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1

I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

water quality, wildlife (including no effect o n endangered species), vegetation, fish,.and land use; and (2) there would be n o effect on cultural resources. ' Based.on the...

2

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

3

Ecologically Significant Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys FINAL REPORT Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork of the Flathead River Valley Appendix 29b #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, and Swan River Valleys JUNE 1, 1999 DEQ

4

Avian Use of Restored Wetlands in the Ridge and Valley Region of Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fifteen wetlands, which were surveyed in 1998 for water depths, vegetation, area, and bird use. I detected significantly affected wetland bird species richness (P tended to decline as well. Overall, average water depths changed little since 1998 with except of medium

Omiecinski, Curtis

5

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared See Also: Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the Flathead, Stillwater, & Swan River Valleys Appendix 29 #12;Ecologically Significant Wetlands in the North Fork Flathead River Watershed Prepared

6

Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix L Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities (http://clientzone.golder.com/YSBI) The Inventory element in the Yakima Subbasin plan is intended to summarize fish and wildlife protection. The Inventory will be updated as the Yakima Subbasin Plan gets updated. This iterative process will allow us

7

Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan November 26, 2004 Prepared for the Presented's subbasin planning process is iterative and designed within an adaptive management framework. Management is comprised of elected officials from local governments throughout the subbasin, and meets regularly to work

10

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204...

11

Climate Change and Adaptation in Irrigated Agriculture?A Case Study of the Yakima River  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a case study of the Yakima River Valley in Washington State, we show that relatively simple tools originally developed to forecast the impact of the El Nino phenomenon on water supplies to irrigated agriculture also can be used to estimate the significantly shifted probability distribution of water shortages in irrigated agriculture during climate change, and that these shifted probabilities can be used to estimate the impact on agriculture in a region. The more permanent nature of changes in the temperature and precipitation regime associated with climate change means that risk management options also take a more permanent form (such as changes in crops and cultivars, and adding storage). A number of storage options have been proposed to deal with El Nino-associated drought, and would be more valuable under climate change. The most ambitious of the proposed storage projects is Black Rock, which would add about 500,00 acre-feet of water to supplement the Yakima's current 1.1 million acre-feet, at a cost currently estimated at $1.9 billion. For perspective, economic losses in the Yakima Valley reportedly have been about $100 million in a drought year such as 2001. Under current circumstances, the expected annual fisheries and periodic drought relief benefits may be large enough to justify the expenditure, but since drought has been occasional, environmental consequences of new projects uncertain, and the price tag beyond the reach of all but the Federal government, no projects have been built. The benefits become more certain with warming. Analysis shows that adding 500,000 acre-feet to TWSA would offset El Nino and the effects of 2 C warming.

Scott, Michael J.; Vail, Lance W.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Kemanian, Armen

2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

12

EA-0941: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Assessment EA-0941: Final Environmental Assessment Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the...

13

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

=palustrine forested wetlands PEM=palustrine emergent wetlands PUB=palustrine unconsolidated wetlands #12;The Virginia

15

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-17 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program A Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to the Functional Assessment of Forested Wetlands in Alluvial Valleys of East Texas Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC

US Army Corps of Engineers

16

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook salmon in the Yakima River basin. The objectives were to: (1) determine the abundance, distribution and survival of naturally produced fry and smolts in the Yakima River; (2) evaluate different methods of fry and smolt supplementation into the natural rearing environment while maintaining as much as possible the gentic integrity of naturally produced stocks; (3) locate and define areas in the watershed which may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; (4) define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and (5) determine physical and biological limitations for production within the system.

Fast, David E.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Presence of Avian Influenza Viruses in Waterfowl and Wetlands during Summer 2010 in California: Are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of migratory birds. We collected water and fecal samples at ten wetlands in two regions (Yolo Bypass in fecal samples was higher from wetlands in the Sacramento Valley (11.9%) than in the Yolo Bypass (0

Mladenoff, David

18

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1987 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The smelt outmigration was monitored at wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be 16,141 smolts. The 1987 spring outmigration of wild spring chinook from the Yakima Basin was estimated to be 251,975 smolts at Prosser. The survival from egg to smelt was calculated using the 1985 redd counts and the 1987 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The estimated survival was 4.16%, which gives a mean egg to smolt survival over four years of 6.32%. In 1987 a total of 3,683 adult and 335 jack spring chinook salmon returning to the Yakima River were counted at Prosser fish ladder. This gives a total of 4,018 salmon returning to Prosser Dam. The median dates of passage were May 12 and May 16 for adults and jacks respectively. An additional 372 fish were estimated to have been caught in the Yakima River subsistence dipnet fishery below Horn Rapids and Prosser Dams. Therefore, total return to the Yakima system was 4,390 spring chinook salmon. Spring chinook were counted at Roza Dam from May 1 to September 30, 1987. Passage at Roza Dam was 1,610 adult and 67 jack spring chinook for a total of 1,677 wild fish. The median dates of passage at Roza Dam were May 29 and May 26 for spring chinook adults and jacks respectively. The smolt to adult (S{sub sa}) survival was calculated based on the 1983 smelt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish) the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. It was estimated that 6,012 wild three, four, and five year old fish returned from an estimated smolt outmigration of 135,548 fish in 1983. This gives an estimated survival from smolt to adult of 4.4%. The smolt to adult survival for the 1984 smolt outmigration was 5.3% with 423 jacks returning in 1985, 5,163 four year old adults returning in 1986, and 983 five year old fish returning in 1987 fran an estimated 123,732 smolts in 1984. Spring chinook adults from fourteen different hatchery release groups were recovered in 1987. A total of 211 coded wire tags were recovered and these were expanded to an estimated 253 returning hatchery fish in 1987. Nine of these fish were jacks.

Fast, David E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory MARCH 1984 Wetlands of the United States: Current Status and Recent, Childers, Tiner, USFWS #12;WETLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES : CURRENT STATUS AND RECENT TRENDS by Ralph W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 What Is A Wetland

20

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops data to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. The first objective is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. Naturally produced populations will be studied to determine if these runs can be sustained in the face of present harvest and environmental conditions. This information will be gathered through spawning ground surveys, counting of adults at Prosser and Roza fish ladders, and through monitoring the tribal dipnet fishery. Concurrent studies will examine potential habitat limitations within the basin. Presently, survival to emergence studies, in conjunction with substrate quality analysis is being undertaken. Water temperature is monitored throughout the basin, and seining takes place monthly to evaluate distribution and abundance. The outcome of this phase of the investigation is to determine an effective manner for introducing hatchery stocks that minimize the impacts on the wild population. The second objective of this study is to determine relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation.

Wasserman, Larry

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Yakima County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodsonCounty is a county inXining WestbandYPPI NewYakima

22

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2000 Vol. 15, No. 1 Virginia Debates Nontidal Wetlands Regulation Carl Hershner Wetland regulation is once again- trolling impacts on existing wetlands, as well as creating new wetlands. There is general agreement

23

Structural geometry, strain distribution, and mechanical evolution of eastern Umtanum Ridge and a comparison with other selected localities within Yakima fold structures, south-central Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima fold system of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon is a series of megascopic anticlinal ridge of multilayered basalt. Cross-sectional strain analyses were performed at five localities within three anticlines. The analyses show that the strain is consistent both laterally along a fold and within different folds. Folding strain is localized layer-internal faulting, extensive shattering, and limited layer-parallel faulting. Most strain is cataclastic, but glassy flow tops appear to have been more ductile. The strain distributions and structural geometries accord well with a flexural flow buckle model; however, the internal cataclastic flow is not inherently penetrative and limited flexural slip has occurred. This fold model suggests that most strain in the fold is by simple shear and it took place above the topographic surface of adjacent synclinal valleys. Large reverse faults associated with the anticlines are interpreted to be folding strain required by the concentric folding and their displacement is interpreted to have reached the surface late in the folding process. Therefore, the observed strain and its distribution are interpreted to be not directly the result of regional plateau shortening, but of local stresses and resultant strains related to fold geometry. A mechanical analysis of the Umtanum structure termination geometry, combined with slickenside striae movement directions from the study areas suggests that the Palouse slope has behaved as a rigid buttress around which the basalt has rotated clockwise into the folds from the southeast. Compression-box clay modeling of the Yakima fold system within the Pasco Basin shows that the buttress edge orientations control the localization and orientations of buckle folds. Fold orientations and three-dimensional shapes remarkably resembling the Yakima fold system in the Pasco Basin were produced under north-south compression.

Price, E.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

Pearsons, Todd N.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1997 Vol. 12, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Wetlands mitigation banking is a relatively new tool for wetlands managers. It is finding increasing application in the struggle to achieve a "no net loss" goal for our remaining wetland resources. The concept of creating

28

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2005 Vol. 20, No. 2 VMRC Adopts Wetland Mitigation/ Compensation Policy Changes By Tom Barnard When the Virginia Wetlands Act went into effect on July 1, thirty- three years ago, no one had ever heard of compensatory mitigation, wetland

29

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2005 Vol. 20, No. 1 Annual Summary of Permitted Tidal Wetland Impacts - 2004 By Karen Duhring The Wetlands Program has main impact areas based on a site visit and information provided in the permit documents. The Wetlands Program

30

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland or wetland buffer zone which is not an allowed use. Activity in Class I or Class II wetland or its associated buffer zone...

32

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 2000 Vol. 15, No. 2 Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Implementing Nontidal Wetlands Protection Mandate Ellen Gilinsky wetland resources, but which occur outside of federal regulation. The General Assembly was motivated

35

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 1997 Vol. 12, No. 3The Virginia Wetlands Report Almost everyone their actions. It is this com- mon sense notion which is motivating a new Wetlands Initiative under the auspices of the Chesapeake Bay Program Wetlands Workgroup. State and federal wet- lands program man- agers are working

36

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2001 Vol. 16, No. 3 A GIS Approach for Targeting Potential Wetlands Mitigation or Restoration Sites By Marcia Berman and Tamia vegeta- tion, islands, and wetlands. Most activi- ties enhance habitat for living resources, but also

37

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2002 Vol. 17, No. 1 Update On Virginia's New and Improved Nontidal Wetlands Program By Ellen Gilinsky, Ph.D. PWS Virginia wetlands program. Key changes included the provi- sion of additional jurisdic- tion over: excavation in all

38

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virginia Wetlands Report Continued on page 2 Spring 1996 Vol. 11, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Completely Updated The Wetlands Program of the Vir- ginia Institute of Marine Science has completed its update of the Vir- ginia Wetlands Management Hand- book, and with the aid of the Marine

39

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2001 Vol. 16, No. 1 The VIMS Teaching Marsh: A Tidal Wetland Restoration and Education Project Karen Duhring Purpose wetlands education opportunities, including field lessons. Due to the vari- ety and geographic distribution

40

FILENAME.PPT CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS:CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treatment media #12;FILENAME.PPT Marsh Pond Meadow Rip-RapRip-Rap Wetland Plants Wetland Plants EffluentFILENAME.PPT CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS:CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS: An Overview of the TechnologyAn Overview Is A Constructed Wetland? What Is A Constructed Wetland? Saturated Substrates Definition: A designed and man

Detwiler, Russell

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wetlands and Fish: A Vital Connection 2 What is a Wetland? 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Wetlands and Fish: A Vital Connection 2 What is a Wetland? 3 Are Wetlands Important? 4 Wetlands and their Surroundings 5 Wetlands in the U.S. Caribbean Region 6 Distribution 6 Common Wetland Types 7 Saltwater wetlands 7 Freshwater wetlands 7 Wetland Loss and Consequences 9 Fish Need Wetlands 10 Wetlands as Habitat 10

42

Vegetation survey of knapweed on the Yakima Training Center - 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and discusses the results of a vegetation survey conducted in 1992 on a portion of the Yakima Training Center (YTC). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this survey and a similar survey in 1991 for the U.S. Department of the Army. The objectives of the survey were to evaluate the impact of the herbicide picloram on forbs where aerial applications of picloram were made in 1988, 1989, and 1991 to control knapweed infestations. Forbs are of special interest because they are an important part of the spring and summer diet of the western sage grouse, which is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list. We also conducted a limited evaluation of the effectiveness of the spray program in controlling the spread of knapweed. Percent plant canopy cover and number of forbs were measured on 120 transacts on the herbicide-treated and untreated control areas. Herbicide treatment in 1991 resulted in a significant reduction in knapweed based on percent cover and density. The treatment areas also all had lower percent canopy cover of perennial forbs and fewer perennial forbs compared to control areas. Canopy cover of shrubs and annual, biennial, and perennial forbs measured on the YTC increased between the 1991 and 1992 survey, which may indicate a recovery of these vegetation types after disturbance. These increases also could reflect the mild 1992 winter and superior growing conditions in the spring of 1992. We recommend that these vegetation transacts continue to be monitored for an additional growing season to evaluate (1) whether knapweed increases to its previous abundance in the 1991 herbicide-treated area, (2) the efficacy of herbicide application on transacts along roadways, and (3) the increase in invasive annuals in herbicide-treated areas and the possible effects on community vegetation structure and sage grouse habitat.

