Sample records for yakima valley wetlands

  1. I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    water quality, wildlife (including no effect o n endangered species), vegetation, fish,.and land use; and (2) there would be n o effect on cultural resources. ' Based.on the...

  2. EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement...

  3. Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix L Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities (http://clientzone.golder.com/YSBI) The Inventory element in the Yakima Subbasin plan is intended to summarize fish and wildlife protection. The Inventory will be updated as the Yakima Subbasin Plan gets updated. This iterative process will allow us

  4. Selection of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of Urban Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rejmankova, Eliska; Bayer, David E

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UC Davis KEYWORDS: Wetlands, Water Treatment, Urban Runoff,of Native Wetland Plants for Water Treatment of UrbanValley Wetlands Biomass Response to Heavy Metal Treatment

  5. Hyperspectral landcover classification for the Yakima Training Center, Yakima, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinmaus, K.L.; Perry, E.M.; Petrie, G.M.; Irwin, D.E.; Foote, H.P.; Wurstner, S.K.; Stephen, A.J.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked in FY97-98 to conduct a multisensor feature extraction project for the Terrain Modeling Project Office (TMPO) of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA). The goal of this research is the development of near-autonomous methods to remotely classify and characterize regions of military interest, in support of the TMPO of NIMA. These methods exploit remotely sensed datasets including hyperspectral (HYDICE) imagery, near-infrared and thermal infrared (Daedalus 3600), radar, and terrain datasets. The study site for this project is the US Army`s Yakima Training Center (YTC), a 326,741-acre training area located near Yakima, Washington. Two study areas at the YTC were selected to conduct and demonstrate multisensor feature extraction, the 2-km x 2-km Cantonment Area and the 3-km x 3-km Choke Point area. Classification of the Cantonment area afforded a comparison of classification results at different scales.

  6. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  7. Ecologically Significant Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agreement 280016 © 1999 Montana Natural Heritage Program State Library Building · P.O. Box 201800 · 1515 on vegeta- tion, documenting the types of wetland communities present, their quality and condition, and rare integrity. Our observations indicate that some types of wetlands, like wet meadows and valley bottom

  8. Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan November 26, 2004 Prepared for the Presented's subbasin planning process is iterative and designed within an adaptive management framework. Management is comprised of elected officials from local governments throughout the subbasin, and meets regularly to work

  9. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204...

  10. Yakima Hatchery Experimental Design : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Curtis; Marshall, Anne

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report details the results and status of Washington Department of Fisheries' (WDF) pre-facility monitoring, research, and evaluation efforts, through May 1991, designed to support the development of an Experimental Design Plan (EDP) for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), previously termed the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP or Y/KPP). This pre- facility work has been guided by planning efforts of various research and quality control teams of the project that are annually captured as revisions to the experimental design and pre-facility work plans. The current objective are as follows: to develop genetic monitoring and evaluation approach for the Y/KPP; to evaluate stock identification monitoring tools, approaches, and opportunities available to meet specific objectives of the experimental plan; and to evaluate adult and juvenile enumeration and sampling/collection capabilities in the Y/KPP necessary to measure experimental response variables.

  11. Climate Change and Adaptation in Irrigated Agriculture?A Case Study of the Yakima River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Vail, Lance W.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Kemanian, Armen

    2004-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a case study of the Yakima River Valley in Washington State, we show that relatively simple tools originally developed to forecast the impact of the El Nino phenomenon on water supplies to irrigated agriculture also can be used to estimate the significantly shifted probability distribution of water shortages in irrigated agriculture during climate change, and that these shifted probabilities can be used to estimate the impact on agriculture in a region. The more permanent nature of changes in the temperature and precipitation regime associated with climate change means that risk management options also take a more permanent form (such as changes in crops and cultivars, and adding storage). A number of storage options have been proposed to deal with El Nino-associated drought, and would be more valuable under climate change. The most ambitious of the proposed storage projects is Black Rock, which would add about 500,00 acre-feet of water to supplement the Yakima's current 1.1 million acre-feet, at a cost currently estimated at $1.9 billion. For perspective, economic losses in the Yakima Valley reportedly have been about $100 million in a drought year such as 2001. Under current circumstances, the expected annual fisheries and periodic drought relief benefits may be large enough to justify the expenditure, but since drought has been occasional, environmental consequences of new projects uncertain, and the price tag beyond the reach of all but the Federal government, no projects have been built. The benefits become more certain with warming. Analysis shows that adding 500,000 acre-feet to TWSA would offset El Nino and the effects of 2 C warming.

  12. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, Fisheries Resource Management, Yakima Indian Nation1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook to the Yakima River system. In January, 1983, 100,000 fish raised at Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery were transported to Nile Springs Rearing Ponds on the Naches River. These fish were allowed a volitional release as smolts in April. An additional 100,000 smolts were transported from Leavenworth Hatchery in April and immediately released to the Upper Yakima River. Relative survival of smolts from their points of release to a trap at Prosser (RM48) was 1.69:1 for fish from Nile Springs, versus the trucked smolts. The fish from Nile Springs arrived at Prosser and McNary Dam approximately 1 week earlier than the transported fish. To better determine the magnitude and location of releases, distribution and abundance studies were undertaken. There is a decrease in abundance from upstream areas over time, indicating a general downstream movement. In the Naches System, the lower Naches River is heavily utilized by juvenile spring chinook during the early summer. A preliminary study evaluated physical limitations of production. On a single evening 67 fish were killed on diversion screens at Chandler Canal. This constituted 5.7% of the wild spring chinook entering the canal and 8.2% of the fall chinook. The larger hatchery spring chinook sustained a 2.3% loss. Adult returns resulted in 443 redds in the Yakima System, with 360 in the Yakima River and 83 in the Naches System.

  13. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

  14. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  15. Yakima Fisheries Project : Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s fish and wildlife program, would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. Fisheries resources in the Yakima River are severely reduced from historical levels and there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) the construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. The project has been considerably revised from the original proposal described in the first draft EIS. Examined in addition to No Action (which would leave present anadromous fisheries resources unchanged in the, Basin) are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing (via stock imported from another basin) naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 has been identified as the preferred action. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

  16. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook salmon in the Yakima River basin. The objectives were to: (1) determine the abundance, distribution and survival of naturally produced fry and smolts in the Yakima River; (2) evaluate different methods of fry and smolt supplementation into the natural rearing environment while maintaining as much as possible the gentic integrity of naturally produced stocks; (3) locate and define areas in the watershed which may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; (4) define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and (5) determine physical and biological limitations for production within the system.

  17. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? Conveyance Pipeline & Outfall Structure Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure Diversion Structure ? Withdraws and lifts water from the East Fork of the Trinity River into the constructed wetland Diversion Pump Station ? Pumps river... supplied by Trinity Valley Electric Cooperative ? Incoming power 138 kV reduced to 5 kV Conveyance Pipeline Conveyance Pipeline ? Transfers polished water to outfall structure at Lavon Lake ? Pipeline divided into 3 segments ? Northern ? Central...

  18. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1987 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The smelt outmigration was monitored at wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be 16,141 smolts. The 1987 spring outmigration of wild spring chinook from the Yakima Basin was estimated to be 251,975 smolts at Prosser. The survival from egg to smelt was calculated using the 1985 redd counts and the 1987 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The estimated survival was 4.16%, which gives a mean egg to smolt survival over four years of 6.32%. In 1987 a total of 3,683 adult and 335 jack spring chinook salmon returning to the Yakima River were counted at Prosser fish ladder. This gives a total of 4,018 salmon returning to Prosser Dam. The median dates of passage were May 12 and May 16 for adults and jacks respectively. An additional 372 fish were estimated to have been caught in the Yakima River subsistence dipnet fishery below Horn Rapids and Prosser Dams. Therefore, total return to the Yakima system was 4,390 spring chinook salmon. Spring chinook were counted at Roza Dam from May 1 to September 30, 1987. Passage at Roza Dam was 1,610 adult and 67 jack spring chinook for a total of 1,677 wild fish. The median dates of passage at Roza Dam were May 29 and May 26 for spring chinook adults and jacks respectively. The smolt to adult (S{sub sa}) survival was calculated based on the 1983 smelt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish) the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. It was estimated that 6,012 wild three, four, and five year old fish returned from an estimated smolt outmigration of 135,548 fish in 1983. This gives an estimated survival from smolt to adult of 4.4%. The smolt to adult survival for the 1984 smolt outmigration was 5.3% with 423 jacks returning in 1985, 5,163 four year old adults returning in 1986, and 983 five year old fish returning in 1987 fran an estimated 123,732 smolts in 1984. Spring chinook adults from fourteen different hatchery release groups were recovered in 1987. A total of 211 coded wire tags were recovered and these were expanded to an estimated 253 returning hatchery fish in 1987. Nine of these fish were jacks.

  19. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops data to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. The first objective is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. Naturally produced populations will be studied to determine if these runs can be sustained in the face of present harvest and environmental conditions. This information will be gathered through spawning ground surveys, counting of adults at Prosser and Roza fish ladders, and through monitoring the tribal dipnet fishery. Concurrent studies will examine potential habitat limitations within the basin. Presently, survival to emergence studies, in conjunction with substrate quality analysis is being undertaken. Water temperature is monitored throughout the basin, and seining takes place monthly to evaluate distribution and abundance. The outcome of this phase of the investigation is to determine an effective manner for introducing hatchery stocks that minimize the impacts on the wild population. The second objective of this study is to determine relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation.

  20. Yakima County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, New York:StateXining WestbandYPPI NewYakima

  1. Structural geometry, strain distribution, and mechanical evolution of eastern Umtanum Ridge and a comparison with other selected localities within Yakima fold structures, south-central Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, E.H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima fold system of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon is a series of megascopic anticlinal ridge of multilayered basalt. Cross-sectional strain analyses were performed at five localities within three anticlines. The analyses show that the strain is consistent both laterally along a fold and within different folds. Folding strain is localized layer-internal faulting, extensive shattering, and limited layer-parallel faulting. Most strain is cataclastic, but glassy flow tops appear to have been more ductile. The strain distributions and structural geometries accord well with a flexural flow buckle model; however, the internal cataclastic flow is not inherently penetrative and limited flexural slip has occurred. This fold model suggests that most strain in the fold is by simple shear and it took place above the topographic surface of adjacent synclinal valleys. Large reverse faults associated with the anticlines are interpreted to be folding strain required by the concentric folding and their displacement is interpreted to have reached the surface late in the folding process. Therefore, the observed strain and its distribution are interpreted to be not directly the result of regional plateau shortening, but of local stresses and resultant strains related to fold geometry. A mechanical analysis of the Umtanum structure termination geometry, combined with slickenside striae movement directions from the study areas suggests that the Palouse slope has behaved as a rigid buttress around which the basalt has rotated clockwise into the folds from the southeast. Compression-box clay modeling of the Yakima fold system within the Pasco Basin shows that the buttress edge orientations control the localization and orientations of buckle folds. Fold orientations and three-dimensional shapes remarkably resembling the Yakima fold system in the Pasco Basin were produced under north-south compression.

