUNIX server systems. This new client/server environment has reduced Yankee`s computing costs while increasing its computing power and its ability to respond to customers.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Joint Regulation of Radionuclides at Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant - Finding Common Ground and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the site closure of nuclear facilities where both radionuclides and chemicals are present in environmental media, state and federal regulatory agencies other than the Nuclear Regulatory Commission often have a stake in the regulation of the site closure process. At the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant in Haddam, Connecticut, the site closure process includes both radiological and chemical cleanup which is regulated by two separate divisions within the state and two federal agencies. Each of the regulatory agencies has unique closure criteria which pertain to radionuclides and, consequently, there is overlapping and in some cases disparate regulation of radionuclides. Considerable effort has been expended by CYAPCO to find common ground in meeting the site closure requirements for radionuclides required by each of the agencies. This paper discusses the approaches that have been used by CYAPCO to address radionuclide site closure requirements. Significant lessons learned from these approaches include the demonstration that public health cleanup criteria for most radionuclides of concern at nuclear power generation facilities are protective for chemical toxicity concerns and are protective for ecological receptors and, consequently, performing a baseline ecological risk assessment for radionuclides at power generation facilities is not generally necessary. (authors)

Peters, J.; Glucksberg, N.; Fogg, A. [MACTEC Engineering and Consulting, Inc., Portland, Maine 04112 (United States); Couture, B. [Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company, Haddam Neck Plant, Haddam, Connecticut 06424 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Shutdown plus 3 - a look at Yankee decommissioning experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In three years, the Yankee Nuclear Power Station has not only made the transition from a facility with a full power operating license to a shut down facility but to a facility with a mature and experienced organization poised to effectively and efficiently decommission the remainder of the plant. Opportunities were acted upon to reduce the cost of running and dismantling a shut-down facility. This paper describes some of those opportunities and Yankee`s future strategy for dismantling in an environment with limited waste disposal availability.

Szymczak, W.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Connecticut Yankee risk reduction initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Risk Reduction Task Force, comprised of an interdisciplinary team of Connecticut Yankee (CY) and Northeast Utilities (NU) personnel, was formed to identify means of reducing the core-melt frequency (CMF) and the overall risk at CY. Currently, Connecticut Yankee is the only NU nuclear power plant with a CMF significantly above the corporate nuclear safety goal of < 10{sup {minus}4}/yr. It was the purpose of this task force to brainstorm ideas for design and/or procedural changes that would improve safety while allowing for operational flexibility, and also give consideration to licensing issues and design basis/deterministic concerns. The final recommendations by the task force include the installation of a tornado-protected, air-cooled diesel generator; reconfiguration of the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) flow path; addition of a diverse AFW pump; additional modifications to address tornado concerns; and repowering of several motor-operated valves.

Oswald, E.A.; Dube, D.A.; Becker, W.H.; Flannery, G.A.; Weyland, S.J. (Northeast Utilities Service Co., Hartford, CT (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE RELEASE FROM CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yankee Atomic Energy Company (YAEC) is considering allowing portions of existing structures at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to remain on site at the time of license termination. Accordingly, release of residual radioactive contaminants (i.e., H-3, C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137) from remaining subsurface concrete structures (Darman, 2004) and dose due to that release must be evaluated. Analyses were performed using DUST-MS to assess the rate of release for each radionuclide from the concrete, based upon an assumed concentration of 1 pCi/g and a concrete density of 2.5 g/cm{sup 3}. Using the same assumptions that were applied to the soil DCGL calculation (and where appropriate, the same input parameters), RESRAD was used to calculate the dose from water pathways. Values for selected RESRAD input parameters were chosen to match the release rate calculated by DUST-MS. The results indicated that Cs-137 yielded the highest dose.

SULLIVAN, T.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nuclear thermal-hydraulics education: the Yankee Atomic/University of Lowell experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the long and meaningful relationship between the University of Lowell (UL) and Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in the area of nuclear thermal hydraulics. The UL has actively interacted with YAEC for many years. Many UL graduates from the nuclear program as well as health physics and other disciplines are employed by YAEC. Furthermore, many students have worked for YAEC on a part-time basis through summer employment or the coop program. Several graduate students have completed their thesis work under the joint direction of UL and YAEC personnel, and some faculty members have had consulting and research contracts with the company. At the same time, YAEC employees have taken advantage of the graduate program offered by UL and have earned advanced degrees. Some YAEC personnel have taught courses at UL and have served on the industrial advisory committees.

Husain, A.; Brown, G.J.; Yeung, W.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Maine Yankee Decommissioning - Experience Report: Detailed Experiences 1997-2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several U.S. nuclear power plants began the decommissioning process in the 1990s. Based on current information, it will be several years before the next group of plant licenses expires, and the plants begin decommissioning. This report provides detailed information on the decommissioning of one power reactor, Maine Yankee, in order to document their experience for future plants.

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Experience with gadolinium at yankee  

SciTech Connect

The Vermont Yankee nuclear power station, a boiling water reactor, has been operating with gadolinium in the fuel bundles since 1973. The gadolinium has ranged from 2.0 to 4.0 wt% in 7 x 7, 8 x 8, and retrofit 8 x 8 bundle designs. When Yankee Atomic Electric Company initiated its program in 1978 to perform reload licensing analysis, these bundles and the core designs had to be modeled accurately. The basic calculational model consists of the cross section generation code, CASMO, and the three-dimensional nodal code, SIMULATE. The gadolinium cross sections for use in CASMO were generated using MICBURN to model each gadolinium pin individually. This combination of codes has been used to calculate 11 cycles of operation at Vermont Yankee. The model has been depleted each cycle using explicit plant conditions at equilibrium xenon. At various state points, the eigenvalues, hot and cold, were calculated and tabulated for each cycle. Comparisons were made between plant-measured and SIMULATE-calculated TIP values and between process computer and SIMULATE thermal margins. The model is also used to predict future cycle operating conditions and thermal margins based on past comparisons.

Cacciapouti, R.J.; Sironen, M.A.; Kaptiz, D.M.; Potter, R.C.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Integrated safety assessment of an oxygen reduction project at Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power's Haddam Neck plant  

SciTech Connect

Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCo) has implemented an Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP) for the integrated evaluation and prioritization of plant-specific licensing issues, regulatory policy issues, and plant improvement projects. As part of the ISAP process, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is utilized to evaluate the net safety impact of plant modification projects. On a few occasions, implementation of this approach has resulted in the identification of projects with negative safety impacts that could not be quantified via the normal design review and 10CFR50.59 safety evaluation process. An example is a plant modification that was proposed to reduce the oxygen in the Haddam Neck plant's demineralized water storage tank (DWST). The project involved the design and installation of a nitrogen blanketing system on the DWST. The purpose of the project was to reduce the oxygen content on the secondary side, consistent with recommendations from the Electric Power Research Institute Steam Generator Owners Group. Oxygen is one of the contributors to the corrosion process in systems in contact with the feedwater and can cause damage to associated components if not controlled.

Aubrey, J.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Yankee atomic experience with coastdown. Report YAEC-1270  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Yankee Atomic's operating experience with 19 coastdowns in three different nuclear power plants. The observed effects of coastdown on plant capacity factor, efficiency, maneuverability, and fuel integrity are demonstrated. Calculations of resource requirements and fuel cycle economics for equilibrium cycles show typical savings of 3 to 5% for cycles using coastdown compared to those which produce the same energy without coastdown.

Quan, B.L.; Malone, J.P.; Pilat, E.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Yankee bonds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

Delaney, P. (Bear, Stearns Co. Inc., New York, NY (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Technical evaluation of the adequacy of station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the adequacy of the station electric distribution system voltages for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station. The evaluation is to determine if the onsite distribution system, in conjunction with the offsite power sources, has sufficient capacity to automatically start and operate all Class 1E loads within the equipment voltage ratings under certain conditions established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The analysis shows that the station electric distribution system has the capacity and capability to supply voltage to the Class 1E equipment with their design ratings for the worst case loading condition.

Selan, J.C.

1981-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

31

Nuclear plant owners move closer to life extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major debate is now underway about the safety of 40-year-old nuclear power plants. Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 a nuclear power plant's license is limited to a maximum of 40 years. Although the act permits the renewal of an operating license, it does not outline any standards or procedures for determining when or under what conditions a plant's operating license should be renewed. This paper reports that the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-sponsors of a program to demonstrate the license renewal process for two nuclear power plants - Yankee Atomic Electric's 175-MW Yankee PWR plant and Northern States Power's 536-MW Monticello BWR plant. The demonstration is known as the lead plant project. Yankee Atomic has already analyzed the plant's condition and evaluated aging using computer-based expert systems and the plant's operating experience. During these tests Yankee Atomic found embrittlement of the reactor vessel.

Smith, D.J.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDE RELEASE FROM INTACT STRUCTURES BACKFILLED WITH CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE YANKEE NUCLEAR POWER STATION.  

SciTech Connect

This calculation determines the release of residual radioactivity (including H-3, C-14, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137), from subsurface structures filled with concrete debris at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station. Analyses were performed to assess the rate of release from the source of contamination and the resulting dose in the groundwater pathway. Two mechanisms were considered, diffusive release from the concrete structures (walls and floors) that remain intact and sorption onto concrete backfill placed within these structures. RESRAD was used to calculate the predicted maximum dose assuming a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on the intact structures. To the extent possible, the same assumptions in the soil DCGL calculations performed for Yankee Atomic were used in the calculation. However, modifications to some input parameter values were needed to represent the geometry of the subsurface facilities, flow through these facilities, and releases from the backfill and intact structures. Input parameters specific to these calculations included the leach rate, disposal geometry, pumping rate, porosity and bulk density. The dose results for a unit loading of 1 pCi/g on intact structures showed that Sr-90 had the highest dose (3.67E-02 mrem/yr).

SULLIVAN, T.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

BWR (boiling-water reactor) radiation control: In-plant demonstration at Vermont Yankee: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of the RP1934 program, which was established by EPRI in 1981 to demonstrate the adequacy of BRAC program (RP819) principles for BWR radiation control at Vermont Yankee, are presented. Evaluations were performed of the effectiveness of optimization of purification system performance, control of feedwater dissolved oxygen concentrations, minimization of corrosion product and ionic transport, and improved startup, shutdown, and layup practices. The impact on shutdown radiation levels of these corrective actions was assessed based on extensive primary system radiation survey and component gamma scan data. Implementation of the BRAC recommendations was found to be insufficient to reduce the rate of activity buildup on out-of-core surfaces at Vermont Yankee, and additional corrective actions were found necessary. Specifically, replacement of cobalt-bearing materials in the control rod drive pins and rollers and feedwater regulating valves was pursued as was installation of electropolished 316 stainless steel during a recirculation piping replacement program. Aggressive programs to further reduce copper concentrations in the reactor water by improving condensate demineralizer efficiency and to minimize organic ingress to the power cycle by reducing organic concentrations in recycled radwaste also were undertaken. Evaluations of the impact on activity buildup of several pretreatment processes including prefilming in moist air, preexposure to high temperature water containing zinc, and electropolishing also were performed in a test loop installed in the reactor water cleanup system. A significant beneficial impact of electropolishing was shown to be present for periods up to 6000 hours.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the ``primary acceptance criterion`` in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Review of reactor pressure vessel evaluation report for Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station (YAEC No. 1735)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed an Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS)-type evaluation of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel in accordance with the PTS Rule (10 CFR 50. 61) and a US Regulatory Guide 1.154. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the YAEC document and performed an independent probabilistic fracture-mechnics analysis. The review included a comparison of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the ORNL probabilistic fracture-mechanics codes (VISA-II and OCA-P, respectively). The review identified minor errors and one significant difference in philosophy. Also, the two codes have a few dissimilar peripheral features. Aside from these differences, VISA-II and OCA-P are very similar and with errors corrected and when adjusted for the difference in the treatment of fracture toughness distribution through the wall, yield essentially the same value of the conditional probability of failure. The ORNL independent evaluation indicated RT{sub NDT} values considerably greater than those corresponding to the PTS-Rule screening criteria and a frequency of failure substantially greater than that corresponding to the primary acceptance criterion'' in US Regulatory Guide 1.154. Time constraints, however, prevented as rigorous a treatment as the situation deserves. Thus, these results are very preliminary.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evaluation of the Decontamination of the Reactor Coolant Systems at Maine Yankee and Connecticut Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, utilities carried out chemical decontamination of the reactor coolant loops at two permanently closed PWR plants. They used EPRI's Decontamination For Decommissioning (DFD) process at Maine Yankee, and Siemens' Chemical Oxidation Reduction Decontamination (CORD) process at Connecticut Yankee. This report describes each application, and presents the results and lessons learned.

1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

37

Technical evaluation of the susceptibility of safety-related systems to flooding caused by the failure of non-category 1 systems for the Yankee Rowe Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine whether the failure of any non-Class I (seismic) equipment could result in a condition, such as flooding, that might adversely affect the performance of the safety-related equipment required for the safe shutdown of the facility, or to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Criteria developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission were used to evaluate the acceptability of the existing protection system as well as measures taken by Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (MYAPC) to minimize the danger of flooding and to protect safety-related equipment.

Epps, R.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Vermont Yankee simulator qualification: large-break LOCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) has developed simulator benchmark capabilities for the Seabrook, Maine Yankee, and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (VYNPS) simulators. The goal is to establish that each simulator has a satisfactory real-time response for different scenarios that will enhance operator training. Vermont Yankee purchased a full-scope plane simulator for the VYNPS, a four-unit boiling water reactor with a Mark-I containment. The following seven benchmark cases were selected by YAEC and VYNPC to supplement the Simulator Acceptance Test Program: (1) control rod swap; (2) partial reactor scram; (3) recirculation pump trip; (4) main steam isolation valve (MSIV) closure without scram, (5) main steamline break, (6) small-break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), and (7) large-break LOCA. Five simulator benchmark sessions have been completed. Each session identified simulator capabilities and limitations that needed correction. This paper discusses results from the latest large-break LOCA case.

Loomis, J.N.; Fernandez, R.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Proceedings: A Guide for Intervenors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workers, 367 U.S. 396 (1961); Vermont Yankee, 435 U.S. 519;in two 2. See, e.g. , Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. v.1143 (8th Cir. 1971); and Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp.

Hansell, Dean

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Examination of turbine discs from nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Investigations were performed on a cracked turbine disc from the Cooper Nuclear Power Station, and on two failed turbine discs (governor and generator ends) from the Yankee-Rowe Nuclear Power Station. Cooper is a boiling water reactor (BWR) which went into commercial operation in July 1974, and Yankee-Rowe is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) which went into commercial operation in June 1961. Cracks were identified in the bore of the Cooper disc after 41,913 hours of operation, and the disc removed for repair. At Yankee-Rowe two discs failed after 100,000 hours of operation. Samples of the Cooper disc and both Yankee-Rowe disc (one from the governor and one from the generator end of the LP turbine) were sent to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for failure analysis.

Czajkowski, C.J.; Weeks, J.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant, this measurement is car a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

42

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactor Unit 4 of the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant (Sweden) during fuel cycle 16 is analyzed reactivity effects--has been benchmarked against measurements.30 At the Ringhals nuclear power plant a measurement performed at the PWR Unit 4 of the Ring- hals Nuclear Power Plant was available to us

Demazière, Christophe

43

Observations and comments on the turbine failure at Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary analysis is presented of the catastrophic disc failure in the low-pressure turbine at the Yankee Rowe nuclear reactor plant. The analysis is based on on-site inspection and documentation of fractured components. Heavily oxidized thumbnail cracks were observed on fractured surfaces of the first-stage generator-end disc, indicating stress corrosion cracking as the precursor to the catastrophic failure of this disc. No evidence of such cracks was seen on the corresponding fractured governor-end disc. We propose a number of alternative possible causes for the failures and for the differences observed between the two discs.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

ARM - Campaign Instrument - pyran-yankee-isothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

yankee-isothermal Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Yankee Isothermal Pyranometer...

45

Innovative implementation of decommissioning activities at Yankee  

SciTech Connect

The decommissioning of the Yankee Rowe reactor is described. Reactor dismantlement, radioactive waste manageemnt, and cost are discussed.

Kadak, A.C.; Maret, G.A.; Mellor, R.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Department of Energy interest and involvement in nuclear plant license renewal activities  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the importance of nuclear license renewal to the nation's energy strategy, the Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a plant lifetime improvement program during 1985 to determine the feasibility of the license renewal option for US nuclear plants. Initial activities of the DOE program focused on determining whether there were technical and economic obstacles that might preclude or limit the successful implementation of the license renewal option. To make this determination, DOE cosponsored with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pilot-plant efforts by Virginia Electric Power and Northern States Power. Both pilot-plant efforts concluded that life extension is technically and economically feasible. In parallel with the pilot-plant activities, DOE performed national economic studies that demonstrated the economic desirability of life extension. Having demonstrated the feasibility of life extension, DOE, in conjunction with EPRI, selected two lead plants to demonstrate the license renewal process. These lead plants are Yankee Atomic's Yankee Rowe facility and Northern States Power's Monticello facility. DOE also initiated activities to develop the technical and regulatory bases to support the license renewal process in the United States. DOE has recently identified nuclear plant license renewal to be an important element of its National Energy Strategy. This paper summarizes the significant results, conclusions, and ongoing activities of the DOE effort. 18 refs.

Bustard, L.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Harrison, D.L. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, DC (USA). Office of LWR Safety and Technology)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 benchmarking against Vermont Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cross-section generation code CASMO-3 and the advanced nodal code SIMULATE-3 are used to model Vermont Yankee (VY) cycles 9 through 13. Vermont Yankee is a small, high-power density boiling water reactor (BWR)-3 reactor. Cycles 9 through 13 were chosen for benchmarking because they have high-enrichment cores and use gamma-sensing traversing in-core probes (TIPs). To judge the merit of the new CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 model, the results are compared to the old CASMO-2/SIMULATE-2 model. The figures of merit are consistent hot and cold eigenvalues near 1.0 and accurate reproduction of the plant TIP readings.

Hubbard, B.Y.; Morin, D.J.; Pappas, J.; Potter, R.C.; Woehlke, R.A. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate SE- 10658 Stockholm, Sweden. NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY VOL. 131 AUG. 2000 239 by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, contract 14.5-980942-98242. REFERENCES 1. A. M. WEINBERG and H. C

Pázsit, Imre

49

DEVELOPING SITE-SPECIFIC DERIVED CONCENTRATION GUIDELINE LEVELS FOR MULTIPLE MEDIA AT THE CONNECTICUT YANKEE HADDAM NECK PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the license termination process, site-specific Derived Concentration Guideline Levels for the Haddam Neck Plant site are developed for soil, groundwater, concrete left standing, and concrete demolished that satisfy the radiological criteria for unrestricted use as defined in 10 CFR 20.1402. Background information on the license termination process and characteristics of the Haddam Neck Plant site are presented. The dose models and associated resident farmer and building occupancy scenarios, applicable pathways, and critical groups developed to establish the Derived Concentration Guideline Levels are described. A parameter assignment process is introduced wherein general population values are used to establish behavioral and metabolic parameters representative of an average member of the critical group, while the uncertainty associated with important physical parameters is considered. A key element of the parameter assignment process is the use of sensitivity analysis to identify the dose sensitive physical parameters and to ensure that such parameters are assigned conservative values. Structuring the parameter assignment process, completing the formal sensitivity analyses, and assigning conservative values to the sensitive physical parameters in a consistent way establishes a calculation framework that lead to Derived Concentration Guideline Levels with a uniform level of conservatism across all media and all radionuclides.

Taylor, S.W.; Smith, L.C.; Carr, R.K.; Carson, A.; Darois, E.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Qualification of in-service examination of the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

Technical support was provided to assist the Yankee Atomic Electric Company with their restart effort for the Yankee plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. Demonstration of adequate margin during a postulated pressurized thermal shock accident was an important part of the justification for restarting the plant, and effective inservice examination of the critical inner surface of the vessel in the beltline region was a key objective and a significant component of the safety analysis. This report discussed this inservice inspection.

Ammirato, F.; Kietzman, K.; Becker, L.; Ashwin, P.; Selby, G.; Krzywosz, K.; Findlan, S. (Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States). Nondestructive Evaluation Center); Lance, J. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Fragility analysis  

SciTech Connect

This Fragility Analysis is the third of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 1 is the Summary Report of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 2, Systems Analysis, documents the results of the systems screening for the review. The three volumes are part of the Seismic Margins Program initiated in 1984 by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to quantify seismic margins at nuclear power plants. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Ravindra, M. K.; Hardy, G. S.; Hashimoto, P. S.; Griffin, M. J.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Examination of cracked turbine discs from nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Investigations were performed on a cracked turbine disc from the Cooper Nuclear Power Station (BWR), and on two failed turbine discs from the Yankee-Rowe Nuclear Power Station (PWR). The Yankee-Rowe discs were subjected to SEM/EDAX, uniaxial tension tests, hardness testing, notch sensitivity tests, and environmental notched tensile tests. The results of this investigation support the model whereby the cracks initiated at startup of the turbine, probably from H/sub 2/S produced by hydrolysis of MoS/sub 2/, and grew at a rate consistent with published data for propagation of cracks in pure steam.

Czajkowski, C.J.; Weeks, J.R.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

54

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

55

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

56

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

57

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

58

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

59

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

60

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

62

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

63

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

64

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

65

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

66

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

67

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

68

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

69

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

70

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

71

Yankee Rowe simulator core model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the validation of the Yankee Rowe simulator core model. Link-Miles Simulation Corporation is developing the Yankee Rowe simulator and Yankee Atomic Electric Company is involved in input and benchmark data generation, as well as simulator validation. Core model validation by Yankee comprises three tasks: (1) careful generation of fuel reactivity characteristics (B constants); (2) nonintegrated core model testing; and (3) fully integrated core model testing. Simulator core model validation and verification is a multistage process involving input and benchmark data generation as well as interactive debugging. Core characteristics were brought within acceptable criteria by this process. This process was achieved through constant communication between Link-Miles and Yankee engineers. Based on this validation, the Yankee Rowe simulator core model is found to be acceptable for training purposes.