Downs, J.L.; Cadoret, N.A.; Rickard, W.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

Buehrer, R. Michael

44

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

46

EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line in Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington.

47

Fabricate and Install Yakima Basin Phase II Fish Screens; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to restore ESA listed and resident fish stocks within the Yakima Basin by preventing mortality and/or injury to all life stages of anadromous and resident fish at irrigation diversions. This goal is being accomplished through an on-going effort by the Yakima Basin Phase II Technical Work Group (TWG), which is comprised of local, state, federal, tribal and private groups who prioritize and assign screening projects.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Staff, (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Santa Rosa Wetlands .. .................................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Santa Rosa Wetlands .. .................................1 · Botrychium................6 · What cognitiorem tradit. -- Linnaeus January 5, 2004Number 29 VASCULAR PLANTS OF SOME SANTA ROSA WETLANDS, EAST wetland habitat in New Mexico is less well known. Relatively large expanses of municipal and private

Johnson, Eric E.

49

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet What is a Wetland? The US Army Corps of Engineers(Corps) and the US Environmental Protection Agency define wetlands as follows: Those areas that are inundated conditions. Wetlands generally include swamps, marshes, bogs, and similar areas. Wetlands are areas

US Army Corps of Engineers

51

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

Myra, D.; Ready, C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Institute (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pipeline corridors through wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Isaacson, H.R. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

57

Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

58

Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

Rosensteel

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD June 3-8, 2012 Orlando .................................................................................... 27 Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Section-Organized Symposia and Section-Sponsored Sessions.................................................................................................................. 222 #12;9 th INTECOL: International Wetlands Conference 2 WELCOME TO THE JOINT CONFERENCE OF: 9TH

Slatton, Clint

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into three chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fifth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River basin. Chapter 2 describes our tributary sampling methodology for monitoring the status of tributary NTT. Chapter 3 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River. The chapters in this report are in various stages of d

Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands in the commonwealth. The newly enacted Virginia Wet- landsAct of 1972 went into effect July estuarine tributary of the park. The construction of the marina would have required dredging a defined

63

WaterbirdsWaterbirds on different wetland typeson different wetland types MethodsMethods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland type? We observedWe observed waterbirdswaterbirds on 5 wetland types:on 5 wetland types: treatmentAdditional treatment ponds may attract larger numbers of wetland birds,larger numbers of wetland birds, particularlyWaterbirdsWaterbirds on different wetland typeson different wetland types MethodsMethods Result

Johnson, Matthew

64

The Amenity Value of Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

family homes using actual sales prices of properties from 1991 to 2005 in Chatham County, Georgia, where wetland resources are unevenly distributed in terms of types and quantities of wetlands. Separate hedonic models are investigated to understand...

Gao, Shan

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their...

66

Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in the State, and state that it is in the public interest to restore and preserve these wetlands and their biological...

67

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White Ranch Wetlands Biological Survey and Permanent Vegetation Monitoring Plots Prepared for: U Services Building Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO 80523 March 1998 #12;WHITE RANCH WETLANDS assessment of the White Ranch wetlands. In addition we set up permanent plots along transects to collect

68

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Klickitat Monitoring and Evaluation, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for salmonid fish populations and habitat in the Klickitat River subbasin in south-central Washington. The M&E activities described here were conducted as a part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)-funded Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) and were designed by consensus of the scientists with the Yakama Nation (YN) Fisheries Program. YKFP is a joint project between YN and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Overall YKFP goals are to increase natural production of and opportunity to harvest salmon and steelhead in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins using hatchery supplementation, harvest augmentation and habitat improvements. Klickitat subbasin M&E activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of the YKFP Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. YKFP biologists have also been involved with the Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP - a project aimed at improving the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key M&E questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia Basin) and are working towards keeping Klickitat M&E activities consistent with CSMEP recommendations. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - to gather baseline information in order to characterize habitat and salmonid populations pre- and post-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) Ecological Interactions - to determine presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information. (3) Genetics - to develop YKFP supplementation broodstock collection protocols for the preservation of genetic variability, by refining methods of detecting within-stock genetic variability and between-stock genetic variability.

Zendt, Joe; Babcock, Mike [Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 97106 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

97 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 97­106 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists SPATIAL

Manley, Steven L.

70

Wetlands Status and Trends for Coastal Wetlands P. Chow-Fraser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Status and Trends ­ for Coastal Wetlands P. Chow-Fraser Background Coastal wetlands as wetlands that occur within 2 km of the 1:100 year floodline of the Great Lake/channel shoreline, and include all four wetland types identified in the Ontario Wetland Evaluation System. An estimate of current

McMaster University

71

The Virginia Wetlands Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Board is Excellent Learning Tool for Virginia Beach Students by Karla L. Schillinger The apple-headed gavel struck the desk top precisely at 10:00 a.m. with a bang. The Waterton Wetlands Board public "help the environment and the economy of Waterton," Dozer was proposing to subdivide the 55 acre farm

72

Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

Hall, Sharon J.

74

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogeology along the southern boundary of the Hanford Site between the Yakima and Columbia Rivers, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) operations at the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington, have generated large volumes of hazardous and radioactive wastes since 1944. Some of the hazardous wastes were discharged to the ground in the 1100 and 3000 Areas, near the city of Richland. The specific waste types and quantities are unknown; however, they probably include battery acid, antifreeze, hydraulic fluids, waste oils, solvents, degreasers, paints, and paint thinners. Between the Yakima and Columbia rivers in support of future hazardous waste site investigations and ground-water and land-use management. The specific objectives were to collect and review existing hydrogeologic data for the study area and establish a water-level monitoring network; describe the regional and study area hydrogeology; develop a hydrogeologic conceptual model of the unconfined ground-water flow system beneath the study area, based on available data; describe the flow characteristics of the unconfined aquifer based on the spatial and temporal distribution of hydraulic head within the aquifer; use the results of this study to delineate additional data needs in support of future Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS), Fate and Transport modeling, Baseline Risk Assessments (BRA), and ground-water and land-use management.

Liikala, T.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 10031014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1003 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 4, December 2003, pp. 1003­1014 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists WETLAND AND UPLAND USE PATTERNS IN SEMI-AQUATIC SNAKES: IMPLICATIONS FOR WETLAND CONSERVATION John H. Roe1) in northwestern Ohio and southern Michigan, USA, to investigate differences in the use of wetland and upland

Canberra, University of

78

WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 1, March 2001, pp. 6674 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

66 WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 1, March 2001, pp. 66­74 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists LINKING ACTIONS TO OUTCOMES IN WETLAND MANAGEMENT: AN OVERVIEW OF U.S. STATE WETLAND MANAGEMENT Megan K. La Peyre1,3 , Margaret A. Reams2 , and Irving A. Mendelssohn1 1 Wetland Biogeochemistry Institute Louisiana State

La Peyre, Megan

79

COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land wetlands continues, it has the potential to alter the distribution of wetland birds, a group that has

Gawlik, Dale E.

80

Wetlands Ecology and ISSN 0923-4861  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 23 Wetlands Ecology and Management ISSN 0923-4861 Volume 19 Number 3 Wetlands Ecol Manage (2011 / Published online: 5 March 2011 ? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Coastal wetlands sensing imagery to map wetland habitat. In this study, we use IKONOS satellite imagery to classify coastal

McMaster University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

82

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WHICH HYDRAULIC MODEL TO USE IN VERTICAL FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS? Ania Morvannoua , Nicolas-equilibrium model, preferential flow path, vertical flow constructed wetlands INTRODUCTION Constructed wetlands (CWs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bethel Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

study to find soluble contamination sources that contribute to the contamination of surface and ground waters. Once the remediation activities required by the Bethel Valley...

85

Melton Valley Watershed  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

watershed. Wastes disposed in Melton Valley reside at a variety of locations, including solid waste landfills, trenches, liquid waste tanks and pipelines, surface structures,...

86

PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

Maxwell, Bruce D.

87

Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

Eke, Paul Emeka

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

89

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development and use of the Wetland Fish Index to assess the quality of coastal wetlands 40 wetlands of the Laurentian Great Lakes to develop the Wetland Fish Index (WFI), a tool that can of water quality degradation and wetlands condition, as indicated by an independent index of wetland

McMaster University

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated constructed wetlands Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wetland TRODUINCTION Wetland ecosystems, including constructed wetlands for wastewater... in constructed ... Source: Brix, Hans - Biologisk Institut, Aarhus Universitet...

91

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification for Wetlands of the number designating technical reports of research published under the Wetlands Research Program identify;.-- Wetlands Research Program Technical Report WRP-DE-4 August 1993 A Hydrogeomorphic Classification

Gray, Matthew

92

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 230243 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

230 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2006, pp. 230­243 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists HYDROLOGIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN AN ALLUVIAL FAN AND A SLOPE WETLAND IN THE CENTRAL ROCKY MOUNTAINS, USA Scott Abstract: Slope wetlands generally occur at breaks in slope where discharging ground water maintains moist

MacDonald, Lee

93

WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003, pp. 112 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WETLANDS, Vol. 23, No. 1, March 2003, pp. 1­12 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists PLANT DIVERSITY, COMPOSITION, AND INVASION OF RESTORED AND NATURAL PRAIRIE POTHOLE WETLANDS: IMPLICATIONS of Botany 353 Bessey Hall Iowa State University Ames, Iowa, USA 50011-1020 Abstract: Hundreds of wetlands

94

WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 7791 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

77 WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 77­91 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists AQUATIC MACROINVERTEBRATE DIVERSITY OF PLAYA WETLANDS: THE ROLE OF LANDSCAPE AND ISLAND BIOGEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS Dianne District Palatka, Florida, USA 32178 Abstract: Wetland habitats continue to be lost at a unsettling rate

Willig, Michael

95

WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 562572 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

562 WETLANDS, Vol. 24, No. 3, September 2004, pp. 562­572 2004, The Society of Wetland Scientists INVERTEBRATE EGG BANKS OF RESTORED, NATURAL, AND DRAINED WETLANDS IN THE PRAIRIE POTHOLE REGION OF THE UNITED relic egg banks in the sediments and dispersal of eggs into wetlands is believed to be important

96

WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 465474 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

465 WETLANDS, Vol. 26, No. 2, June 2006, pp. 465­474 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists MAPPING WETLANDS AND RIPARIAN AREAS USING LANDSAT ETM IMAGERY AND DECISION-TREE-BASED MODELS Corey Baker of wetlands and riparian zones influence the ecological functions present on a landscape. Accurate and easily

Lawrence, Rick L.

97

Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are...