  2. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  3. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2003. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2002) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. Each chapter of this report deals with monitoring phenotypic and demographic traits of Yakima River basin spring chinook comparing hatchery and wild returns in 2002; the second year of adult hatchery returns. The first chapter deals specifically with adult traits of American River, Naches basin (excluding the American River), and upper Yakima River spring chinook, excluding gametes. The second chapter examines the gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish. In the third chapter, we describe work begun initially in 2002 to characterize and compare redds of naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River.

  4. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the eleventh of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin. This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding. Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition. Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued nontarget taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into two chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fourth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima Basin. Chapter 2 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River.

  5. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  6. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  7. Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

  8. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  9. Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland or wetland buffer zone which is not an allowed use. Activity in Class I or Class II wetland or its associated buffer zone...

  10. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  11. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 1 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busack, Craig A.; Frye, Alice; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genetic work for 2003, as in previous years, was quite diverse. In chapter 1 we report on the use of DNA microsatellite markers to sex spring chinook collected at Roza. We have learned through comparison of sex determinations at Roza and then at CESRF that sexing green fish on the basis of morphology is somewhat inaccurate, and accurate sexing of fish at Roza is needed to estimate sex ratios of fish on the spawning grounds. Using DNA microsatellite markers, sexing accuracy was high, but not perfect. In chapter 2 we report on new genetic risk concepts currently being developed and their implications for the YKFP spring chinook program. The impact on domestication of gene flow between the natural and hatchery spawning components is now much better understood. It is now possible to compare the risk of different hatchery programs much more quantitatively in the past. Thus, we can now make good predictions of how much less domesticating the Yakima spring chinook supplementation effort is than other programs. In chapter 3 we present the initial results of morphological comparisons of adult (1) hatchery-origin Upper Yakima spring chinook, (2) natural-origin U. Yakima spring chinook, and (3) Naches spring chinook. Canonical variate analysis allowed both sexes of the three groups to be classified correctly with over accuracy. The differences are subtle, but hatchery-origin fish appear to be someone thinner than natural-origin fish. This is consistent with observations of hatchery vs wild morphology in coho. In chapter 4 we describe the ongoing work to refine the Domestication Research/Monitoring Plan. Work for last year included analysis of the impact of HC line precocious males spawning in the wild, development of a misting incubation system for off-site incubation of Naches eggs, and refinement of some aspects of experimental design. The misting incubation system has broad applicability outside the project. The most recent version of the domestication monitoring plan is included as an appendix. In chapter 5 we present a final report on computer simulations of factorial mating designs. Using three different schemes for combining breeding values of fish, we found that full factorial mating offers a substantial increase in effective size over single-pair mating. Although full factorial mating may be too difficult logistically, but a significant proportion of the full factorial mating advantage can be obtained by using 2 x 2 partial factorials. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the relative effective size advantage of mixed partial factorial designs. In chapter 6 we report on an analysis of stock origin of smolts collected at Chandler. The 702 Chinook salmon smolts collected at the Chandler trap in 2003 were screened at 12 microsatellite DNA loci. A new Yakima basin baseline, consisting of spring chinook from the upper Yakima, Naches, and American River populations and fall chinook from the Marion Drain and lower Yakima populations, was created for these same 12 loci. DNA template problems with the tissue collections from the Naches, and American River populations prompted the omission of four loci prior to analysis. The results indicated: 80% Naches spring, 13% American River spring, 7% upper Yakima spring, and less than 1% for the two fall populations combined. The estimated stock proportions in the 2003 Chandler collection differed substantially from those for the 2002 collection. The temporal pattern of sampling in both Chandler smolt collections was not proportional to the observed outmigration in each year, suggesting that both of these estimates should be regarded with caution. Strengthening of the baseline data set will be a high priority for future work with Chandler smolts.

  12. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line in Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington.

  13. Sandhill Crane Roost Site Characteristics in the North Platte River Valley Author(s): Martin J. Folk and Thomas C. Tacha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhill Crane Roost Site Characteristics in the North Platte River Valley Author(s): Martin J the North Platte River Valley (NPRV) of Nebraska in riverine and semipermanent palustrine wetlands from late in the Platte River. Cranes roosted in semipermanent wetlands where widths were >12 m, water depths were 5

  14. NEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    wetland delineation, wetland restoration, and constructed wetlands for water treatment. Course contentNEW COURSE: WETLAND HYDROLOGY AND BIOGEOCHEMISTRY EXPLORING THE PROCESSES THAT CONTROL WETLAND (FOR 5984; CRN 19997) Course Overview and Objectives: Wetland ecosystems provide myriad functions from

  15. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  16. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  17. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . I was hired into the fledgling Wetlands Re- search Department consisting of Ken Marcellus, George- port with regard to the Wetlands Act. One of my very first assignments was to work with Marcellus

  18. Wetland Preservation Areas (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wetland owner can apply to the host county for designation of a wetland preservation area. Once designated, the area remains designated until the owner initiates expiration, except where a state...

  19. Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

  20. Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into three chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the fifth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River basin. Chapter 2 describes our tributary sampling methodology for monitoring the status of tributary NTT. Chapter 3 describes predation on juvenile salmonids by smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the lower Yakima River. The chapters in this report are in various stages of d

  1. Wetland Survey of Selected Areas in the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Area of Responsibilty, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was prepared to summarize wetland surveys performed in the Y- 1 2 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994. Wetland surveys were conducted in three areas within the Oak Ridge Y- 12 Plant area of responsibility in June and July 1994: the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Operable Unit (OU), part of the Bear Creek Valley OU (the upper watershed of Bear Creek from the culvert under Bear Creek Road upstream through the Y-12 West End Environmental Management Area, and the catchment of Bear Creek North Tributary 1), and part of Chestnut Ridge OU 2 (the McCoy Branch area south of Bethel Valley Road). Using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual, 18 wetland areas were identified in the 3 areas surveyed; these areas were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin. Fourteen wetlands and one wetland/pond area that are associated with disturbed or remnant stream channels and seeps were identified in the UEFPC OU. Three wetlands were identified in the Bear Creek Valley OU portion of the survey area. One wetland was identified in the riparian zone of McCoy Branch in the southern portion of Chestnut Ridge OU 2.

  2. Tidal Wetlands Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most activities occurring in or near tidal wetlands are regulated, and this section contains information on such activities and required permit applications for proposed activities. Applications...

  3. Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

  4. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adjacent Wetlands Tidal marsh inventory Navigation and Safety Distance to 2m contour is > 50% creek width- ing ones. The tool is a series of maps of the Virginia coastline shown in seg- ments which are rated

  5. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Locally Important Wetlands Carl H. Hershner Editor's note: The Virginia Coastal Resources Management ............. 7 Peat: Processing and Potential for Restoration .................................. 9 Calendar and by the Virginia Coastal Resources Management Program of the Depart- ment of Environmental Quality through Grant

  6. Wastewater Reclamation/Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetland easement (2000 acres) 3.7 miles 1.4 miles Direction of flow NORTH FM 3039 US 175 Five Major Components ? Diversion Pump Station & Diversion Structure ? Constructed Wetland ? Conveyance Pump Station ? Electrical Substation... ? Vertical Turbine Pumps 3 ? 3000 Hp 2 ? future 6000 Hp ? Equipped with SCADA system Electrical Substation Electrical Substation ? Provides power to the Conveyance Pump Station ? Power is approximately 60% of annual operating budget ? Power...

  7. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Klickitat Monitoring and Evaluation, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zendt, Joe; Babcock, Mike [Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management

    2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of monitoring and evaluation (M&E) activities for salmonid fish populations and habitat in the Klickitat River subbasin in south-central Washington. The M&E activities described here were conducted as a part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA)-funded Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) and were designed by consensus of the scientists with the Yakama Nation (YN) Fisheries Program. YKFP is a joint project between YN and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Overall YKFP goals are to increase natural production of and opportunity to harvest salmon and steelhead in the Yakima and Klickitat subbasins using hatchery supplementation, harvest augmentation and habitat improvements. Klickitat subbasin M&E activities have been subjected to scientific and technical review by members of the YKFP Science/Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) as part of the YKFP's overall M&E proposal. Yakama Nation YKFP biologists have transformed the conceptual design into the tasks described. YKFP biologists have also been involved with the Collaborative Systemwide Monitoring and Evaluation Project (CSMEP - a project aimed at improving the quality, consistency, and focus of fish population and habitat data to answer key M&E questions relevant to major decisions in the Columbia Basin) and are working towards keeping Klickitat M&E activities consistent with CSMEP recommendations. This report summarizes progress and results for the following major categories of YN-managed tasks under this contract: (1) Monitoring and Evaluation - to gather baseline information in order to characterize habitat and salmonid populations pre- and post-habitat restoration and pre-supplementation. (2) Ecological Interactions - to determine presence of pathogens in wild and naturally produced salmonids in the Klickitat Basin and develop supplementation strategies using this information. (3) Genetics - to develop YKFP supplementation broodstock collection protocols for the preservation of genetic variability, by refining methods of detecting within-stock genetic variability and between-stock genetic variability.

  8. Wetlands and Riparian Rights (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment regulates dredging, dumping, filling, and similar activities in wetland areas to protect the environmental and public values of the wetlands and to sustain their...

  9. Regulatory and Wetlands Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These statutes establish wetlands as a natural resource of public value in the State, and state that it is in the public interest to restore and preserve these wetlands and their biological...

  10. Regulating Constructed Wetlands in Scotland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    / minewater treatment ­ Stormwater management wetlands (SUDS) ­ Reedbeds for "polishing" farmyard runoff of a treatment system · CAR Engineering licence ­ if wetland associated with river/loch ­ Environmental service · Improved riparian habitat Insh Marshes, River Spey #12;23/05/2012 5 Wetlands for Sewage Treatment

  11. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  12. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 5 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L.; James, Brenda B. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2003 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  13. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  14. Maintenance of Stormwater Wetlands and Wet Ponds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    constructed across North Carolina. OVERVIEW As its name implies, a stormwater wetland is a wetland system of stormwater wetlands and wet ponds is performed to achieve four goals: efficient hydraulic flow and pollutant

  15. Techniques for Wetlands Construction and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Shawn; Frentress, C.; Cathey, James; Mason, C.; Hirsch, R.; Wagner, M.