Napolitano, M.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, June 1996. Volume 43, Number 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the issuances received during the specified period form the Commission, the Atomic Safety and licensing Boards, the administrative Law Judges, the Director`s decisions and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are a memorandum and order on the decommissioning plan for Yankee Nuclear Power Station, a memorandum and order suspending byproduct material license for Eastern Testing and Inspection, Inc., an initial decision of the source materials license for Sequoyah Fuels Corporation, Director`s decisions for Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Indian Point, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Trojan Nuclear Plant, Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, and Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant for use in an airless environment or other environment in which cooling is difficult is described. The power plant includes a boiling mercury reactor, a mercury--vapor turbine in direct cycle therewith, and a radiator for condensing mercury vapor. (AEC)

Carter, J.C.; Armstrong, R.H.; Janicke, M.J.

1963-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

75

Review of selected areas of Yankee Rowe probabilistic safety study  

SciTech Connect

The Yankee Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Safety Study has been reviewed in three specific areas. These areas are (1) treatment of initiating events, (2) treatment of human actions, and (3) treatment of the emergency ac and dc power systems. The results reported here are based on three individual and highly focused reviews. Therefore, the conclusions offered are based within the context of each individual review. 22 tabs.

Arrieta, L.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Spettell, C.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

YAEC's view of the cause and control of escalating nuclear plant O and M costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides insights on this issue in terms of both the genesis and effective long-term control of O and M costs. Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC's) insights stem not only from an analysis of certain industry data, but also from its unique position within the nuclear industry in terms of its age, plant size, and organization. First, at 30 yr of age, the YAEC plant has endured the full swing of the regulatory/institutional pendulum and the associated impact on O and M costs. Second, with a size of only 185 MW(electric), YAEC's imperative since start-up has been the strict control of O and M costs while still achieving operational excellence. Finally, YAEC is an organization strictly focused on nuclear power operations and has not been distracted by fossil plant operations or other utility requirements like distribution, retail sales, etc., that may have plagued other plant operators.

Haseltine, J.D.; Lessard, L.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Seismic margin review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station: Summary report  

SciTech Connect

This Summary Report is the first of three volumes for the Seismic Margin Review of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. Volume 2 is the Systems Analysis of the first trial seismic margin review. Volume 3 documents the results of the fragility screening for the review. The three volumes demonstrate how the seismic margin review guidance (NUREG/CR-4482) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Seismic Design Margins Program can be applied. The overall objectives of the trial review are to assess the seismic margins of a particular pressurized water reactor, and to test the adequacy of this review approach, quantification techniques, and guidelines for performing the review. Results from the trial review will be used to revise the seismic margin methodology and guidelines so that the NRC and industry can readily apply them to assess the inherent quantitative seismic capacity of nuclear power plants.

Prassinos, P.G.; Murray, R.C.; Cummings, G.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Nuclear Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990s several nuclear utilities proceeded with full decommissioning of their nuclear power plants based on perceived economics. This major shift to immediate decommissioning presented a significant challenge to the industry in terms of the development of a decommissioning process and a comprehensive updated regulatory framework. EPRI responded by undertaking the formation of the Decommissioning Support Program. The initial work involved conducting a series of topical workshops directed to specific...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

80

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

82

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

83

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

84

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

85

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

86

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

87

Nuclear power plant design analysis  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning the engineering aspects of the design of commercial nuclear power plants is presented. Topics discussed include: electric utility economics; nuclear plant cconomics; thermal-transport systems and core design; nuclear analysis methods; safcty requirements; fuel-system analysis; dcsign considerations; and optimization approaches. (DCC)

Sesonske, A.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Vermont Yankee Nucl Pwr Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yankee Nucl Pwr Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Vermont Yankee Nucl Pwr Corp Place Vermont Utility Id 19796 Utility Location Yes Ownership I NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes...

89

Comparison of three-dimensional neutron flux calculations for Maine Yankee  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed on the Maine Yankee Power Plant to obtain three-dimensional neutron fluxes using the spatial synthesis with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code THREEDANT and the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP. Neutron fluxes are compared for energies above 0.1 MeV and 1.0 MeV as well as dpa. Results were obtained at the Yankee dosimetry locations and special test regions within the pressure vessel, in the reactor cavity, and in a shield tank detector well.

Urban, W.T.; Crotzer, L.A.; Waters, L.S.; Parsons, D.K.; Alcouffe, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spinney, K.B.; Cacciapouti, R.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ESTIMATES FOR RELEASE OF RADIONUCLIDES FROM POTENTIALLY CONTAMINATED CONCRETE AT THE HADDAM NECK NUCLEAR PLANT.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning of the Haddam Neck Nuclear Power Plant operated by Connecticut Yankee is in progress. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the Containment Building and Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) Building. Consideration is being given to leaving some subsurface concrete from the Containment, Spent Fuel and certain other buildings in place following NRC license termination. Characterization data of most of these structures show small amounts of residual contamination. The In-Core Sump area of the Containment Building has shown elevated levels of tritium, Co-60, Fe-55, and Eu-152 and lesser quantities of other radionuclides due to neutron activation of the concrete in this area. This analysis is provided to determine levels of residual contamination that will not cause releases to the groundwater in excess of the acceptable dose limits. The objective is to calculate a conservative relationship between the radionuclide concentration of subsurface concrete and the maximum groundwater concentration (pCi/L) for the concrete that may remain following license termination at Connecticut Yankee.

SULLIVAN, T.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Qualification of In-Service Examination of the Yankee Rowe Reactor Pressure Vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective in-service examination of the reactor pressure vessel was an essential part of the restart program for the Yankee Atomic Power Company plant in Rowe, Massachusetts. This report describes development of an effective examination strategy, demonstration of performance of the examination procedures, and development of data on the distribution of flaws in reactor pressure vessels.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

94

Spare-parts replacement and the commercial grade issues at Connecticut Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Connecticut Yankee was designed and built according to code B31.1 of the American National Standards Institute for pressure piping and began commercial operations in 1968, 2 yr prior to 10CFR50 Appendix B of the Code of Federal Regulations. Therefore, at the time of commercial operation, the entire plant, except for several major primary plant components, met the current criteria for commercial grade items (CGIs). When spare parts were needed, 10CFR50 Appendix B and 10CFR21 requirements had to be backfitted onto suppliers who had not agreed to these requirements when supplying the original equipment. The problem of identifying original equipment manufacturers that would or would not accept these additional requirements was compounded at Connecticut Yankee by three related problems that also became apparent at approximately the same time: (1) The accuracy of the material, equipment, parts list (Q-list) was being questioned. (2) The use of existing spare parts bought without additional current quality assurance requirements and the adequacy of the existing inventory to support plant operations were being questioned. (3) The general industry concerns over use of GCIs in safety-related applications needed to be resolved. Connecticut Yankee management recognized the need to address each of these problems. Three specific actions were taken: (1) A Q-list upgrade program was funded. (2) A spare parts bill of materials (BOM) project was funded. (3) Connecticut Yankee's engineering department dedicated several engineers to address procurement issues and specifically to develop a CGI program.

Nichols, E.M.; Scott, D.J.; Maret, D.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Small break LOCA analysis for Maanshan nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

Since 1990, Taiwan Power Company has conducted a LWR LOCA technology transfer program on RELAP5YA computer code from Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC). One objective of this program is to acquire the RELAP5YA computer code from YAEC for Taipower in-house licensing analysis. The RELAP5YA is a computer program developed at YAEC for analysing the dynamic behaviour of thermal-hydraulic systems, and it can cover most of the postulated accidents and transients in light water reactor systems. In this paper, Taipower`s engineers have performed a small break loss of coolant accidents analysis for Maanshan nuclear power plant. Thais action is used to perform the licensing actions for increasing the operation margin on the steam generator tube plugging. The result is shown that the steam generator tube can be plugged slightly without a reduction in safety margins. This analysis covers a spectrum of break size for a small break LOCA. For a complete spectrum of the transient and accident analysis, the large break LOCA and the non-LOCA analysis were performed by the fuel vendor for the reload safety evaluation.

Jer-Cherng Kang; Shou-Chuan Chiang; Lang-Chen Wang [Taiwan Power Company, Taipei (China)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plants In naval nuclear propulsion plants, fissioning of uranium atoms in the reactor core produces heat. Because the fission process also produces...

97

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

98

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

99

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

100

An assessment of citizen action committees as a risk communication strategy in the decommissioning of Connecticut Yankee nuclear power plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Public utility companies manage unexpected crises by disseminating usable and understandable information about the incident/crisis to the general public. It is often hard to deal (more)

Pillittere, Joseph T., Jr

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ct Millstone Unit 2, Unit 3 2,103 16,750 100.0 Dominion Nuclear Conn Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent ...

102

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2ar Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 1, Unit 2 1,835 15,023 100.0 Entergy Arkansas Inc 1 Plant 2 Reactors Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of ...

103

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Volume 44, Number 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes issuances received during September 1996. After reviewing in detail each of the claims made in this informal proceeding the presiding officer sustained the staff of the USNRC in its determination that the applicant did not pass the written portion of his examination to become a licensed operator of a nuclear power plant. In the proceeding concerning citizen group challenges to the decommissioning plan for the Rowe Yankee power station, the licensing board grants licensee Yankee Atomic Electric Company`s motion for summary disposition.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3wi4046 506 3,954 89.2 PWR 512 4,336 96.7 1,018 8,291 93.0 Point Beach Nuclear Plant Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor. Note: Totals ...

105

Considerations in the evaluation of concrete structures for continued service in aged Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs)  

SciTech Connect

Currently, there are /approximately/119 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the US either under construction, operating at low-to-full power, or awaiting an operating license. Together, these units have a net generating capacity of /approximately/110 GW(e). Assuming no life extension of present facilities, the operating licenses for these plants will start to expire in the middle of the next decade with Yankee Rowe being the first plant to attain this status. Where it is noted that with no life extension of facilities, a potential loss of electrical generating capacity in excess of 75 GW(e) could occur during the time period 2006 to 2020 when the operating licenses of 80 to 90 NPPs are scheduled to expire. A potential timely and cost-effective solution to meeting future electricity demand, which has worked well for non-nuclear generating plants, is to extend the service life (operating licenses) of existing NPPs. Since the concrete components in these plants provide a vital safety function, any continued service considerations must include an in-depth assessment of the safety-related concrete structures. 7 refs.

Naus, D.; Marchbanks, M.; Oland, B.; Arndt, G.; Brown, T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryers  

SciTech Connect

Several failure investigations and recent research on thermal spray coatings on Yankee dryer surfaces show at least three modes of environmentally induced degradation. Corrosion may occur with the ingress of certain chemicals into coating pores. Erosion or corrosion is manifested by streaks at local sites of high doctor blade loading. Erosion and cracking occur due to coating parameters, thermal stress, and differential expansion. While most of the results described in this paper are from investigations of molybdenum, stainless steel coatings also are discussed.

Bowers, D.F. (Packer Engineering, Inc., Naperville, IL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

ALARA at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle at nuclear power plants presents a continuing challenge for health physicists at utility corporate and plant levels, for plant designers, and for regulatory agencies. The relatively large collective doses at some plants are being addressed though a variety of dose reduction techniques. It is planned that this report will include material on historical aspects, management, valuation of dose reduction, quantitative and qualitative aspects of optimization, design, operational considerations, and training. The status of this work is summarized in this report. 30 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Baum, J.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Health physics support for thermal shield repair at Connecticut Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the radiation and safety controls used by Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company to support underwater repair work on the Haddam Neck Plant's core barrel thermal shield. The work was conducted by divers in the reactor cavity using remote tools and protected by a specially-constructed physical barrier that restricted their movements to a carefully defined and thoroughly surveyed area. A unique dosimetry test rig was used to determine the dose rate profiles within the work areas, and all underwater survey equipment was qualified against personnel dosimetric devices. Underwater operations were monitored and controlled by remote means (video surveillance and dosimetry telemetry), and health physics technicians were rotated through job coverage to avoid complacency and maximize training opportunities. A single, hot particle event occurred during one dive, but this was identified almost immediately and controlled to prevent excessive exposure to the diver.

Nevelos, W.F.; Gates, W.J. (Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Co., East Hampton, CT (United States))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

STATE OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY-JANUARY 1962  

SciTech Connect

Events in nuclear technology in 1961 are reviewed. The SL-1 incident, operation of the Yankee plant, restarting of the Dresden plant, contributions to the state of water reactor technology, transitions to private industry, dry criticality in EBR-II, startup of Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiment (LAMPRE), successful Tory tests, performance of SNAP reactor tests, and use of radioisotope-powered electric source in Transit IV A are discussed. (M.C.G.)

Crewe, A.; Lawreski, S.; Spinrad, B.I.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Simulating Online Yankee Auctions to Optimize Sellers Revenue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The online Yankee auction sells multiple units of the same good to multiple buyers using an ascending and open auction mechanism. One of the important controllable factors of the Yankee auction is the minimum bid increment, specified at the beginning ... Keywords: Simulation, Online Auctions, E-commerce

R. Bapna; P. Goes; A. Gupta

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Performance of nuclear plant RTDs  

SciTech Connect

Resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) are used for safety-related measurements in nuclear power plants and must therefore be accurate and respond to temperature changes in a timely fashion. Experience has shown that RTD calibration shift and response-time degradation can occur with aging. Therefore, periodic testing is performed to ensure that acceptable performance limits are not exceeded. A new method called the loop current step response (LCSR) test is used for periodic response-time testing of nuclear plant RTDs. This method permits testing the RTD as installed in an operating plant (in situ testing). The LCSR test is based on heating the RTD sensing element with a small electric current applied remotely through the sensor lead wires.

Hashemian, H.M.; Petersen, K.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Bookmark and Share Activities in Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety research and development fulfill a primary goal of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division to promote improvements in safe and reliable operation of present and future

116

Sabotage at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently there has been a noted worldwide increase in violent actions including attempted sabotage at nuclear power plants. Several organizations, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have guidelines, recommendations, and formal threat- and risk-assessment processes for the protection of nuclear assets. Other examples are the former Defense Special Weapons Agency, which used a risk-assessment model to evaluate force-protection security requirements for terrorist incidents at DOD military bases. The US DOE uses a graded approach to protect its assets based on risk and vulnerability assessments. The Federal Aviation Administration and Federal Bureau of Investigation conduct joint threat and vulnerability assessments on high-risk US airports. Several private companies under contract to government agencies use formal risk-assessment models and methods to identify security requirements. The purpose of this paper is to survey these methods and present an overview of all potential types of sabotage at nuclear power plants. The paper discusses emerging threats and current methods of choice for sabotage--especially vehicle bombs and chemical attacks. Potential consequences of sabotage acts, including economic and political; not just those that may result in unacceptable radiological exposure to the public, are also discussed. Applicability of risk-assessment methods and mitigation techniques are also presented.

Purvis, James W.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Indian Point Unit 2, Unit 3","2,063","16,321",39.0,"Entergy Nuclear Indian Point" "James A Fitzpatrick Unit 1",855,"6,361",15.2,"Entergy Nuc Fitzpatrick LLC" "Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station Unit 1, Unit 2","1,773","14,239",34.0,"Nine Mile Point Nuclear Sta LLC" "R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1",581,"4,948",11.8,"R.E. Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, LLC" "4 Plants

118

A comparison of factors impacting on radiation buildup at the Vermont Yankee and Monticello BWRs (boiling-water reactors): Interim report  

SciTech Connect

Design and operating features of the Monticello and Vermont Yankee BWRs were compared in an attempt to explain why shutdown radiation levels at Vermont Yankee were significantly higher than at Monticello. The plants were shown to be similar in many respects, for example, condenser and feedwater system design and materials, condensate treatment system design, feedwater iron and copper concentrations, reactor water piping materials and fabrication techniques, reactor water cleanup system flowrates and equipment type, fuel cycle lengths, and fuel failure history. Differences were noted in core power density, jet pump design, reactor water conductivity, volume of radwaste recycle, and the amount of Stellite bearing materials in the feedwater system. Corrosion films on reactor system decontamination flanges from the two plants also were very different. At Monticello, the film was typical of that observed at other BWRs. The Vermont Yankee film contained significantly higher levels of zinc, chromium, and cobalt. Since reactor water Co-60 concentrations at Monticello were about twice those at Vermont Yankee, the Vermont Yankee corrosion film must exhibit a greater tendency to incorporate Co-60.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Sawochka, S.G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Balance of Plant Corrosion Issues in Aging Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... number of times, can be used to forecast the most probable number of leaks. ... Conditions for Long Term Operation of Nuclear Power Plants in Sweden.

120

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

122

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

123

Organizational learning at nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Power Plant Advisory Panel on Organizational Learning provides channels of communications between the management and organization research projects of the MIT International Program for Enhanced Nuclear Power ...

Carroll, John S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1988 presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1988. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1989-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

Materials in Nuclear Power Plant Construction - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

139th Annual Meeting & Exhibition. February 14 - 18, 2010, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington USA. Materials in Nuclear Power. Plant ...

126

Steam Reheat in Nuclear Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, reheating steam from a commercial nuclear power plant is explored in order to increase efficiency and power output. A thermal source in (more)

Marotta, Paul John

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Pantex Plant Pantex Plant http://www.pantex.com/ Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas and the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tenn. The Pantex Plant is

128

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has entered into a voluntary initiative to implement groundwater monitoring programs at all nuclear power plant sites. This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to nuclear power utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

Basu, Prabir [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)] [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA); Labbe, Pierre [Electricity of France (EDF)] [Electricity of France (EDF); Naus, Dan [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated June 20, 1997 Hanford, WA Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated The Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX), the largest of the

132

Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Processing Plant Deactivated | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated June 20, 1997 Hanford, WA Plutonium Processing Plant Deactivated The Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX), the largest of the

133

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1000 was designed by Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and has been formally approved by NRC. See, and show that the member has authorized the organization to intervene on his or her behalf. Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corp. (Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station), CLI-00-20, 52 NRC 151, 163 (2000). B. Ruling

Laughlin, Robert B.

134

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

SciTech Connect

This document is the March 1996 listing of NRC issuances. Included are: (1) NRC orders granting Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company`s petition for review of the ASLB order LBP-95-17, (2) NRC orders relating to the potential disqualification of two commissioners in the matter of the decommissioning of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (3) ASLB orders pertaining to the Oncology Services Corporation, (4) ASLB orders pertaining to the Radiation Oncology Center, (5) ASLB orders pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station, and (6) Director`s decision pertaining to the Yankee Nuclear Power Station.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis...

136

Plant Support Engineering: Elastomer Handbook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On a daily basis, engineers and maintenance personnel make judgments regarding the capabilities, degradation, and longevity of elastomeric material and its compatibility with other materials. Although most applications of elastomers in nuclear power plants are not unique to the industry, there is an extra emphasis in certain applications with regard to reliability, quality, and resistance to nuclear-plant-specific environments. Existing resources on elastomers are extensive, but they are not tailored to ...

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3ny6122 581 4,948 97.2 PWR R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant Unit Summer Capacity (MW) Net Generation (Thousand MWh) Summer Capacity Factor (Percent) Type

138

Nuclear Power Plant NDE Challenges Past, Present, and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating fleet of U.S. nuclear power plants was built to fossil plant standards (of workmanship

S. R. Doctor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Kansas City Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Kansas City Plant Kansas City Plant http://honeywell.com/sites/aero-kcp/Pages/Home.aspx Field Office: The Kansas City Field Office (KCFO) stewards the NNSA Kansas City Plant, the principal nonnuclear production site within the nuclear

140

Kansas City Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our Locations > Kansas City Plant Kansas City Plant http://honeywell.com/sites/aero-kcp/Pages/Home.aspx Field Office: The Kansas City Field Office (KCFO) stewards the NNSA Kansas City Plant, the principal nonnuclear production site within the nuclear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986  

SciTech Connect

Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors.

1987-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Project Prioritization for Nuclear Plant Investments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating investments, sometimes called project prioritization, is a central business process in a plant's or fleet's management of their nuclear assets. To date, a variety of project prioritization approaches have been used in the nuclear industry. Many nuclear utilities use an approach that can be characterized as an engineering work grading process. Project prioritization is related closely to long-range planning. Long-range plans help to avoid surprises from increased expenditures and reduced levels...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and downstream processes Risks due to power plant emissions Coal Lignite Gas CC Nuclear PV (amorph) Wind Hydro-proliferation and waste. Then BUILD one! #12;Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Thermal Power 250 MW Core Height 10.0 m Core Product Barrier · Core Physics · Safety · Balance of Plant Design · Modularity Design · Core Power

144

Nuclear power plant construction activity 1987  

SciTech Connect

This annual report published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) presents data on nuclear power plant construction activity. The previous report, Nuclear Power Plant Construction Activity 1986, included data for units that, as of December 31, 1986, were (1) in the construction pipeline, (2) canceled, or (3) commercial operation as of December 31, 1986. The data in this report, which were collected on Form EIA-254, ''Semiannual Report on Status of Reactor Construction,'' update the data in the previous report to be current as of December 31, 1987. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership; construction costs; and construction schedules and milestone dates.

1988-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Catawba Unit 1, Unit 2","2,258","18,964",36.5,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "H B Robinson Unit 2",724,"3,594",6.9,"Progress Energy Carolinas Inc" "Oconee Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3","2,538","20,943",40.3,"Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC" "V C Summer Unit 1",966,"8,487",16.3,"South Carolina Electric&Gas Co" "4 Plants 7 Reactors","6,486","51,988",100.0

147

Nuclear Power Plant Design Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................. 22 5.1.16 Decommissioning: AP600, HTGR, ALWR ............................................................................................................... 35 7.3.4 Decommissioning Cost #12;9 decommissioning. The long delayed nuclear waste disposal facility at Yucca Mountain is becoming

148

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2mo Callaway Unit 1 1,190 8,996 100.0 Union Electric Co 1 Plant 1 Reactor Owner Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

149

Press Room - Testimony - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee nuclear plant closure in 2014 will challenge New England energy markets. See More ...

150

Press Room - Events - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee nuclear plant closure in 2014 will challenge New England energy markets. See More ...

151

Press Room - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee nuclear plant closure in 2014 will challenge New England energy markets. See More ...