99

Green Valley Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The "green valley" is a wide region separating the blue and the red peaks in the ultraviolet-optical color magnitude diagram, first revealed using GALEX UV photometry. The term was coined by Christopher Martin in 2005. Green valley highlights the discriminating power of UV to very low relative levels of ongoing star formation, to which the optical colors, including u-r, are insensitive. It corresponds to massive galaxies below the star-forming "main" sequence, and therefore represents a critical tool for the study of the quenching of star formation and its possible resurgence in otherwise quiescent galaxies. This article reviews the results pertaining to morphology, structure, environment, dust content and gas properties of green valley galaxies in the local universe. Their relationship to AGN is also discussed. Attention is given to biases emerging from defining the "green valley" using optical colors. We review various evolutionary scenarios and we present evidence for a new, quasi-static view of the green ...

Salim, Samir

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this study the treatment wetland has continued wetland impoundment, and a treatment (

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two-compartment septic tank Soil absorption field Constructed wetland Onsite wastewater treatment systems Constructed wetlands Natural wetlands generally have visible water in the system. However, for those at homes, the water flows beneath... the media surface, which limits contact between residents and wastewater. The constructed wetland waste- water treatment system has three main components that work together to purify wastewater: ? A septic tank, which is an en- closed watertight...

Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nebraska's Wetlands By Ted LaGrange,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

completely dry. Many wetlands receive their water from groundwater aquifers while others are totally moves through the wetland, a series of chemical transformations take place that tie-up or alter marshes, playa wetlands in the south-west, and many more types. However, through much of the state

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

103

WETLAND DELINEATION REPORT UMORE MINING AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project 08-0092 September 29, 2009 #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire Township Wetland Delineation TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0. INTRODUCTION Determination Form #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS Empire

Netoff, Theoden

104

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2006 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-3897) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

105

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2008 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

106

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2005 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mattjgray-2635) Required Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via

Gray, Matthew

107

Route to: WOC Wetlands Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route to: WOC PPS PS Wetlands Oversight Committee Phone: 425-352-3557 / Fax: 425-352-5431 Wetlands Restoration Area (WRA) ACCESS REQUEST FORM All tours are required to complete this form and have Phone No. E-mail Purpose of Tour ­ (Access to these wetlands is limited for research and educational

Queitsch, Christine

108

An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Prepared Interior Wetlands Program Evaluation Page i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program (IWP): Accomplishments and Impacts to Date This document presents the results

109

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2007 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 047129232X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James C. Gosselink Course Goal: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class

Gray, Matthew

110

An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program Accomplishments and Impacts to Date Executive;Dovetail Consulting Interior Wetlands Program Evaluation Page i EXECUTIVE SUMMARY EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An Evaluation of the Interior Wetlands Program (IWP): Accomplishments and Impacts to Date This document presents

111

Reference: RGL 82-02 Subject: WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reference: RGL 82-02 Subject: WETLANDS Title: CLARIFICATION OF "NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES" IN THE WETLAND DEFINITION Issued: 02/11/82 Expires: 12/31/84 Originator: DAEN-CWO-N Description: DEFINES NORMAL CIRCUMSTANCES, CONVERTED WETLANDS, AND ABNORMAL PRESENCE OF AQUATIC VEGETATION 1. This letter will serve

US Army Corps of Engineers

112

GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 23 GLOBAL CHANGE AND TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS: SCENARIOS AND IMPACTS Scott C. Neubauer Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt, Dennis Whigham & Andrew Baldwin 2009, viii + 320pp Publishers GmbH This chapter was originally published in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy

Neubauer, Scott C.

113

Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Spring 2009 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk-3897) Drew Wirwa (dwirwa@utk.edu, 201 Ellington PSB, 974-3897) Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs, and field

Gray, Matthew

114

Route to: WOC Wetlands Oversight Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Route to: WOC PPS PS Wetlands Oversight Committee Phone: 425-352-5557 / Fax: 425-352-5431 Wetlands Restoration Area SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH PERMIT REQUEST FORM Name of Principal Investigator Position is it important that this study be done at the UWB-CCC wetland site? . What parts of the site will you need access

Queitsch, Christine

115

A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

D. J. Hansen

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant - polishing · Encouraged by SEPA in its guidance · Normally small scale ­ several houses · Benefits of natural wetlands · Enhance self-purification capacity of watercourses · Reduce flood risk · But some large scale examples · Valleyfield Reedbed, Fife · 8000pe, 4.5 hectares · CAR licence conditions

Heal, Kate

118

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Coastal Resources "The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2010 Center for Coastal Resources Management #12;"The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to the Commonwealth's tidal wetlands and subaqueous lands management programs through review of individual tidal wetland permit applications, training for local and state managers

120

Coastal Resources "The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Report 2007 Center for Coastal Resources Management #12;"The Wetlands Program provides extensive support to the Commonwealth's tidal wetlands and subaqueous lands management programs through review of individual tidal wetland permit applications, training for local and state managers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access...

124

Compliance With Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requiremen...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

list of sources that may be used in determining the location of floodplains and wetlands, and allowing floodplain and wetland assessments for actions proposed to be taken...

125

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN NATURAL AND CREATED WETLANDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Wetland ecosystems are significant carbon sinks. Their high productivity and presence of water gives them the ability to efficiently sequester carbon in the soil, (more)

Bernal, Blanca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

127

A Summary of Coupled, Uncoupled, and Hybrid Tectonic Models for the Yakima Fold Belt--Topical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize the range of opinions and supporting information expressed by the expert community regarding whether a coupled or uncoupled model, or a combination of both, best represents structures in the Yakima Fold Belt. This issue was assessed to have a high level of contention with up to moderate potential for impact on the hazard estimate. This report defines the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

Chamness, Michele A.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Beaver Valley  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Beaver Valley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

130

Case Study - Sioux Valley Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

periods. This detailed billing cannot be done with conventional meters. Critical Peak Pricing Lowers Peak Demands and Electric Bills in South Dakota and Minnesota Sioux Valley...

131

Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

Heal, Kate

132

What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Filling of Wetlands Permits Issued by Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Impact Statement and organisms live Substrate is non-soil (H2O depth prevents emergent hydrophyte growth) >2 m (6.6 ft) in Depth (Non-tidal Wetlands) #12;3 What are Hydrophytes? USACE Definition "...macrophytic plant life

Gray, Matthew

133

Songs From Happy Valley and Other Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RIVERSIDE Songs From Happy Valley and Other Stories A Thesisv TABLE OF CONTENTS Songs From Happy Valley The X-Ray SpecsMatch Game vi Songs From Happy Valley Thursday, October 13,

Nagel, Lisa W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agriculturalhas been available to help guide that selection. We

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands Bradford P # Society of Wetland Scientists 2011 Abstract Depressional wetlands are distributed through- out the United and a regulatory perspective, to understand the surface water pathways that connect such wetlands to each other

136

PROTECTING AMERICA'S WETLANDS: A FAIR, FLEXIBLE, AND EFFECTIVE APPROACH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROTECTING AMERICA'S WETLANDS: A FAIR, FLEXIBLE, AND EFFECTIVE APPROACH WHITE HOUSE OFFICE. The Interagency Working Group on Federal Wetlands Policy IV. Five Principles for Federal Wetlands Policy V wetlands program that reflects a new broad-based consensus among Federal agencies. For years, many have

US Army Corps of Engineers

137

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management What is a Jurisdictional Wetland? 1) Know the 3 USACE criteria that are necessary for an area to be classified as a jurisdictional wetland. 2 to meet USACE jurisdictional wetland criteria, and how to calculate percent dominance using the 50

Gray, Matthew

138

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory: A Strategy for the 21st Century #12;Estuarine emergent wetlands account for only five percent of the wetland area in the lower 48 States. Those like this estuarine wetland in South Carolina provide essential rearing habitat for important

Gray, Matthew

139

Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment Will Mayes1 & Jon · Circum-neutral pH, high Fe concentrations Treatment wetlands and post-industrial pollution Taff Merthyr The basis for treatment wetlands · `Volunteer' wetlands · pH 12 lime spoil leachate · pH 12 steel slag

Heal, Kate

140

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 constructed wetland Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: . Wetland ecology Hammer, D.A. ed. 1989. Constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment: municipal... OF WETLAND SYSTEMS Autumn 2008 Instructor: Tom Whillans ESC B202.1...

142

Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

Cubbison, Erin O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of first-order treatment wetland models. EcologicalR. L. Knight. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Lewis Publishers CRCS. D. Wallace. 2008. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press Taylor &

Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Vegetation of Upper Coastal Plain depression wetlands: Environmental templates and wetland dynamics within a landscape framework.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reference wetlands play an important role in efforts to protect wetlands and assess wetland condition. Because wetland vegetation integrates the influence of many ecological factors, a useful reference system would identify natural vegetation types and include models relating vegetation to important regional geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical properties. Across the U.S. Atlantic Coastal Plain, depression wetlands are a major hydrogeomorphic class with diverse characteristics. For 57 functional depression wetlands in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, we characterized the principal vegetation types and used a landscape framework to assess how local (wetland-level) factors and regional landscape settings potentially influence vegetation composition and dynamics. Wetland sites were stratified across three Upper Coastal Plain landscape settings that differ in soils, surface geology, topography, and land use. We sampled plant composition, measured relevant local variables, and analyzed historical transitions in vegetative cover types. Cluster analysis identified six vegetation types, ranging from open-water ponds and emergent marshes to closed forests. Significant vegetation-environment relationships suggested environmental ''templates'' for plant community development. Of all local factors examined, wetland hydrologic regime was most strongly correlated with vegetation type, but depression size, soil textural type, and disturbance history were also significant. Because hydrogeologic settings influence wetland features, local factors important to vegetation were partly predictable from landscape setting, and thus wetland types were distributed non-randomly across landscape settings. Analysis of long-term vegetation change indicated relative stability in some wetlands and succession in others. We developed a landscape-contingent model for vegetation dynamics, with hydroperiod and fire as major driving variables. The wetland classification, environmental templates, and dynamics model provide a reference framework to guide conservation priorities and suggest possible outcomes of restoration or management.

De Steven, Diane; Toner, Maureen, M.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides 640 Turkeys to People in Need Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food Drive Provides...

146

Enforcement Documents - West Valley Demonstration Project | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services - EA-1999-09 Issued to West Valley Nuclear Services, related to a High-Level Radioactive Waste Contamination Event at the West Valley Demonstration...

147

Valley Forge Corporate Center  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote55 Jefferson Ave. Valley Forge

148

Valley Forge Corporate Center  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote55 Jefferson Ave. Valley Forge April

149

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s {+-} 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s {+-} 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest degree of microhabitat overlap with spring chinook salmon. Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon residuals (age 1+ during the summer) was low (< 0.007/m), representing less than 2% of the naturally produced spring chinook salmon (age 0+ and age 1+ during the summer). Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon that complete their life cycle in freshwater was high relative to anadromous adults. The authors observed an average of 9.5 precocially mature spring chinook salmon on redds with anadromous adults. In addition, 87% of the redds with anadromous adults present also had precocial males attending. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF MICROTOPOGRAPHY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VEGETATION PATTERNS IN CREATED WETLANDS, Virginia, USA 20192 Abstract: Created wetlands are increasingly used to mitigate wetland loss. Thus, identifying wetland creation methods that enhance ecosystem development might increase the likelihood

152

Department of Environmental Conservation, University of Massachusetts-Amherst Concentration in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Water, Wetlands and Watersheds 1 Environmental Conservation Graduate Program Water, Wetlands want scientific training in the multi-disciplinary field of water, wetlands and watershed conservation such as wetlands, hydrology, nonpoint source pollution, modeling, ecosystems, water resource management, watershed

Schweik, Charles M.

153

Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

Elgin, Barbara K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

California Valley Solar Ranch Biological Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Biological Assessment for the California Valley Solar Ranch Project San Luis Obispo County, California

155

Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

None

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

Ma, Lena

157

Valley Electric Association- Net Metering  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Board of Directors for Valley Electric Association (VEA) approved net metering in April 2008. The rules apply to systems up to 30 kW, though owners of larger systems may be able to negotiate...