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands are important ecosystems that contain a vast array of plants and animals. Wetlands perform a variety of vital functions, such as purifying water. This publication explains the role of wetlands and how to construct and manage them....

  16. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  17. 11/17/11 Treatment Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    11/17/11 1 Treatment Wetlands Dr. Andrea Ludwig Biosystems Engineering TerOary) ­ nutrient removal Uses of Treatment Wetlands for Improved Water Wetland Ecology ­ November 17, 2011 Mississippi River Flooding 2011 Gulf

  18. Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Introduction Wetlands are increasingly used for wastewater treatment Plant community changes and related nutrient retention within an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland How does plant community composition change in an aridland constructed wastewater treatment wetland and how do those

  19. The Amenity Value of Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Shan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 50 4.3.1 Chatham County Board of Assessor ................................... 50 4.3.2 Chatham County Metropolitan Planning Council............... 51 4.3.3 National Wetland Inventory................................................ 51 4... 6.3.4 The Implicit Prices of Wetland Attributes .......................... 100 6.4 Hedonic Models in Savannah ................................................... 100 6.4.1 Basic Hedonic Model...

  20. Effects of Domestication on Predation Mortality and Competitive Dominance; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Scott, Jennifer L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second of a series of progress reports that address the effects of hatchery domestication on predation mortality and competitive dominance in the upper Yakima River basin (Pearsons et al. 2004). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. Raising fish in hatcheries can cause unintended behavioral, physiological, or morphological changes in chinook salmon due to domestication selection. Domestication selection is defined by Busack and Currens 1995 as, ''changes in quantity, variety, or combination of alleles within a captive population or between a captive population and its source population in the wild as a result of selection in an artificial environment''. Selection in artificial environments could be due to intentional or artificial selection, biased sampling during some stage of culture, or unintentional selection (Busack and Currens 1995). Genetic changes can result in lowered survival in the natural environment (Reisenbichler and Rubin 1999). The goal of supplementation or conservation hatcheries is to produce fish that will integrate into natural populations. Conservation hatcheries attempt to minimize intentional or biased sampling so that the hatchery fish are similar to naturally produced fish. However, the selective pressures in hatcheries are dramatically different than in the wild, which can result in genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish. The selective pressures may be particularly prominent during the freshwater rearing stage where most mortality of wild fish occurs. The Yakima Fisheries Project is studying the effects of domestication on a variety of adult and juvenile traits of spring chinook salmon (Busack et al. 2003). The overall experimental design is to compare a variety of traits, across generations, from three lines of Yakima basin chinook, a hatchery control, supplementation line, and a wild control. The hatchery line was derived from wild upper Yakima broodstock and is only allowed to spawn in the hatchery. The supplementation line is upper Yakima stock that spawns in the upper Yakima River. This stock is an integration of wild and hatchery supplementation fish. Starting in 2005, we plan to use a wild control line of fish that will be the offspring of wild broodstock collected in the Naches River system, a tributary to the Yakima River. The Naches River is not stocked with hatchery fish, and there is minimal stray from Upper Yakima supplementation, so we believe that these will serve as a control to compare any genotypic changes in the hatchery and the supplementation line. As generations of fish are tested, we believe we will be able to analyze the data using an analysis of covariance to test the hypothesis that the hatchery line will exhibit greater domestication over generations, the wild line will remain at baseline levels, and the supplementation line will be somewhere in between. In this report, we have used the terms ''hatchery'' or ''supplementation'' to refer to upper Yakima fish that are progeny of fish that spent one generation in the hatchery, and ''wild'' to refer to fish that have had no exposure to the hatchery other than the matings for this experiment. The terms are relative to the parents that produced the fish for these experiments. All progeny of these fish were mated and reared under the same laboratory conditions. This report addresses two juvenile traits: predation mortality, and competitive dominance. Other traits will be presented in other project reports. It is anticipated that it will take at least two to five generations to detect measurable responses in many domestication response variables (Busack et

  1. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of constructed wetland treatment performance forof a con- structed wetland for treatment of winery effluent.constructed wetlands for process wastewater treatment at two

  2. Bethel Valley Watershed

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    study to find soluble contamination sources that contribute to the contamination of surface and ground waters. Once the remediation activities required by the Bethel Valley...

  3. Hydrogeologic characterization of Illinois wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, J.J.; Miller, M.V.; Rorick, N.L.; Fucciolo, C.S. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), under contract from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT), is evaluating a series of selected wetlands and sites proposed for wetland construction and/or restoration. The program is associated with wetland mitigation for unavoidable effects of state highway construction. The goal of this ongoing program is: (1) to collect commonly lacking geologic, geomorphic, hydrologic, and geochemical data from various wetland sites; and (2) to create a database of this information for use by government agencies and the private sector. Some of the potential uses of this database include: (1) determination of history, role, and possible life cycle of various wetland types allowing more effective design criteria; (2) functional comparison of constructed or restored wetlands versus natural wetlands; (3) testing of wetland hypotheses and delineation techniques under a variety of known hydrogeologic conditions in Illinois; (4) hydrogeologic assessment of potential mitigation sites against a suite of known sites; and (5) determination of data and collection methods appropriate for hydrogeologic wetland studies. A series of tasks is required to complete each study. Historical information is collected from ISGS records, including data regarding topography, soils, sediments, bedrock, and local well records. A field-testing plan is prepared, which includes goals of the study, methods, research potential, and potential results. An initial report is prepared after geologic and geochemical characterization and the installation of needed ground water monitoring wells and surface water gauges. After one year of water-level monitoring, a final report is prepared regarding the present conditions of a site. Further monitoring may be required to determine the performance at constructed and/or restored sites.

  4. PAUL B. HOOK Wetland and Watershed Scientist, Intermountain Aquatics, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    design for water resource protection Native-plant-based streambank bioengineering and treatment wetland and plant effects in wastewater treatment wetlands and riparian buffers Wetland and riparian restoration in surface and groundwater hydrology.** Residential wastewater treatment wetland, Jackson, WY (research

  5. Bottom-up, decision support system development : a wetlandsalinity management application in California's San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin ofCalifornia's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratorywildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during theannual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetland contain saltwhich, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdownperiod, negatively impacts downstream agricultural riparian waterdiverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinityto the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-pointsources, now addresses return flows from seasonally managed wetlands.Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means ofmatching wetland return flows to the assimilative capacity of the SanJoaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring anddecision support systems to implement this concept have failed forreasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed inthe context of more general challenges facing the successfulimplementation of environmental monitoring, modelling and decisionsupport systems. The paper then provides details of a current researchand development project which will ultimately provide wetland managerswith the means of matching salt exports with the available assimilativecapacity of the San Joaquin River, when fully implemented. Manipulationof the traditional wetland drawdown comes at a potential cost to thesustainability of optimal wetland moist soil plant habitat in thesewetlands - hence the project provides appropriate data and a feedback andresponse mechanism for wetland managers to balance improvements to SanJoaquin River quality with internally-generated information on the healthof the wetland resource. The author concludes the paper by arguing thatthe architecture of the current project decision support system, whencoupled with recent advances in environmental data acquisition, dataprocessing and information dissemination technology, holds significantpromise to address some of the problems described earlier in the paperthat have limited past efforts to improve Basin water qualitymanagement.

  6. Wetlands Mitigation Banking and the Problem of Consolidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Gordon

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of waterbirds in Aspen Park wetlands. Hydrobiologia, 567(1),introducing small fish into Aspen Parkland pothole wetlands

  7. Ganges valley aerosol experiment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

  8. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

  9. A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanna, W. Mark

    2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

  10. Surprise Valley water geochmical data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicolas Spycher

    Chemical analyses of thermal and cold ground waters from Surprise Valley, compiled from publicly available sources.

  11. Death Valley TronaWestend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Valley North Lake Mohave Lake Mead Mohave County Inyo County San Bernardino County Clark County Esmeralda

  12. COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gawlik, Dale E.

    COMMUNITY PATTERNS IN TREATMENT WETLANDS, NATURAL WETLANDS, AND CROPLANDS IN FLORIDA TYLER J. BECK of treatment wetlands called Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) have been constructed on agricultural land greatly decreased, the creation of constructed wetlands for wastewater treatment has been increasing since

  13. Industry and forest wetlands: Cooperative research initiatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, J.P. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Lucier, A.A. (National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, New York, NY (United States)); Haines, L.W. (International Paper, Bainbridge, GA (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the forest products industry responded to a challenge of the National Wetlands Policy Forum to initiate a cooperative research program on forest wetlands management organized through the National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). The objective is to determine how forest landowners can manage wetlands for timber production while protecting other wetland functions such as flood storage, water purification, and food chain/wildlife habitat support. Studies supported by the NCASI in 9 states are summarized. Technical support on wetland regulatory issues to member companies is part of the research program. Since guidelines for recognizing wetlands for regulatory proposed have changed frequently, the NCASI has recommend an explicit link between wetland delineation and a classification system that considers difference among wetland types in vegetation, soils, hydrology, appearance, landscape position, and other factors. 16 refs.

  14. Development near Wetlands and Waterways (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wetlands and Waterways Program requires permits for commercial activity or development proposed on or near a wetland or waterway. For the purpose of the permitting process, major projects are...

  15. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this  study  the  “treatment  wetland  ”  has  continued  wetland   impoundment,   and   a   treatment   (

  16. Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Land Management (BLM), and numerous county and local governments. The surveys have also involvedColorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland Program Plan A Vision for Building Comprehensive Wetland Information for the State of Colorado Planning Years 2011­2015 #12;Colorado Natural Heritage Program Wetland

  17. WETLAND DELINEATION REPORT UMORE MINING AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Project 08-0092 September 29, 2009 #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0. INTRODUCTION Determination Form #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire Township Wetland Delineation #12;UMore Gravel EIS ­ Empire

  18. Constructed Wetlands for Industry in Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Treatment System 2. The Artificially Constructed Wetland System 3. The Grass Filtration System 4. The Red treatment ponds 1 water quality improvement pond #12;23/05/2012 5 The Constructed Wetland System - Shallow wetlands (Natural treatment system) Ubol Ratana #12;23/05/2012 8 Immediate Objectives - Treat community

  19. Geometry of Valley Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petroff, Alexander P; Abrams, Daniel M; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Kudrolli, Arshad; Rothman, Daniel H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although amphitheater-shaped valley heads can be cut by groundwater flows emerging from springs, recent geological evidence suggests that other processes may also produce similar features, thus confounding the interpretations of such valley heads on Earth and Mars. To better understand the origin of this topographic form we combine field observations, laboratory experiments, analysis of a high-resolution topographic map, and mathematical theory to quantitatively characterize a class of physical phenomena that produce amphitheater-shaped heads. The resulting geometric growth equation accurately predicts the shape of decimeter-wide channels in laboratory experiments, 100-meter wide valleys in Florida and Idaho, and kilometer wide valleys on Mars. We find that whenever the processes shaping a landscape favor the growth of sharply protruding features, channels develop amphitheater-shaped heads with an aspect ratio of pi.