152

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2tx Comanche Peak Unit 1, Unit 2 2,406 20,208 48.9 Luminant Generation Company LLC South Texas Project Unit 1, Unit 2 2,560 21,127 51.1 STP Nuclear Operating Co

153

Nuclear plant cancellations: causes, costs, and consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was commissioned in order to help quantify the effects of nuclear plant cancellations on the Nation's electricity prices. This report presents a historical overview of nuclear plant cancellations through 1982, the costs associated with those cancellations, and the reasons that the projects were terminated. A survey is presented of the precedents for regulatory treatment of the costs, the specific methods of cost recovery that were adopted, and the impacts of these decisions upon ratepayers, utility stockholders, and taxpayers. Finally, the report identifies a series of other nuclear plants that remain at risk of canellation in the future, principally as a result of similar demand, finance, or regulatory problems cited as causes of cancellation in the past. The costs associated with these potential cancellations are estimated, along with their regional distributions, and likely methods of cost recovery are suggested.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Seismic Isolation of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With increasing public concern for seismic safety in general and research findings that indicate that seismic hazards may be larger than expected in many parts of the world, it would be prudent for the nuclear industry to consider more fully the potential benefits, costs, and impediments associated with applying seismic isolation more widely and to identify actions needed to develop practical and cost-effective guidelines for the application of seismic isolation to nuclear power plants (NPPs) and ...

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Virtual environments for nuclear power plant design  

SciTech Connect

In the design and operation of nuclear power plants, the visualization process inherent in virtual environments (VE) allows for abstract design concepts to be made concrete and simulated without using a physical mock-up. This helps reduce the time and effort required to design and understand the system, thus providing the design team with a less complicated arrangement. Also, the outcome of human interactions with the components and system can be minimized through various testing of scenarios in real-time without the threat of injury to the user or damage to the equipment. If implemented, this will lead to a minimal total design and construction effort for nuclear power plants (NPP).

Brown-VanHoozer, S.A.; Singleterry, R.C. Jr.; King, R.W. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Burnup Credit -- Contribution to the Analysis of the Yankee Rowe Radiochemical Assays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a methodology for validation of the isotopic contents of spent light water reactor fuel for actinide-only burnup credit with additional high-quality radiochemistry assay (RCA) data obtained from the Yankee Rowe pressurized water reactor. The additional Yankee Rowe RCA data were not included in previous isotopic validation studies for burnup credit due to the difficulty of accurately modeling the complex Yankee Rowe fuel assembly design using the SAS2H one-dimensional sequence of the ...

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Holdup measurement for nuclear fuel manufacturing plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assay of nuclear material holdup in fuel manufacturing plants is a laborious but often necessary part of completing the material balance. A range of instruments, standards, and a methodology for assaying holdup has been developed. The objectives of holdup measurement are ascertaining the amount, distribution, and how firmly fixed the SNM is. The purposes are reconciliation of material unbalance during or after a manufacturing campaign or plant decommissioning, to decide security requirements, or whether further recovery efforts are justified.

Zucker, M.S.; Degen, M.; Cohen, I.; Gody, A.; Summers, R.; Bisset, P.; Shaub, E.; Holody, D.

1981-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, Volume 44, No. 4  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the issuances received in October 1996. Issuances are from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors` Decisions. 15 issuances were received and are abstracted individually in the database: Louisiana Energy Services, U.S. Enrichment Corporation, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation, James L. Shelton, Juan Guzman, Northern States Power Company, TESTCO Inc., Washington Public Power Supply System, all nuclear plants, Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, and Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (2 issuances). No issuances were received from the the Administrative Law Judges or the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nuclear plant construction and investment risk  

SciTech Connect

Escalated cost estimations, delays and cancellations in nuclear construction have caused a preoccupation with the risks of nuclear power plant construction that dominates utility stock investment, overshadowing increased earnings per share and recent growth in production. The issue will be resolved when increased power demand requires new construction, but the effect has so far been to erode the economic advantage of nuclear power and threaten the ability of utilities to get rate increases high enough to cover their costs. Projected delays and cost escalations and their effects must go into an economic appraisal of the investment risks.

Studness, C.M.

1984-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

160

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt3md6011 855 6,755 90.2 PWR 850 7,239 97.2 1,705 13,994 93.7 Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit Type Data for 2010 PWR = Pressurized Light Water Reactor.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Maine Yankee steam generator tube modification from a radiobiological prospective  

SciTech Connect

Maine Yankee installed permanent sleeving in the primary secondary interface tubing of their steam generators. This repair was necessary because of numerous defects approaching or exceeding technical specification requirements. This project was accomplished under budget, and for a radiation exposure of 141.974 person-rem. This paper addresses the ALARA considerations, temporary lead shielding, mockup training, radiation worker training, radiological initiatives, and lessons learned.

Heath, E.; Granados, B. [Maine Yankee, Wiscasset, MA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Fork+ Developmental Measurement Campaign at Maine Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of burnup credit in the design of spent-fuel storage and transportation systems significantly reduces risks and decreases costs. However, approval of storage and transportation designs using burnup credit will likely require independent measurement of the spent-fuel assembly burnup. EPRI's Fork(plus) system has been designed for measuring spent-fuel burnup without recourse to reactor records. This report presents results from testing of the Fork(plus) system prototype at the Maine Yankee reactor ...

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Overview of Trends in Nuclear Power Plant Sensors and Instrumentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trends in Nuclear Power Plant Sensors and Instrumentation SASAN BAKTIARI Nuclear Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory Ph: (630) 252-8982 bakhtiati@anl.gov Abstract -...

164

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (kWh). There were 65 nuclear power plants with 104 operating nuclear reactors that generated a total of 790 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh), ...

165

Groundwater Monitoring Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experience has shown that the initial design of nuclear power plant groundwater characterization programs can have a significant impact upon the resources needed to demonstrate regulatory compliance. This document provides technical experience and lessons learned in designing an optimized groundwater investigation program.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

Routine application of the in situ soil analysis technique by the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a technique developed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for field spectrometry, the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory (YAEL) has routinely performed in situ soil measurements in the vicinity of five nuclear power stations for more than a decade. As a special research endeavor, several locations at the FURNAS Angra 1 site in Brazil having high natural backgrounds were also measured in 1987. The technical basis of the technique, a comparison of soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil radionuclide concentrations predicted by the in situ technique to soil analyses from the same sites, the advantages and disadvantages of the in situ methodology, and the evolution of the portable equipment utilized at YAEL for the field measurements are presented in this paper.

Murray, J.C.; McCurdy, D.E.; Laurenzo, E.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Trojan Nuclear Power Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One goal of the EPRI Decommissioning Technology Program is to capture the growing utility experience in nuclear plant decommissioning activities for the benefit of other utilities facing similar challenges in the future. This report provides historical information on the background, scope, organization, schedule, cost, contracts, and support activities associated with the Trojan Nuclear Plant Reactor Vessel and Internals Removal (RVAIR) Project. Also discussed are problems, successes, and lessons learned...

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

168

Extended outages at several nuclear plants led to high outage ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Outages at U.S. nuclear power plants so far in 2012 are generally higher than in recent years because of extended forced outages at four nuclear power plants.

169

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi between those used to monitor the reactor coolant pump of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) is considered Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

170

International Cooperation on Safety of Nuclear Plants - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

171

Advanced nuclear plant control room complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

NNSA presentation on Radiological Assessment of effects from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant from May 13, 2011

173

Engineering Fundamentals - Nuclear Power Plant Materials, Version 2.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Engineering Fundamentals - Nuclear Power Plant Materials (EF-Materials) Version 2.0 computer-based training module provides new-hire engineering personnel with an overview of the basic concepts of nuclear power plant materials. Graphics and interactive features are used to enhance learning.EF-Materials covers the basic terms and concepts related to nuclear power plant materials and provides information about the significance of material degradation issues in nuclear power plants. ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

The removal and segmentation of the Yankee Rowe reactor vessel internals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major element of the reactor decommissioning of the Rowe Yankee reactor was the segmentation and packaging of the reactor internals. PCI Energy Services, specializing in remote cutting, machining, and welding, performed this work under contract to Yankee Atomic Electric Company. Removal techniques are described.

Child, C.; McGough, M.; Smith, G. [Power Cutting Inc., Lake Bluff, IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT GRAPHITE PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing new nuclear grades of graphite used in the core of a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is one of the critical development activities being pursued within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. Graphites thermal stability (in an inert gas environment), high compressive strength, fabricability, and cost effective price make it an ideal core structural material for the HTGR reactor design. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical nuclear grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermo-mechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. The NGNP graphite R&D program has selected a handful of commercially available types for research and development activities necessary to qualify this nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor. These activities fall within five primary areas; 1) material property characterization, 2) irradiated material property characterization, 3) modeling, and 4) ASTM test development, and 5) ASME code development efforts. Individual research and development activities within each area are being pursued with the ultimate goal of obtaining a commercial operating license for the nuclear graphite from the US NRC.

William E. Windes; Timothy D. Burchell; Robert L. Bratton

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Nuclear Plant Life Cycle Management Implementation Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The day-to-day pressures of operation, limited budgets, and regulatory scrutiny of nuclear power plants focus on the present or short term, and may preempt cost-beneficial activities with long-term pay-off. This guide to implementing life-cycle management (LCM) fosters long-range thinking and decision making focused on profitability in the new competitive era of electricity production.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Environmental behavior of transuranic nuclides leaked from water cooled nuclear power plants. Final report, August 1, 1977-December 31, 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Release data are reported for three coastal water-cooled nuclear reactors: Millstone Point No. 1 and No. 2 (for the period January 1977 through April 1978), and Maine Yankee (for the period 20 June 1977 through 25 March 1978); release samples were analyzed for /sup 55/Fe, /sup 60/Co, /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 239,240/Pu, /sup 241/Am, /sup 242/Cm, and /sup 244/Cm, but not all nuclides on every sample. Radioiron is a major component of the releases measured; the transuranium nuclides are less significant components than was expected, but levels have occasionally reached microcuries per month. Pulses of this size are adequate for tracer studies. Environmental samples (water, sediments, and biota) have been analyzed from about the two reactor sites noted, and that of the Pilgrim No. 1 reactor. No water samples remote from reactor outflows have unequivocally shown reactor contamination. No sediment samples from near Millstone Point or Pilgrim 1 have shown reactor contamination; this has been clearly evident in several sediment collections from near Maine Yankee. Biota so far measured from near Millstone Point show reactor contamination only when taken from the effluent canal. From the Maine Yankee and Plymouth areas, however, biota samples frequently prove to show slight, but definite, reactor contamination.

Bowen, V.T.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nuclear power plant performance assessment pertaining to plant aging in France and the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of aging on nuclear power plant performance has come under increased scrutiny in recent years. The approaches used to make an assessment of this effect strongly influence the economics of nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to present the results of a statistical analysis of nuclear power plant construction costs and lead-times (where lead-time is defined as the duration of the construction period), using a sample of units that entered construction during the 1966-1977 period. For more than a decade, analysts have been attempting to understand the reasons for the divergence between predicted and actual construction costs and lead-times. More importantly, it is rapidly being recognized that the future of the nuclear power industry rests precariously on an improvement in the cost and lead-time situation. Thus, it is important to study the historical information on completed plants, not only to understand what has occurred to also to improve the ability to evaluate the economics of future plants. This requires an examination of the factors that have affected both the realized costs and lead-times and the expectations about these factors that have been formed during the construction process. 5 figs., 22 tabs.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. Nuclear Power Plants: Construction and Technology Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Korean nuclear power industry has grown rapidly since Kori Unit 1, the first Korean nuclear power plant (NPP), which began operation in April 1978. Following the technology developments of the nuclear power industry in 1980s, the first standard Korean nuclear plants (Ulchin Units 3 and 4) were constructed in the 1990s. At present, 20 NPP units operate in Korea16 pressurized water reactor (PWR) plants and four pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) plants; eight PWR units are under construction. This ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant Secretary Chu Visits Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant February 15, 2012 - 3:54pm Addthis Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Secretary Chu traveled to Waynesboro, Georgia, to visit the Vogtle nuclear power plant, the site of what will be the first new nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in three decades. | Image credit: Southern Company. Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Just over 60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho, successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs, laying the foundation for U.S.

183

Nuclear Plant Analyzer: Installation manual. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the installation instructions for the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) System. The NPA System consists of the Computer Visual System (CVS) program, the NPA libraries, the associated utility programs. The NPA was developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to provide a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of these analysis codes. The NPA also provides the user with a convenient means of interactively controlling the host program through user-defined pop-up menus. The NPA was designed to serve primarily as an analysis tool. After a brief introduction to the Computer Visual System and the NPA, an analyst can quickly create a simple picture or set of pictures to aide in the study of a particular phenomenon. These pictures can range from simple collections of square boxes and straight lines to complex representations of emergency response information displays.

Snider, D.M.; Wagner, K.L.; Grush, W.H.; Jones, K.R. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)]|[Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluation of low flow characteristics of the Vermont Yankee plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiling water reactor (BWR) core flow instrumentation inaccuracies under low-flow conditions have been the subject of both reactor vendor and regulatory communications in response to incidents of the reported core flow being less than the flow corresponding to the natural-circulation line on the power flow map. During single recirculation loop operation, low-flow conditions exist in the idle recirculation loop, and these flow inaccuracies can affect the usefulness of the reported core flow. Accurate core flow indications are needed above 25% power to administer fuel thermal limits and comply with restrictions associated with the potential for thermal-hydraulic instability. While the natural-circulation line on the power flow map is recognized to be a nominal estimate of the flow expected at and near natural-circulation conditions, the boundaries of the stability regions are associated with conditions assumed in safety analyses performed to demonstrate compliance with general design criteria 10 and 12.

Ganther, S.; LeFrancoi, M.; Bergeron, P. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

BWR Radiation Control: In-Plant Demonstration at Vermont Yankee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A five-year program has demonstrated several techniques for reducing radiation fields in BWRs. Improved chemistry control, replacement of valves and control blades containing cobalt, and electropolishing and prefilming of replacement piping proved particularly beneficial.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Recent Progress in U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Progress in U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Safety Speaker(s): Robert Budnitz Date: April 15, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The U.S. commercial nuclear-power industry consists...

187

Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate? ... tariff, and demand charge data? How is electricity used in U.S. homes?

189

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2012 ... Abstract: Nuclear power plants must be regularly shut down in order to perform refueling and maintenance operations. The scheduling of the...

190

Guideline for Online Monitoring of Nuclear Power Plants: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report continues a series of guidelines that assist member utilities in developing an online monitoring (OLM) program for equipment condition assessment at nuclear power plants.

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

191

Need for process/radiochemists at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Viewgraphs are presented concerning the operating requirements for chemists at nuclear power plants. The number of positions available, job duties, and training requirements are reviewed.

Wymer, R.G.; Skrable, K.W.; Alexander, E.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MANAGING MODERNIZATION OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managing modernization of nuclear power plant instrumentation and control systems February 2004The originating Section of this publication in the IAEA was:

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Risk-informed incident management for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decision making as a part of nuclear power plant operations is a critical, but common, task. Plant management is forced to make decisions that may have safety and economic consequences. Formal decision theory offers the ...

Smith, Curtis Lee, 1966-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Technical evaluation of the susceptibility of safety-related systems to flooding caused by the failure of non-Category I systems for the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the technical evaluation of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station. The purpose of this evaluation was to determine whether the failure of any non-Class I (seismic) equipment could result in a condition, such as flooding, that might adversely affect the performance of the safety-related equipment required for the safe shutdown of the facility, or to mitigate the consequences of an accident. Criteria developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission were used to evaluate the acceptability of the existing protection system as well as measures taken by Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (MYAPC) to minimize the danger of flooding and to protect safety-related equipment. Based on the information supplied, we conclude that the licensee, Maine Yankee Atomic Power Company (MYAPC), has demonstrated in its analysis that the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station has the capacity and capability to manage and mitigate any single incident, such as flooding from a non-Class I system component or pipe, so that this flooding will not prevent a safe shutdown of the facility. 7 refs.

Epps, R.C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Safety Evaluation Report, pump and valve inservice testing program, Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EG and G, Inc., report presents the results of our evaluation of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station, Inservice Testing Program for pumps and valves whose function is important to safety.

Rockhold, H.C.; Stromberg, H.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

Sylvain, D.C.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures  

SciTech Connect

Safety-related nuclear power plant (NPP) structures are designed to withstand loadings from a number of low-probability external and interval events, such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and loss-of-coolant accidents. Loadings incurred during normal plant operation therefore generally are not significant enough to cause appreciable degradation. However, these structures are susceptible to aging by various processes depending on the operating environment and service conditions. The effects of these processes may accumulate within these structures over time to cause failure under design conditions, or lead to costly repair. In the late 1980s and early 1990s several occurrences of degradation of NPP structures were discovered at various facilities (e.g., corrosion of pressure boundary components, freeze- thaw damage of concrete, and larger than anticipated loss of prestressing force). Despite these degradation occurrences and a trend for an increasing rate of occurrence, in-service inspection of the safety-related structures continued to be performed in a somewhat cursory manner. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) published the first of several new requirements to help ensure that adequate in-service inspection of these structures is performed. Current regulatory in-service inspection requirements are reviewed and a summary of degradation experience presented. Nondestructive examination techniques commonly used to inspect the NPP steel and concrete structures to identify and quantify the amount of damage present are reviewed. Finally, areas where nondestructive evaluation techniques require development (i.e., inaccessible portions of the containment pressure boundary, and thick heavily reinforced concrete sections are discussed.

Graves, H.L.; Naus, D.J.; Norris, W.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Pantex Plant | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Locations > Pantex Plant Pantex Plant http:www.pantex.com Field Office: The NNSA Production Office is responsible for contract management and oversight of the Pantex Plant in...

199

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Nuclear Power Plant Fire-Modeling Applications Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report replaces EPRI 1002981, Fire Modeling Guide for Nuclear Power Plant Applications, August 2002, as guidance for fire-modeling practitioners in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The report has benefited from insights gained since 2002 on the predictive capability of selected fire models to improve confidence in the use of fire modeling in NPP decision-making.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Welding and Fabrication Critical Factors for New Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welding and fabrication processes employed for manufacture of critical nuclear power plant components may adversely affect material performance and can potentially increase susceptibility to known degradation mechanisms. This report identifies important welding and fabrication processes for specific materials, assesses their effects on potential degradation mechanisms, and identifies process enhancements that can improve long-term asset management of new nuclear plant components.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

Review of Polyimide Insulated Wire in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of its toughness and other desirable properties, Kapton insulated wire has been test-qualified for use in nuclear power plants; however, failures of this material in military aircraft have raised safety questions. This report identifies the conditions of proper use and handling that will ensure reliable functioning of the wire under nuclear plant operating and accident conditions.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Groundwater Sampling and Analysis Sourcebook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides technical guidance and best practices for groundwater sampling and analysis at nuclear power plants. Robust sampling and analysis protocols are required to ensure accurate characterization of radionuclides in groundwater.BackgroundNuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to minimize contamination of on-site soil and groundwater, and to prevent the off-site migration of licensed material through groundwater ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

204

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Utility Program Info State Vermont Program Type Siting and Permitting Any petition for approval of construction of a nuclear energy generating plant within the state, or any petition for approval of the operation of a nuclear energy generating plant beyond the date established in a certificate of public good issued under this title, must be submitted to the public service board no later than four years before the date upon which the approval may take effect. Upon receipt of a petition for approval of construction or operation as provided under this section, the public service board shall notify the

205

Program Change Management During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decommissioning a nuclear power plant is a complex project, which involves the coordination of several different departments and the management of changing plant conditions, programs, and regulations. As plants meet certain project Milestones, the evolution of such plant programs and regulations can help optimize project execution and cost. This report provides information about these Milestones and the plant departments and programs that change throughout a decommissioning project.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

206

Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Response to an Earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for nuclear plant response to earthquakes enable utilities to evaluate in a timely manner the need for post-earthquake plant shutdown and to provide procedures for evaluation of earthquake effects on the plant, as well as criteria for plant restart. The procedures enable the responding team of operators and engineers to identify and assess any earthquake effects and, if shutdown is necessary, to return the plant to safe operation as rapidly as possible. The guidelines presented herein ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Response to an Earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for nuclear plant response to earthquakes enable utilities to evaluate in a timely manner the need for post-earthquake plant shutdown and to provide procedures for evaluation of earthquake effects on the plant, as well as criteria for plant restart. The procedures enable the responding team of operators and engineers to identify and assess any earthquake effects and, if shutdown is necessary, to return the plant to safe operation as rapidly as possible. The guidelines presented herein ...

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

Some aspects of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The major factors influencing the choice of a national concept for the decommissioning of nuclear power plants are examined. The operating lifetimes of power generating units with nuclear reactors of various types (VVER-1000, VVER-440, RBMK-1000, EGP-6, and BN-600) are analyzed. The basic approaches to decommissioning Russian nuclear power plants and the treatment of radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel are discussed. Major aspects of the ecological and radiation safety of personnel, surrounding populations, and the environment during decommissioning of nuclear installations are identified.

Khvostova, M. S., E-mail: marinakhvostova@list.ru [St. Petersburg State Maritime Technical University (Sevmashvtuz), Severodvinsk Branch (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Financial and ratepayer impacts of nuclear power plant regulatory reform  

SciTech Connect

Three reports - ''The Future Market for Electric Generating Capacity,'' ''Quantitative Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Licensing Reform,'' and ''Nuclear Rate Increase Study'' are recent studies performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory that deal with nuclear power. This presents a short summary of these three studies. More detail is given in the reports.