158

Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec The Canadian Wetland Classification System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By the National Wetlands Working Group / Edited by B.G. Warner and C.D.A. Rubec The Canadian Wetland Classification System Second Edition #12; 1997 by the Wetlands Research Centre, University Wetlands Conservation Council (Canada) · Wetlands Research Centre, University of Waterloo Copies

Laval, Université

160

Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the last century wetlands have considerably decreased. The principal cause is urbanization, especially in large urban regions such as the Houston area. In order to protect the remaining wetlands, they have to be monitored carefully. However...

Villeneuve, Julie

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Special points of inter-National Wetlands In-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Special points of inter- est National Wetlands In- daba 2011 18 to 21 October 2011 Didima Resort & Confer- ence Centre Central Drakensberg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa www.wetlands.za.net/indaba Welcome

Wagner, Stephan

163

Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

Dong, Yu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

165

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

Mühlemann, Oliver

167

Characterizing Microclimate and Plant Community Variation in Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate . Wetlands . Soil . Temperature . Modeling . Boreal Introduction Groundwater-fed calcareous of Wetland Scientists 2013 Abstract Groundwater-fed calcareous wetlands (fens) sup- port diverse plant developed accurate daily resolution soil temperature models (min and max) from a 29-sensor network

Fridley, Jason D.

168

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-08-28 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Arid West Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2008 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

169

DEVELOPING BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR ISOLATED FORESTED WETLANDS IN FLORIDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING BIOLOGICAL INDICATORS FOR ISOLATED FORESTED WETLANDS IN FLORIDA By KELLY CHINNERS REISS at the H.T. Odum Center for Wetlands for stimulating discussion and valuable input along the way of gratitude to the land owners and managers who allowed access to the 118 wetlands throughout Florida

Slatton, Clint

170

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado 80523 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Mesa County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife, Wetlands Program 6060 Broadway Denver, Colorado 80203

171

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

172

TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 14 TIDAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES James E Publishers, Weikersheim, 2009 Tidal Freshwater Wetlands, edited by Aat Barendregt in the book ,,Tidal Freshwater Wetlands". The copy attached is provided by Margraf Publishers Gmb

Newman, Michael C.

173

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUES By KRISTINA KOSTUK, B OF SCIENCE (2006) McMaster University (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario TITLE: Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands coastal wetlands. The first chapter examines the influence of gear type and sampling protocol on fish

McMaster University

174

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS: A NATIONWIDESURVEY OF STATE; 8QFODVVLILHG 1RRISDJHV 3ULFH )RUP'27)#12; 5HSURGXFWLRQRIFRPSOHWHGSDJHDXWKRUL]HG #12;WETLANDS Title: Development of a Mechanism to Compare On-Site vs. Off-Site Wetlands Mitigation Conducted

Texas at Austin, University of

175

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-5 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Hawai`i and Pacific Islands Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-5 February 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

176

The Tennessee Wetlands Conservation Strategy, first published in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 #12;PREFACE The Tennessee Wetlands Conservation Strategy, first published in February 1994, and actions to better understand and conserve Tennessee's wetlands resources. This is the third edition goals for the upcoming years. The development of a Wetlands Strategy in Tennessee began in the fall

Gray, Matthew

177

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-11-11 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Guidebook for Applying the Hydrogeomorphic Approach to Assessing the Functions of Headwater Slope Wetlands on the South Carolina Coastal Ainslie September 2011 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

178

Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Case Studies: Balancing Risks Associated with Shoreline Protection Publication Focused on Virginia Wetland Issues and Training Fall 2007 Erosion happens and the sea level of the property owner with the public interest in the Bay and its living resources. The Tidal Wetlands Act (1972

179

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-1 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Great Plains Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers March 2010 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

180

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-12-9 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Eastern Mountains and Piedmont Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U;#12;Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC/EL TR-12-9 April 2012 Regional Supplement to the Corps

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-10-16 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Midwest Region (Version 2.0) EnvironmentalLaboratory U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands Regulatory

US Army Corps of Engineers

182

TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants treatment systems aesthetically pleasing. Wetland species of all growth forms have been used in treatment

Brix, Hans

183

Nine objectives are being implemented to achieve the wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 3 OBJECTIVES Nine objectives are being implemented to achieve the wetlands goal. The action the Interagency Wetlands Committee recognized the validity of these objectives and the need for their continued the state's wetlands resource base more completely and identify the critical functions of the major types

Gray, Matthew

184

Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

185

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ERDC/ELTR-07-24 Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program Regional Supplement to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual: Alaska Region (Version 2.0) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers September 2007 EnvironmentalLaboratory Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. #12;Wetlands

US Army Corps of Engineers

186

Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

187

H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................... 14 #12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Construction of the H-02 constructed treatment wetlands adjacent to HH-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5

Georgia, University of

188

River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

Johnson, Matthew

189

A synthesis of ethnohistorical materials concerning the administration of Federal Indian policy among the Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce Indian people: Working draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purposes of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe have been accorded the status of ''Affected Indian Tribe'' and have become party to the proceedings to determine a suitable location for the nation's first commercial waste repository. Each of the Tribes has expressed concerns about the suitability of the Hanford Site in eastern Washington. These concerns, in general, address the proposed repository's effects on traditional spiritual beliefs and cultural practices, on tribal sovereignty and the Tribes' right to self-government, on the natural resources under tribal management jurisdiction, and on the health and socioeconomic characteristics of the Tribes' reservation communities. The Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce have distinctive cultural traditions that may be adversely affected by activities related to the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). Further, the Tribes enjoy a unique relationship with the federal government. Because of their distinctive cultures and governmental status, particular attention will be paid to expressed interests of the Tribes, and to ways in which these interests may be affected by the repository program. Monitoring is needed to describe current conditions among the Affected Tribes' populations, to describe BWIP site characterization activities affecting the Tribes, and to measure any changes in these conditions that may occur as a direct result of site characterization. This paper reports our first efforts at gathering historical information. It summarizes materials contained in two sources: the reports of field agents to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1854-1936), and the dockets of the Indian Claims Commission. 24 refs., 3 figs.

Liebow, E.B.; Younger, C.A.; Broyles, J.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Valley County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 5.5% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 472.3 455.5 543.2 1 Community Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. Diabetes 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Valley County Secondary Data Analysis July 23, 2012 2

Maxwell, Bruce D.

193

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 (on-line edition) Corps of Engineers Wetlands used as part of the number designating technical reports of research published under the Wetlands;Wetlands Research Program Technical Report Y-87-1 January 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation

US Army Corps of Engineers

194

Wetlands Ecology and Management 12: 543546, 2004. # 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Ecology and Management 12: 543­546, 2004. # 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 543 Neotropical wetlands: building links among wetland scientists J.F. Gottgens1, * and R in revised form 7 November 2003 Key words: Conservation, Millennium wetland conference, Neotropical wetlands

Gottgens, Hans

195

11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Wetlands Across the US But there is hope... Everything Is Connected Need Drives wastewater treatment faciliOes, combined sewer overflows, municipal stormwater, industry Annual cost of eutrophica1on in US freshwaters is es1mated to be $2.2B (Dodds

Gray, Matthew

196

Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Title: Amazon Basin/Eugene Wetlands (199205900) and Willamette Valley Wide Acquisition of Priority Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~$40,000/yr Native vegetation management costs approximately ~$10,000/yr Native Plant Materials getting established Management of species of concern Plant materials availability Working U.S. Bureau of Land Management U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

198

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of operating conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Effect of polishing electroplating wastewater in subsurface vertical flow constructed wetland. Electroplating wastewater treatment or polishing in constructed wetlands (CWs) was studied to a very limited degree. Four

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

200

A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

Wilson, Ashley

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK For additional copies of this document, contact: National Cover Page: Photographs: Kathryn Conant Striped bass graphic: Duane Raver I #12;WETLANDS AND FISH: CATCH THE LINK Table of Contents Fish Need Wetlands

202

40 ELR 11106 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REPORTER 11-2010 Gaining Ground: Wetlands,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

40 ELR 11106 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW REPORTER 11-2010 Gaining Ground: Wetlands, Hurricanes .5% dis- count rate). Marine waters, wetlands, swamps, agricultural lands, and forests provide natural goods and services . The 1 . David Batker et al ., Gaining Ground: Wetlands, Hurricanes

Vermont, University of

203

TECHNICAL REPORTS Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL REPORTS 1904 Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. Soil Biogeochemical Characteristics Influenced by Alum Application in a Municipal WastewaterTreatmentWetland Lynette M

Florida, University of

204

Mechanically and optically controlled graphene valley filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate the valley-dependent electronic transport through a graphene monolayer modulated simultaneously by a uniform uniaxial strain and linearly polarized light. Within the Floquet formalism, we calculate the transmission probabilities and conductances of the two valleys. It is found that valley polarization can appear only if the two modulations coexist. Under a proper stretching of the sample, the ratio of the light intensity and the light frequency squared is important. If this quantity is small, the electron transport is mainly contributed by the valley-symmetric central band and the conductance is valley unpolarized; but when this quantity is large, the valley-asymmetric sidebands also take part in the transport and the valley polarization of the conductance appears. Furthermore, the degree of the polarization can be tuned by the strain strength, light intensity, and light frequency. It is proposed that the detection of the valley polarization can be realized utilizing the valley beam splitting. Thus, a graphene monolayer can be used as a mechanically and optically controlled valley filter.

Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun, E-mail: gjin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland modelling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 42 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetlands pilot Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

several watersheds for functional assessments of wetlands and their position on the landscape... of hydrogeomorphic assessments, habitat availability and wetland functional...

208

Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

Whitcraft, Christine R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

Whitcraft, Christine Ren

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Innovation and Social Capital in Silicon Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Innovation and Social Capital in Silicon Valley * BRIEpath from social capital to innovation has been identified.social capital has for economic development and innovation.

Kenney, Martin; Patton, Donald

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Valley Electric Association- Solar Water Heating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Valley Electric Association (VEA), a nonprofit member owned cooperative, developed the domestic solar water heating program to encourage energy efficiency at the request of the membership. VEA...

215

Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

conducted an independent oversight review of activity-level implementation of the radiation protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The onsite review was...

216

Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

West Valley Demonstration Project - December 2014 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report EA-1552: Final Environmental Assessment...

217

Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Efficient Appliance Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who...

218

Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project HIAR WVDP-2012-07-30 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

219

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San...

220

azapa valley northern: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dry Valley lakes, Antarctica Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: evaluation of silicon biogeochemistry in the Taylor Valley lakes, Southern Victoria Land, was...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

222

Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

223

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Abstract Fluids from springs, fumaroles, and wells throughout Dixie Valley, NV were analyzed for noble...

224

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

225

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Conservation, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal...

226

Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

227

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

228

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

229

Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

230

Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

231

Deformation of the Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (2) Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia, Et Al., 2003) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

232

AMF Deployment, Ganges Valley, India  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011Astudies smartHistory:CONTR.l\CTIndia Ganges Valley

233

Union Valley | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New EnergyofDEVELOPMENTEnergy 1n n d d e eUnion Valley

234

Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana Joy Merino & Christiane, such as wetland loss, influence CWPPRA project selection for funding. We found that the program was selecting cost- effective projects overall. Cost efficacy varied significantly by restoration project type, with barrier

235

Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title in 1987, assigning Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) responsibility for making wetland Surveys · Farm Service Agency crop compliance slides · U.S. Weather Service data · U.S. Fish and Wildlife

US Army Corps of Engineers

236

APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

McMaster University

237

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Classification of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado A Users Guide: Colorado Natural Heritage Program 254 General Services Bldg. Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO of Riparian Wetland Plant Associations of Colorado: User Guide to the Classification Project. Colorado Natural

238

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

239

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

240

Town of Portola Valley 765 Portola Roac  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Town of Portola Valley Green Building Ordinance No. 2010-386 and the Building Efficiency Standards as part of the implementation of our local green building energy ordinance. As the town to the Portola Valley Town Council, the Green Building Ordinance and the Energy Cost Effective Study as explained

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

Allwine, K.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

Allwine, K.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Bruland et al. 2006). In spite of these charac- teristic failings, created wetlands are increasingly used

244

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hurricane-induced failure of low salinity wetlands Nick C. Howesa,1 , Duncan M. FitzGeralda , Zoe J States Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Wetlands Environmental of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher

Kulp, Mark

245

Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binational GIS database of coastal wetlands for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence: a demonstration wetlands of Lake Ontario in ArcMap (ESRI). Information for the Canadian wetlands were obtained from two Canada, along with wetland polygons from the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and geographic

McMaster University

246

Reducing Agricultural Nitrate Losses in the Embarras River Watershed through Bioreactors, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Constructed Wetlands, and Outreach Proposed by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mark David project will combine research, education, and extension on using tile-fed constructed wetlands and wood of wetlands using three constructed in 1994, while at the same time install two additional wetlands in other

David, Mark B.