  20. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project: Short Project Overview of Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation in the Upper Yakima Basin; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.; Bosch, William J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is on schedule to ascertain whether new artificial production techniques can be used to increase harvest and natural production of spring Chinook salmon while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the fish population being supplemented and keeping adverse genetic and ecological interactions with non-target species or stocks within acceptable limits. The Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) collected its first spring chinook brood stock in 1997, released its first fish in 1999, and age-4 adults have been returning since 2001. In these initial years of CESRF operation, recruitment of hatchery origin fish has exceeded that of fish spawning in the natural environment, but early indications are that hatchery origin fish are not as successful at spawning in the natural environment as natural origin fish when competition is relatively high. When competition is reduced, hatchery fish produced similar numbers of progeny as their wild counterparts. Most demographic variables are similar between natural and hatchery origin fish, however hatchery origin fish were smaller-at-age than natural origin fish. Long-term fitness of the target population is being evaluated by a large-scale test of domestication. Slight changes in predation vulnerability and competitive dominance, caused by domestication, were documented. Distribution of spawners has increased as a result of acclimation site location and salmon homing fidelity. Semi-natural rearing and predator avoidance training have not resulted in significant increases in survival of hatchery fish. However, growth manipulations in the hatchery appear to be reducing the number of precocious males produced by the YKFP and consequently increasing the number of migrants. Genetic impacts to non-target populations appear to be low because of the low stray rates of YKFP fish. Ecological impacts to valued non-target taxa were within containment objectives or impacts that were outside of containment objectives were not caused by supplementation activities. Some fish and bird piscivores have been estimated to consume large numbers of salmonids in the Yakima Basin. Natural production of Chinook salmon in the upper Yakima Basin appears to be density dependent under current conditions and may constrain the benefits of supplementation. However, such constraints (if they exist) could be countered by YKFP habitat actions that have resulted in: the protection of over 900 acres of prime floodplain habitat, reconnection and screening of over 15 miles of tributary habitat, substantial water savings through irrigation improvements, and restoration of over 80 acres of floodplain and side channels. Harvest opportunities for tribal and non-tribal fishers have also been enhanced, but are variable among years. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until further data is collected and analyses completed. Nonetheless, the YKFP has produced significant findings, and produced methodologies that can be used to evaluate and improve supplementation. A summary table of topical area performance is presented.

  1. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  2. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental Values, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release CO2

  3. Wetland Importance Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    /Tourism (consumptive & non-consumptive uses) ·Aesthetics ·Economic Value #12;2 Biological Values Wetland Dependent Billion in Damage in U.S. 2004 Hurricanes ·Charley (22) ·Frances (15) ·Ivan (60) ·Jeanne (6) Environmental) Pesticides, Heavy Metals, Grease, Oil 99.9% E. coli Eutrophication 40% of Global C 25% in Peatlands Release

  4. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Effects? Fuel 1.9 Trillion Tons ·Canada (510 bT) ·Russia (770 bT) World Peat Resources 1) Finland 2 After Discharges ·Chemical ·Temperature #12;6 Human Influences on Wetlands Peat Mining Horticulture) Ireland 3) Russia World Peat Mining 16.8 mil tons 6.9 mil tons 23.7 mil tons Fuel= Hort= 70% 30%

  5. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders.

  6. A Summary of Coupled, Uncoupled, and Hybrid Tectonic Models for the Yakima Fold Belt--Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize the range of opinions and supporting information expressed by the expert community regarding whether a coupled or uncoupled model, or a combination of both, best represents structures in the Yakima Fold Belt. This issue was assessed to have a high level of contention with up to moderate potential for impact on the hazard estimate. This report defines the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  7. A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  8. NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) Location: San...

  9. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

  10. Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access Road over Lena Gulch Floodplain and Wetlands Assessment for Construction of a Second Full Service Access...

  11. artificial wetlands pilot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A process-based pilot-scale (more) Beebe, Donald 2013-01-01 6 National Wetlands Inventory Wetlands of the Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: National...

  12. artificial wetland ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source Centre for Climate Change Research) DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF METHANE IN LAKES AND WETLANDS INVITED SPEAKERS...

  13. Inland Wetlands and Water Courses Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Regulated activities in or near inland wetlands and water courses include the removal or depositing of material, land or water obstruction or alteration, construction, pollution, or water diversion...

  14. Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Brenda B.; Pearsons, Todd N.; McMichael, Geoffrey A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Select ecological interactions and spring chinook salmon residual/precocial abundance were monitored in 1998 as part of the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's supplementation monitoring program. Monitoring these variables is part of an effort to help evaluate the factors that contribute to, or limit supplementation success. The ecological interactions that were monitored were prey consumption, competition for food, and competition for space. The abundance of spring chinook salmon life-history forms that have the potential to be influenced by supplementation and that have important ecological and genetic roles were monitored (residuals and precocials). Residual spring chinook salmon do not migrate to the ocean during the normal emigration period and continue to rear in freshwater. Precocials are those salmon that precocially mature in freshwater. The purpose of sampling during 1998 was to collect baseline data one year prior to the release of hatchery spring chinook salmon which occurred during the spring of 1999. All sampling that the authors report on here was conducted in upper Yakima River during summer and fall 1998. The stomach fullness of juvenile spring chinook salmon during the summer and fall averaged 12%. The food competition index suggested that mountain whitefish (0.59), rainbow trout (0.55), and redside shiner (0.55) were competing for food with spring chinook salmon. The space competition index suggested that rainbow trout (0.31) and redside shiner (0.39) were competing for space with spring chinook salmon but mountain whitefish (0.05) were not. Age-0 spring chinook salmon selected a fairly narrow range of microhabitat parameters in the summer and fall relative to what was available. Mean focal depths and velocities for age 0 spring chinook salmon during the summer were 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.26 m/s {+-} 0.19 m/s, and during the fall 0.5 m {+-} 0.2 m and 0.24 m/s {+-} 0.18 m/s. Among potential competitors, age 1+ rainbow trout exhibited the greatest degree of microhabitat overlap with spring chinook salmon. Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon residuals (age 1+ during the summer) was low (< 0.007/m), representing less than 2% of the naturally produced spring chinook salmon (age 0+ and age 1+ during the summer). Abundance of naturally occurring spring chinook salmon that complete their life cycle in freshwater was high relative to anadromous adults. The authors observed an average of 9.5 precocially mature spring chinook salmon on redds with anadromous adults. In addition, 87% of the redds with anadromous adults present also had precocial males attending. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

  15. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  16. Indefinite Deferral: Imagining Salinas Valley’s Subterranean Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarna-Wojcicki, Daniel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ground waters of the Salinas Basin. It therefore provides aPublished “Bulletin 52”, Salinas Basin Investigation Seaintervention, the Salinas Valley groundwater basin has not

  17. What is a Wetland? Matthew J. Gray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    and Filling of Wetlands Permits Issued by Army Corps of Engineers Environmental Impact Statement and organisms live Substrate is non-soil (H2O depth prevents emergent hydrophyte growth) >2 m (6.6 ft) in Depth (Non-tidal Wetlands) #12;3 What are Hydrophytes? USACE Definition "...macrophytic plant life

  18. Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    23/05/2012 1 Constructed wetlands for industry and commerce Brian D'Arcy and Kate Heal Types of pollution sources and water quality reductions needed Increasing Concentration Treatment & dilution Self drainage Resource recovery #12;23/05/2012 2 How do constructed wetlands improve water quality? Treatment

  19. Songs From Happy Valley and Other Stories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagel, Lisa W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RIVERSIDE Songs From Happy Valley and Other Stories A Thesisv TABLE OF CONTENTS Songs From Happy Valley The X-Ray SpecsMatch Game vi Songs From Happy Valley Thursday, October 13,

  20. Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Beaver Valley

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Beaver Valley" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  1. Case Study - Sioux Valley Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    periods. This detailed billing cannot be done with conventional meters. Critical Peak Pricing Lowers Peak Demands and Electric Bills in South Dakota and Minnesota Sioux Valley...

  2. Channel Design to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity and Connectivity in Stockton, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, Erin O.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Facility. Treatment Wetland System Startup PeriodDesign to Increase Wastewater Treatment Wetland Capacity andof wastewater treatment wetlands at the Stockton Regional

  3. Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of first-order treatment wetland models. EcologicalR. L. Knight. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. Lewis Publishers CRCS. D. Wallace. 2008. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press Taylor &

  4. Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF G FGalacticGanges Valley

  5. Jurisdictional wetland delineation in the Texas Gulf Coast Prairie utilizing aerial photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Samuel Jewell

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ,jurisdictional wetlands, areas of inclusion (wetlands which occurred within the remote sensing and the onsite method), omission (wetlands omitted by the remote sensing method), and commission (upland areas delineated as wetlands by the remote sensing method). An equation...

  6. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    df III SS Mean F-Ratio p-value Squares Treatment WetlandDepth Treatment*Wetland Treatment*DepthWetland*Depth Treatment*Wetland*Depth Error Table 2: A. Data

  7. Feasibility of using geothermal effluents for waterfowl wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using geothermal effluents for developing and maintaining waterfowl wetlands. Information in the document pertains to a seven State area the West where geothermal resources have development potential. Information is included on physiochemical characteristics of geothermal effluents; known effects of constituents in the water on a wetland ecosystem and water quality criteria for maintaining a viable wetland; potential of sites for wetland development and disposal of effluent water from geothermal facilities; methods of disposal of effluents, including advantages of each method and associated costs; legal and institutional constraints which could affect geothermal wetland development; potential problems associated with depletion of geothermal resources and subsidence of wetland areas; potential interference (adverse and beneficial) of wetlands with ground water; special considerations for wetlands requirements including size, flows, and potential water usage; and final conclusions and recommendations for suitable sites for developing demonstration wetlands.