Turpin, A.G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants A funding opportunity announcement of the cost shared feasibility studies of nuclear energy based production of hydrogen using available technology. The objective of this activity is to select and conduct project(s) that will utilize hydrogen production equipment and nuclear energy as necessary to produce data and analysis on the economics of hydrogen production with nuclear energy. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants More Documents & Publications https://e-center.doe.gov/iips/faopor.nsf/UNID/E67E46185A67EBE68 Microsoft Word - FOA cover sheet.doc Microsoft Word - hDE-FOA-0000092.rtf

211

Nuclear Power Plant Emergency Diesel Generator Tanks 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear power provides about 20 % of the total electricity generated in the United States. In 2005, this was about 782 Billion kWh of the total electricity generation (EIA 2006). 2 As with fossil-fueled electricity generating plants, electricity in a nuclear power plant is produced by heated steam that drives a turbine generator. In a nuclear power plant, however, nuclear fission reactions in the core produce heat that is absorbed by a liquid that flows through the system and is converted to steam. Nuclear power plants are highly efficient and have become more so over the last 25 years. Operational efficiency (also referred to as plant performance or electricity production) can be measured by the capacity factor. The capacity factor is the ratio of the actual amount of electricity generated to the maximum possible amount that could be generated in a given period of time usually a year. Today, nuclear power plants operate at an average 90 % capacity factor (compared to 56 % in 1980) (EIA 2006a). Thus, although nuclear generating capacity has remained roughly constant since 1990, at about 99 gigawatts (or about 10 % of the total U.S. electric generating capacity), the amount of electricity produced has increased 33 % since that time because of increased capacity utilization. Nuclear plants have the highest capacity factors of

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Dynamical Systems Model for Nuclear Power Plant Risk Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a mathematical dynamical systems model of the effect of plant processes and programs on nuclear plant safety. That is, it models the safety risk management process. Responses of this model to postulated changes in performance and coupling parameters were verified to be in accordance with experience from years of commercial nuclear power plant operation. A preliminary analysis of the model was performed using the techniques of dynamical systems theory to determine regions of operation...

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Tenth Nuclear Plant Performance Improvement (NPPI) Seminar Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information presented at the Tenth Nuclear Plant Performance Improvement (NPPI) Seminar held July 15-16, 2002, in Saratoga Springs, New York. The biannual seminar -- sponsored by EPRI Plant Support Engineering (PSE), EPRI Plant Performance Enhancement Program (P2EP), and Rochester Gas and Electric -- provided an opportunity for participants to exchange technical information and experience regarding the achievement of the highest possible megawatt electric (MWe) output from nuclear po...

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plants: Industry Recommendations for Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries. Good initial and continued performance is vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Estimation of Carbon-14 in Nuclear Power Plant Gaseous Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants report the amount of radioactivity released through permitted effluent pathways in their plant annual reports. This report provides users with a method for calculating the amount of carbon-14 (14C) generated in a light water reactor (LWR) core and released through plant gaseous effluent pathways.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

217

Plant Engineering: Advanced Nuclear Plant Cable System Design and Installation Concepts to Assure Longevity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the electrical cable systems for existing nuclear power plants have functioned well for up to 40 years, the desired service life for new plants is 60 or more years. Experience with existing plants indicates that relatively small changes during the design and construction of nuclear plants will lead to longer cable system lives and greater ease of testing and assessment of cables to verify their remaining service life. This report describes those changes and provides recommendations for their imp...

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States nuclear power industry has undertaken a Groundwater Protection Initiative [NEI 07-07] at the direction of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Nuclear Strategic Issues Advisory Committee (NSIAC). International nuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to ensure appropriate management of on-site groundwater and protection of the public and environment. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guideline provides essential technical guidance to utilities on the ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

219

Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants This lesson takes a look at the waste from electricity production at nuclear power plants. It considers the different types of waste generated, as well as how we deal with each type of waste. Specific topics covered include: Nuclear Waste Some radioactive Types of radioactive waste Low-level waste High-level waste Disposal and storage Low-level waste disposal Spent fuel storage Waste isolation Reprocessing Decommissioning Lesson 7 - Waste.pptx More Documents & Publications National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management

220

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants' (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making,

222

DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction DOE Announces Loan Guarantee Applications for Nuclear Power Plant Construction October 2, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it has received 19 Part I applications from 17 electric power companies for federal loan guarantees to support the construction of 14 nuclear power plants in response to its June 30, 2008 solicitation. The applications reflect the intentions of those companies to build 21 new reactors, with some applications covering two reactors at the same site. All five reactor designs that have been certified, or are currently under review for possible certification, by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are represented in the Part I applications. DOE also has received Part I

223

SUBJECT: PRAIRIE ISLAND NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Plant. The enclosed report documents the inspection findings which were discussed on February 22, 2001, with you and other members of your staff. This inspection examined activities conducted under your license as they relate to safety and compliance with the Commissions rules and regulations and with the conditions of your license. The inspectors reviewed selected procedures and records, observed activities, and interviewed personnel. Based on the results of this inspection, the inspectors identified two issues of very low safety significance (Green). One of these issues was determined to involve a violation of NRC requirements. However, because of its very low safety significance and because it has been entered into your corrective action program, the NRC is treating the issue as a non-cited violation, in accordance with Section VI.A.1 of the NRCs Enforcement Policy. If you deny the non-cited violation, you should provide a response with the basis for your denial, within 30 days of the date of this inspection report, to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, ATTN: Document Control Desk, Washington DC 20555-0001; with copies to the Regional Administrator,

Dear Mr. Sorensen; Roger D. Lanksbury

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mesoscale to plant-scale models of nuclear waste reprocessing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Imported oil exacerabates our trade deficit and funds anti-American regimes. Nuclear Energy (NE) is a demonstrated technology with high efficiency. NE's two biggest political detriments are possible accidents and nuclear waste disposal. For NE policy, proliferation is the biggest obstacle. Nuclear waste can be reduced through reprocessing, where fuel rods are separated into various streams, some of which can be reused in reactors. Current process developed in the 1950s is dirty and expensive, U/Pu separation is the most critical. Fuel rods are sheared and dissolved in acid to extract fissile material in a centrifugal contactor. Plants have many contacts in series with other separations. We have taken a science and simulation-based approach to develop a modern reprocessing plant. Models of reprocessing plants are needed to support nuclear materials accountancy, nonproliferation, plant design, and plant scale-up.

Noble, David Frederick; O'Hern, Timothy John; Moffat, Harry K.; Nemer, Martin B.; Domino, Stefan Paul; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant June 29, 2006 - 2:41pm Addthis Gen IV Reactor Capable of Producing Electricity and/or Hydrogen WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking expressions of interest from prospective industry teams interested in participating in the development and conceptual design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor prototype with the capability to produce process heat, electricity and/or hydrogen. The very high temperature reactor is based on research and development activities supported by DOE's Generation IV nuclear energy systems initiative.

226

Isotopic validation for PWR actinide-only burnup credit using Yankee Rowe data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety analyses of criticality control systems for transportation packages include an assumption that the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) loaded into the package is fresh or unirradiated. In other words, the spent fuel is assumed to have its original, as-manufactured U-235 isotopic content. The ``fresh fuel`` assumption is very conservative since the potential reactivity of the nuclear fuel is substantially reduced after being irradiated in the reactor core. The concept of taking credit for this reduction in nuclear fuel reactivity due to burnup of the fuel, instead of using the fresh fuel assumption in the criticality safety analysis, is referred to as ``Burnup Credit.`` Burnup credit uses the actual physical composition of the fuel and accounts for the net reduction of fissile material and the buildup of neutron absorbers in the fuel as it is irradiated. Neutron absorbers include actinides and other isotopes generated as a result of the fission process. Using only the change in actinide isotopes in the burnup credit criticality analysis is referred to as ``Actinide-Only Burnup Credit.`` The use of burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems enables more spent fuel to be placed in a package. Increased package capacity results in a reduced number of storage, shipping and disposal containers for a given number of SNF assemblies. Fewer shipments result in a lower risk of accidents associated with the handling and transportation of spent fuel, thus reducing both radiological and nonradiological risk to the public. This paper describes the modeling and the results of comparison between measured and calculated isotopic inventories for a selected number of samples taken from a Yankee Rowe spent fuel assembly.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Loss of benefits resulting from mandated nuclear plant shutdowns  

SciTech Connect

This paper identifies and discusses some of the important consequences of nuclear power plant unavailability, and quantifies a number of technical measures of loss of benefits that result from regulatory actions such as licensing delays and mandated nuclear plant outages. The loss of benefits that accompany such regulatory actions include increased costs of systems generation, increased demand for nonnuclear and often scarce fuels, and reduced system reliability. This paper is based on a series of case studies, supplemented by sensitivity studies, on hypothetical nuclear plant shutdowns. These studies were developed by Argonne in cooperation with four electric utilities.

Peerenboom, J.P.; Buehring, W.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

snpt2nj Oyster Creek Unit 1 615 4,601 14.0 Exelon Nuclear PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station Unit 1 1,161 9,439 28.8 PSEG Nuclear LLC PSEG Salem Generating Station

229

A CCA-compliant nuclear power plant simulator kernel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a parallel, component-oriented nuclear power plant simulator kernel. It is based on the high-performance computing oriented Common Component Architecture. The approach takes advantage of both the component paradigm and the parallel ...

Manuel Daz; Daniel Garrido; Sergio Romero; Bartolom Rubio; Enrique Soler; Jos M. Troya

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Mapping complexity sources in nuclear power plant domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the sources of complexity in advanced Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) control rooms and their effects on human reliability is critical for ensuring safe performance of both operators and the entire system. New ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

231

Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants & Touts Robust Economy Secretary Bodman Announces Federal Risk Insurance for Nuclear Power Plants & Touts Robust Economy August 4, 2006 - 8:42am Addthis ATLANTA, GA - After touring Georgia Power and speaking to its employees, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced completion of the final rule that establishes the process for utility companies building the next six new nuclear power plants in the United States to qualify for a portion of $2 billion in federal risk insurance. The rule will be available on DOE's web site soon. "Providing federal risk insurance is an important step in speeding the nuclear renaissance in this country," Secretary Bodman said. "Companies

232

Training Module for Cyber Security in Nuclear Plant Digital Modifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants face increasing regulatory requirements from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for cyber security of digital devices, components, and systems. The focus of these cyber security requirements is to protect plant digital computer systems, communications systems, and networks from cyber attacks that would affect reactor safety or generation reliability. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) computer-based training mod...

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Advanced Sensor Diagnostics in Nuclear Power Plant Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Diagnostics in Nuclear Power Plant Applications Sensor Diagnostics in Nuclear Power Plant Applications R.B. Vilim Argonne National Laboratory Sensor degradation occurs routinely during nuclear power plant operation and can contribute to reduced power production and less efficient plant operation. Mechanisms include drift of sensor electronics and mechanical components, fouling and erosion of flow meter orifice plates, and general degradation of thermocouples. One solution to this problem is the use of higher quality instrumentation and of physical redundancy. This, however, increases plant cost and does not address the degradation problem in a fundamental way. An alternative approach is to use signal processing algorithms to detect a degraded sensor and to construct a replacement value using an

234

Y-12 PLANT NUCLEAR SAFETY HANDBOOK  

SciTech Connect

Information needed to solve nuclear safety problems is condensed into a reference book for use by persons familiar with the field. Included are a glossary of terms; useful tables; nuclear constants; criticality calculations; basic nuclear safety limits; solution geometries and critical values; metal critical values; criticality values for intermediate, heterogeneous, and interacting systems; miscellaneous and related information; and report number, author, and subject indexes. (C.H.)

Wachter, J.W. ed.; Bailey, M.L.; Cagle, T.J.; Mee, W.T.; Pletz, R.H.; Welfare, F.G.; Youngblood, B.J. comps

1963-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assessment of Electromagnetic Interference Events in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a study and analysis of reported electromagnetic interference (EMI-) related incidents in nuclear power plants. These incidents were gathered primarily from the total body of incidents reported to the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) database, with a few incidents coming from U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reports. This report analyzes trends and common factors in these events. The analysis is intended to inform the estimation of risk from EMI and offer suggesti...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

Qinshan: China`s first nuclear power plant  

SciTech Connect

Plant design, startup, and operation of the Qinshan-1 nuclear power plant in China are outlined in this article. Qinshan-1 is a 300 MW(e) pressurized water reactor designed and constructed in China. Approximately 70 percent of the equipment was also made in China. Findings of a preoperational safety inspection by the International Atomic Energy Agency are summarized.

NONE

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Life Expectancy of Motors in Mild Nuclear Plant Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicted life expectancies of commercial-grade motors used in the milder environments of nuclear power plants indicate that those motors can last for the life of the plant if properly maintained. This report details methods by which utilities can make such predictions and supplies the extensive data on which the analytic techniques are based.

1985-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

238

Atmospheric Deposition of Tritium at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium source terms at nuclear power plants consist of several sources that include plant vents and cooling impoundments, cooling towers, and treatment ponds. Cooling lakes and reservoirs can be sources of airborne tritium. Methods are presented for estimating these source terms and predicting resulting deposition of tritium using metrological models and for estimating infiltration of tritium using hydrogeological models.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

Data Mining for Monitoring Loose Parts in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring the mechanical impact of a loose (detached or drifting) part in the reactor coolant system of a nuclear power plant is one of the essential functions for operation and maintenance of the plant.Large data tables are generated during this monitoring ...

J. W. Guan; David A. Bell

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has undertaken a Groundwater Protection Initiative at the Direction of the NEI Nuclear Strategic Issues Advisory Committee (NSIAC). This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (for Light-Water Cooled Nuclear Power Plants to Assess PlantStandards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Calibration of Radiation Monitors at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation monitors are installed in nuclear power plants to indicate to operators the levels of radioactivity in various processes and at specific plant locations. Plant personnel depend on radiation monitors for accurate and precise data in order to make informed decisions and take appropriate actions during normal, abnormal, and design basis events. As with all electronic measurement systems, error can be introduced by changing environmental conditions, aging components, and replaced parts. The radiati...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

243

Use of expert systems in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The application of technologies, particularly expert systems, to the control room activities in a nuclear power plant has the potential to reduce operator error and increase plant safety, reliability, and efficiency. Furthermore, there are a large number of nonoperating activities (testing, routine maintenance, outage planning, equipment diagnostics, and fuel management) in which expert systems can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of overall plant and corporate operations. This document presents a number of potential applications of expert systems in the nuclear power field. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

Uhrig, R.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy proposed action to conduct a lead test assembly program to confirm the viability of using a commercial light water reactor to produce tritium. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Finding of No Significant Impact Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 22, 1997 EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment

245

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many nuclear power plants are in the U.S. and where are they located? There are currently 65 commercially operating nuclear power plants with 104 nuclear reactors ...

246

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEs project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

QUARTERLY NUCLEAR POWER DEPLOYMENT SUMMARY OCTOBER 2013 News Updates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 News Updates  Dominion has filed an updated integrated resource plan with Virginia and North Carolina State regulators; the plan sets an "earliest possible" in- service date of October 2024 for North Anna 3. Earlier this year, the company announced its intention to return to the General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) ESBWR reactor design with an amended Combined Operating License (COL) to be filed by the end of 2013.  Entergy announced that it will close its single unit Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in late 2014; sustained low natural gas prices, financial impacts of cumulative regulations, and the wholesale market structure all contributed to the company's decision to shutter the plant. This is the fourth plant this year to announce decommissioning plans. Dominion's closure of its single unit Kewaunee plant also followed from low wholesale

248

Nuclear dual-purpose plants for industrial energy  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to extensive application of nuclear power to industrial heat is the difference between the relatively small energy requirements of individual industrial plants and the large thermal capacity of current power reactors. A practical way of overcoming this obstacle would be to operate a centrally located dual-purpose power plant that would furnish process steam to a cluster of industrial plants, in addition to generating electrical power. The present study indicates that even relatively remote industrial plants could be served by the power plant, since it might be possible to convey steam economically as much as ten miles or more. A survey of five major industries indicates a major potential market for industrial steam from large nuclear power stations.

Klepper, O.H.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Advanced Cooling Options for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative power plant cooling systems exist that offer significant opportunity for reducing the amount of water used in power plant cooling. These systems include direct dry cooling using air-cooled condensers, indirect dry cooling using air-cooled heat exchangers paired with water-cooled surface condensers, and a variety of hybrid systems incorporating both dry and wet cooling elements. The water savings afforded by the use of these systems, however, comes at a price in the form of more expensive ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

US nuclear power plant operating cost and experience summaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NUREG/CR-6577, U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Cost and Experience Summaries, has been prepared to provide historical operating cost and experience information on U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Cost incurred after initial construction are characterized as annual production costs, representing fuel and plant operating and maintenance expenses, and capital expenditures related to facility additions/modifications which are included in the plant capital asset base. As discussed in the report, annual data for these two cost categories were obtained from publicly available reports and must be accepted as having different degrees of accuracy and completeness. Treatment of inconclusive and incomplete data is discussed. As an aid to understanding the fluctuations in the cost histories, operating summaries for each nuclear unit are provided. The intent of these summaries is to identify important operating events; refueling, major maintenance, and other significant outages; operating milestones; and significant licensing or enforcement actions. Information used in the summaries is condensed from annual operating reports submitted by the licensees, plant histories contained in Nuclear Power Experience, trade press articles, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) web site (www.nrc.gov).

Kohn, W.E.; Reid, R.L.; White, V.S.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the method of nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the practice for Qinshan NPP and for Guangdong Daya Bay NPP (GNPS). The results of the practice show that the surveillance models set up for Qinshan NPP and for GNPS commissioning were effective and the surveillance has played an important role for ensuring the quality and safety of the commissioning testing and consequently the nuclear safety of these two plants.

Feng, W.; Zhang, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Review of the natural circulation effect in the Vermont Yankee spent-fuel pool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 7429-node, three-dimensional computer model of the Vermont Yankee spent-fuel pool was set up and run using the porous media model of the TEMPEST computer code. The results of this analysis show that natural circulation is sufficient to ensure adequate cooling, regardless of the loading pattern used or the orientation of the cooling system discharge nozzle.

Wheeler, C.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Equipment Reliability for New Nuclear Plant Projects: Industry Recommendations for Storage, Construction, and Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial and continued good operating performance of the current build of new nuclear plants is critical to the rebirth of the nuclear option in many countries and vital to the companies making the large investments required for new nuclear plants. One of the foundations of good performance is a sound process for establishing and sustaining plant equipment reliability (ER).

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

254

Nuclear Power Plant Containment Pressure Boundary Research  

SciTech Connect

Research to address aging of the containment pressure boundary in light-water reactor plants is summarized. This research is aimed at understanding the significant factors relating occurrence of corrosion, efficacy of inspection, and structural capacity reduction of steel containment and liners of concrete containment. This understanding will lead to improvements in risk-informed regulatory decision making. Containment pressure boundary components are described and potential aging factors identified. Quantitative tools for condition assessments of aging structures to maintain an acceptable level of reliability over the service life of the plant are discussed. Finally, the impact of aging (i.e., loss of shell thickness due to corrosion) on steel containment fragility for a pressurized water reactor ice-condenser plant is presented.

Cherry, J.L.; Chokshi, N.C.; Costello, J.F.; Ellingwood, B.R.; Naus, D.J.

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Costs on Plant Life Cycle Decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities implementing Life Cycle Management (LCM) Programs and facing run-relicense-retire decisions need to evaluate the financial cost/benefit of such decisions. Decommissioning costs are one element of these evaluations. This report includes a decommissioning cost estimate for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (CCNPP) that can be used as a reference source by nuclear utilities involved in LCM and license renewal (LR) decisions.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Plant Engineering: Predicting Nuclear Plant Output from Performance Losses and Gains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The marginal costs of generating electricity, together with the strong emphasis on maximizing production at today's nuclear power generating units, have increased the need for nuclear plant thermal performance engineers (TPEs) to determine the gap between the station's actual performance and its ultimate capability. This report from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) outlines the various items that influence the performance of a nuclear unit and gives the TPE methods to employ in estimating the...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2013 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2013 October 2013 Quarterly Nuclear Deployment Scorecard - October 2013 News Updates Dominion has filed an updated integrated resource plan with Virginia and North Carolina State regulators; the plan sets an "earliest possible" in-service date of October 2024 for North Anna 3. Earlier this year, the company announced its intention to return to the General Electric-Hitachi (GEH) ESBWR reactor design with an amended Combined Operating License (COL) to be filed by the end of 2013. Entergy announced that it will close its single unit Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant in late 2014; sustained low natural gas prices, financial impacts of cumulative regulations, and the wholesale market structure all contributed to the company's decision to shutter the plant.

258

Program on Technology Innovation: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Update documents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which will demonstrate the design, licensing, construction, and operation of a new nuclear energy source using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. This new non-emitting energy source is applicable to a broad range of uses, from generating electricity to providing high-temperature industrial process heat to producing hydrogen. The NGNP project is sponsored as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and envi...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Nuclear Power Plant Fire Modeling Application Guide (NPP FIRE MAG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a movement to introduce risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) analyses into fire protection engineering practice, both domestically and worldwide. This movement exists in both the general fire protection and the nuclear power plant (NPP) fire protection communities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has used risk-informed insights as a part of its regulatory decision making since the 1990s.In 2001, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Materials Handbook for Nuclear Plant Pressure Boundary Applications (2013)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility engineers require accurate structural materials properties and performance data to make decisions regarding the adequacy of materials for nuclear power applications. To meet this need, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) publishes the Materials Handbook for Nuclear Plant Pressure Boundary Applications, which has been updated and revised since its initial publication in 1998. The primary focus of the handbook is on pressure boundary materials such as those used for piping ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Toshiba's developments on construction techniques of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Reliable and economic energy supplies are fundamental requirements of energy policies in Japan. To accomplish these needs, nuclear power plants are being increased in Japan. In recent years, construction cost increases and schedule extensions have affected the capital cost of nuclear energy, compared with fossil power plants, due to lower costs of oil and coal. On the other hand, several severe regulations have been applied to nuclear power plant designs. High-quality and cooperative engineering and harmonized design of equipment and parts are strongly required. Therefore, reduced construction costs and scheduling, as well as higher quality and reliability, are the most important items for nuclear industry. Toshiba has developed new construction techniques, as well as design and engineering tools for control and management, that demonstrate the positive results achieved in the shorter construction period of 1100-MW(electric) nuclear power plants. The normal construction period so far is 64 months, whereas the current construction period is 52 months. (New construction techniques are partially applied). In future years, the construction period will be lowered to 48 months. (New construction techniques are fully applied). A construction period is defined as time from the start of rock inspection to the start of commercial operation.

Hayashi, Y.; Itoh, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Report on aging of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Structural Aging Program provides the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with potential structural safety issues and acceptance criteria for use in continued service assessments of nuclear power plant safety-related concrete structures. The program was organized under four task areas: Program Management, Materials Property Data Base, Structural Component Assessment/Repair Technology, and Quantitative Methodology for Continued Service Determinations. Under these tasks, over 90 papers and reports were prepared addressing pertinent aspects associated with aging management of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures. Contained in this report is a summary of program results in the form of information related to longevity of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, a Structural Materials Information Center presenting data and information on the time variation of concrete materials under the influence of environmental stressors and aging factors, in-service inspection and condition assessments techniques, repair materials and methods, evaluation of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures, and a reliability-based methodology for current and future condition assessments. Recommendations for future activities are also provided. 308 refs., 61 figs., 50 tabs.

Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fire models for assessment of nuclear power plant fires  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in available fire models for the assessment of nuclear power plants fires. The advantages and disadvantages of three basic types of fire models (zone, field, and control volume) and Sandia's experience with these models will be discussed. It is shown that the type of fire model selected to solve a particular problem should be based on the information that is required. Areas of concern which relate to all nuclear power plant fire models are identified. 17 refs., 6 figs.

Nicolette, V.F.; Nowlen, S.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A methodology for evaluating ``new`` technologies in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

As obsolescence and spare parts issues drive nuclear power plants to upgrade with new technology (such as optical fiber communication systems), the ability of the new technology to withstand stressors present where it is installed needs to be determined. In particular, new standards may be required to address qualification criteria and their application to the nuclear power plants of tomorrow. This paper discusses the failure modes and age-related degradation mechanisms of fiber optic communication systems, and suggests a methodology for identifying when accelerated aging should be performed during qualification testing.

Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Holcomb, D.E.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Review of recent ORNL specific-plant analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been helping the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) develop the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) evaluation methodology since the mid-1970s. During the early 1980s, ORNL developed the integrated PTS (IPTS) methodology, which is a probabilistic approach that includes postulation of PTS transients, estimation of their frequencies, thermal/hydraulic analyses to obtain the corresponding thermal and pressure loadings on the reactor pressure vessel, and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses. The scope of the IPTS program included development of the probabilistic fracture mechanics code OCA-P and application of the IPTS methodology to three nuclear plants in the US (Oconee I, Calvert Cliffs I, and H. B. Robinson II). The results of this effort were used to help establish the PTS Rule (10CFR50.61) and Regulatory Guide 1.154, which pertains to the PTS issue. The IPTS Program was completed in 1985, and since that time the ORNL related effort has been associated with long-term programs aimed at improving/updating the probabilistic fracture mechanics methodology and input data. In 1990, the NRC requested that ORNL review a vessel-integrity evaluation report submitted to the NRC by the Yankee Atomic Electric Co. for the Yankee Rowe reactor and that ORNL also perform an independent probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Details of the methodology and preliminary results are the subject of this paper/presentation.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Review of recent ORNL specific-plant analyses  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been helping the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) develop the pressurized thermal shock (PTS) evaluation methodology since the mid-1970s. During the early 1980s, ORNL developed the integrated PTS (IPTS) methodology, which is a probabilistic approach that includes postulation of PTS transients, estimation of their frequencies, thermal/hydraulic analyses to obtain the corresponding thermal and pressure loadings on the reactor pressure vessel, and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses. The scope of the IPTS program included development of the probabilistic fracture mechanics code OCA-P and application of the IPTS methodology to three nuclear plants in the US (Oconee I, Calvert Cliffs I, and H. B. Robinson II). The results of this effort were used to help establish the PTS Rule (10CFR50.61) and Regulatory Guide 1.154, which pertains to the PTS issue. The IPTS Program was completed in 1985, and since that time the ORNL related effort has been associated with long-term programs aimed at improving/updating the probabilistic fracture mechanics methodology and input data. In 1990, the NRC requested that ORNL review a vessel-integrity evaluation report submitted to the NRC by the Yankee Atomic Electric Co. for the Yankee Rowe reactor and that ORNL also perform an independent probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis. Details of the methodology and preliminary results are the subject of this paper/presentation.

Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation Protection Program Resource Optimization Project; Brunswick Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation protection (RP) managers face challenges in providing a necessary service that complies with stringent regulations, while simultaneously reducing operations and maintenance (O&M) costs. The results of this pilot project, hosted by Brunswick Nuclear Plant (BNP), will assist utilities in targeting resource commitments and cost effectiveness while optimizing overall performance. This report identifies specific program cost reduction and process performance enhancements for the host plant, and esta...

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

270

Optimization of Auxiliaries Consumption in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operators of nuclear power plants face significant challenges to produce power more cost-effectively. One approach to producing power more cost-effectively is to reduce power consumption by auxiliary systems in the plant, leading to more power available for the grid. This report provides guidance for assessing auxiliary system performance and recommends approaches to reduce their power consumption. The report also presents results from questionnaires on auxiliary system consumption and, in some cases, ac...

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

271

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Planned Replacement of Large Power Transformers at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continue to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken on an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants are facing the necessity of replacing large power transformers to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant construction8212there are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials and standards might have changed, and licensees are typically no...

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Replacing Inverters and Battery Chargers at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are continuing to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken on an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants must replace inverters and battery chargers to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant constructionthere are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials have changed in many cases, and licensees are typically not currently staffed for...

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Plant Support Engineering: Guidance for Replacing Feedwater Heaters at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities continue to pursue license renewal applications and power uprates, and these initiatives are being undertaken in an aging fleet of nuclear plants. Many plants are facing the necessity of replacing feedwater heaters to support these initiatives. However, industry expertise to support such activities has diminished since the days of plant construction8212there are fewer qualified vendors and equipment manufacturers, materials might have changed, and licensees are typically not staffed for these m...

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Carbon-14 Dose Calculation Methods at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon-14 (C-14) is a naturally occurring isotope of carbon produced by cosmic radiation interactions in the upper atmosphere. Nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s significantly increased the amount of C-14 in the atmosphere. C-14 is also produced in commercial nuclear reactors, but the amounts produced are much less than those produced naturally or from weapons testing. C-14 is released through permitted effluent pathways of a nuclear power plant. This report provides the current industry best...

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Aging assessment of large electric motors in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large electric motors serve as the prime movers to drive high capacity pumps, fans, compressors, and generators in a variety of nuclear plant systems. This study examined the stressors that cause degradation and aging in large electric motors operating in various plant locations and environments. The operating history of these machines in nuclear plant service was studied by review and analysis of failure reports in the NPRDS and LER databases. This was supplemented by a review of motor designs, and their nuclear and balance of plant applications, in order to characterize the failure mechanisms that cause degradation, aging, and failure in large electric motors. A generic failure modes and effects analysis for large squirrel cage induction motors was performed to identify the degradation and aging mechanisms affecting various components of these large motors, the failure modes that result, and their effects upon the function of the motor. The effects of large motor failures upon the systems in which they are operating, and on the plant as a whole, were analyzed from failure reports in the databases. The effectiveness of the industry`s large motor maintenance programs was assessed based upon the failure reports in the databases and reviews of plant maintenance procedures and programs.

Villaran, M.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Enhancing Cross-Correlation Analysis with Artificial Neural Networks for Nuclear Power Plant Feedwater Flow Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the primary cost-saving objectives of the power plant industry, including the nuclear industry, has long been the efficient operation of plant systems. Since the maximum operating thermal power of any nuclear plant is bounded by the specific licensing ... Keywords: flow measurement, neural networks, nuclear power plant

Davide Roverso; Da Ruan

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Application of Nuclear Energy for Seawater Desalination: Design Concepts of Nuclear Desalination Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear energy is playing an important role in electricity generation, producing 16% of the world's electricity. However, most of the world's energy consumption is in the form of heat, in which case nuclear energy could also play an important role. In particular, process heat for seawater desalination using nuclear energy has been of growing interest to some Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency over the past two decades. This growing interest stems from increasingly acute freshwater shortages in many arid and semi-arid zones around the world. Indeed, several national and international nuclear desalination demonstration programs are already under way or being planned. Of particular interest are projects for seawater nuclear desalination plants in coastal regions, where saline feed water can serve the dual purpose of cooling water for the nuclear reactor and as feed water for the desalination plant. In principle any nuclear reactor can provide energy (low-grade heat and/or electricity), as required by desalination processes. However, there are some additional requirements to be met under specific conditions in order to introduce nuclear desalination. Technical issues include meeting more stringent safety requirements (nuclear reactors themselves and nuclear-desalination integrated complexes in particular), and performance improvement of the integrated systems. Economic competitiveness is another important factor to be considered for a broader deployment of nuclear desalination. For technical robustness and economic competitiveness a number of design variants of coupling configurations of nuclear desalination integrated plant concepts are being evaluated. This paper identifies and discusses various factors, which support the attractiveness of nuclear desalination. It further summarizes some of the key approaches recommended for nuclear desalination complex design and gives an overview of various design concepts of nuclear desalination plants, which are experienced, being implemented or evaluated by several IAEA Member States. Operating experience with nuclear desalination using a liquid-metal reactor BN-350 in Kazakhstan and several Pressurized Water Reactor units in Japan is discussed. Results of economic analyses of nuclear desalination are also presented in order to illustrate the competitiveness of this technology with other conventional desalination operations. (authors)

Faibish, R.S.; Konishi, T.; Gasparini, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA, P.O. Box 100, Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

PM-1 NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PROGRAM PARAMETRIC STUDY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study deals with narrowing the range of parameters prior to preliminary design of the PM-1, a factory prepackaged, air-transportable, pressurized water nuclear power plant. The plant is to produce 1000 kw of net electrical power and 7 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr of space heat that is suitable for use with a central heating system. The data and conclusions resulting from the parametric study will provide the basis for the preliminary design of the PM-1 power plant. (W.D.M.)

Sieg, J.S.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Delays in nuclear power plant construction. Volume II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies barriers to shortening nuclear power plant construction schedules and recommends research efforts which should minimize or eliminate the identified barriers. The identified barriers include (1) Design and Construction Interfacing Problems; (2) Problems Relating to the Selection and Use of Permanent Materials and Construction Methods; (3) Construction Coordination and Communication Problems; and (4) Problems Associated with Manpower Availability and Productivity.

Mason, G.E.; Larew, R.E.; Borcherding, J.D.; Okes, S.R. Jr.; Rad, P.F.

1977-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

283

Radiation Data for Design and Qualification of Nuclear Plant Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphic summaries in this report represent the most comprehensive collection to date of data on the degrading effects of radiation on organic materials used in nuclear plant equipment. The data, which can help designers in selecting radiation-resistant materials, can also help in qualifying equipment at minimum cost.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic  

SciTech Connect

The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

Cronkite, E.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear Plant Reliability: Data Collection and Usage Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most nuclear utility programs and regulatory compliance actions involve several organizations within a utility and often have overlapping elements. Nearly all of these programs need extensive data. This report discusses some issues associated with the identification, collection, and effective use of plant data in support of such utility programs.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reprocessing of nuclear fuels at the Savannah River Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) has been a major supplier of nuclear materials such as plutonium-239 and tritium-3 for nuclear and thermonuclear weapons, plutonium-238 for space exploration, and isotopes of americium, curium, and californium for use in the nuclear research community. SRP is a complete nuclear park, providing most of the processes in the nuclear fuel cycle. Key processes involve fabrication and cladding of the nuclear fuel, target, and control assemblies; rework of heavy water for use as reactor moderator; reactor loading, operation, and unloading; chemical recovery of the reactor transmutation products and spent fuels; and management of the gaseous, liquid, and solid nuclear and chemical wastes; plus a host of support operations. The site's history and the key processes from fabrication of reactor fuels and targets to finishing of virgin plutonium for use in the nuclear weapons complex are reviewed. Emphasis has been given to the chemistry of the recovery and purification of weapons grade plutonium from irradiated reactor targets.

Gray, L.W.

1986-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Online Monitoring of Plant Assets in the Nuclear Industry  

SciTech Connect

Todays online monitoring technologies provide opportunities to perform predictive and proactive health management of assets within many different industries, in particular the defense and aerospace industries. The nuclear industry can leverage these technologies to enhance safety, productivity, and reliability of the aging fleet of existing nuclear power plants. The U.S. Department of Energys Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is collaborating with the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Long-Term Operations program to implement online monitoring in existing nuclear power plants. Proactive online monitoring in the nuclear industry is being explored using EPRIs Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software, a set of web-based diagnostic and prognostic tools and databases that serves as an integrated health monitoring architecture. This paper focuses on development of asset fault signatures used to assess the health status of generator step-up transformers and emergency diesel generators in nuclear power plants. Asset fault signatures describe the distinctive features based on technical examinations that can be used to detect a specific fault type. Fault signatures are developed based on the results of detailed technical research and on the knowledge and experience of technical experts. The Diagnostic Advisor of the FW-PHM Suite software matches developed fault signatures with operational data to provide early identification of critical faults and troubleshooting advice that could be used to distinguish between faults with similar symptoms. This research is important as it will support the automation of predictive online monitoring techniques in nuclear power plants to diagnose incipient faults, perform proactive maintenance, and estimate the remaining useful life of assets.

Nancy Lybeck; Vivek Agarwal; Binh Pham; Richard Rusaw; Randy Bickford

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ties Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants. LBlr5921, Lawrencein U. S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. Octoberand Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Survey of nuclear power plant construction costs, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This report presents cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in the construction pipeline, collected on Form EIA-254. The information on US nuclear power plants in the construction pipeline is reported voluntarily each quarter by the electric utilities. This report presents the data collected in the first quarter of 1983 on the 71 nuclear units in the construction pipeline. Historical data on 73 units, totalling 57,287 net megawatts (MWe) of design capacity, in commercial operation as of March 31, 1983, are also given. Three types of information are included: plant characteristics and ownership, construction costs, and construction schedule or chronology. Summary statistics are presented on direct component costs and construction leadtimes for a sample of operating units and units in the construction pipeline. The reactor-specific cost data included in Chapter 4 are the estimated final nuclear production plant costs and, for units in the construction pipeline, the disbursed and sunk costs as of March 31, 1983. 7 figures, 5 tables.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

Indicator system for advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Guidance for Medium- Voltage Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory and management concern regarding the reliability of medium-voltage cable systems at nuclear plants has been increasing for 510 years. The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are concerned that wetted (up to and including submergence) medium-voltage cable circuits may be degrading to the point at which multiple cable circuits may fail when called on to perform functions affecting safety. Utility managers are concerned that cables may fail, causing adverse safety consequences ...

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE Releases Filing Instructions for Federal Risk Insurance for New Nuclear Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Outlines Five Steps for New Nuclear Plant Sponsors to Enter Into a Conditional Agreement for Risk Insurance

294

Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction for Future Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 Development of Advanced Technologies to Reduce Design, Fabrication and Construction for Future Nuclear Power Plants

O' Connell, J. Michael

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

INFORMATION INTEGRATION IN CONTROL ROOMS AND TECHNICAL OFFICES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information integration in control rooms and technical offices in nuclear power plants Report prepared within the framework of the

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Yankee hood performance studies; The effect of air balance on thermal efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With today's ever-increasing production rates on tissue-grade machines, many mills experience a need to increase the contribution of Yankee hoods to drying. Until the cylinder is replaced, its contribution to drying is fixed at its maximum drying rate. Consequently, the hoods should be checked routinely to ensure that they run optimally. Most air systems are not gas-or oil-fired, in contrast to the original steam-heated designs. As a result, Yankee air systems are energy intensive. A proper hood balance ensures minimum thermal consumption, or optimum thermal efficiency. Thermal efficiency is defined as the Btu's consumed by the burner per pound of water evaporated by hood. A simple engineering survey, or system examination, allows the papermaker to verify hood performance and balance the air system. In this paper typical data from a such a survey are shown. These surveys can often lead to considerably savings in burner fuel.

Schukov, V. (Yankee Air Systems (US)); Wozny, J. (Enerquin Air Inc., Montreal, Quebec (CA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel assemblies [412.3 metric ton heavy metal (MTHM)] and 3 canisters of greater-than-class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. Photo courtesy of Connecticut Yankee (http://www.connyankee.com/html/fuel_storage.html). Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel

298

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Plant Engineering: Electrical Cable Test Applicability Matrix for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When assessing cable degradation or failure assessment, using the correct test and assessment methodology is critical to obtaining the correct answer. Many in-plant and laboratory tests exist. Some apply to the cable types used in nuclear plants. Some apply only to distribution cables. Most have pertinence to only one issue or even one cable design. This report provides a correlation between specific cable problems and the appropriate tests that may be used to resolve the issue. The report starts with su...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

Vermont Yankee's benefits and concerns operating with Axially zoned GE9 fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vermont Yankee (VY) is a 368-assembly, D-lattice, boiling water reactor (BWR)/4. The current cycle 16 contains 252 GE9 assemblies with axial zoning of gadolinium and enrichment, 112 GE8 assemblies with axially zoned gadolinium, and 4 Siemens 9 x 9-IX lead qualification assemblies. In this paper, the performance of the GE9-dominated core is evaluated against previous cores containing less sophisticated fuel designs.

Woehlke, R.A. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vulnerability Analysis of a Nuclear Power Plant Considering Detonations of Explosive Devices Marko threats to a nuclear power plant in the year 1991 and after the 9/11 events in 2001. The methodology which strength and injuries of human beings with nuclear power plant models used in probabilistic safety

Cizelj, Leon

302

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants ANL-AFCI-168 by G. Palmiotti, J. Cahalan, P. Pfeiffer, T;2 ANL-AFCI-168 Requirements for Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Separation Plants G

Anitescu, Mihai

303

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Supplier Quality Management for New Nuclear Plant Construction Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance for new nuclear power plant construction projects on supplier quality-related risks associated with the procurement of materials, equipment, and services intended for use in a safety-related plant application. This guidance takes an in-depth look into the procurement-related challenges that new construction projects face and at measures for overcoming these challenges. A methodology is provided for identifying, managing, evaluating, and mitigating quality-related risks ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Passive Component Maintenance Guide for Nuclear Power Plant Personnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this report represents a significant collection of technical and human performance information, including techniques and good practices, related to the design, maintenance, and operation of passive components common at most domestic nuclear power plants. Assemblage of this information provides a single point of reference for plant engineering and maintenance personnel, both in the present and in the future. Through the use of this guideline, in close conjunction with the indu...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

305

U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Design and construction of the Qinshan nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The construction work of China's first prototype nuclear power plant Qinshan NPP has already begun. This plant is located on the northern shore of Hangzhou Bay. It is designed to have a capacity of 300 MW electricity. The thermal power of the reactor is 966 MW. The primary circuit consists of 2 coolant loops and 16 auxiliary systems for normal operation. Safety is always the priority in design consideration. Preliminary safety analyses have been done and satisfactory results have been obtained. Excavation and clean out work has been finished.

Yu, O.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effects of delaying the operation of a nuclear power plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of an actual 24-month nuclear power plant licensing delay. A representative utility was chosen for examination. The research was oriented toward determination of the licensing delay's impact on the utility's operating results, ratepayers, and security issues. The methodology utilized to estimate those impacts involved the recursive interaction of a generation costing program to estimate replacement fuel costs and a financial regulatory model to concomitantly determine the impact on the utility, its ratepayers and security issues. The latter model was executed under six alternate scenarios: (1) no delay in the plant's operation; (2) a 24-month delay; (3) a 24-month delay but further assuming all replacement power was generated by coal-fired plants; (4) a 24-month delay assuming all replacement power from oil-fired plants; (5) no delay but assuming the capital cost of the plant was twice as large; and (6) a 24-month delay with the capital cost of the plant twice as large. Three primary conclusions were made. First, under all scenarios, a 24-month delay in operation of the plant has an adverse impact on the utility's internal generation of funds. Second, although electricity rates are not appreciably affected by the delay, the direction of electricity price changes is contingent on the source of fuel used for replacement power. Finally, a 24-month delay has an adverse impact on the indicators used to evaluate the financial soundness of the utility in all cases under consideration.

Hill, L.J.; Rainey, J.A.; Tepel, R.C.; Van Dyke, J.W.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Application of Non-Nuclear Robotics to Nuclear Industry Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Segmentation of radioactive components, including reactor cavity internals, has proved to be a challenging job for the nuclear power industry during decommissioning. The innovative use of robotic technology to perform debris cleanup can help utilities maximize worker safety. This report documents a first of its kind robotics experience at Connecticut Yankee.

2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

September 6 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee nuclear plant closure in 2014 will challenge New England energy markets The pending closure of a 41-year-old nuclear plant located in Vermont will ...

310

Predictive Maintenance Self-Assessment Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a need at nuclear power plants for optimization and continuous improvement in the predictive maintenance (PdM) process. This need is based upon increased reliance on PdM to contribute to low unplanned capability loss factors, prevent significant equipment failures, reduce resources for maintenance, manage assets in support of license renewal and aging control, incorporate new technologies and advanced information management, and manage the risk associated with maintenance activities. This docume...

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Introduction to Nuclear Plant Steam Turbine Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Nuclear Power Plants produce their power through the use of Steam Turbine Generators, any problems associated with the Turbine Control System has a direct effect on power generation. Although considerable effort has been expended in improving control system reliability, failures resulting in lost generation and high maintenance cost still plague the industry. On an individual basis, improvements have been made through maintenance techniques, modifications and upgrades. Unfortunately, this informati...

1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Human Factors Considerations in New Nuclear Power Plants: Detailed Analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored study has identified human-performance issues in new and advanced nuclear power plants. To identify the issues, current industry developments and trends were evaluated in the areas of reactor technology, instrumentation and control technology, human-system integration technology, and human factors engineering (HFE) methods and tools. The issues were organized into seven high-level HFE topic areas: Role of Personnel and Automation, Staffing and Training, Normal Operations Management, Disturbance and Emergency Management, Maintenance and Change Management, Plant Design and Construction, and HFE Methods and Tools. The issues where then prioritized into four categories using a 'Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table' methodology based on evaluations provided by 14 independent subject matter experts. The subject matter experts were knowledgeable in a variety of disciplines. Vendors, utilities, research organizations and regulators all participated. Twenty issues were categorized into the top priority category. This Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technical report provides the detailed methodology, issue analysis, and results. A summary of the results of this study can be found in NUREG/CR-6947. The research performed for this project has identified a large number of human-performance issues for new control stations and new nuclear power plant designs. The information gathered in this project can serve as input to the development of a long-term strategy and plan for addressing human performance in these areas through regulatory research. Addressing human-performance issues will provide the technical basis from which regulatory review guidance can be developed to meet these challenges. The availability of this review guidance will help set clear expectations for how the NRC staff will evaluate new designs, reduce regulatory uncertainty, and provide a well-defined path to new nuclear power plant licensing.