247

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2010 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs

Gray, Matthew

248

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry­1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse

Amelung, Falk

249

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2011 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands: To expose students to the basic principles of wetland ecology and management via class lectures, labs

Gray, Matthew

250

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2012 Instructor: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk://fwf.ag.utk.edu/mgray/wfs340/340home.htm Required Text: Wetland Restoration and Construction, 2011 (978-0-9834558-0-6) Author: Thomas Biebighauser Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands

Gray, Matthew

251

GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 2 GOAL OF THE STATE WETLANDS STRATEGY It shall be the goal of the State of Tennessee to provide the maximum practicable wetlands benefits to Tennessee and her citizens by conserving, enhancing, and restoring the acreage, quality, and biological diversity of Tennessee wetlands. The management of wetlands

Gray, Matthew

252

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project Implementation-TERM ANALYSIS SERVICE (STAS) on Final Independent External Peer Review Report Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands COASTAL WETLANDS PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands (BBCW

US Army Corps of Engineers

253

Ecological Modelling 105 (1997) 121 Interaction and spatial distribution of wetland nitrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Wetland model; Nitrogen cycling; Wastewater treatment 1. Introduction methods of wetland treatment systems. This design ap- proach, referred to as `black box' methodology in wetlands, and (ii) factors affecting N removal from treatment wetlands. A mechanistic model was developed

Florida, University of

254

Suitability of a Constructed Treatment Wetland as Conservation Habitat and the Impact of the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) on the Invertebrate Community and Mosquito Oviposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of treatment wetlands. Environmental ScienceKnight R.L. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press, Boca Raton,in constructed treatment wetlands. Ecological Engineering

Why, Adena

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

West Valley Demonstration Project Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The annual site environmental monitoring report for the West Valley Demonstration Project nuclear waste management facility.

NONE

2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of phytotoxicity tests using wetland species  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory phytotoxicity tests used to assess contaminant effects may not effectively protect wetland communities. The authors are developing routine culture and testing methods for selected fresh water plants, that can be used in risk assessments and monitoring of existing wetland systems. Utility of these tests includes evaluating the effects of point or non-point source contamination that may cause water or sediment quality degradation. Selected species include algae (blue-green, green), phytoflagellates (Chlamydomonas, Euglena), and floating or submerged vascular plants (milfoil, coontail, wild celery, elodea, duckweed). Algae toxicity tests range from 2-d, 4-d, and 7 day tests, and macrophyte tests from 10-d to 14 days. Metribuzin and boron are the selected contaminants for developing the test methods. Metribuzin, a triazinone herbicide, is a photosystem 11 inhibitor, and is commonly used for control of grass and broad-leaf plants. As a plant micronutrient, boron is required in very small amounts, but excessive levels can result in phytotoxicity or accumulation. The investigations focus on the influence of important factors including the influence of light quality and quantity, and nutrient media. Reference toxicant exposures with potassium chloride are used to establish baseline data for sensitivity and vitality of the plants. These culture and test methods will be incorporated into recommendations for standard phytotoxicity test designs.

Nelson, M.K.; Fairchild, J.F. [National Biological Survey, Columbia, MO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

"A Methods book that is interdisciplinary and will be a standard for everyone investigating wetlands for years to come..."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetlands for years to come..." David Lindbo 2013 SSSA President Wetland Volume 13 Spring 2014 WireThe Newsletter of the Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment From the Director: 2 The Wetland Ecologist's Daughter 5 Carbon for Money 6 On The Inside New Wetland Methods Book Published by SSSA

258

Valley and electric photocurrents in 2D silicon and graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the optical excitation of multi-valley systems leads to valley currents which depend on the light polarization. The net electric current, determined by the vector sum of single-valley contributions, vanishes for some peculiar distributions of carriers in the valley and momentum spaces forming a pure valley current. We report on the study of this phenomenon, both experimental and theoretical, for graphene and 2D electron channels on the silicon surface.

Tarasenko, S. A.; Ivchenko, E. L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Olbrich, P.; Ganichev, S. D. [Terahertz Center, University of Regensburg, 93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Peachtree Valley and Valley Town mission : a baptist recategorization of a Cherokee landscape.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Peachtree Valley in Clay county, North Carolina has a long history of diversity in plant, animal, and human habitation. The Cherokee, who have inhabited the (more)

Owen, James Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

VALMET-A valley air pollution model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following a thorough analysis of meteorological data obtained from deep valleys of western Colorado, a modular air-pollution model has been developed to simulate the transport and diffusion of pollutants released from an elevated point source in a well-defined mountain valley during the nighttime and morning transition periods. This initial version of the model, named VALMET, operates on a valley cross section at an arbitrary distance down-valley from a continuous point source. The model has been constructed to include parameterizations of the major physical processes that act to disperse pollution during these time periods. The model has not been fully evaluated. Further testing, evaluations, and development of the model are needed. Priorities for further development and testing are provided.

Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SAVE THE DATE!!! The Silicon Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SAVE THE DATE!!! The Silicon Valley 3rd Annual Social Innovation Leadership Forum 2014 (SILF 2014 towards a better tomorrow... Register for the event today! The Social Innovation Leadership Forum (SILF

Su, Xiao

262

25055 W. Valley Parkway Olathe, Kansas 66061  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25055 W. Valley Parkway Suite 106 Olathe, Kansas 66061 Evans Enterprises is growing, or a person we need to reach out to. Our company website is below, and I am happy to answer any questions you

Dyer, Bill

263

Poudre Valley REA- Photovoltaic Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poudre Valley REC is providing rebates to their residential customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. This rebate program was timed to coincide with the Colorado Governor's...

264

City of Sunset Valley- PV Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Sunset Valley offers rebates to local homeowners who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The local rebate acts as an add-on to the PV rebates that are offered by...

265

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreseeing critical phosphorus cycle transitions in constructed wetlands: applied to the new Tres Rios arid-land constructed wetlands with the city of Phoenix E.Chapman1 and B.Warner2 1 School of Life Sciences, 2 School of Sustainability, Arizona State University,Tempe, AZ Abstract Constructed wetland

Hall, Sharon J.

266

Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

economic development and efficiency in the development process.economic development and efficiency in the development process.process has always been the assumption that wetland preservation should be balanced with economic

Steinhoff, Gordon

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

BOD5 removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The frequency of on-site systems for treatment of domestic wastewater is increasing with new residential development in both rural and low-density suburban areas. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCW) have emerged as a viable option to achieve...

Melton, Rebecca Hobbs

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the permits is to protect and preserve submerged lands under tidal and freshwaters and wetlands, both salt and fresh water, from unregulated alteration that would adversely affect...

269

Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and volatile suspended solids, NH?, P, and fecal and total coliforms. Differences between medium types in wetland performance were found for the parameters of BOD? and P, in which tire chip wetlands outperformed gravel wetlands. The average percent reduction...

Richmond, Amanda Yvette

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland typesthan was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

Z. Adam Szybinski

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

NONE

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N FactSheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and wildlife habitat. The property runs along the Yakima River and contains important in-stream and riparian habitat in the historic floodplain portions of the agricultural valley...

275

The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Implications of hypoxia tolerance for wetland refugia use in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of hypoxia tolerance for wetland refugia use in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda Andrea J. Reid1 in their use of hypoxic wetlands in Lake Nabugabo, Uganda: the cichlid Pseudocrenilabrus multicolor victoriae

Chapman, Lauren J.

277

Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment...

Culver, Wesley Richard

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

278

Methane in lakes and wetlands -Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methane in lakes and wetlands - Microbiological production, ecosystem Zürcher, Fortunat Joos Global methane emissions from wet ecosystems 9:50 - 10 Were tropical wetlands C4-dominated during the glacial? A view from methane

Mühlemann, Oliver

279

Early development of wetland plant and invertebrate communities: effects and implications of restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Seabloom and van der Valk 2003, Zampella and Laidig 2003, Balcombe et al. 2005b, Spieles 2005), demonstrating the highly variable response of wetland development to site conditions. Commonly used approaches to wetland plant restoration include (1...

Berg, Matthew D.

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

280

Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

O'Geen, Anthony T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: MARS VALLEY NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regions and Multiple Water Release Events in Valley Networks of the Libya Montes Region on Mars [#1729] We investigate a valley network in the western Libya Montes region, which originates in a highland mountain

Rathbun, Julie A.

283

A Home for Everyone San Joaquin Valley Housing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 C. Kings County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 D. Madera related to growth and development and lead to improved outcomes for California's cities and counties Joaquin Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 APPENDICES: DATA TABLES FOR VALLEY COUNTIES A

Tipple, Brett

284

Valley wins High School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Valley wins High School Science Bowl West Des Moines Valley defeated Bettendorf 72-32 in the championship match to win the 25th Ames LaboratoryIowa State University Regional High...

285

Tesla Demonstration for Happy Valley Elementary Tuesday, November 20th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tesla Demonstration for Happy Valley Elementary Tuesday, November 20th Schedule Load Time: 11: ___________________________________________________________ Contact: Chris McGriff, cmcgriff@santacruz.k12.ca.us Address: Happy Valley Elementary School, Branciforte

California at Santa Cruz, University of

286

Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

287

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

288

The Lower Rio Grande Valley Regional Public Transportation Coordination Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KFH GROUP, INC. THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY REGIONAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION COORDINATION PLAN Developed for: Lower Rio Grande Valley Regional Transportation Coordination Plan Committee By: KFH Group, Incorporated... Page BACKGROUND..............................................................................................................................1 PLAN PROCESS...

Lower Rio Grande Valley Development Council

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 P: 925. This report was prepared by Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Blvd., Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA

290

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration...

291

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy & Soest, 2006) Exploration Activity Details...

292

Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson, 1985) Exploration Activity Details...

293

WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDARY YEAR 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE ANNUAL (CALENDAR YEAR 2001) SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY.

NONE

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Silicon Valley Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Silicon Valley Power offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of a variety of energy efficient products including:

295

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 28, Issue Wetlands Report/CCRM P.O. Box 1346 Gloucester Pt., VA 23062 (804) 684-7380 dawnf@vims.edu CCRM Director: Dr subagencies or DEQ. Printed on recycled paper Tidal Wetlands News & Events VIMS Discovery Workshops. Sponsored

296

Assessing the Ecological Condition of Wetlands in the Lower Missouri River Floodplain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................. 68 APPENDIX D: CHARACTERIZATION OF LEAST DISTURBED WATER QUALITY CONDITIONS ........................................ 72 APPENDIX E: PARAMETERS, INSTRUMENTS, METHODS AND FORMS USED IN THE STUDY ........................................ 75 vi..., developing a method to assess the condition of remnant wetlands within the Lower Missouri River floodplain may give insight into how specific hydrologic alterations impact wetland condition by characterizing the extent of wetland impairment according...

Beury, Jason Horry

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

Kirby, Carl S.