  8. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Easterbrooks, John A. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council and funded by the Bonneville Power Administration. The YKFP has adopted the definition of supplementation described by Regional Assessment of Supplementation Program (1992), which is ''the use of artificial propagation in an attempt to maintain or increase natural production while maintaining the long-term fitness of the target population, and keeping the ecological and genetic impacts on nontarget populations within specified biological limits''. Recent scientific reviews of hatchery supplementation continue to highlight the experimental nature and risk of supplementation (Independent Scientific Group 1996; National Research Council 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Independent Multidisciplinary Science Team 2000; Independent Scientific Advisory Board 2003; Hatchery Scientific Review Group 2003). In addition, many of these reviews included recommendations about the best ways to operate a supplementation program. Most of these recommendations were already being done or have been incorporated into the YKFP. The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), and Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve at the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2002 and July 31, 2003. The Yakama Nation's portion of the YKFP is presented in another report. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal. Pearsons and Easterbrooks (2003) described last year's activities.

  9. Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, Final Report For the Performance Period May 1, 2008 through April 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, Melvin R. [The Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima-Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a joint project of the Yakama Nation (lead entity) and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and is sponsored in large part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with oversight and guidance from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). It is among the largest and most complex fisheries management projects in the Columbia Basin in terms of data collection and management, physical facilities, habitat enhancement and management, and experimental design and research on fisheries resources. Using principles of adaptive management, the YKFP is attempting to evaluate all stocks historically present in the Yakima subbasin and apply a combination of habitat restoration and hatchery supplementation or reintroduction, to restore the Yakima Subbasin ecosystem with sustainable and harvestable populations of salmon, steelhead and other at-risk species. The original impetus for the YKFP resulted from the landmark fishing disputes of the 1970s, the ensuing legal decisions in United States versus Washington and United States versus Oregon, and the region's realization that lost natural production needed to be mitigated in upriver areas where these losses primarily occurred. The YKFP was first identified in the NPCC's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) and supported in the U.S. v Oregon 1988 Columbia River Fish Management Plan (CRFMP). A draft Master Plan was presented to the NPCC in 1987 and the Preliminary Design Report was presented in 1990. In both circumstances, the NPCC instructed the Yakama Nation, WDFW and BPA to carry out planning functions that addressed uncertainties in regard to the adequacy of hatchery supplementation for meeting production objectives and limiting adverse ecological and genetic impacts. At the same time, the NPCC underscored the importance of using adaptive management principles to manage the direction of the Project. The 1994 FWP reiterated the importance of proceeding with the YKFP because of the added production and learning potential the project would provide. The YKFP is unique in having been designed to rigorously test the efficacy of hatchery supplementation. Given the current dire situation of many salmon and steelhead stocks, and the heavy reliance on artificial propagation as a recovery tool, YKFP monitoring results will have great region-wide significance. Supplementation is envisioned as a means to enhance and sustain the abundance of wild and naturally-spawning populations at levels exceeding the cumulative mortality burden imposed on those populations by habitat degradation and by natural cycles in environmental conditions. A supplementation hatchery is properly operated as an adjunct to the natural production system in a watershed. By fully integrating the hatchery with a naturally-producing population, high survival rates for the component of the population in the hatchery can raise the average abundance of the total population (hatchery component + naturally-producing component) to a level that compensates for the high mortalities imposed by human development activities and fully seeds the natural environment. The objectives of the YKFP are to: use Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) and other modeling tools to facilitate planning for project activities, enhance existing stocks, re-introduce extirpated stocks, protect and restore habitat in the Yakima Subbasin, and operate using a scientifically rigorous process that will foster application of the knowledge gained about hatchery supplementation and habitat restoration throughout the Columbia River Basin. The YKFP is still in the early stages of evaluation, and as such the data and findings presented in this report should be considered preliminary until results are published in the peer-reviewed literature. The following is a brief summary of current YKFP activities by species.

  10. COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    COURSE SYLLABUS WETLANDS AND WATER QUALITY SOS 5242 3 Credits I. COURSE DESCRIPTION: Introduction page of this syllabus to contact the instructor if you are not able to make it to an exam ­ prior

  11. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosensteel, B.A. [JAYCOR, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Trettin, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  12. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  13. Valley Electric Association- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Directors for Valley Electric Association (VEA) approved net metering in April 2008. The rules apply to systems up to 30 kW, though owners of larger systems may be able to negotiate...

  14. Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

  15. Geothermal wetlands: an annotated bibliography of pertinent literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanley, N.E.; Thurow, T.L.; Russell, B.F.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annotated bibliography covers the following topics: algae, wetland ecosystems; institutional aspects; macrophytes - general, production rates, and mineral absorption; trace metal absorption; wetland soils; water quality; and other aspects of marsh ecosystems. (MHR)

  16. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    XII of this Act introduced 3 conservation provisions to address environmental concerns associatedWetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title) Conservation ­ "Sodbuster" provision ­ Wetland Conservation, or "Swampbuster" #12;The Swampbuster provision

  17. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South

  18. Application of integrated constructed wetlands for contaminant treatment and diffusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Yu

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sediment accumulation is an important characteristic in the ageing process of integrated constructed wetlands (ICW). Retained nutrient and other contaminants in wetland sediments have the potential to be remobilized ...

  19. Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This stream restoration increases water contact with the floodplain and vegetation to remove fertilizer, auto Park SWAMP Duke University Wetland Center The Sandy Creek Stream Channel Restoration Before After.nicholas.duke.edu/wetland native bird species? The effect of stream and wetland restoration can vary depending on the bird species

  20. Characterizing Microclimate and Plant Community Variation in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, Jason D.

    Climate . Wetlands . Soil . Temperature . Modeling . Boreal Introduction Groundwater-fed calcareous of Wetland Scientists 2013 Abstract Groundwater-fed calcareous wetlands (fens) sup- port diverse plant developed accurate daily resolution soil temperature models (min and max) from a 29-sensor network

  1. Page 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wetlands ecology and management. They encountered water treatment and sewage treatment facilities that hadPage 4 Summer 2004Wetland Wire Revisiting the Iraqi Marshlands DUWC Director says restoration efforts are progressing, but the record is mixed hen Duke University Wetland Center Director Curtis

  2. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    .................................... 14 #12;iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Construction of the H-02 constructed treatment wetlands adjacent to HH-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5

  3. River otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    monitored otter latrines at two wetland types (a saltwater lake and freshwater treatment ponds), 5 times perRiver otter foraging opportunities at a coastal wetland Results DiscussionIntroduction River otters (Lontra canadensis) are the top predator in functioning wetland ecosystems. Kruuk (1995) proposed

  4. Post-project evaluation of Tule Ponds in Fremont, California : Integration of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunde, Kevin B; Weinstein, Adam H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of stormwater treatment and wetland restoration A paperSurface-Flow Constructed Treatment Wetlands, University oftools in the context of treatment wetlands, and if designed

  5. The Department of Energy`s floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE`s floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE`s floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE`s requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action`s impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  6. The Department of Energy's floodplain/wetlands review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Votteler, T.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Executive Orders (E.O.) issued in 1977, Floodplain Management (E.O. 11988) and Protection of Wetlands (E.O. 11990), require that Federal agencies examine the impacts of proposed actions on floodplains and wetlands. To comply with these Orders, the US Department of Energy (DOE) promulgated 10 CFR 1022, DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements. DOE's floodplain/wetlands review consists of two procedures: the floodplain/wetlands determination, and the floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands determination ascertains the applicability of DOE's floodplain management and wetlands protection requirements for a proposed action. If DOE's requirements apply to a proposed action, DOE shall prepare a floodplain/wetlands assessment. The floodplain/wetlands assessment ascertains an action's impact, any alternatives, and mitigation, if appropriate. The assessment consists of a project description, an analysis of the potential impacts, and a consideration of alternatives to the proposed action. This paper describes the components of the DOE floodplain/wetlands review process.

  7. Demonstration of constructed wetlands for treatment of municipal wastewaters, monitoring report for the period, March 1988--October 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choate, K.D.; Watson, J.T.; Steiner, G.R.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the constructed wetland technology, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) implemented a municipal wastewater demonstration project in western Kentucky. Using combined city, State, and TVA appropriated funds, three constructed wetland systems were built at Benton, Hardin, and Pembroke, Kentucky. Demonstration objectives include evaluating relative advantages and disadvantages of these types of systems; determining permit compliance ability; developing, evaluating, and improving basic design and operation criteria; evaluating cost effectiveness; and transferring technology to users and regulators. A demonstration monitoring project was implemented with a partnership of funds from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, other EPA funds through the National Small Flows Clearinghouse (NSFC), and TVA appropriations. TVA is managing the project in cooperation with an interagency team consisting of EPA, Kentucky Division of Water and NSFC. This report, which supersedes the first monitoring report (Choate, et. al., 1989) of these demonstration projects, describes each constructed wetland system, its status, and summarizes monitoring data and plans for each system. 5 refs., 30 figs., 26 tabs.

  8. South Valley Compliance Agreement Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transfer toSensorSoftware HelpsSouth Valley Agreement Name South Valley

  9. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  10. Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

  11. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Bohlen, C.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  12. Title: Amazon Basin/Eugene Wetlands (199205900) and Willamette Valley Wide Acquisition of Priority Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~$40,000/yr · Native vegetation management costs approximately ~$10,000/yr · Native Plant Materials getting established · Management of species of concern · Plant materials availability · Working · U.S. Bureau of Land Management · U.S. Army Corps of Engineers · U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  13. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  14. Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France: comparison of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    13 Constructed Wetlands and Waste Stabilization Ponds for municipal wastewater treatment in France In France, vertical flow constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds are both extensive treatment Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands, Waste Stabilization Ponds, operation and maintenance, sludge management

  15. TECHNICAL REPORTS Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low-cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    TECHNICAL REPORTS 1904 Constructed treatment wetlands are a relatively low significantly affect the biogeochemistry of treatment wetlands and needs further investigation. Soil Biogeochemical Characteristics Influenced by Alum Application in a Municipal WastewaterTreatmentWetland Lynette M

  16. Delineating wetlands using geographic information system and remote sensing technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villeneuve, Julie

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 a. Riverine Wetlands versus Upland Wetlands . . . . 73 b. Large Size Wetlands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 c. Ground Truth Data Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . 76 C. Results and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 V... the ArcGIS ?ow accumulation function on the ?ow direction raster : : : 20 6 Line shape?le of high ?ow accumulation (more than 3055) ob- tained from the ?ow accumulation raster : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 21 7 DEM derived from LIDAR data (15cm vertical...

  17. Wetland Plant Influence on Sediment Ecosystem Structure and Trophic Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalternijlora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  18. Wetland plant influence on sediment ecosystem structure and trophic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitcraft, Christine René

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:assemblages of marine wetland microalgae and photosyntheticalterniflora and benthic microalgae in salt marsh food webs:

  19. Plants in constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processing wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grismer, Mark E; Shepherd, Heather L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed wetlands help to treat agricultural processingacross the western to treat winery process wastewater Uniteddocumented relative to treat- discharged downstream. ment

  20. Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

  1. altitude saline wetland: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. A. Zuwerink; Robert J. Gates 107 Functional Assessment for a Proposed Stormwater Treatment Wetland. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Urbanization can...