OHara,J.; Higgins, J.; Brown, W.; Fink, R.

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optimization of Fire Protection Impairments at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) fire protection is gaining further acceptance by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the industry. In addition, fire risk assessment methods are gaining some level of maturity since the first industrywide experience with individual plant examination for external events (IPEEE). RI/PB methods can reduce the cost of operating fire protection programs and maintaining fire safety.

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consultation correspondence related to the evaluation of the renewal of the operating license | for Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (VYNPS) is identified in Table E-1. Copies of the correspondence are included at the end of this appendix. The licenses, permits, consultations, and other approvals obtained from Federal and State | authorities for VYNPS are listed in Table E-2.

Commission (r. L. Franovich; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of recent survey studies on the seismic design practice for nuclear power plants in Japan. The seismic design codes and standards for both nuclear as well as non-nuclear structures have been reviewed and summarized. Some key documents for understanding Japanese seismic design criteria are also listed with brief descriptions. The paper highlights the design criteria to determine the seismic demand and component capacity in comparison with US criteria, the background studies which have led to the current Japanese design criteria, and a survey of current research activities. More detailed technical descriptions are presented on the development of Japanese shear wall equations, design requirements for containment structures, and ductility requirements.

Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Acceptance Strategy for Nuclear Power Plant In Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia has planned to build nuclear power plants. Some feasibility studies have been conducted intensively. However, the processes of NPP introduction are still uncertain. National Energy Plan in Indonesia, which has been made by some governmental agencies, does not yet give positive impact to the government decision to construct the nuclear power plant (NPP). This paper discusses the process of NPP introduction in Indonesia, which has been colored with debate of stakeholder and has delayed decision for go-nuclear. The technology paradigm is used to promote NPP as an alternative of reliable energy resources. This paradigm should be complemented with international politic-economic point of view. The international politic-economic point of view shows that structural powers, consisting of security, production, finance, and knowledge structures, within which the NPP is introduced, have dynamic characteristics. The process of NPP introduction in Indonesia contains some infrastructure development (R and D, legislation, regulation, energy planning, site study, public acceptance efforts, etc), but they need a better coherent NPP implementation program and NPP Acceptance Program. Strategic patterns for NPP acceptance described in this paper are made by considering nuclear regulation development and the interest of basic domestic participation. The first NPP program in Indonesia having proven technology and basic domestic participation is and important milestone toward and optimal national energy-mix.

Suhaemi, Tjipta [Centre for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia); Syaukat, Achmad [Centre for Nuclear Technology Business, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Kawasan PUSPIPTEK, Serpong-Tangerang Selatan (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

Conceivable new recycling of nuclear waste by nuclear power companies in their plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We outline the basic principles and the needed experiments for a conceivable new recycling of nuclear waste by the power plants themselves to avoid its transportation and storage to a (yet unknown) dumping area. Details are provided in an adjoining paper and in patents pending.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

1997-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

319

Validation of seismic probabilistic risk assessments of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

A seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a nuclear plant requires identification and information regarding the seismic hazard at the plant site, dominant accident sequences leading to core damage, and structure and equipment fragilities. Uncertainties are associated with each of these ingredients of a PRA. Sources of uncertainty due to seismic hazard and assumptions underlying the component fragility modeling may be significant contributors to uncertainty in estimates of core damage probability. Design and construction errors also may be important in some instances. When these uncertainties are propagated through the PRA, the frequency distribution of core damage probability may span three orders of magnitude or more. This large variability brings into question the credibility of PRA methods and the usefulness of insights to be gained from a PRA. The sensitivity of accident sequence probabilities and high-confidence, low probability of failure (HCLPF) plant fragilities to seismic hazard and fragility modeling assumptions was examined for three nuclear power plants. Mean accident sequence probabilities were found to be relatively insensitive (by a factor of two or less) to: uncertainty in the coefficient of variation (logarithmic standard deviation) describing inherent randomness in component fragility; truncation of lower tail of fragility; uncertainty in random (non-seismic) equipment failures (e.g., diesel generators); correlation between component capacities; and functional form of fragility family. On the other hand, the accident sequence probabilities, expressed in the form of a frequency distribution, are affected significantly by the seismic hazard modeling, including slopes of seismic hazard curves and likelihoods assigned to those curves.

Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

AN ADVANCED SODIUM-GRAPHITE REACTOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

An advanced sodium-cooled, graphite-moderated nuclear power plant is described which utilizes high-pressure, high-temperature steam to generate electricity at a high thermal efficiency. Steam is generated at 2400 psig, superheated to 1050 deg F and, after partial expansion in the turbine, reheated to 1000 deg F. Net thermal efficiency of the plant is 42.3%. In a plant sized to produce a net electrical output of 256 Mw, the estimated cost is 8232/kw. Estimated cost of power generation is 6.7 mills/kwh. In a similar plant with a net electrical output of 530 Mw, the estimated power generating cost is 5.4 mills/ kwh. Most of the components of the plant are within the capability of current technology. The major exception is the fuel material, uranium carbide. Preliminary results of the development work now in progress indicate that uranium carbide would be an excellent fuel for high-temperature reactors, but temperature and burnup limitation have yet to be firmly established. Additional development work is also required on the steam generators. These are the single-barrier type similar to those which will be used in the Enrico Fernri Fast Breeder Reactor plant but produce steam at higher pressure and temperature. Questions also remain regarding the use of nitrogen as a cover gas over sodium at 1200 deg F and compatibility of the materials used in the primary neutron shield. All of these questions are currently under investigation. (auth)

Churchill, J.R.; Renard, J.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of Feedwater Oxygen Control at the Vermont Yankee BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests in an operating BWR show that routine injection of oxygen into the feedwater to control radiation buildup is not warranted under normal operating conditions. However, since oxygen injection reduces the nickel release rate, it might be considered on a plant-by-plant basis for BWRs experiencing high nickel corrosion levels.

1985-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

Mark Holbrook

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Guide for monitoring equipment environments during nuclear plant operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide is intended to assist utilities in formulating and implementing improved monitoring programs by providing guidance on why, where and how to track environmental conditions such as temperature, radiation, and humidity for equipment in nuclear power plants during operation. The guide describes steps for implementing programs. It also gives advantages, disadvantages and costs for a variety of monitoring methods and devices such as sensors with recording devices, thermographic surveys, and passive thermal and radiation integrating devices. The guide also contains twenty technical papers presented at an environmental monitoring workshop covering the subjects of plant experience with elevated temperatures, plant environmental monitoring programs, and techniques for monitoring temperature and radiation. These individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Danahy, J.W.; Evans, R.W. (Grove Engineering, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps  

SciTech Connect

This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

population growth surrounding a nuclear power plant once thegrowth by requiring that certification of nuclear power plant

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors incentive programs established by state regulators in order to obtain current information and to consider the potential safety effects of the incentive programs as applied to nuclear units. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5509, Incentive Regulation of Nuclear Power Plants by State Public Utility Commissions, published in December 1989. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulator and each utility with a minimum entitlement of 10%. The agreements, orders, and settlements from which each incentive program was implemented were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program. The programs currently in effect represent the adoption of an existing nuclear performance incentive program proposal and one new program. In addition, since 1989 a number of nuclear units have been included in one existing program; while one program was discontinued and another one concluded. 6 refs., 27 tabs.

Martin, R.L.; Baker, K.; Olson, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

(Safety and reliability of nuclear power plant technology)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the 16th MPA Seminar on the Safety and Reliability of Plant Technology with Special Emphasis on Nuclear Technology. The objective of the trip was to gather information and data that could prove useful to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) sponsored Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) and Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Programs and to present a paper entitled, Effects of Irradiation on Initiation and Crack-Arrest Toughness of Two High-Copper Welds and on Stainless Steel Cladding. This paper summarizes results from the 5th, 6th, and 7th Irradiation Series of experiments performed within the HSSI Program by the Metals and Ceramics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

Dickson, T.L.

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

329

Guidelines for inservice testing at nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) gives licensees guidelines and recommendations for developing and implementing programs for the inservice testing of pumps and valves at commercial nuclear power plants. The staff discusses the regulations; the components to be included in an inservice testing program; and the preparation and content of cold shutdown justifications, refueling outage justifications, and requests for relief from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code requirements. The staff also gives specific guidance on relief acceptable to the NRC and advises licensees in the use of this information at their facilities. The staff discusses the revised standard technical specifications for the inservice testing program requirements and gives guidance on the process a licensee may follow upon finding an instance of noncompliance with the Code.

Campbell, P.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

COMMERCIAL UTILITY PERSPECTIVES ON NUCLEAR POWER PLANT CONTROL ROOM MODERNIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States need to modernize their main control rooms (MCR). Many NPPs have done partial upgrades with some success and with some challenges. The Department of Energys (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, and in particular the Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) and Information Systems Technologies Research and Development (R&D) Pathway within LWRS, is designed to assist commercial nuclear power industry with their MCR modernization efforts. As part of this framework, a survey was issued to utility representatives of the LWRS Program Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems/Technologies (II&C) Utility Working Group to obtain their views on a range of issues related to MCR modernization, including: drivers, barriers, and technology options, and the effects these aspects will have on concepts of operations, modernization strategies, and staffing. This paper summarizes the key survey results and discusses their implications.

Jeffrey C. Joe; Ronald L. Boring; Julius J. Persensky

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The environmental behavior of transuranic nuclides released from water cooled nuclear power plants. Final report, 1 August 1977-31 December 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Release data are reported for three coastal water-cooled nuclear reactors: Millstone Point No. 1 and No. 2 (for the period January 1977 through April 1978), and Maine Yankee (for the period 20 June 1977 through 25 March 1978); release samples were analyzed for (55)Fe, (60)Co, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239), (240)Pu, (241)Am, (242)Cm and (244)Cm, but not all nuclides on every sample. Radioiron is a major component of the releases measured; the transuranium nuclides are less significant components than was expected, but levels have occasionally reached microcuries per month. Pulses of this size are adequate for tracer studies. Environmental samples (water, sediments, and biota) have been analyzed from about the two reactor sites noted, and that of the Pilgrim No. 1 reactor. No water samples remote from reactor outflows have unequivocally shown reactor contamination. No sediment samples from near Millstone Point or Pilgrim 1 have shown reactor contamination; this has been clearly evident in several sediment collections from near Main Yankee.

Bowen, V.T.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Need for Near-Term Deployment of New Nuclear Power Plants Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society (ANS) supports and encourages the near-term deployment of new nuclear power plants. Nuclear energy, the second-largest power source, contributes 20 % of the electricity production in the United States. 1 Nuclear power can be competitive with gas and coal plants. Like solar, wind, and hydropower, nuclear energy has near-zero emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants. The more than one hundred nuclear power plants currently operating in the United States have an excellent safety record and are proven reliable sources of power.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. 1 figures.

Powell, J.G.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Float level switch for a nuclear power plant containment vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a float level switch used to sense rise or drop in water level in a containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during a loss of coolant accident. The essential components of the device are a guide tube, a reed switch inside the guide tube, a float containing a magnetic portion that activates a reed switch, and metal-sheathed, ceramic-insulated conductors connecting the reed switch to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel. Special materials and special sealing techniques prevent failure of components and allow the float level switch to be connected to a monitoring system outside the containment vessel.

Powell, James G. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Seismic Margin Assessment of the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Plant, Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic margin assessment of the Georgia Power Company Edwin I. Hatch, unit 1 nuclear power plant showed the practicality of an EPRI methodology for assessing the ability of nuclear plants to withstand large earthquakes. The assessment, performed by the utility, established that the plant can withstand an earthquake at least twice the magnitude for which it was designed.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Ukraine Loads U.S. Nuclear Fuel into Power Plant as Part of DOE-Ukraine Nuclear Fuel Qualification Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

fficials from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy today (April 8, 2010) participated in a ceremony in Ukraine to mark the insertion of Westinghouse-produced nuclear fuel into a nuclear power plant in Ukraine.

338

Plant Support Engineering: Nuclear Power Plant Equipment Qualification Reference Manual, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual compiles information on technology, requirements, and experience pertaining to the qualification of safety-related equipment for use in nuclear power plants under normal operating conditions and under adverse environments such as steam line breaks and earthquakes. The manual covers both environmental and seismic qualification of all safety-related electrical and mechanical equipment, but places emphasis on environmental qualification of Class 1E electrical equipment subject to harsh...

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Comparison of Options for a Pilot Plant Fusion Nuclear Mission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The pilot plant mission encompassed component test and fusion nuclear science missions plus the requirement to produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. Three magnetic configuration options were developed around this mission: the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS). With the completion of the study and separate documentation of each design option a question can now be posed; how do the different designs compare with each other as candidates for meeting the pilot plant mission? In a pro/con format this paper will examine the key arguments for and against the AT, ST and CS magnetic configurations. Key topics addressed include: plasma parameters, device configurations, size and weight comparisons, diagnostic issues, maintenance schemes, availability influences and possible test cell arrangement schemes.

Brown, T; Goldston, R J; El-Guebaly, L; Kessel, C; Neilson, G H; Malang, S; Menard, J E; Prager, S; Waganer, L; Titus, P

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

340

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Considerations for Developing a Critical Parts Program at a Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, Plant Support Engineering (PSE) of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published the report Critical Component Identification Process8212Licensee Examples: Scoping and Identification of Critical Components in Support of INPO AP-913 (1007935). That report was the initial output from a project to assist utilities that were implementing Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) AP-913, Equipment Reliability Process Description. Two of the key aspects of INPO AP-913 are the accurate scop...

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESSPlanning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination of Accidentnuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2.4.3.

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear power plant Generic Aging Lessons Learned (GALL). Appendix B  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this generic aging lessons learned (GALL) review is to provide a systematic review of plant aging information in order to assess materials and component aging issues related to continued operation and license renewal of operating reactors. Literature on mechanical, structural, and thermal-hydraulic components and systems reviewed consisted of 97 Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) reports, 23 NRC Generic Letters, 154 Information Notices, 29 Licensee Event Reports (LERs), 4 Bulletins, and 9 Nuclear Management and Resources Council Industry Reports (NUMARC IRs) and literature on electrical components and systems reviewed consisted of 66 NPAR reports, 8 NRC Generic Letters, 111 Information Notices, 53 LERs, 1 Bulletin, and 1 NUMARC IR. More than 550 documents were reviewed. The results of these reviews were systematized using a standardized GALL tabular format and standardized definitions of aging-related degradation mechanisms and effects. The tables are included in volume s 1 and 2 of this report. A computerized data base has also been developed for all review tables and can be used to expedite the search for desired information on structures, components, and relevant aging effects. A survey of the GALL tables reveals that all ongoing significant component aging issues are currently being addressed by the regulatory process. However, the aging of what are termed passive components has been highlighted for continued scrutiny. This report consists of Volume 2, which consists of the GALL literature review tables for the NUMARC Industry Reports reviewed for the report.

Kasza, K.E.; Diercks, D.R.; Holland, J.W.; Choi, S.U. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cognitive skill training for nuclear power plant operational decision making  

SciTech Connect

Training for operator and other technical positions in the commercial nuclear power industry traditionally has focused on mastery of the formal procedures used to control plant systems and processes. However, decisionmaking tasks required of nuclear power plant operators involve cognitive skills (e.g., situation assessment, planning). Cognitive skills are needed in situations where formal procedures may not exist or may not be as prescriptive, as is the case in severe accident management (SAM). The Westinghouse research team investigated the potential cognitive demands of SAM on the control room operators and Technical Support Center staff who would be most involved in the selection and execution of severe accident control actions. A model of decision making, organized around six general cognitive processes, was developed to identify the types of cognitive skills that may be needed for effective performance. Also, twelve SAM scenarios were developed to reveal specific decision-making difficulties. Following the identification of relevant cognitive skills, 19 approaches for training individual and team cognitive skills were identified. A review of these approaches resulted in the identification of general characteristics that are important in effective training of cognitive skills.

Mumaw, R.J.; Swatzler, D.; Roth, E.M. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Thomas, W.A. [Quantum Technologies, Inc., Oak Brook, IL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Identification of good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work developed an approach to diagnose problems and identify good practices in the operation of nuclear power plants using the system dynamics technique. The research began with construction of the ORSIM (Nuclear Power ...

Chen, Haibo, 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

An examination of the pursuit of nuclear power plant construction projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent serious reconsideration of nuclear power as a means for U.S. electric utilities to increase their generation capacity provokes many questions regarding the achievable success of future nuclear power plant ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

347

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume I, Summary Report: A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Nuclear power plants in the United States currently produce about 20 percent of the nation's electricity. This nuclear-generated electricity is safe, clean and economical, and does not emit greenhouse gases. Continued and expanded reliance on nuclear energy is one key to meeting future demand for electricity in the U.S. and is called for in the National Energy Policy. Nevertheless, no new nuclear plants have been built in the U.S. in many years, and none are currently slated for construction. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been working with the nuclear

348

Advanced design nuclear power plants: Competitive, economical electricity. An analysis of the cost of electricity from coal, gas and nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an updated analysis of the projected cost of electricity from new baseload power plants beginning operation around the year 2000. Included in the study are: (1) advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants; (2) low emissions coal-fired power plants; (3) gasified coal-fired power plants; and (4) natural gas-fired power plants. This analysis shows that electricity from advanced-design, standardized nuclear power plants will be economically competitive with all other baseload electric generating system alternatives. This does not mean that any one source of electric power is always preferable to another. Rather, what this analysis indicates is that, as utilities and others begin planning for future baseload power plants, advanced-design nuclear plants should be considered an economically viable option to be included in their detailed studies of alternatives. Even with aggressive and successful conservation, efficiency and demand-side management programs, some new baseload electric supply will be needed during the 1990s and into the future. The baseload generating plants required in the 1990s are currently being designed and constructed. For those required shortly after 2000, the planning and alternatives assessment process must start now. It takes up to ten years to plan, design, license and construct a new coal-fired or nuclear fueled baseload electric generating plant and about six years for a natural gas-fired plant. This study indicates that for 600-megawatt blocks of capacity, advanced-design nuclear plants could supply electricity at an average of 4.5 cents per kilowatt-hour versus 4.8 cents per kilowatt-hour for an advanced pulverized-coal plant, 5.0 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gasified-coal combined cycle plant, and 4.3 cents per kilowatt-hour for a gas-fired combined cycle combustion turbine plant.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fire Events Database and Generic Ignition Frequency Model for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a revision of the EPRI Fire Events Database for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants last published in EPRI Report 1000894 in October 2000. This report also contains a revision of the generic fire ignition frequency models that were published in NSAC-178L, "Fire Events Database of U.S. Nuclear Power Plants" (January 1993) and EPRI TR-105929, "Fire Ignition Frequency Model at Shutdown for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants" (December 1995).

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

350

Success of the first nuclear power plant built on China`s self-reliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Having overcome a series of difficulties and hard points, the first Chinese indigenous nuclear power plant, Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant of PWR type with the capacity of 300MW(e) is now in steady operation. Through tremendous works done for this project great achievements and experience as well as lessons learned have been obtained for systematic acquisition of nuclear power technology. The sound fact has demonstrated that China has the ability to develop nuclear power mainly depending on self-reliance.

Yu, O.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Costs: A 1995 Update, An  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an analysis of nuclear power plant operating costs. EIA published three reports on this subject during the period 1988-1995.

James G. Hewlett

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Guideline for On-Line Monitoring of Nuclear Power Plant Instrument Channel Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a guideline for a utility to develop an on-line monitoring (OLM) program for evaluating instrument channel performance at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

Survey on the Use of Configuration Risk and Safety Management Tools at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A joint project of Electricite de France (EDF) and EPRI, this project analyzed use of configuration safety and risk management tools at nuclear power plants.

1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

354

Compilation of Results and Feedback Regarding Turbine Upgrades at Nuclear and Fossil Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compiles results and feedback and draws a number of conclusions and lessons learned regarding steam turbine generator upgrades at nuclear and fossil power plants.

2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Bayesian Analysis for the Site-Specific Dose Modeling in Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Decommissioning is the process of closing down a facility. In nuclear power plant decommissioning, it must be determined that that any remaining radioactivity at a (more)

Ling, Xianbing

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

A review of the methods of economic analysis of nuclear power plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nuclear power plants across the United States are reaching the end of their current operating licenses, forcing decision makers to think about the way forward. (more)

Cavender, Brittainy Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Long term control of 3D engineering data for nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The engineering of the next generation of nuclear power plants requires to take into account the whole plant lifecycle: engineering, building, operating, maintaining and decommissioning. Satisfying stronger and stronger safety regulations requires the ...

Thomas Paviot; Christophe Mouton; Samir Lamouri

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee nuclear plant closure in 2014 will challenge New England energy markets. July 2, 2013 Lower power prices and high repair costs drive nuclear retirements.

359

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty can be either an opportunity or a risk. Every construction project begins with the expectation of project performance. To meet the expectation, construction projects need to be managed through sound risk assessment and management beginning with the front-end of the project life cycle to check the feasibility of a project. The Construction Industry Institutes (CII) International Project Risk Assessment (IPRA) tool has been developed, successfully used for a variety of heavy industry sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks associated with NPP projects, the goal of this thesis is to develop tailored risk framework for NPP projects that leverages and modifies the existing IPRA process. The IPRA has 82 elements to assess the risks associated with international construction projects. The modified IPRA adds five major issues (elements) to consider the unique risk factors of typical NPP projects based upon a review of the literature and an evaluation of the performance of previous nuclear-related facilities. The modified IPRA considers the sequence of NPP design that ultimately impacts the risks associated with plant safety and operations. Historically, financial risks have been a major chronic problem with the construction of NPPs. This research suggests that unstable regulations and the lack of design controls and oversight are significant risk issues. This thesis includes a consistency test to initially validate whether the asserted risks exist in actual conditions. Also, an overall risk assessment is performed based on the proposed risk framework for NPP and the list of assessed risk is proposed through a possible scenario. After the assessment, possible mitigation strategies are also provided against the major risks as a part of this thesis. This study reports on the preliminary findings for developing a new risk framework for constructing nuclear power plants. Future research is needed for advanced verification of the proposed elements. Follow-on efforts should include verification and validation of the proposed framework by industry experts and methods to quantify and evaluate the performance and risks associated with the multitude of previous NPP projects.