298

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

Wang, Yang

299

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Colorado Natural Heritage Program-8002 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in La Plata County Prepared for: Colorado. We thank the Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife Wetlands Program and Alex

300

A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

217 A LANDSCAPE SCALE EVALUATION OF PHOSPHORUS RETENTION IN WETLANDS OF THE LAPLATTE RIVER BASIN approach to examine phosphorus retention in wetlands of the LaPlatte River basin (13,723 ha), Vermont information system. Most wetland variables had significant (p

Wang, Deane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Urbanization interferes with the use of amphibians as indicators of ecological integrity of wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wetlands Jacquelyn C. Guzy1,2 *, Earl D. McCoy1 , Anna C. Deyle1 , Shannon M. Gonzalez3 , Neal Halstead1 Consulting Group Inc., 10150 Highland Manor Drive, Suite 200, Tampa, FL 33610, USA Summary 1. Wetlands disturbance. Understanding the responses of wetland species to human disturbance is essential for effective

Dorcas, Michael E.

302

Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Management of Wetlands for Wildlife Matthew J. Gray, Heath M. Hagy, J. Andrew Nyman, and Joshua D. Stafford Abstract Wetlands are highly productive ecosystems that provide habitat for a diversity of wildlife species and afford various ecosystem services. Managing wetlands effectively requires

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

303

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Riparian wetlands for enhancing the self-purification capacity of streams B.J. D'Arcy*, N. Mc these flows into riparian treatment wetlands for treatment before drainage back into the watercourse at the site is undersized (4950 m2 ) compared to the required wetland area (11,800 m2 ), but accommodating

Heal, Kate

304

Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing Soil and Hydrologic Properties for the Successful Creation of Non-Tidal Wetlands W. Lee, VA 23529-0276 rwhittec@odu.edu Introduction Federal and state wetlands protection regulations require the mitigation of impacts to jurisdictional wetlands via avoidance and minimization of damage whenever possible

Darby, Dennis

305

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement and validation of a multi-level assessment method for Mid-Atlantic tidal wetlands (EPA of wetland resources across the Mid-Atlantic physiographic region, efforts are currently underway in a number of states, most notably Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia, to develop and implement wetland

306

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WETLANDS OF THE FRASER LOWLAND, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES No. 156 /'auteur. . #12;Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: Summary Report Peggy Ward Technical Report Series 156 Pacific and Yukon Region 1992 Canadian Wildlife Service This series mav be cited as: Ward, Peggy. Wetlands

307

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Guidance Letter 90-06 SUBJECT: Expiration Dates for Wetlands Jurisdictional Delineations the length of time that wetlands jurisdictional delineations remain valid. In light of the need for national to the provisions in paragraphs 5., 6., and 7. 2. Since wetlands are affected over time by both natural and man

US Army Corps of Engineers

308

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,, Mary A. Cialone a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,?, Mary A. Cialone a , Jane M to be the potential contribution of wetlands to the lowering of surges as they propagate inland from the coast. Consequently, an accurate method to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels is required

US Army Corps of Engineers

309

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY #12;FACTORS AFFECTING MACROPHYTE AND FISH DISTRIBUTION IN COASTAL WETLANDS OF GEORGIAN BAY By MAJA CVETKOVIC, B and fish distribution in coastal wetlands of Georgian Bay AUTHOR: Maja Cvetkovic, B.Sc. (Mc

McMaster University

310

Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 91104 The role of seepage in constructed wetlands receiving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 91­104 The role of seepage in constructed wetlands receiving 1999 Abstract Constructed wetlands positioned in the landscape between row crop agriculture and surface. A potential exit pathway in constructed wetlands for detained water and possibly NO3 - -N is via seepage

David, Mark B.

311

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PBRP Research Highlight Use of Lake Maurepas Wetlands by Migrating Birds P.C. Stouffer and Jason A's largest migratory routes for Neotropical migratory birds, many of which use the Maurepas wetlands during spring and fall migrations. Large portions of swamp in the Maurepas wetlands have converted to marsh

Stouffer, Phil

312

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Colorado Natural Heritage Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2005 #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Dolores County Prepared for: Colorado photograph: Riverine wetlands dominated by Mountain Willow along Fish Creek, SJNF. Photo taken by Sarah

313

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Kathleen Moore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An I.nventmy Peggy Ward Kathleen Moore GIS Applications Ron. Wetlands of the Fraser Lowland, 1989: An Inventory. Technical Report Series No. 146. Canadian Wiidlife report. ... 111 #12;ABSTRACT The remaining wetlands of the Fraser Lowland provide vital habitat for large

314

Evaluating the sensitivity of wetlands to climate change with remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the sensitivity of wetlands to climate change with remote sensing techniques Zutao of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606, USA Abstract: Wetlands are valuable ecosystems and south-central Canada, characterized by glacially sculpted landscapes and abundant wetlands, is one

Chen, Jiquan

315

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Regulatory Assistance Program ERDC TN-WRAP-12-1 August 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Updating Regional Supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual by Jacob F. Berkowitz PURPOSE: Regional supplements to the Corps of Engineers Wetland Delineation Manual

US Army Corps of Engineers

316

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Natural Heritage Assessment and Inventory of State Wildlife Area Wetlands 1998-99 Pilot Study) was contracted to conduct a ilot study of wetlands and riparian areas on several Colorado Division of Wildlife, and will be corporated into a wetlands database and the Natural Diversity Information System n HP e s secured

317

Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

Canet, Léonie

318

Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment K in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance wetlands are widely used for tertiary wastewater treatment but, although effective for nitrogen removal

Heal, Kate

319

Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

Quinn, Nigel

320

Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

Hall, Sharon J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

Gray, Matthew

322

The Valley Fever Corridor Year 2 Fundraising Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marianne Stephens Ray Thurston Valley of the Sun Boston Terrier Club Mark Whitaker Nickel $500The Valley Fever Corridor Year 2 Fundraising Status Goal = $85,000 Updated: 2/15/2011 *The Valley Fever Clinic Titanium $5,000 or more: Anonymous Shirley and Ken Cole Heller Foundation

Arizona, University of

323

San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District Best Available Control Technology.4.2 #12;San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control Distri RECEIVED ~ 2 ED ECEIVED www.valleyalr.org SJVAPCD-2370·(661)326-6900"FAX(661)326-6985 #12;San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District TITLE V MODIFICATION

324

Survey of Critical Biological Resources of Garfield County, Volume II: Survey of Critical Wetlands and Riparian Areas in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Colorado Natural Heritage Program College of Natural Wetlands and Riparian Areas in Garfield County Prepared for: Colorado Department of Natural Resources 1313 plant communities, including wetland and riparian areas. Volume II focuses exclusively on wetland

325

3.1 Greater Everglades Wetlands Module CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan, Part 1 3-3 January 15, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.1 Greater Everglades Wetlands Module CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan, Part 1 3-3 January 15, 2004 3.1 GREATER EVERGLADES WETLANDS MODULE 3.1.1 Introduction The remaining portion of the Greater Everglades Wetlands includes a mosaic of inter-connected freshwater wetlands and estuaries (Figure 3

Gawlik, Dale E.

326

MEMORANDUM FOR SWG-2007-1623 Subject: Jurisdictional Determination (JD) for SWG-2007-1623 on Interdunal Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1623 on Interdunal Wetlands Adjacent to Traditional Navigable Waters (TNWs) Summary The U.S. Environmental Protection wetlands for JD SWG-2007- 1623. This determination is based on our finding that these wetlands are adjacent interdunal wetlands for JD SWG-2007-1623. First, we provide a baseline assessment (in Section II

US Army Corps of Engineers

327

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu) and Chris Graves (cgraves2@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2013 Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.htm Required Text: Wetland Restoration and Construction, 2011 (978-0-9834558-0-6) Author: Thomas Biebighauser Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 0

Gray, Matthew

328

Removal of nutrients from combined sewer overflows and lake water in a vertical-flow constructed wetland system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is planted with common reed (Phragmites australis). The constructed wetland is intermittently loaded

Brix, Hans

329

ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr. Heath Hagy (hhagy@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(all day workshop) Biebighauser (USFS) 17 Treatment Wetlands Ludwig (UT) 22 Optional Field TripWFS 536 ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Fall 2011 Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition, Wiley (www.wiley.com, ISBN 047129232X) or Wetlands, 2007, 4th

Gray, Matthew

330

Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

331

Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

Hall, Sharon J.

332

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

Hall, Sharon J.

333

Golden Valley County Secondary Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infarction prevalence (Heart Attack) 4.3% 4.1% 6.0% All Sites Cancer 510.8 455.5 543.2 1 Community County1 Montana1,2 Nation2 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. Unintentional Injuries** 1. Cancer 2. Heart Disease 3.CLRD* 1. Heart Disease 2. Cancer 3. CLRD* #12; Golden Valley County Secondary Data

Maxwell, Bruce D.

334

Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

Miller Julianne J.,Mizell Steve A.,Nikolich George, Campbell Scott

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Quantum pumping of valley current in strain engineered graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the generation of valley dependent current by adiabatic quantum pumping in monolayer graphene in the presence of electric potential barriers, ferromagnetic field and strain. The pumped currents in the two valleys have same magnitudes and opposite directions; thus, a pure valley current is generated. The oscillation of the pumped pure valley current is determined by the Fabry-Perot resonances formed in the structure. In our calculation, the pumped pure valley current can be as high as 50?nA, which is measurable using present technologies. The proposed device is useful for the development of graphene valleytronic devices.

Wang, Jing [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China) [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Chan, K. S., E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Lin, Zijing, E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)] [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Sandia National Laboratories: Yakima Washington  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia, NREL Release Wave EnergyLinks WaterWindSandiaWorkshops

338

MAPPING OF CENTRALAFRICAFORESTED WETLANDS USING REMOTE SENSING Julie; GOND1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to characterize land cover patterns of the second largest wetland area of the world (The `Cuvette Centrale to the time period of flood and solar intensity for this region, similarly to what is observed in biogeochemical cycles, including the methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) cycles in particular (Matthews, 2000

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

339

Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Streams: Pools (deep and slow parts) and riffles (fast and shallow parts) provide more areas for water'S OS Improve Water Q lit Better Habitat for W tl d S i Outdoor Research F ilit Education Established 2007 Nicholas School of the Environment www.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland Sandy Creek Restoration Project

340

Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

Paparella, Francesco

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide mitigation Laetitia ROUX*, Julien chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment construction. The bibliography's study focus on two subjects: the tracer experiments and the constructed

Boyer, Edmond

342

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

343

The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

344

SINGH and BHATNAGAR Urban lakes and wetlands: opportunities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, urban water bodies commonly become cesspools due to lack of sanitation facilities. Delhi is continually it is not unusual for some of them to be referred to as lakes. Ponds and tanks are small in size compared to lakes:50,000 scale, however, the mapping for Delhi was carried out at 1:25,000 scale under the National Wetland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

345

Preprints of the 8 International Conference on Wetland Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preprints of the 8 th International Conference on Wetland Systems Arusha ­ Tanzania ­ 16 th to 19 th Spetember 2002 1 DESIGN CRITERIA AND PERFORMANCES OF REED BED FILTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF WASHING.houdoy@inst-elevage.asso.fr ABSTRACT Initially designed for the treatment of domestic wastewater, Vertical Flow Reed Bed Filters [VFRBF

Boyer, Edmond

346

Hudson Valley Clean Energy Office and Warehouse  

High Performance Buildings Database

Rhinebeck, NY Hudson Valley Clean Energy's new head office and warehouse building in Rhinebeck, New York, achieved proven net-zero energy status on July 2, 2008, upon completing its first full year of operation. The building consists of a lobby, meeting room, two offices, cubicles for eight office workers, an attic space for five additional office workers, ground- and mezzanine-level parts and material storage, and indoor parking for three contractor trucks.

347

Sequachee Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa, Mallorca: EnergySecondarySequachee Valley

348

North Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company) JumpNorth Haven, Maine:Ohio:Pole,NorthNorth Valley Geothermal

349

Melton Valley Watershed | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopmentTechnologies | DepartmentADVISORYFinalMelton Valley

350

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska: Energy ResourcesLualualei Valley

351

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska: Energy ResourcesLualualei ValleyJump to:

352

Clean Cities: Rogue Valley Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmerging FuelsRelated4Rogue Valley Clean Cities Coalition

353

VALMET: a valley air pollution model. Final report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An air quality model is described for predicting air pollution concentrations in deep mountain valleys arising from nocturnal down-valley transport and diffusion of an elevated pollutant plume, and the fumigation of the plume on the valley floor and sidewalls after sunrise. Included is a technical description of the model, a discussion of the model's applications, the required model inputs, sample calculations and model outputs, and a full listing of the FORTRAN computer program. 55 refs., 27 figs., 6 tabs.