  2. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetland Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Weaver, Richard; Richter, Amanda; O'Neill, Courtney

    2005-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the functions, characteristics, choices, configurations and maintenance needs for constructed wetland media in on-site wastewater treatment systems....

  3. Independent Oversight Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project - December 2014 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report EA-1552: Final Environmental Assessment...

  4. Enterprise Assessments Review, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    conducted an independent oversight review of activity-level implementation of the radiation protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project. The onsite review...

  5. Roaring Fork Valley- Energy Efficient Appliance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Aspen Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) promotes renewable energy, energy efficiency and green building techniques in western Colorado's Roaring Fork Valley. For customers who...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Livermore Valley Open Campus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Livermore Valley Open Campus Sandia, SRI International Sign Pact to Advance Hydrogen and Natural Gas Research for Transportation On August 28, 2013, in Center for Infrastructure...

  7. Poudre Valley REA- Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association (PVREA), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers residential energy efficiency rebate programs for qualified residential water heaters, heat pumps, space...

  8. Magnetotelluric Transect of Long Valley Caldera: Resistivity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MT line. Our MT data set reveals numerous resistivity structures which illuminate the evolution and present state of the Long Valley system. Many of these have been quantified...

  9. Valley Electric Association- Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Valley Electric Association (VEA), a nonprofit member owned cooperative, developed the domestic solar water heating program to encourage energy efficiency at the request of the membership. VEA...

  10. Independent Activity Report, West Valley Demonstration Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    July 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the West Valley Demonstration Project HIAR WVDP-2012-07-30 This Independent Activity Report documents an operational awareness...

  11. Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San...

  12. Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

  13. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

  14. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

  15. azapa valley northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dry Valley lakes, Antarctica Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: evaluation of silicon biogeochemistry in the Taylor Valley lakes, Southern Victoria Land, was...

  16. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

  17. Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conceptual Model At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  18. Isotopic Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique...

  19. Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Nash & D., 1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date...

  20. Deformation of the Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activities (2) Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia, Et Al., 2003) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

  1. Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind Awards Silicon Valley Power and Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Win 2014 Public Power Wind...

  2. APPLIED ISSUES Biomanipulation: a useful tool for freshwater wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    . In this paper we show that biomanipulation may have a strong potential for wetland eutrophication abatement variability, eutrophication sources and gradients of wind exposure and water colour. Keywords: eutrophication the structure and function of many natural wetlands have been severely altered by eutrophication, which has

  3. TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Department of Plant Ecology, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, Nordlandsvej 68, 8240 Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants

  4. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  5. Wetland Ecology in Jericho Town Forest Weston, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    heavy metals and other pollutants by trapping and holding the material in soil and forming insoluble is discussed. What is a wetland? A wetland ecosystem arises when inundation by water produces soils dominated: overstory trees, saplings, shrubs, herbs (ferns, wildflowers, grasses), and ground cover (mosses and lichens

  6. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603.862.4024 http://www.unhsc.unh.edu #12;POROUS ASPHALT Watershed Boundary #12;#12;Gravel Wetland Effluent sampling

  7. Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nutrient Removal Mechanisms in a Cold Climate Gravel Wetland Alison Watts, Robert Roseen, Kim Farah and development of stormwater treatment systems Gregg Hall 35 Colovos Road Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3534 603;Gravel Wetland Sampling within the system #12;NEIWPCC-UNH Project Goals Validation of constructed gravel

  8. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS AND AQUATIC SYSTEMS UF-Wetland Biogeochemistry Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: 1) To provide students with the basic concepts involved in biogeochemical cycling of macroelements (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus

  9. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448-OnCampus version BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS -SWS 6448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    , water quality, carbon sequestration, global climate change, and sea level rise. LEARNING OBJECTIVES of wetlands and aquatic systems in relation to elemental cycling as related to water quality, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and sea level rise. OVERALL COURSE OBJECTIVES: To provide students

  10. Ecological Modelling 105 (1997) 121 Interaction and spatial distribution of wetland nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Elsevier Science B.V. Keywords: Wetland model; Nitrogen cycling; Wastewater treatment 1. Introduction methods of wetland treatment systems. This design ap- proach, referred to as `black box' methodology in wetlands, and (ii) factors affecting N removal from treatment wetlands. A mechanistic model was developed

  11. Suitability of a Constructed Treatment Wetland as Conservation Habitat and the Impact of the Arroyo Chub (Gila orcutti) on the Invertebrate Community and Mosquito Oviposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Why, Adena

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of treatment wetlands. Environmental ScienceKnight R.L. 1996. Treatment Wetlands. CRC Press, Boca Raton,in constructed treatment wetlands. Ecological Engineering

  12. Spring Valley | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp JumpsourceSouthlake,AeHJump to:SpringValley

  13. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  14. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  15. Town of Portola Valley 765 Portola Roac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ca 95814-5514 Re: Town of Portola Valley Green Building Ordinance No. 2010-386 and the Building Efficiency Standards as part of the implementation of our local green building energy ordinance. As the town to the Portola Valley Town Council, the Green Building Ordinance and the Energy Cost Effective Study as explained

  16. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the America¹s WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  17. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N FactSheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and wildlife habitat. The property runs along the Yakima River and contains important in-stream and riparian habitat in the historic floodplain portions of the agricultural valley...

  18. West Valley Demonstration Project Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2001-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual site environmental monitoring report for the West Valley Demonstration Project nuclear waste management facility.

  19. Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

  20. Post project appraisal of Green Valley Creek, Solano County, California : design and management review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Maureen; Fortin, Alex

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates, 1991. Green Valley Creek Restoration Plan. Beck,1996. Green Valley Creek Post-Construction Monitoring 3 Year1998. Green Valley Creek Post-Construction Monitoring 5

  1. Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland types—than was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

  2. Poudre Valley REA- Photovoltaic Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poudre Valley REC is providing rebates to their residential customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. This rebate program was timed to coincide with the Colorado Governor's...

  3. City of Sunset Valley- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Sunset Valley offers rebates to local homeowners who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their properties. The local rebate acts as an add-on to the PV rebates that are offered by...

  4. Thanksgiving Goodwill: West Valley Demonstration Project Food...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    applies spray foam to a waste box to stabilize the contents and fill void space before the container is shipped off site for disposal. West Valley Accomplishments: Year in Review...

  5. Magnetotellurics At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis The goal of this project was to better define the fault system running through the thermally active part of Dixie Valley and infer the sources for the heat...

  6. 25055 W. Valley Parkway Olathe, Kansas 66061

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    25055 W. Valley Parkway Suite 106 Olathe, Kansas 66061 Evans Enterprises is growing, or a person we need to reach out to. Our company website is below, and I am happy to answer any questions you

  7. Wetlands Standard Dredge and Fill Permit (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the permits is to protect and preserve submerged lands under tidal and freshwaters and wetlands, both salt and fresh water, from unregulated alteration that would adversely affect...

  8. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  9. Exam Review WFS 340: Wetlands Ecology and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    populations. #12;7) Be able to describe how global warming may affect amphibians. 8) Know what amphibians, and how (and likely why) it causes malformations in amphibians. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts 1) Know

  10. Community Leadership: Best Practices for Brazos Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Johnathan; Harlow, Evan; Dorshaw, Carlie; Brower, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community Leadership: Best Practices for Brazos Valley Report for the Brazos Community Foundation Executive Summary May 7, 2008 This report was prepared as part of a graduate student capstone project at the George Bush School of Government... and Public Service for our client, the Brazos Community Foundation (BCF). We believe the report has implications for the BCF and the broader nonprofit community in the Brazos Valley. The project team identified ten potential community leadership roles...

  11. Argus Energy WV, LLC wins 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argus Energy's Kiah Creek Operation has received the 2007 Wetlands West Virginia Award presented by the West Virginian Coal Association. The operation was originally a 1267 acre underground mine in the Coalburg seam. Underground mining commenced in 2000 until the end of 2003 with more than two million tons of coal being produced. The creation of the wetlands was achieved during the operations. 8 photos.

  12. WETLANDS. Vol. 18. No.3. September 1998. pp. 329-334 1998. The Society of Wetland Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Fish and Wildlife Service. NOl1h American Waterfowl and Wetlands Office. Patuxent Wildlife Research River and Big Sioux River Watersheds. 1982, typed report on file, USFWS. Pierre. SD, USA), and the USFWS

  13. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  14. Restoration of resaca wetlands and associated wet prairie habitats at Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margo, Michael Ray

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cultivation and drainage projects associated with livestock production have substantially disturbed resaca wetlands and wet prairie habitats in southern Texas. As a consequence of the anthropogenic disturbances, the area of these wetlands has been...

  15. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biostimulation for enhanced biodegradation of petroleum in a wetland. The primary goal of this research was to evaluate the performance of two commercial bioaugmentation products for their ability to enhance bioremediation of petroleum in a wetland. Additional...

  16. The physical role of transverse deep zones in improving constructed treatment wetland performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lightbody, Anne F. (Anne Fraser), 1977-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Velocity heterogeneity is often present in wetland systems and results in some influent water remaining in the wetland for less than the expected residence time. This phenomenon, known as short-circuiting, alters the ...

  17. Unusual sedimentation of a Galveston Bay wetland at Pine Gully, Seabrook, Texas: implications for beach renourishment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culver, Wesley Richard

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , well sorted, quartz rich sediments began plugging the main channel of the previously tidally dominated wetland. Progressive sedimentation has produced overbank deposits in the marine grasses, contributing to the death of wetland grasses by sediment...

  18. Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits and operation modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Recirculation on a single stage of vertical flow constructed wetland: treatment limits French vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCWs) plant comprises two stages of treatment which the first and treatment performances in different operating conditions. Results showed good performances

  19. Do constructed flow through wetlands improve water quality in the San Joaquin River?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Geen, Anthony T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of tailwaters. Wetland treatment of irrigation tailwaterswetlands have the potential to be excellent contaminant sinks and represent the last opportunity for treatmenttreatment. In addition, these components contribute to biological oxygen demand (BOD) in wetland

  20. Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater. ,Focus on Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley Groundwater. ,in the Tulare Lake Basin and Salinas Valley are currently at

  1. Valley wins High School Science Bowl | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valley wins High School Science Bowl West Des Moines Valley defeated Bettendorf 72-32 in the championship match to win the 25th Ames LaboratoryIowa State University Regional High...