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

How much electricity does a typical nuclear power plant generate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear Reactor Operational Status Tables (Information and data on nuclear power reactors Generation: by State and Reactor. Annual Energy Review, ...

363

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

364

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress Next Generation Nuclear Plant: A Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project helps address the President's goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The NGNP project was formally established by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), designated as Public Law 109-58, 42 USC 16021, to demonstrate the generation of electricity and/or hydrogen with a high-temperature nuclear energy source. The project is being executed in collaboration with industry, DOE national laboratories, and U.S. universities. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for licensing and regulatory oversight of the demonstration nuclear reactor.

365

Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Prognostics and Life Beyond 60 for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safe, secure, reliable and sustainable energy supply is vital for advanced and industrialized life styles. To meet growing energy demand there is interest in longer term operation (LTO) for the existing nuclear power plant fleet and enhancing capabilities in new build. There is increasing use of condition based maintenance (CBM) for active components and periodic in service inspection (ISI) for passive systems: there is growing interest in deploying on-line monitoring. Opportunities exist to move beyond monitoring and diagnosis based on pattern recognition and anomaly detection to and prognostics with the ability to provide an estimate of remaining useful life (RUL). The adoption of digital I&C systems provides a framework within which added functionality including on-line monitoring can be deployed, and used to maintain and even potentially enhance safety, while at the same time improving planning and reducing both operations and maintenance costs.

Leonard J. Bond; Pradeep Ramuhalli; Magdy S. Tawfik; Nancy J. Lybeck

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Capturing Historical Knowledge for Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants: Summary of Historical Site Assessments at Eight Decommis sioning Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes approaches utilized and experience gained in the development of early characterization activities by a number of nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning. In particular, the report provides experience and lessons of performing the Historical Site Assessment, or HSA.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

License Stewardship Approach to Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

The paper explores both the conceptual approach to decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities using a license stewardship approach as well as the first commercial application of this approach. The license stewardship approach involves a decommissioning company taking control of a site and the 10 CFR 50 License in order to complete the work utilizing the established trust fund. In conclusion: The license stewardship approach is a novel way to approach the decommissioning of a retired nuclear power plant that offers several key advantages to all parties. For the owner and regulators, it provides assurance that the station will be decommissioned in a safe, timely manner. Ratepayers are assured that the work will be completed for the price they already have paid, with the decommissioning contractor assuming the financial risk of decommissioning. The contractor gains control of the assets and liabilities, the license, and the decommissioning fund. This enables the decommissioning contractor to control their work and eliminates redundant layers of management, while bringing more focus on achieving the desired end state - a restored site. (authors)

Daly, P.T.; Hlopak, W.J. [Commercial Services Group, EnergySolutions 1009 Commerce Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nuclear Safety Risk Management in Refueling Outage of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The NPP is used to planning maintenance, in-service inspection, surveillance test, fuel handling and design modification in the refueling outage; the operator response capability will be reduced plus some of the plant systems out of service or loss of power at this time. Based on 8 times refueling outage experiences of the Qinshan NPP, this article provide some good practice and lesson learned for the nuclear safety risk management focus at four safety function areas of Residual Heat Removal Capability, Inventory Control, Power availability and Reactivity control. (authors)

Meijing Wu; Guozhang Shen [Qinshan Nuclear power company (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Review and evaluation of the RELAP5YA computer code and the Vermont Yankee LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) licensing analysis model for use in small and large break BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) LOCAS  

SciTech Connect

A review has been completed of the RELAP5YA computer code to determine its acceptability for performing licensing analyses. The review was limited to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) reactor applications. In addition, a Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) licensing analysis method, using the RELAP5YA computer code, has been reviewed. This method is applicable to the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station to perform full break spectra LOCA and fuel cycle independent analyses. The review of the RELAP5YA code consisted of an evaluation of all Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) incorporated modifications to the RELAP5/MOD1 Cycle 18 computer code from which the licensing version of the code originated. Qualifying separate and integral effects assessment calculations were reviewed to evaluate the validity and proper implementation of the various added models. The LOCA licensing method was assessed by reviewing two RELAP5YA system input models and evaluating several small and large break qualifying transient calculations. A review of the RELAP5YA code modifications and their assessments, as well as the submitted LOCA licensing method, is given and the results of the review are provided.

Jones, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

EIA - AEO2010 - U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? U.S. nuclear power plants: continued life or replacement after 60? Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 U.S. nuclear power plants: Continued life or replacement after 60? Background Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20 percent of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of GHG regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating. The nuclear industry has expressed strong interest in continuing the operation of existing nuclear facilities, and no particular technical issues have been identified that would impede their continued operation. Recent AEOs had assumed that existing nuclear units would be retired after 60 years of operation (the initial 40-year license plus one 20-year license renewal). Maintaining the same assumption in AEO2010, with the projection horizon extended to 2035, would result in the retirement of more than one-third of existing U.S. nuclear capacity between 2029 and 2035. Given the uncertainty about when existing nuclear capacity actually will be retired, EIA revisited the assumption for the development of AEO2010 and modified it to allow the continued operation of all existing U.S. nuclear power plants through 2035 in the Reference case.

374

The Decommissioning of the Trino Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a referendum in Italy in 1987, the four Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) owned and operated by the state utility ENEL were closed. After closing the NPPs, ENEL selected a ''safestore'' decommissioning strategy; anticipating a safestore period of some 40-50 years. This approach was consistent with the funds collected during plant operation, and was reinforced by the lack of both a waste repository and a set of national free release limits for contaminated materials in Italy. During 1999, twin decisions were made to privatize ENEL and to transform the nuclear division into a separate subsidiary of the ENEL group. This group was renamed Sogin and during the following year, ownership of the company was transferred to the Italian Treasury. On formation, Sogin was asked by the Italian government to review the national decommissioning strategy. The objective of the review was to move from a safestore strategy to a prompt decommissioning strategy, with the target of releasing all of the nuclear sites by 2020. It was recognized that this target was conditional upon the availability of a national LLW repository together with interim stores for both spent fuel and HLW by 2009. The government also agreed that additional costs caused by the acceleration of the decommissioning program would be considered as stranded costs. These costs will be recovered by a levy on the kWh price of electricity, a process established and controlled by the Regulator of the Italian energy sector. Building on the successful collaboration to develop a prompt decommissioning strategy for the Latina Magnox reactor (1), BNFL and Sogin agreed to collaborate on an in depth study for the prompt decommissioning of the Sogin PWR at Trino. BNFL is currently decommissioning six NPPs and is at an advanced stage of planning for two further units, having completed a full and rigorous exercise to develop Baseline Decommissioning Plans (BDP's) for these stations. The BDP exercise utilizes the full range of BNFL decommissioning experience and knowledge to develop a strategy, methodology and cost for the decommissioning of NPPs. Over the past year, a prompt decommissioning strategy for Trino has been developed. The strategy has been based on the principles of minimizing waste products that require long term storage, maximizing 'free release' materials and utilizing existing and regulatory approved technologies.

Brusa, L.; DeSantis, R.; Nurden, P. L.; Walkden, P.; Watson, B.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Advisory system for the diagnosis of lost electric output in nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The enhancement of efficiency is world-wide trend to survive under intense competition. In recent years, the efficiency in the power industry is also one of the important topics. In case of nuclear power plants(NPPs), the period and quality of maintenance ... Keywords: Advisory system, Bayesian network, Diagnosis, Nuclear power plant, Regression, Turbine cycle

Gyunyoung Heo; Soon Heung Chang; Seong Soo Choi; Gwang Hee Choi; Moon Hak Jee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refabrication. through which nuclear fuel passes. Fusion.with the experience at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant (seecommitment from the nuclear fuel cycle; see Section 3.2.3. )

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

Stephen Schey

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NUCLEAR SCIENCE, VOL. 58, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2011 277 Anomaly Detection in Nuclear Power Plants via  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications (e.g., nuclear power reactor plants, petroleum industry and micro-gravity flow systems and Seungjin Kim Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University sensing. The underlying algorithm is built upon the recently reported theory of a statistical pattern

Ray, Asok

380

Activities in support of continuing the service of nuclear power plant concrete structures  

SciTech Connect

In general, nuclear power plant concrete structure s performance has been very good; however, aging of concrete structures occurs with the passage of time that can potentially result in degradation if is effects are not controlled. Safety-related nuclear power plant concrete structures are described. In-service inspection and testing requirements in the U.S. are summarized. The interaction of the license renewal process and concrete structures is noted. A summary of operating experience related to aging of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided. Several candidate areas are identified where additional research would be beneficial for aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures. Finally, an update on recent activities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory related to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures is provided.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

382

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

383

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report A Roadmap to Deploy New Nuclear Power Plants in the United States by 2010: Volume II, Main Report The objective of this document is to provide the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry with the basis for a plan to ensure the availability of near-term nuclear energy options that can be in operation in the U.S. by 2010. This document identifies the technological, regulatory, and institutional gaps and issues that need to be addressed for new nuclear plants to be deployed in the U.S. in this timeframe. It also identifies specific designs that could be deployed by 2010, along with the actions and resource requirements that are needed to ensure their

384

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant DOE, NRC Issue Licensing Roadmap For Next-Generation Nuclear Plant August 15, 2008 - 3:15pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) today delivered to Congress the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Licensing Strategy Report which describes the licensing approach, the analytical tools, the research and development activities and the estimated resources required to license an advanced reactor design by 2017 and begin operation by 2021. The NGNP represents a new concept for nuclear energy utilization, in which a gas-cooled reactor provides process heat for any number of industrial applications including electricity production, hydrogen production, coal-to-liquids, shale oil

385

Plant Engineering: Performance Diagnostic Test Program for the Nuclear Turbine Cycle at Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, many power generating companies are challenged to reduce operating costs, and at the same time, the cost of unit unavailability can be significant in today's power markets. In the past decade, management of nuclear power plants, including Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power (KHNP), has been focused on reducing forced outage rates and nuclear-safety-related issues, with less attention paid to thermal performance. But recently, KHNP has been strongly challenged to increase unit thermal performance, as f...

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Thirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than 30 countries signed a deal on Tuesday to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor nuclear reactors, but critics argue it could be at least 50 years before a commercially viable reactorThirty states sign ITER nuclear fusion plant deal 1 hour, 28 minutes ago Representatives of more

387

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

388

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants New Seismic Model Will Refine Hazard Analysis at U.S. Nuclear Plants January 31, 2012 - 2:09pm Addthis The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a new seismic study today that will help U.S. nuclear facilities in the central and eastern United States reassess seismic hazards. The Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities model and report is the culmination of a four-year effort among the participating organizations and replaces previous seismic source models used by industry and government since the late 1980s. The NRC is requesting U.S. nuclear power plants to reevaluate seismic

389

Time-Limited Aging Analysis Report for the Edwin I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The option to operate a nuclear power plant beyond its initial license term of 40 years is an important factor in financial decisions and long-term planning for utility asset management and capital improvement. Southern Company has submitted an application for the renewal of its operating licenses for the E. I. Hatch Nuclear Power Plant. As part of the application preparation process, Southern Company has reviewed its design and licensing basis for Plant Hatch for time-limited, aging-related assumptions....

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

390

Impact of Nuclear Power Plant Operations on Carbon-14 Generation, Chemical Forms, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As nuclear power plants continue to implement best practices to reduce the total radioactivity in plant effluents, other radionuclides that were not previously significant fractions of the effluent streams will need to be quantified and reported. Carbon-14 can become a principal radionuclide for the gaseous effluent pathway as the concentrations of other radionuclides decrease. This report documents the potential opportunities for further understanding the impact of nuclear power plant operations on Carb...

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Process Data Network Architecture Plan for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer networks are essential in efficiently managing the large volumes of data used in power plant operation. Nuclear plants, however, have been cautious in applying computer technology because of their unique safety, security, and regulatory requirements. This report describes a strategic plan developed to manage the evolution of the network that processes real-time operating data for Tennessee Valley Authority's Browns Ferry nuclear plants.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary of Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience forResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

EVALUATION OF THE MIGRATION POTENTIAL FOR 60Co AND 137Cs AT THE MAINE YANKEE SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to discuss the degree of sorption and desorption of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co that may be associated with the granite bedrock and the ''popcorn'' cement drain system that underlie the Maine Yankee Containment Foundation. The purpose is to estimate how much retardation of these two radionuclides takes place in groundwater that flows in the near-field of the Containment Foundation, specifically with respect to contamination originating at the PAB Test Pit. Specific concerns revolve around the potential for the contamination originating near the PAB to create a radioactive dose to a hypothetical ''resident farmer'' using a well intercepting this water to exceed 4 millirems/yr.

FUHRMANN,M.SULLIVAN,T.

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

394

Validation of the YAEC (Yankee Atomic Electric Company) criticality safety methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YEAC's) criticality safety methodology has evolved over the years to analyze high-density spent fuel rack designs, new fuel vault optimum moderation, burnup credit, pin consolidation, storage rack sensitivities, and large spent fuel rack arrays. The present methodology has three calculational paths: NITAWL-S/ KENO V.a Monte Carlo, CASMO-3 integral transport, and CASMO-3/CHART-2/PDQ-7 diffusion theory analysis. These calculational paths have been validated by caparison to 21 Babock Wilcox (B W) fuel storage criticals. These criticals covered a range of fuel storage conditions in which criticality was maintained by a combination of water height, soluble boron, fixed poison, and array spacing. Statistical analysis of the 21 calculated k{sub eff}'s gives a method bias and 95/95 method uncertainty for each path.

Napolitano, D.G.; Carpenito, F.L.; Rashid, P.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Response Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Extended nuclear plant outages raise Southern California wholesale ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; exports; nuclear; forecast; View All Tags ...

398

Safeguards Issues at Nuclear Reactors and Enrichment Plants  

SciTech Connect

The Agency's safeguards technical objective is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection.

Boyer, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the highly ranked phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

Ritterbusch, S.E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Thermal-Fluid Characterizations of ZnO and SiC Nanofluids for Advanced Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 2008 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants / Thermal Hydraulics

In Cheol Bang; Ji Hyun Kim

404

DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant DOE Seeks Additional Input on Next Generation Nuclear Plant April 17, 2008 - 10:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced it is seeking public and industry input on how to best achieve the goals and meet the requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) demonstration project work at DOE's Idaho National Laboratory. DOE today issued a Request for Information and Expressions of Interest from prospective participants and interested parties on utilizing cutting-edge high temperature gas reactor technology in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by enabling nuclear energy to replace fossil fuels used by industry for process heat. "This is an opportunity to advance the development of safe, reliable, and

405

Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities Letter to NEAC to Review the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Activities The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was established under the Energy Policy Act in August 2005 (EPACT-2005). EPACT-2005 defined an overall plan and timetable for NGNP research, design, licensing, construction and operation by the end of FY 2021. At the time that EPACT-2005 was passed, it was envisioned that key aspects of the project included: NGNP is based on R&D activities supported by the Gen-IV Nuclear Energy initiative;  NGNP is to be used to generate electricity, to produce hydrogen or (to do) both;  The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be the lead national lab for the project;  NGNP will be sited at the INL in

406

Aging assessment of surge protective devices in nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

An assessment was performed to determine the effects of aging on the performance and availability of surge protective devices (SPDs), used in electrical power and control systems in nuclear power plants. Although SPDs have not been classified as safety-related, they are risk-important because they can minimize the initiating event frequencies associated with loss of offsite power and reactor trips. Conversely, their failure due to age might cause some of those initiating events, e.g., through short circuit failure modes, or by allowing deterioration of the safety-related component(s) they are protecting from overvoltages, perhaps preventing a reactor trip, from an open circuit failure mode. From the data evaluated during 1980--1994, it was found that failures of surge arresters and suppressers by short circuits were neither a significant risk nor safety concern, and there were no failures of surge suppressers preventing a reactor trip. Simulations, using the ElectroMagnetic Transients Program (EMTP) were performed to determine the adequacy of high voltage surge arresters.

Davis, J.F.; Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Information Foraging in Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms  

SciTech Connect

nformation foraging theory articulates the role of the human as an 'informavore' that seeks information and follows optimal foraging strategies (i.e., the 'information scent') to find meaningful information. This paper briefly reviews the findings from information foraging theory outside the nuclear domain and then discusses the types of information foraging strategies operators employ for normal and off-normal operations in the control room. For example, operators may employ a predatory 'wolf' strategy of hunting for information in the face of a plant upset. However, during routine operations, the operators may employ a trapping 'spider' strategy of waiting for relevant indicators to appear. This delineation corresponds to information pull and push strategies, respectively. No studies have been conducted to determine explicitly the characteristics of a control room interface that is optimized for both push and pull information foraging strategies, nor has there been empirical work to validate operator performance when transitioning between push and pull strategies. This paper explores examples of control room operators as wolves vs. spiders and con- cludes by proposing a set of research questions to investigate information foraging in control room settings.

R.L. Boring

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Department of Energy to Co-Sponsor Workshop on Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension R&D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) will co-sponsor a Second Workshop on U.S. Nuclear Power Plant Life Extension Research and Development.

409

Recommendations to the NRC on human engineering guidelines for nuclear power plant maintainability  

SciTech Connect

This document contains human engineering guidelines which can enhance the maintainability of nuclear power plants. The guidelines have been derived from general human engineering design principles, criteria, and data. The guidelines may be applied to existing plants as well as to plants under construction. They apply to nuclear power plant systems, equipment and facilities, as well as to maintenance tools and equipment. The guidelines are grouped into seven categories: accessibility and workspace, physical environment, loads and forces, maintenance facilities, maintenance tools and equipment, operating equipment design, and information needs. Each chapter of the document details specific maintainability problems encountered at nuclear power plants, the safety impact of these problems, and the specific maintainability design guidelines whose application can serve to avoid these problems in new or existing plants.

Badalamente, R.V.; Fecht, B.A.; Blahnik, D.E.; Eklund, J.D.; Hartley, C.S.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Proceedings: EPRI/NEI Technical Information Workshop - Nuclear Plant Groundwater Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Groundwater Protection Workshop focused on the subject of groundwater monitoring related to nuclear plant sites. This subject is very important to both decommissioning and operating plants. The Workshop provided information to assist operating plants in the development of technically sound plant site groundwater monitoring programs. Presentations provided the latest information on groundwater assessments, such as related tools, strategies, technologies and experience. The program included inform...

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

411

Future AI and Robotics Technology for Nuclear Plants Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotics Program The Robotics Program within the Nuclear Engineering Division is developing new technologies. Currently, we are exploring opportunities in applications for nuclear reactor operation, maintenance of remote energy installations, decontamination and decommissioning, and minimally invasive surgery

Hu, Huosheng

412

Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on shell and straight tube and printed circuit heat exchangers.

Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Study of Outage Management Practices at Selected U.S. Nuclear Plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents insights gained from a study of the outage management practices at a number of U.S. nuclear plants. The objective of the study was to conduct an in-depth review of the current practices of outage management at these selected plants and identify important factors that have contributed to the recent success of their outage performance. Two BWR-4, three BWR-6, and two 3-loop Westinghouse PWR plants were selected for this survey. The results of this study can be used to formulate outage improvement efforts for nuclear plants in other countries. (author)

Lin, James C. [ABSG Consulting Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Plant Engineering, Aging Management Program Guidance for Medium-Voltage Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared in response to regulatory and management concern regarding the reliability of medium-voltage cable systems at nuclear plants. The staff of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been concerned that wetted (up to and including submergence) medium-voltage cable circuits may be degrading to the point at which multiple cable circuits may fail when called on to perform functions affecting safety. A utility managers concern is that cables may fail, causing ...

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Identification of hazards in non-nuclear power plants. Volume II. Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study extends the Phase I study to also include a hazards evaluation for two new emerging coal power plant technologies: coal fired atmospheric fluidized bed and pressurized fluidized bed power generating systems. The study also considers the sensitivity of the hazards ranking for all the non-nuclear power plants to the effects of population density, mode of plant operation, technical changes, location and environmental (temperature) effects. Information is provided under the following section headings: background; environmental and public health concerns associated with fluidized-bed combustion power plants; description of a conceptual atmospheric fluidized-bed power plant; pressurized fluidized-bed combustion combined cycle (PFBCC) power plant; hazard ranking and risk assessment for non-nuclear power plants; and, hazards sensitivity analysis.

Fell, R.W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mathematical model of steam generator feed system at power unit of nuclear plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model of a steam generator feed system at a power unit of a nuclear plant with variable values of transfer function coefficients is presented. The model is realized in the MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow event-driven simulation.

E. M. Raskin; L. A. Denisova; V. P. Sinitsyn; Yu. V. Nesterov

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A holistic investigation of complexity sources in nuclear power plant control rooms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nuclear power community in the United States is moving to modernize aging power plant control rooms as well as develop control rooms for new reactors. New generation control rooms, along with modernized control rooms, ...

Sasangohar, Farzan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Losses of Offsite Power at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants - 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the loss of offsite power experience at U.S. nuclear power plants during the year 2011 and provides insights into the causes of offsite power losses during the period 20022011.

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

419

Guidelines for the Technical Evaluation of Replacement Items in Nuclear Power Plants (NCIG-11)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a systematic technical evaluation process, utilities can ensure that replacement parts for nuclear power plants are equivalent to the originals. Guidelines developed by EPRI and NCIG provide practical information and a systematic approach to procurement.

1990-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

Probabilistic methods in seismic risk assessment for nuclear power plants: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art in seismic risk analysis applied to the design and siting of nuclear power plants was addressed in this meeting. Presentations were entered individually into the date base. (ACR)

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

How much spent (used) fuel is stored at U.S. nuclear power plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much spent (used) fuel is stored at U.S. nuclear power plants? In 2002, the most recent year for which EIA has data, there were 161,662 fuel assemblies, or 46,268 ...

422

A Software Configuration Management System for the Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plant Simulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the KSG experiencies to introduce a configuration management system for the maintenance of nuclear power plant simulator software. After a discussion on the KSG specific requirements on a computer based software configuration management ...

Burkhard Holl

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Verification and Validation of Selected Fire Models for Nuclear Power Plant Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the verification and validation (VV) of five selected fire models commonly used in support of risk-informed and performance-based (RI/PB) fire protection at nuclear power plants (NPPs).