Whiteman, C.D.; Allwine, K.J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Citrus Production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIE?ARY, A t r: COLLEGE, CAvrus. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - BULLETIN NO. 419 DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE Citrus Production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas... of Agriculture. . Citrus fruit production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, especially grapefruit, has increased at a rather rapid rate dur- ing the past few years. More than 5,000,000 citrus trees were set in orchard form in the Lower Rio Grande Valley up...

Traub, Hamilton Paul; Friend, W. H. (William Heartsill)

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results vtaprelimevalresults.pdf More...

356

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith,...

357

Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

over the Dixie Valley hydrothermal convection system, and if so, are they related with soil geochemical, vegetal-spectral, soil spectral, and biogeochemical anomalies. Other goals...

358

Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative (VVEC) offers rebates for residential customers who purchase energy efficient home equipment. Rebates are available for room air conditioners, electric water...

359

West Valley Demonstration Project - North Plateau Strontium-90...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Demonstration Project - North Plateau Strontium-90 West Valley Demonstration Project - North Plateau Strontium-90 January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy...

360

Field Mapping At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sorey & Farrar, 1998) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey & Farrar, 1998)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity...

362

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

363

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et...

364

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

365

Non-Double-Couple Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California, Provide Evidence For Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

366

Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

367

Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992)...

368

Poudre Valley REA- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association (PVREA), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers a variety of lighting rebates to commercial customers. Rebates are available on commercial lighting...

369

Magic Valley Electric Cooperative- ENERGY STAR Builders Program (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Magic Valley Electric Cooperative's (MVEC) ENERGY STAR Builders Program offers a variety of incentives to builders of energy efficiency homes within MVEC service territory. Incentives are provided...

370

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity...

371

Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1999 - 1999 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A second...

372

Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date 1999 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown...

373

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Here we...

374

Kennebec Valley Community College's State of the Art Solar Lab  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fairfield, Maine's Kennebec Valley Community College has opened a state of the art lab to teach participants from throughout the Northeast how to install solar systems.

375

Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

McKenna & Blackwell, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna &...

376

Lobbyist Disclosure Form - Silicon Valley | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lobbyist Disclosure Form - Silicon Valley.pdf More Documents & Publications Lobbyist Disclosure Form - AltEn Lobbyist Disclosure Form - First Solar Interested Parties - Shipp...

377

Wabash Valley Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, and...

378

Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eichelberger, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger, Et...

379

Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mallan, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan, Et Al.,...

380

Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hermance, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance, Et...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al.,...

382

Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

383

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

384

Wabash Valley Power Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Illinois...

385

Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cumberland Valley Electric offers a number of programs to promote energy conservation. This program offers rebates for air source heat pumps, building insulation (including windows and doors), and...

386

Magic Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Magic Valley Electric Cooperative's Value Incentive Program (VIP) offers consumers incentives for the installation of new central heat pump systems, dual fuel heating systems, central air...

387

Lower Valley Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lower Valley Energy offers numerous rebates for residential customers who wish to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Rebates are available for weatherization measures, water heaters,...

388

Wabash Valley Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, and...

389

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative- Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative offers an incentive for members to increase the energy efficiency of existing homes and facilities through the Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program. The loan...

390

Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L. Sorey, Robert H. Mariner, Alfred H. Truesdell (1979) Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal System at Long Valley, California Michael...

391

Zena conservation easement protects habitat in Willamette Valley...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

central Willamette Valley for fi sh and wildlife habitat mitigation. Located in the Eola Hills about eight miles northwest of Salem (see map), this property provides refuge for...

392

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia, Et Al., 2003)...

393

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Several fluid-flow models presented regarding the Long Valley Caldera....

394

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Tempel, Et Al., 2011) Exploration...

395

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker, Et Al., 2006) Exploration...

396

Technical Services Contract Awarded for West Valley Demonstration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order to Safety and Ecology Corporation of Knoxville, Tennessee, for technical services at the West Valley...

397

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative (MVEC) offers financial incentives to encourage energy efficiency within the residential sector. Rebates are available for a variety of equipment including air...

398

Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC offers the Member Loan Program to residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible...

399

Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC's residential rebate program offers a $500 rebate for the installation of 15 SEER or higher electric...

400

Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Smith & Suemnicht, 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 1985 - 1988 Usefulness useful...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies Authors David D. Blackwell, Richard P. Smith and Maria C. Richards Conference Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir...

402

Idaho Owyhee Lemhi Custer Valley Elmore Butte Blaine Cassia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Owyhee Lemhi Custer Valley Elmore Butte Blaine Cassia Boise Clark Bonner Ada Shoshone Bingham Caribou Clearwater Fremont Power Adams Latah Twin Falls Bonneville Lincoln Oneida...

403

Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Foulger...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date - 2004 Usefulness not indicated...

404

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

405

Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalLiteratureReviewAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid510804...

406

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleModeling-ComputerSimulationsAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid387627...

407

Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleStaticTemperatureSurveyAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid511143...

408

Golden Valley Electric Association- Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Golden Valley Electric Association's (GVEA) SNAP program encourages members to install renewable energy generators and connect them to the utility's electrical distribution system by offering an...

409

Conservation tillage production systems compared in San Joaquin Valley cotton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in San Joaquin Valley cotton by Jeffrey P. Mitchell, Danielfor 25% or more of overall cotton production costs. Thesesuccessfully elsewhere in the Cotton Belt may be a viable

Mitchell, Jeffrey; Munk, Dan; Prys, Bob; Klonsky, Karen; Wroble, Jon; De Moura, Rich

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

antarctic dry valley: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

411

antarctic dry valleys: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

412

Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Battaglia, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia,...

413

Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1978 - 1985 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

414

Evaluation and Comparison of Ecological Models Simulating Nitrogen Processes in Treatment Wetlands,Implemented in Modelica.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Two ecological models of nitrogen processes in treatment wetlands have been evaluated and compared. These models have been implemented, simulated, and visualized in the (more)

Edelfeldt, Stina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 57 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: . This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com...

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude saline wetland Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: basins of the world contain numerous freshwater, brackish and saline...

417

The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

Leonard, Daniel Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed (more)

Grubh, Archis Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

Elgin, Barbara K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - aburra valley caused Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

distribution of air pollutants in an Alpine valley Motivation: High air... pollution in Alpine valleys during wintertime Only sparse routine measurements available...

423

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (McKenzie & Truesdell, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

424

West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the West Valley Citizen Task Force More Documents & Publications EIS-0337: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0337: Final Environmental Impact Statement West Valley...

425

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

426

E-Print Network 3.0 - antelope valley california Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Antelope Valley Solar Ranch One Maricopa Sun Solar... Complex Project T-Squared Inc. California Valley Solar Ranch Topaz Solar Farm Lost Hills Synapse Solar 2... Kramer...

427

Petrophysical rock classification in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir with a clustering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Petrophysical rock classification in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir classification method with field data acquired in the Cotton Valley tight-gas sandstone reservoir located

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

428

Environmental Assessment : Happy Valley [Substation Project].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Happy Valley project consists of construction of a new BPA customer service 69-kV substation south of Sequim in Clallam County, Washington. A tie line, to be constructed by the customer as part of this project, will link the new BPA facility to the existing customer's transmission system in the area. This project responds to rapid load growth in the Olympic Peninsula, and will strengthen the existing BPA system and interconnected utility systems. It will reduce transmission losses presently incurred, especially on the BPA system supplying power to the Olympic Peninsula. This report describes the potential environmental impact of the proposed actions. 2 figs., 1 tab.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Powell Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips ColorLoading map...ClimatePowder RiverValley

430

Lighthouse Solar Diablo Valley | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolar (Texas) Jump to: navigation, searchValley

431

All Valley Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitecAWSAgri-Energy Focus AreaValley Solar Jump to:

432

Boone Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo Feng Bio JumpVenturesCoral CapitalBoilersBoone Valley

433

Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1Dering Harbor,DiscountDiversified EnergyDixieDixie Valley

434

Dixie Valley Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1Dering Harbor,DiscountDiversified EnergyDixieDixie ValleyDixie

435

Valley, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UCOpen Energy Information Valley View Hot Springs

436

Antelope Valley Neset | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperimentsInformation Anson County, NorthAntarisValley

437

Minnesota Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area Energy Efficiency,Grid RenewableMini-GridAgencyValley

438

Valley View Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place: Salt Lake City, Utah Zip:Scale Solar IncVairexVallesValley View

439

Bethel Valley Watershed | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchTheMarketing,Energy and NaturalBethel Valley Watershed. Topics include: * The

440

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration JumpSanyalTempWellheadWahkiakum County Place:PulteGroup JumpValley

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Whirlwind Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview, Florida:WheatleyWheeler, New York:Whippany, NewValley

442

Valley Electric Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy NowNew HampshireValero Refining Company - NJ JumpValley

443

Aire Valley Environmental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen Energy Information 2008)Aire Valley

444

Tees Valley Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:Taos County,Tees Valley Biofuels Jump to: navigation,

445

Wetlands Research Program Bulletin. Volume 5. Number 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The city of Lincoln, Neb., was founded in the mid-18OOs along Salt Creek. During the last century, the saline marshes suffered extensive degradation through commercial and residential development, road construction, and agriculture. Today, Nebraska`s eastern saline wetlands are considered to be among the most restricted and imperiled ecosystems. Eastern Nebraska saline wetlands are regionally unique, located in floodplain swales and depressions within the Salt Creek and Rock Creek watersheds in Lancaster and southern Saunders counties. Water sources are a combination of discharge from the Dakota sandstone formation aquifer, precipitation, and overbank flooding. Salts are concentrated in the soil during dry periods. Vegetation in these wetlands is characterized by halophytes including spearscale (Atriplex subspicata), inland saltgrass (Distichlis spicata var. stricta), saltwort (Sa1icornia rubra), prairie bulrush (Scirpus mantimus var. paludosus), sea blite (Suaeda depressa), and narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia). Four plant species considered rare in Nebraska are saltmarsh aster (Aster subulatus var. ligulatus), seaside heliotrope (Heliotropium curassavicurn), saltwort, and Texas dropseed (Sporobolus texanus) can be found in the marshes along Salt Creek.

Gilbert, M.C.; Stutheit, R.G.; Davis, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Surprise Valley Electric Co-Op Trinity Shasta Lake  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cove California Electric Utility Service Areas California Energy Commission Systems Assessment-Op PacifiCorp Trinity Shasta Lake Redding PG&E Area served by both Surprise Valley Electric Co-Op & Pacific Vernon Aha MacavAzusa Pasadena Glendale Burbank City and County of S.F. Palo Alto Silicon Valley Power

448

TFC-0004- In the Matter of Tri-Valley CARES  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tri-Valley CARES filed an Appeal from a determination that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued on June 2, 2010. In that determination, NNSA denied in part a request for information that Tri-Valley CARES had submitted on September 8, 2008, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552.