  2. Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Road, Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA 94596 P: 925. This report was prepared by Global Energy Partners, LLC 500 Ygnacio Valley Blvd., Suite 450 Walnut Creek, CA

  3. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lachenbruch...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regime of Long Valley Caldera. Journal of Geophysical Research. 81(5):763-768. J.L. Smith,R.W. Rex. 1977. Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera. () : American...

  5. Tuesday, March 13, 2007 POSTER SESSION I: MARS VALLEY NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Regions and Multiple Water Release Events in Valley Networks of the Libya Montes Region on Mars [#1729] We investigate a valley network in the western Libya Montes region, which originates in a highland mountain

  6. LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley LA Rooftop Solar Project Goes Online in San Fernando Valley June 26, 2013 - 4:52pm Addthis Installing a rooftop solar...

  7. Tesla Demonstration for Happy Valley Elementary Tuesday, November 20th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Tesla Demonstration for Happy Valley Elementary Tuesday, November 20th Schedule Load Time: 11: ___________________________________________________________ Contact: Chris McGriff, cmcgriff@santacruz.k12.ca.us Address: Happy Valley Elementary School, Branciforte

  8. QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report and First Year Monitoring Data. The project restored 2,000 linear feet of stream and created 3 new acres of wetlands. An as-built survey of Understanding language for stream and wetlands restorations services, between Coal Township and the US Fish

  9. Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

  10. Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

  11. Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    Enhancing phosphorus removal in constructed wetlands with ochre from mine drainage treatment K in a wastewater constructed wetland (175 m2 area) in Berwickshire, UK. The hydraulic and treatment performance wetlands are widely used for tertiary wastewater treatment but, although effective for nitrogen removal

  12. Ecological Engineering 15 (2000) 121132 Phosphorus removal by wollastonite: A constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    wastewater treatment; Wastewater; Constructed wetlands; Phosphorus removal; Sewage; Water quality; Secondary to those levels. The use of both natural and created wetlands as tools in the treatment of polluted waters). Constructed wet- land ecosystems, offer better opportunities for wastewater treatment than natural wetlands

  13. Sustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel

    wetland sites ­ treatment drawdown is delayed to coincide with VAMP period (April 15-May 15) HighSustainable Best Management Practices for Wetland Seasonal Drainage in Response to San Joaquin wetlands in the Grasslands Ecological Area within the San Joaquin Basin #12;WATER MANAGEMENT FOR MOIST SOIL

  14. Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

  15. AN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) definition of the assessment area, 2) treatment of wetland type, 3) approaches to scoring, 4) considerationAN EVALUATION OF RAPID METHODS FOR ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF WETLANDS M. Siobhan analyzed 40 existing wetland rapid assessment methods that were developed for a variety of purposes

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration...

  17. Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Foulger...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California, Provide Evidence For Hydraulic Fracturing Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  18. Silicon Valley Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Silicon Valley Power offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of a variety of energy efficient products including:

  19. WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CALENDARY YEAR 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ANNUAL (CALENDAR YEAR 2001) SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT NUCLEAR WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITY.

  20. San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District Best Available Control Technology.4.2 #12;San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control Distri RECEIVED ~ 2 ED ECEIVED www.valleyalr.org SJVAPCD-2370·(661)326-6900"FAX(661)326-6985 #12;San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District TITLE V MODIFICATION

  1. The Valley Fever Corridor Year 2 Fundraising Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    Marianne Stephens Ray Thurston Valley of the Sun Boston Terrier Club Mark Whitaker Nickel $500The Valley Fever Corridor Year 2 Fundraising Status Goal = $85,000 Updated: 2/15/2011 *The Valley Fever Clinic Titanium $5,000 or more: Anonymous Shirley and Ken Cole Heller Foundation

  2. ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr. Heath Hagy (hhagy@utk.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    (all day workshop) Biebighauser (USFS) 17 Treatment Wetlands Ludwig (UT) 22 Optional Field TripWFS 536 ADVANCED WETLAND ECOLOGY Fall 2011 Instructors: Dr. Matthew Gray (mgray11@utk.edu); Dr Text: Wetlands, 2000, 3rd edition, Wiley (www.wiley.com, ISBN 047129232X) or Wetlands, 2007, 4th

  3. Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

  4. Spatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland in an arid region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    (CO2). - Many constructed treatment wetland systems (CWS) have been developed to remove nutrients fromSpatial and temporal variability of annual greenhouse gas fluxes from a constructed wetland of Sustainability, 3Wetland Ecosystem Ecology Lab, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA. - Wetlands support

  5. The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland in Phoenix, AZ, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    The contribution of evapotranspiration and evaporation to the water budget of a treatment wetland evapotranspiration and evaporation rates in a constructed treatment wetland in Phoenix during the summer, when both budget for the Tres Rios treatment wetland, and will improve our general knowledge of wetland water

  6. Quantum pumping of valley current in strain engineered graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jing [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China) [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Chan, K. S., E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Materials Science and Centre for Functional Photonics, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong and City University of Hong Kong Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Lin, Zijing, E-mail: apkschan@cityu.edu.hk, E-mail: zjlin@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)] [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the generation of valley dependent current by adiabatic quantum pumping in monolayer graphene in the presence of electric potential barriers, ferromagnetic field and strain. The pumped currents in the two valleys have same magnitudes and opposite directions; thus, a pure valley current is generated. The oscillation of the pumped pure valley current is determined by the Fabry-Perot resonances formed in the structure. In our calculation, the pumped pure valley current can be as high as 50?nA, which is measurable using present technologies. The proposed device is useful for the development of graphene valleytronic devices.

  7. NNSS Soils Monitoring: Plutonium Valley (CAU366)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Julianne J.; Mizell, Steve A.; Nikolich, George; Campbell, Scott

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Nevada Site Office (NSO), Environmental Restoration Soils Activity has authorized the Desert Research Institute (DRI) to conduct field assessments of potential sediment transport of contaminated soil from Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Contamination Area (CA) during precipitation runoff events.

  8. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

  9. The Duke Forest Stormwater Improvement and Wetlands Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the Duke Forest and the Pratt School of Engineering, restored 2000 feet (600 m) of stream Forest Sandy Creek Wetland Restoration site as well as the restoration of over 2000 feet of stream below. 1. Phase I: Re-contour and Restore more than 600 meters (2000 ft) of degraded stream

  10. ROUX et al. Modelling of a constructed wetland for pesticide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to anthropological stress, via industrial, domestic and agricultural wastewater. Europe assumes its responsibility chemical pollution. In the agricultural context, pesticide are a real stress for surrounding environment, and the implantation of buffer zones like artificial wetland at the outlet of the agricultural watershed. A PhD thesis

  11. Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Tools of the Tidal Shoreline Management Trade Friday, October 13, 2006 of new tools produced by the Center for Coastal Resources Managment (CCRM) and other programs) technology with digital aerial photographs and the power of the Internet. They are accessible from desktop

  12. SOIL MICROBIAL ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF A WETLAND RECOVERING FROM PHOSPHORUS EUTROPHICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ) with background soil P contents (698 mg kg21 ). Nutrient loading to this wetland was terminated in 1994. Microbial profiles at the enriched site did not change appreciably over the two year period. The results obtained marshlands. However, once the external load has been divert

  13. Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    Climate Change Threatens Coexistence within Communities of Mediterranean Forested Wetlands Arianna on Agriculture, Forest, and Natural Ecosystems, Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change, Viterbo, Italy, 3 The Mediterranean region is one of the hot spots of climate change. This study aims at understanding what

  14. Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Wetlands Report Sea Level Rise & Other Coastal Hazards: The Risks of Coastal Living See. Climate change is bringing increased temperatures, rising sea level, more frequent storms and increased in tide levels. From these records it is not only clear that water levels are rising, they appear

  15. Preprints of the 8 International Conference on Wetland Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Preprints of the 8 th International Conference on Wetland Systems Arusha ­ Tanzania ­ 16 th to 19 th Spetember 2002 1 DESIGN CRITERIA AND PERFORMANCES OF REED BED FILTERS FOR THE TREATMENT OF WASHING.houdoy@inst-elevage.asso.fr ABSTRACT Initially designed for the treatment of domestic wastewater, Vertical Flow Reed Bed Filters [VFRBF

  16. The cost of wetland creation and restoration. Final report, [February 12, 1992--April 30, 1994]- Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.; Costanza, R.

    1994-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economics of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement projects, especially as they are used within the context of mitigation for unavoidable wetland losses. Complete engineering-cost-accounting profiles of over 90 wetland projects were developed in collaboration with leading wetland restoration and creation practitioners around the country to develop a primary source database. Data on the costs of over 1,000 wetland projects were gathered from published sources and other available databases to develop a secondary source database. Cases in both databases were carefully analyzed and a set of baseline cost per acre estimates were developed for wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement. Observations of costs varied widely, ranging from $5 per acre to $1.5 million per acre. Differences in cost were related to the target wetland type, and to site-specific and project-specific factors that affected the preconstruction, construction, and post-construction tasks necessary to carry out each particular project. Project-specific and site-specific factors had a much larger effect on project costs than wetland type for non-agricultural projects. Costs of wetland creation and restoration were also shown to differ by region, but not by as much as expected, and in response to the regulatory context. The costs of wetland creation, restoration, and enhancement were also analyzed in a broader economic context through examination of the market for wetland mitigation services, and through the development of a framework for estimating compensation ratios-the number of acres of created, restored, or enhanced wetland required to compensate for an acre of lost natural wetland. The combination of per acre creation, restoration, and enhancement costs and the compensation ratio determine the overall mitigation costs associated with alternative mitigation strategies.

  17. Hudson Valley Clean Energy Office and Warehouse

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Rhinebeck, NY Hudson Valley Clean Energy's new head office and warehouse building in Rhinebeck, New York, achieved proven net-zero energy status on July 2, 2008, upon completing its first full year of operation. The building consists of a lobby, meeting room, two offices, cubicles for eight office workers, an attic space for five additional office workers, ground- and mezzanine-level parts and material storage, and indoor parking for three contractor trucks.

  18. Elk Valley coal implements smartcell flotation technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stirling, J.C. [Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Elkford, BC (Canada)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of future raw coal containing higher fines content, Elk Valley Coal Corp.'s Greenhills Operations upgraded their fines circuit to include Wemco SmartCells in March 2007. Positive results were immediately achieved increasing the average flotation tailings ash by 16%. With this increase in yield the SmartCells project paid for itself in less than eight months. 2 figs., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  19. Citrus Production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traub, Hamilton Paul; Friend, W. H. (William Heartsill)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIE?ARY, A t r: COLLEGE, CAvrus. TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS - BULLETIN NO. 419 DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE Citrus Production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas... of Agriculture. . Citrus fruit production in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, especially grapefruit, has increased at a rather rapid rate dur- ing the past few years. More than 5,000,000 citrus trees were set in orchard form in the Lower Rio Grande Valley up...