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fire Events Database for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Update Through 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an update to the EPRI Fire Events Database for U.S. Nuclear Power Plants. This database was last published in January 1993 as NSAC-178L.

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

425

DC power transmission from the Leningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant to Vyborg  

SciTech Connect

DC power transmission from the Leningradskaya Nuclear Power Plant (LAES) to city of Vyborg is proposed. This will provide a comprehensive solution to several important problems in the development and control of the unified power system (EES) of Russia.

Koshcheev, L. A. [JSC 'NIIPT' (Russian Federation); Shul'ginov, N. G. [JSC 'SO EES' (Russian Federation)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

John Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Integration of Biorefineries and Nuclear Cogeneration Power Plants - A Preliminary Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Biomass-based ethanol and nuclear power are two viable elements in the path to U.S. energy independence. Numerous studies suggest nuclear power could provide a practical carbon-free heat source alternative for the production of biomass-based ethanol. In order for this coupling to occur, it is necessary to examine the interfacial requirements of both nuclear power plants and bioethanol refineries. This report describes the proposed characteristics of a small cogeneration nuclear power plant, a biochemical process-based cellulosic bioethanol refinery, and a thermochemical process-based cellulosic biorefinery. Systemic and interfacial issues relating to the co-location of either type of bioethanol facility with a nuclear power plant are presented and discussed. Results indicate future co-location efforts will require a new optimized energy strategy focused on overcoming the interfacial challenges identified in the report.

Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee Vermont Total VA Surry North Anna Virginia Total WA Columbia Generating Station Washington Total WI Point Beach Nuclear Plant Kewaunee Wisconsin Total

429

Today in Energy - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee nuclear plant closure in 2014 will challenge New England energy markets. July 8, 2013 Pumped storage provides grid reliability even with net generation ...

430

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vermont Yankee Vermont Total VA Surry North Anna Virginia Total WA Columbia Generating Station Washington Total WI Point Beach Nuclear Plant Wisconsin Total U.S. Total.

431

Sun-Sentinel How Florida's nuclear plants compare to Japan's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Point plant near Miami and two at its plant in St. Lucie County. Progress has one near Crystal River operation began," said FPL Spokesman Mike Waldron. #12;Progress Energy's Crystal River reactor and one was an effort to wrap up the issue at the Crystal River plant. "Was the company merely unlucky

Belogay, Eugene A.

432

Assessment of Seismic Hazard at 34 U.S. Nuclear Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interest in recent years in early site permits (ESPs) for new nuclear plants has prompted a reevaluation of seismic design criteria and a reexamination of the basis for current criteria. Currently, Regulatory Guide 1.208 bases seismic design requirements on a performance-based approach using probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). The performance-based approach was based on PSHA results at 29 nuclear plant sites, using results that were published in 1989 and 1994. These results were supported by pr...

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

433

Study of the potential uses of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide an evaluation of possible international and domestic uses for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, located in South Carolina, at the conclusion of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Four generic categories of use options for the Barnwell plant have been considered: storage of spent LWR fuel; reprocessing of LWR spent fuel; safeguards development and training; and non-use. Chapters are devoted to institutional options and integrated institutional-use options.

Not Available

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

434

Characterization and Dose Modeling of Soil, Sediment and Bedrock During Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decommissioning nuclear power plant must confirm that the radionuclides present in the soils, sediments, and bedrock left on site at the time of license termination will meet the appropriate dose limits for site release. This process involves the characterization, dose modeling, and if required, remediation, of these media. At some decommissioning nuclear power plants, the management of contaminated soil, sediments, and bedrocks was a major project that led to generation of remediation projects and rad...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

435

Jose Cabrera Nuclear Power Plant Full System Chemical Decontamination Experience Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical decontamination is one of the key challenging tasks of decommissioning a nuclear power plant. This report describes a full system chemical decontamination at SpainJosCabrera Nuclear Power Plant that sought to facilitate future dismantling by removing contamination and lowering radiation fields. Because of several unique features of the JosCabrera decontamination project, it has provided new good practices and useful lessons learned.

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

NONE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Aging Management Guidelines for Commercial Nuclear Power Plants -- Electrical and Mechanical Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the application process for license renewal, nuclear utilities must perform an evaluation to confirm that they have appropriately considered aging effects on plant components within the scope of the License Renewal Rule. This report provides guidelines for managing relevant degradation mechanisms applicable to electrical and mechanical penetrations in nuclear power plants. Use of these guidelines will provide utilities with a basis for verifying that effective methods for managing age-related ...

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

439

Technical Guideline for Cyber Security Requirements and Life Cycle Implementation Guidelines for Nuclear Plant Digital Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants face increasing regulatory requirements from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for cyber security of digital devices, components, and systems. The focus of these cyber security requirements is to protect plant digital computer systems, communications systems, and networks from cyber attacks that would affect reactor safety or generation reliability. This EPRI guideline document provides technical guidance for addressing c...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

440

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state public utility commissions (PUCs). Economic performance incentives established by state PUCs are applicable to the construction or operation of about 45 nuclear power reactors owned by 30 utilities in 17 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Petersen, J.C.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state Public Utility Commissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Economic performance incentives established by state Public Utility Commissions (PUCs) currently are applicable to the construction or operation of approximately 73 nuclear power reactors owned by 27 utilities with investment greater than 10% in 18 states. The NRC staff monitors development of the incentives and periodically provides an updated report on all nuclear plant incentives to its headquarters and regional offices. The staff maintains contact with the PUCs and the utilities responsible for implementing the incentives in order to obtain the updated information and to consider potential safety effects of the incentives. This report on incentive regulation of nuclear power plants by state PUCs presents the NRC staff's concerns on potential safety effects of economic performance incentives. It also includes a plant-by-plant survey that describes the mechanics of each incentive and discusses the financial effects of the incentive on the utility-owner(s) of the plant.

Martin, R.L.; Olson, J. (Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Hendrickson, P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Application Guide for Motor-Operated Valves in Nuclear Power Plants - Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor-operated gate and globe valves are widely used in both safety-related and non-safety-related systems in nuclear power plants. Their proper operation is essential for reliable plant performance and can help eliminate costly downtime. This second revision of the Application Guide for Motor-Operated Valves provides the latest in methods for conducting engineering evaluations in order to confirm that motor-operated gate, globe, and butterfly valves will perform their required function and offers sugges...

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

Extended outages at several nuclear plants led to high outage ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Southern California Edison's San Onofre Nuclear ... and Progress's handling of the Crystal River repairs became an issue in the company's recent merger with ...

444

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2012 ... voirs, fossil energy (coal, gas), atom (nuclear fission process) and to a small .... The dynamic of the stocks of fuel is clear from the differential...

445

Nuclear norm minimization for the planted clique and biclique ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 21, 2009 ... Both problems are NP-hard. We write both problems as matrix-rank minimization and then relax them using the nuclear norm. This technique...

446

Nuclear power plants undergo seasonal scheduled outages - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... Privacy/Security Copyright & Reuse Accessibility. Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy

447

The Management of Aging in Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An example of application of structural reliability theory to investigate the impact of ... Cladding and Duct Materials for Advanced Nuclear Recycle Reactors

448

Qualification of safety-critical systems in TVO nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) operates two nuclear power plant units in Finland and has started to build a third one. The current nuclear power units have to continuously maintain and update existing instrumentation and control systems (I&C). Each new ... Keywords: FMECA, SPICE, instrumentation and control, qualification, safety-critical systems

Juha Halminen; Risto Nevalainen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Trial Plant Review of an American Nuclear Society External Event Probabilistic Risk Assessment Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examined a representative set of Seismic Probabilistic Risk Assessments (SPRAs) and Seismic Margin Assessments (SMAs) performed for U.S. nuclear plants and evaluated them against the American Nuclear Society's draft External-Event PRA Methodology Standard for conducting Probabilistic Risk Assessment of external events.

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Program on Technology Innovation: Information Integration for Equipment Reliability at Nuclear Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the status of information integration for equipment reliability (ER) at nuclear power plants. ER consists of a comprehensive set of processes that span the organization and require extensive data gathering, retrieval, and information integration. To assist nuclear operators, the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) issued AP-913, Equipment Reliability Process Description, as a standard approach to implement effective ER processes among its members. Despite the success tha...

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Plant Support Engineering: Degradation Research for Nuclear Service Level I Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants have experienced degradation of the protective coating systems (nuclear Service Level I coatings) inside reactor containment. The degradation is a matter of concern, but the history of degradation and its causes have not been thoroughly documented. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Utilities Coating Council (NUCC) began a research project designed to gain an understanding of the degradation and the potential influence of aging on the qualified ...

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

453

COST COMPARISONS OF CAPITOL INVESTMENT IN VARIOUS NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS FOR CENTRAL STATION APPLICATION  

SciTech Connect

The capital costs for a number of power reactors are compared after escalation to equivalent construction dates. It is shown that the most important factor affecting nuclear power plant capital costs is the net capacity of the plant. Steam conditions are shown to have a relatively minor effect on capital costs. (auth)

Bender, M.; Stulting, R.D.

1958-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

Assessement of Codes and Standards Applicable to a Hydrogen Production Plant Coupled to a Nuclear Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an assessment of codes and standards applicable to a hydrogen production plant to be coupled to a nuclear reactor. The result of the assessment is a list of codes and standards that are expected to be applicable to the plant during its design and construction.

M. J. Russell

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Life Cycle Management Plan for Main Generator and Exciter at Callaway Nuclear Plant: Generic Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the electric power industry becomes more competitive, life cycle management (LCM) of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) becomes more important to keep nuclear power plants economically viable throughout their remaining licensed operating terms, whether 40 or 60 years. This report provides Ameren UE with an optimized LCM plan for the main generator and exciter at Callaway Plant.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Exergetic analyse for the cooling systems with R-407 refrigerant for application in nuclear plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental Pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation, part of National Research and Development Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies - ICSI Rm. Valcea, as principal target have to establish the technology of the water-hydrogen ... Keywords: R407 refrigerant, irreversibility, nuclear plants, refrigeration efficiency

Sorin Gherghinescu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Location dependent common cause analysis with an application to fires. [Nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the work described is to develop a methodology by which the public risk arising from localized common cause events (e.g., fires) in nuclear plants can be assessed. Attention was paid to maximizing both the completeness and efficiency of the analysis. This methodology was then applied to the analysis of fire events in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP).

Leaver, D.; vonHerrmann, J.; Olmos, J.; Boardman, R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Pre-validation of nuclear power plant control room design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the design of complex automation and control room systems is an essential phase in the design process in the nuclear field. For example, in order to meet the nuclear regulatory requirements, the new control room systems have to be evaluated ... Keywords: concept of operations, control room, pre-validation, verification & validation

Jari Laarni; Paula Savioja; Hannu Karvonen; Leena Norros

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Plant Support Engineering: Aging Management Program Development Guidance for Instrument and Control Cable Systems for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides guidance for developing and implementing a cable aging management program for low-voltage instrument and control cable circuits in nuclear power plants. Guidance is provided for identifying cables located in adverse localized environments and determining if those environments have caused significant cable circuit degradation.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

460

Establishing a Groundwater Protection Program for New Nuclear Generating Units: Appendix to the EPRI Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New nuclear power plants should plan for groundwater protection early in the planning process. The construction project team should be made aware of the need to establish the groundwater protection program prior to the construction planning process. This document provides guidance for establishing Groundwater Protection Programs for new nuclear generating units. It applies to new nuclear generating units on both new and existing nuclear power plant ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yankee nuclear plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Adult leukemia and proximity-based surrogates for exposure to Pilgrim plant`s nuclear emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible associations between adult leukemia incidence and proximity-based surrogate measures of potential for exposure to radioactive emission from the Pilgrim nuclear power plant in Plymouth, Massachusetts, were investigated. Include din this study were 105 nonchronic lymphocytic leukemia cases, diagnosed between 1978 and 1986 at age 13 y or older, that occured in 22 towns near Pilgrim; population controls numbered 208. Residence within 4 mi (6.4 km) of Pilgrim during {open_quotes}high-emissions{close_quotes} years was related to case-control status (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.88, 95% confidence interval [95% Cl] = 0.81-10.64). A high {open_quotes}exposure{close_quotes} score (i.e., a value that accounted for downwind time) was also related to case-control status (OR = 3.46, 95% Cl = 1.50-7.96). Some statistically significant dose-response trends were found. Cautious interpretation of associations is warranted in light of the low levels of reported emission. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Morris, M.S.; Knorr, R.S. [Massachusetts Dept. of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Development of hydrogeological modelling approaches for assessment of consequences of hazardous accidents at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces some modeling approaches for predicting the influence of hazardous accidents at nuclear reactors on groundwater quality. Possible pathways for radioactive releases from nuclear power plants were considered to conceptualize boundary conditions for solving the subsurface radionuclides transport problems. Some approaches to incorporate physical-and-chemical interactions into transport simulators have been developed. The hydrogeological forecasts were based on numerical and semi-analytical scale-dependent models. They have been applied to assess the possible impact of the nuclear power plants designed in Russia on groundwater reservoirs.

Rumynin, V.G.; Mironenko, V.A.; Konosavsky, P.K.; Pereverzeva, S.A. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel from Shutdown Sites  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M2 milestone M2FT-13PN0912022, Stranded Sites De-Inventorying Report. In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (DOE 2013). Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. This focus is consistent with the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Americas Nuclear Future, which identified removal of stranded used nuclear fuel at shutdown sites as a priority so that these sites may be completely decommissioned and put to other beneficial uses (BRC 2012). Shutdown sites are defined as those commercial nuclear power reactor sites where the nuclear power reactors have been shut down and the site has been decommissioned or is undergoing decommissioning. In this report, a preliminary evaluation of removing used nuclear fuel from 12 shutdown sites was conducted. The shutdown sites were Maine Yankee, Yankee Rowe, Connecticut Yankee, Humboldt Bay, Big Rock Point, Rancho Seco, Trojan, La Crosse, Zion, Crystal River, Kewaunee, and San Onofre. These sites have no other operating nuclear power reactors at their sites and have also notified the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that their reactors have permanently ceased power operations and that nuclear fuel has been permanently removed from their reactor vessels. Shutdown reactors at sites having other operating reactors are not included in this evaluation.

Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph E.; Ross, Steven B.; Buxton, Kenneth A.; England, Jeffery L.; McConnell, Paul E.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant, November...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Plant. Human Performance Improvement Coordinator works with the Safety Team and Human Error team from BBS to conduct human performance evaluations. B-12 Data on the...

465

Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal Environmental Compliance Program: Donald C. Cook Nuclear Case Study, Phase 1--Preliminary Planni ng  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes preliminary environmental compliance planning activities that American Electric Power (AEP) is taking to preserve the option of renewing the Donald C. Cook Nuclear Plant license. The activities are based on a program plan manual published previously by EPRI. The report includes an evaluation of the usefulness of that manual.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

466

Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant, November 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Plant Pantex Plant May 2011 November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Independent Oversight Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Scope and Methodology ....................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Results and Conclusions ....................................................................................................................... 3 4.0 Recommendations................................................................................................................................. 5

467

Technical Guidance for Achieving Higher Levels of Electromagnetic Compatibility for Advanced Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents guidance for enhancing electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) for advanced nuclear power plants (NPPs). Included is a summary of EMC challenges facing these plants and the threats that utilities, equipment designers, and plant designers must be aware of. The following requested areas are covered: 1) programmatically addressing EMC through the development of an EMC protection system, 2) minimizing the use of exclusion zones through the demonstration of electromagnetic energy (EM) calcula...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

468

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Kansas City Plant - 10/01/2010 to 09/30/2013 | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0/01/2010 to 09/30/2013 | National Nuclear Security 0/01/2010 to 09/30/2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Kansas City Plant - 10/01/2010 to 09/30/2013 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > M & O Support Department > Kansas City Plant - 10/01/2010 to 09/30/2013 Kansas City Plant - 10/01/2010 to 09/30/2013

470

Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery February 15, 2012 - 12:27pm Addthis It's great to be with all of you today. I want to acknowledge the many people who are playing a role here: Tom Fanning, President of Southern Company Paul Bowers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Georgia Power Tom Smith, Chief Executive Officer of Oglethorpe Power Bob Johnston, Chief Executive Officer of MEAG (Me-ag) Power Jim Bernhard, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Shaw Group Ric Perez, President of Westinghouse Operations Marv Fertel, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Energy Institute; and Finally, all of the workers here, whose skill and expertise are

471

Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared for Delivery February 15, 2012 - 12:27pm Addthis It's great to be with all of you today. I want to acknowledge the many people who are playing a role here: Tom Fanning, President of Southern Company Paul Bowers, President and Chief Executive Officer of Georgia Power Tom Smith, Chief Executive Officer of Oglethorpe Power Bob Johnston, Chief Executive Officer of MEAG (Me-ag) Power Jim Bernhard, President and Chief Executive Officer of The Shaw Group Ric Perez, President of Westinghouse Operations Marv Fertel, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Energy Institute; and Finally, all of the workers here, whose skill and expertise are

472

Aging Management of Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures - Overview and Suggested Research Topics  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power plant concrete structures are described and their operating experience noted. Primary considerations related to management of their aging are noted and an indication of their status provided: degradation mechanisms, damage models, and material performance; assessment and remediation (i.e., component selection, in-service inspection, nondestructive examinations, and remedial actions); and estimation of performance at present or some future point in time (i.e., application of structural reliability theory to the design and optimization of in-service inspection/maintenance strategies, and determination of the effects of degradation on plant risk). Several activities are identified that provide background information and data on areas of concern with respect to nondestructive examination of nuclear power plant concrete structures: inspection of thick-walled, heavily-reinforced sections, basemats, and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. Topics are noted where additional research would be of benefit to aging management of nuclear power plant concrete structures.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Natural Versus Artificial Aging of Nuclear Power Plant Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Examination of test specimens, placed in eight operating reactors during this study, will provide information on the long-term aging effects of plant environments on cabling and electrical components. Material property data, when compared with measured degradation in artificially aged specimens, will help improve predictions of the safe, useful life of plant equipment.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Identification of performance indicators for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance indicators have been assuming an increasingly important role in the nuclear industry. An integrated methodology is proposed in this research for the identification and validation of performance indicators for ...

Sui, Yu, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Enterprise Knowledge Management System for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although initially proposed by the Nuclear Sector, an enterprise knowledge management system can support the work of all business sectors ... fossil generation, nuclear generation, power delivery, environment, as well as business operations. The motivation for this project is the concern that valuable skills, expertise and the corporate knowledge base may be lost due to retirements and other forms of attrition associated with an aging workforce. As originally conceived, the objective of this BSI project ...

2005-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

476

Station blackout at nuclear power plants: Radiological implications for nuclear war  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work on station blackout is reviewed its radiological implications for a nuclear war scenario is explored. The major conclusion is that the effects of radiation from many nuclear weapon detonations in a nuclear war would swamp those from possible reactor accidents that result from station blackout.

Shapiro, C.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Source book for planning nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants  

SciTech Connect

A source book on nuclear dual-purpose electric/distillation desalination plants was prepared to assist government and other planners in preparing broad evaluations of proposed applications of dual-purpose plants. The document is divided into five major sections. Section 1 presents general discussions relating to the benefits of dual-purpose plants, and spectrum for water-to-power ratios. Section 2 presents information on commercial nuclear plants manufactured by US manufacturers. Section 3 gives information on distillation desalting processes and equipment. Section 4 presents a discussion on feedwater pretreatment and scale control. Section 5 deals with methods for coupling the distillation and electrical generating plants to operate in the dual mode.

Reed, S.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Inspection of Nuclear Power Plant Structures - Overview of Methods and Related Applications  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this limited study were to provide an overview of the methods that are available for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete and metallic structures, and to provide an assessment of the status of methods that address inspection of thick, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible areas of the containment metallic pressure boundary. In meeting these objectives a general description of nuclear power plant safety-related structures was provided as well as identification of potential degradation factors, testing and inspection requirements, and operating experience; methods for inspection of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures and containment metallic pressure boundaries were identified and described; and applications of nondestructive evaluation methods specifically related to inspection of thick-section reinforced concrete structures and inaccessible portions of containment metallic pressure boundaries were summarized. Recommendations are provided on utilization of test article(s) to further advance nondestructive evaluation methods related to thick-section, heavily-reinforced concrete and inaccessible portions of the metallic pressure boundary representative of nuclear power plant containments. Conduct of a workshop to provide an update on applications and needed developments for nondestructive evaluation of nuclear power plant structures would also be of benefit.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Online Condition Monitoring to Enable Extended Operation of Nuclear Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Safe, secure, and economic operation of nuclear power plants will remain of strategic significance. New and improved monitoring will likely have increased significance in the post-Fukushima world. Prior to Fukushima, many activities were already underway globally to facilitate operation of nuclear power plants beyond their initial licensing periods. Decisions to shut down a nuclear power plant are mostly driven by economic considerations. Online condition monitoring is a means to improve both the safety and economics of extending the operating lifetimes of nuclear power plants, enabling adoption of proactive aging management. With regard to active components (e.g., pumps, valves, motors, etc.), significant experience in other industries has been leveraged to build the science base to support adoption for online condition-based maintenance and proactive aging management in the nuclear industry. Many of the research needs are associated with enabling proactive management of aging in passive components (e.g., pipes, vessels, cables, containment structures, etc.). This paper provides an overview of online condition monitoring for the nuclear power industry with an emphasis on passive components. Following the overview, several technology/knowledge gaps are identified, which require addressing to facilitate widespread online condition monitoring of passive components.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

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Annual radiological environmental operating report: Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, 1992. Operations Services/Technical Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental radiological monitoring program conducted by TVA in the vicinity of Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BFN) in 1992. The program includes the collection of samples from the environment and the determination of the concentrations of radioactive materials in the samples. Samples are taken from stations in the general area of the plant and from areas not influenced by plant operations. Station locations are selected after careful consideration of the weather patterns and projected radiation doses to the various areas around the plant. Material sampled includes air, water, milk, foods, vegetation, soil, fish, sediment, and direct radiation levels. Results from stations near the plant are compared with concentrations from control stations and with preoperational measurements to determine potential impacts of plant operations. Small amounts of Co-60 and Cs-134 were found in sediment samples downstream from the plant. This activity in stream sediment would result in no measurable increase over background in the dose to the general public.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z