449

Under the Boardwalk Case History St. Johns Sideroad at the McKenzie Wetland, Aurora, Ontario, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is located in the Town of Aurora, Ontario, Canada and liesWetland (also known as Aurora Wetland or McKenzie Marsh), anwith a connection to the Aurora Pumping Station. This $20

Buchanan, Ian D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

Curtis Miller

2009-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

Moseman, Serena Maria

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

Moseman, Serena M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR WATER QUALITY IMPROVEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory implemented a constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) in 2000 to treat industrial discharge and stormwater from the Laboratory area. The industrial discharge volume is 3,030 m{sup 3} per day with elevated toxicity and metals (copper, zinc and mercury). The CWTS was identified as the best treatment option based on performance, capital and continuing cost, and schedule. A key factor for this natural system approach was the long-term binding capacity of heavy metals (especially copper, lead, and zinc) in the organic matter and sediments. The design required that the wetland treat the average daily discharge volume and be able to handle 83,280 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. The design allowed all water flow within the system to be driven entirely by gravity. The CWTS for A-01 outfall is composed of eight one-acre wetland cells connected in pairs and planted with giant bulrush to provide continuous organic matter input to the system. The retention basin was designed to hold stormwater flow and to allow controlled discharge to the wetland. The system became operational in October of 2000 and is the first wetland treatment system permitted by South Carolina DHEC for removal of metals. Because of the exceptional performance of the A-01 CWTS, the same strategy was used to improve water quality of the H-02 outfall that receives discharge and stormwater from the Tritium Area of SRS. The primary contaminants in this outfall were also copper and zinc. The design for this second system required that the wetland treat the average discharge volume of 415 m{sup 3} per day, and be able to handle 9,690 m{sup 3} of stormwater runoff in a 24 hour period. This allowed the building of a system much smaller than the A-01 CWTS. The system became operational in July 2007. Metal removal has been excellent since water flow through the treatment systems began, and performance improved with the maturation of the vegetation during the first season of growth of each system. Sediment samples after the first and third years of operation indicated that copper was being bound in the sediments very rapidly after entering the treatment system. The design of the system encourages low redox and sulfide production in the sediments. The objective is to stabilize metals, including mercury, as sulfide compounds in the sediments. Costs for maintenance and operation of the systems are minimal, consisting primarily of ensuring that the pipes are not clogged and that water is flowing through the system. The treatment cost per thousand gallons is many times less than conventional wastewater treatment facilities. Life expectancy and function of the biological system is based on the life of the engineering aspects and not the wetland ecology.

Nelson, E.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

454

USE OF NITROGEN BUDGETS AND N2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE ROLE OF DENITRIFICATION IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS Monica M. Palta 1, Peter Groffman2, Stuart Findlay2 1 School of Life Sciences in inorganic nitrogen cycling and removal in urban brownfield wetlands INTRODUCTION · Urban areas are net BROWNFIELD SITES SUPPORTING SEMI-PERMANENTLY FLOODED WETLANDS. White outlines delineate low-lying semi

Hall, Sharon J.

455

French vertical flow constructed wetlands: reed bed behaviour and limits due to hydraulic overloading on first stage filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

French vertical flow constructed wetlands: reed bed behaviour and limits due to hydraulic with the European standards. Keywords: Vertical flow constructed wetlands; hydraulic overload; hydraulic behaviour. INTRODUCTION Vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) have been very successful in France over the last five

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

456

Wetlands Ecology and Management Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu) and Chris Graves (cgraves2@utk.edu)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WFS 340 Wetlands Ecology and Management Fall 2014 Instructors: Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.htm Required Readings: Handed out in class or emailed. Recommended Text: Wetlands, 2007, 4th edition (ISBN 978-0-471-69967-5) or Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition (ISBN 0-471-29232-X) Authors: William J. Mitsch and James G. Gosselink Course

Gray, Matthew

457

Developing a Model to Predict Canada Goose Breeding Pair Densities in the Midwest Using National Wetlands Inventory Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wetlands Inventory Data Principal Investigator: Robert Klaver Student Investigator: Brenna Towery (M a revised and refined wetlands inventory for Iowa (circa 2002), as well as 5 years of Canada Goose (singles, pairs, and groups) to specific wetlands or streams/rivers on individual survey plots, we can

Koford, Rolf R.

458

FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DISTURBANCES IN THE GREAT4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i 1 2 FORECASTING THE RESPONSE OF COASTAL WETLANDS TO DECLINING3 WATER LEVELS AND ENVIRONMENTALMaster University23 (Biology) Hamilton, Ontario24 TITLE: Forecasting the response of coastal wetlands to declining plants in Lake Ontario coastal36 wetlands while taking into account other factors such as urbanization

McMaster University

459

Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs, glacial, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), methane (CH4), peatland, wetland. Summary · Wetlands were the largest (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH4 flux, pore water dissolved CH4 and volatile fatty acid

Gauci, Vincent

460

Observations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed treatment wetland in Augusta, Georgia were used to quantify the size, distribution, velocity). In treatment wetlands, such heterogeneity nearly always results in reduced contaminant removal (WoObservations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U

Licciardi, Joseph M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Aquifers and Wetlands SUMMARY: This chapter begins with an overview of the hydrological cycle and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle and considers the flow of water in wetlands and undergraound. Special attention is paid to flow through vegetated wetlands. 14.1 The Hydrological Cycle Rivers and streams are but a link in the global cycle of water, called the hydro- logical cycle. Approximately half of the solar energy striking

Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

462

Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

463

REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

Richner, Heinz

464

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 23, Issue at VIMS Also Living Shoreline Summit Proceedings Now Available Tidal Wetlands News & Events · · Putting Nature to Work: Marine contractors and permitting agents are targeted with new online course and VIMS

465

Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu From the Wetlands Advisory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu From the Wetlands Advisory Group Director and those hosted by VIMS. Integrated Coastal & Shoreline Management Guidance Integrated coastal zone Virginia Institute of Marine Science #12;If you attended the VIMS Tidal Wetlands Workshop in June 2005

466

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 23, Issue, rather than having our usual spring workshop at VIMS, the Center for Coastal Resources Management for upcoming announcements of a staff workshop near you! The VIMS wetlands workshop will return to the VIMS

467

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 24, Issue Shifting Sands: Beaches and Dunes in Virginia Thursday, February 12, 2009 at VIMS See inside for information & registration! Also Tidal Wetlands News & Events VIMS Advisory Support: Updates for 2009

468

Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

Heal, Kate

469

Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment processes well adapted to small rural communities mainly because they are easy to operate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals removal mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands: Metals in microcosm upflow constructed wetlands used for polishing of synthetic electroplating wastewater. Four types (2014) 53-42" DOI : 10.1016/j.cej.2013.12.075 #12;Keywords electroplating wastewater, metals, cyanides

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

471

Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inventories or TMIs. This issue of the Virginia Wetlands Report highlights this research by describing the process and why these inventories are important for management and sustainability of the Commonwealth's tidal wetland resources. What are they? Tidal Marsh Inventories contain maps and information about

472

POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSSIBLE ROLE OF WETLANDS, PERMAFROST, AND METHANE HYDRATES IN THE METHANE CYCLE UNDER FUTURE the available scientific literature on how natural sources and the atmospheric fate of methane may be affected by future climate change. We discuss how processes governing methane wetland emissions, per- mafrost thawing

Chappellaz, Jérôme

473

Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Aquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, P.O. Box 8602, Riccarton, Christchurch, New Zealand Abstract Phragmites australis wetlands act.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon cycling; Gas transport; Methane emission; Phragmites australisAquatic Botany 69 (2001) 313­324 Are Phragmites-dominated wetlands a net source or net sink

Brix, Hans

475

CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

476

Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, perhaps only a few square miles, one is apt to find wetlands that fall all along this hydroperiod that are "good" for bullfrogs are not suitable for spadefoot toads, and a marbled salamander would only be caught

Georgia, University of

477

Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

System for Real-?Time Management of Water Quality Management of hydrologic systems for water quality system development for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality

Quinn, N.W.T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) as of 2006 has accepted the administrative responsibility for the National Wetland Plant List from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). In early 2009 the FWS removed the published 1988 and 1996 wetland plant lists from their National Wetland

US Army Corps of Engineers

479

Geography of Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary Joshua N. Collins, Ph.D., Robin Grossinger, M.S., Zoltan Der,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geography of Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary Joshua N. Collins, Ph.D., Robin Grossinger, M to understand the nature of wetlands in the San Francisco Bay Area. An improved understanding of wetlands, and this has increased the ways that wetlands can be measured and viewed. There has been a large increase

480

Airborne particles in the San Joaquin Valley may affect human health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graphics for nonreaders, created for the event. The San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima valley wetlands" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Passive solar homes in Delaware Valley  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines ten single family residences in the Delaware Valley area which include passive solar design features. The study identifies successful and failed solar features of the houses, evaluates solar performance of a few houses, and examines occupants satisfaction with their houses. The study described in this paper includes the following: description of the overall passive solar design and listing of solar features used in each house, survey of each house in its present condition documenting changes to the original design (if any), summary of occupant questionnaire and interviews of house owners regarding their evaluation of house performance. Owners in this study retained positive attitude to their homes in spite of the problems with some solar features. Modifications to the solar features have been significant, but in no case was the solar aspect abandoned.

Kendig, J. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

483

An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Aluto-Langano Geothermal Field, Ethiopian Rift Valley- Physical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the geothermal systems in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Aluto-Langano is a water-dominated gas-rich geothermal field, with a maximum temperature close to 360C, in the Lakes...

485

Silicon Valley Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Silicon Valley Power (SVP) offers a variety rebates to its business customers, capped at a maximum total incentive of $500,000 per customer per year. Rebates are available for the following:

486

Red River Valley REA- Heat Pump Loan Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Red River Valley Rural Electric Association (RRVREA) offers a loan program to its members for air-source and geothermal heat pumps. Loans are available for geothermal heat pumps at a 5% fixed...

487

LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Incentive Programs, Florida SunShot Rooftop Challenge Awardees The California Valley Solar Ranch has a capacity of 250 MW -- enough energy to power the equivalent of every home...

488

Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Caldera Michael L. Sorey, B. Mack Kennedy, William C. Evans, Christopher D. Farrar (1990) Increases in 3He4He in Fumarolic Gas Associated with the 1989 Earthquake Swarm...

489

Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

show distinct responses to the Chalfant Valley earthquakes. Authors Christopher D. Farrar, M.L. Sorey, S.A. Rojstaczer, A.C. Steinemann and M.D. Clark Published U.S. Geological...

490

Satellite imagery can support water planning in the Central Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area, Merced County County Fresno Kings Merced Sutter Timethe study area Merced County. Kings, Merced and Sutter (fig.counties are par- ticularly important to the agricultural economy of the Central Valley: Fresno, Fresno Kings

Zhong, Liheng; Hawkins, Tom; Holland, Kyle; Gong, Peng; Biging, Gregory S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Silicon Valley Power- Solar Electric Buy Down Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Silicon Valley Power (SVP) offers incentives for the installation of new grid-connected solar electric (photovoltaic, or PV) systems. Incentive levels will step down over the life of the program as...

492

Boulder Valley School District (Colorado) Power Purchase Agreement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boulder Valley School District completed a power purchase agreement to install 1.4 MW of solar PV that are expected to reduce electricity bills in 14 schools by about 10% over the...

493

Present State of the Hydrothermal System in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley caldera to be delineated. The model consists of two principal zones in which hot water flows laterally from west to east at depths less than 1 km within and around the...

494

Quaternary Glaciations in the Lago Pueyrredn Valley, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a better knowledge of the extent and timing of glaciations in southern Argentina throughout the Quaternary. It provides a detailed understanding of successive major glacial outlet lobes in the Lago Pueyrredn valley...

Hein, Andrew S.

495

Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstratio...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

West Valley Demonstration Project Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and Melter Feed Hold Tank 1 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing responses to the comments...

496

Microsoft Word - Finely_NorthValley_CX.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Finely Creek and North Valley Creek property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-58888 Categorical Exclusion...

497

Golden Valley Electric Association- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

BusBusiness $ense is a Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) program designed to increase the efficiency with which energy is used on GVEA's system. It provides rebates of up to $20,000 to...

498

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

499

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-funding Unknown References T. E. C. Keith, J. M. Thompson, R. A. Hutchinson, L. D. White (1992) Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region, Alaska...

500

New River Geothermal Research Project, Imperial Valley, California...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share 9,339,420.00 Total Project Cost 14,339,420.00 Principal Investigator(s) Stuart Johnson Location of Project Imperial Valley, CA About the Area The shallow New River thermal...