  20. VWZ-0011- In the Matter of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This decision considers a “Motion to Dismiss” filed by West Valley Nuclear Services, Inc. (West Valley) on May 18, 1999. In its Motion, West Valley seeks the partial dismissal of a Complaint filed...

  1. Multispectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pickles, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pickles, Et...

  2. Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Stroujkova...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stroujkova & Malin, 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Stroujkova &...

  3. Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mallan, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Electromagnetic Soundings At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Mallan, Et Al.,...

  4. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative (MVEC) offers financial incentives to encourage energy efficiency within the residential sector. Rebates are available for a variety of equipment including air...

  5. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC offers the Member Loan Program to residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible...

  6. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) is a Touchstone Energy Cooperative. SSVEC's residential rebate program offers a $500 rebate for the installation of 15 SEER or higher electric...

  7. Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results vtaprelimevalresults.pdf More...

  8. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  9. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia, Et Al., 2003)...

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date - 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Several fluid-flow models presented regarding the Long Valley Caldera....

  11. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Tempel, Et Al., 2011) Exploration...

  12. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1995 - 2000 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown...

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Wannamaker, Et Al., 2006) Exploration...

  14. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

  15. Geothermal Literature Review At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeothermalLiteratureReviewAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid510804...

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleModeling-ComputerSimulationsAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid387627...

  17. Static Temperature Survey At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleStaticTemperatureSurveyAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid511143...

  18. Golden Valley Electric Association- Sustainable Natural Alternative Power (SNAP) Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Golden Valley Electric Association's (GVEA) SNAP program encourages members to install renewable energy generators and connect them to the utility's electrical distribution system by offering an...

  19. Geothermal Literature Review At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    develop exploration methodology for EGS development. Dixie Valley is being used as a calibration site for the EGS exploration program and multiple studies are being conducted to...

  20. Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    develop exploration methodology for EGS development. Dixie Valley is being used as a calibration site for the EGS exploration program and multiple studies are being conducted to...

  1. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eric Sonnenthal, Jon Sainsbury, Joe Iovenitti, B. Mack Kennedy (2013) Assessing Thermo-Hydrodynamic-Chemical Processes at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Area- A Reactive...

  2. aburra valley caused: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Albian, Karrantza Valley, Northwest Spain): Implications Recherche Dveloppement, Carbonate Sedimentology Group, avenue Larribau sn, 64018 Pau Cedex - France e'Espagne) sont...

  3. Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Pribnow, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity...

  4. Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    McKenna & Blackwell, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (McKenna &...

  5. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- Preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  6. Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Okaya & Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Okaya & Thompson, 1985)...

  7. Valley, Ames teams headed for National Science Bowl | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    school event will have 50 teams. Valley will be represented by Gabriel Mintzer, Ryan Thompson, Charles Napier, Sunita Kolareth and Arun Velamuri and coached by Nate Speichinger....

  8. Core Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Eichelberger...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  9. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  10. Magnetotellurics At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Hermance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  11. Geothermometry At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Mariner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Additional References Retrieved from...

  12. antarctic dry valley: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

  13. antarctic dry valleys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

  14. Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System, Nevada, Status Update Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Egs Exploration Methodology Project Using the Dixie Valley...

  15. An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis of tracer tests Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: An investigation of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada,...

  16. Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MT) Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, and...

  17. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley,...

  18. Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada,...

  19. Kennebec Valley Community College's State of the Art Solar Lab

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fairfield, Maine's Kennebec Valley Community College has opened a state of the art lab to teach participants from throughout the Northeast how to install solar systems.

  20. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity...

  1. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1999 - 1999 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A second...

  2. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004 B. M. Kennedy, M. C. van Soest (2006) a Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Additional...

  3. A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

  4. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith,...

  5. DOE Issues RFP for West Valley Demonstration Project Probabilistic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    that will provide support to the DOE, West Valley Demonstration Project, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority in performing a probabilistic analysis...

  6. Field Mapping At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sorey & Farrar, 1998) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey & Farrar, 1998)...

  7. Static Temperature Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity...

  8. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal...

  9. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et...

  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1998 -...

  11. Non-Double-Couple Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Microearthquakes At Long Valley Caldera, California, Provide Evidence For Hydraulic Fracturing Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  12. Wabash Valley Power Association- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Illinois...

  13. Poudre Valley REA- Commercial Lighting Rebate Program (Colorado)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association (PVREA), a Touchstone Energy Cooperative, offers a variety of lighting rebates to commercial customers. Rebates are available on commercial lighting...

  14. Magic Valley Electric Cooperative- ENERGY STAR Builders Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magic Valley Electric Cooperative's (MVEC) ENERGY STAR Builders Program offers a variety of incentives to builders of energy efficiency homes within MVEC service territory. Incentives are provided...

  15. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki, Et Al.,...

  16. Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gerlach, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Taylor & Gerlach,...

  17. Isotopic Composition of Carbon in Fluids from the Long Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Isotopic Composition of Carbon in Fluids from the Long Valley Geothermal System, California, In- Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in the...

  18. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada- relations between surface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  19. Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

  20. Cumberland Valley Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cumberland Valley Electric offers a number of programs to promote energy conservation. This program offers rebates for air source heat pumps, building insulation (including windows and doors), and...

  1. Magic Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Magic Valley Electric Cooperative's Value Incentive Program (VIP) offers consumers incentives for the installation of new central heat pump systems, dual fuel heating systems, central air...

  2. Lower Valley Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lower Valley Energy offers numerous rebates for residential customers who wish to increase the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Rebates are available for weatherization measures, water heaters,...

  3. Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Verdigris Valley Electric Cooperative (VVEC) offers rebates for residential customers who purchase energy efficient home equipment. Rebates are available for room air conditioners, electric water...

  4. Wabash Valley Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, and...

  5. Wabash Valley Power Association- Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wabash Valley Power Association (WVPA) is a generation and transmission cooperative which provides wholesale electricity to 28 distribution systems in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, and...

  6. Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative- Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative offers an incentive for members to increase the energy efficiency of existing homes and facilities through the Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program. The loan...

  7. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

  8. Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Keith, Et Al., 1992)...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Battaglia, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Battaglia,...

  10. EIS-0478: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mercer, Dunn, Billings, Williams, McKenzie, and Mountrail Counties, North Dakota EIS-0478: Antelope Valley Station to Neset Transmission Project, Mercer, Dunn, Billings,...

  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1991 - 1991 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  12. Thermal Gradient Holes At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date 1978 - 1985 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown...

  13. The Yalahau Regional Wetland Survey: Ancient Maya Land Use in Northern Quintana Roo, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Daniel Ian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Features in Southern Campeche: New Perspectives on theArchaeological Reconnaissance in Campeche, Quintana Roo, andpatterns in wetlands in Campeche and Belize (see review by

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - a-01 wetland treatment Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inventory for Research and Education Network Collection: Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 5 Welcome to SWAMP The Stream and Wetland Assessment Management...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing wetland functions Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Park has been completed. In Spring 2009, DUWC undertook nearly 18 months... restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West...

  16. Soil Organic Matter of Natural and Restored Coastal Wetland Soils in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elgin, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland (Mugu Lagoon, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, TijuanaB) Tijuana Estuary C) Carpinteria Salt Marsh Figure 2: MeanTijuana Estuary and Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Horizontal bars

  17. Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

  18. Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and Low-Sun-Angle Aerial Photography, NAS Fallon Geothermal Exploration Project, Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation,...

  19. West Valley Site History, Cleanup Status, and Role of the West...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the West Valley Citizen Task Force More Documents & Publications EIS-0337: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0337: Final Environmental Impact Statement West Valley...

  20. Innovative approach for restoring coastal wetlands using treated drill cuttings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Hocking, E. K.

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The leading environmental problem facing coastal Louisiana regions is the loss of wetlands. Oil and gas exploration and production activities have contributed to wetland damage through erosion at numerous sites where canals have been cut through the marsh to access drilling sites. An independent oil and gas producer, working with Southeastern Louisiana University and two oil field service companies, developed a process to stabilize drill cuttings so that they could be used as a substrate to grow wetlands vegetation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded a project under which the process would be validated through laboratory studies and field demonstrations. The laboratory studies demonstrated that treated drill cuttings support the growth of wetlands vegetation. However, neither the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would grant regulatory approval for afield trial of the process. Argonne National Laboratory was asked to join the project team to try to find alternative mechanisms for gaining regulatory approval. Argonne worked with EPA's Office of Reinvention and learned that EPA's Project XL would be the only regulatory program under which the proposed field trial could be done. One of the main criteria for an acceptable Project XL proposal is to have a formal project sponsor assume the responsibility and liability for the project. Because the proposed project involved access to private land areas, the team felt that an oil and gas company with coastal Louisiana land holdings would need to serve as sponsor. Despite extensive communication with oil and gas companies and industry associations, the project team was unable to find any organization willing to serve as sponsor. In September 1999, the Project XL proposal was withdrawn and the project was canceled.

  1. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  2. Under the Boardwalk – Case History – St. John’s Sideroad at the McKenzie Wetland, Aurora, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Ian D.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is located in the Town of Aurora, Ontario, Canada and liesWetland (also known as Aurora Wetland or McKenzie Marsh), anwith a connection to the Aurora Pumping Station. This $20

  3. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and cheaper. Before...

  4. Landtype-Association (LTA) Descriptions for the Flathead Valley2 Section M333B Flathead Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 6 Landtype-Association (LTA) Descriptions for the Flathead Valley2 Section M333B Flathead illustrations: · Figure 50: Map showing location of M333B within the Northern Region · Figure 51: M333B distribution of LTAS within M333B · Figure 53: Bar chart showing abundance of landform groups within M333B

  5. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  6. Diversity and function from the ground up : microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena Maria

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  7. Diversity and function from the ground up : Microbial mediation of wetland plant structure and ecosystem function via nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseman, Serena M

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global warming, most coasts may experience sea level riseglobal warming lowers effective wetland elevations beneath rising sea levels.

  8. Environmental Assessment : Happy Valley [Substation Project].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Happy Valley project consists of construction of a new BPA customer service 69-kV substation south of Sequim in Clallam County, Washington. A tie line, to be constructed by the customer as part of this project, will link the new BPA facility to the existing customer's transmission system in the area. This project responds to rapid load growth in the Olympic Peninsula, and will strengthen the existing BPA system and interconnected utility systems. It will reduce transmission losses presently incurred, especially on the BPA system supplying power to the Olympic Peninsula. This report describes the potential environmental impact of the proposed actions. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Little Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and WindLightingLinthicum,Little Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected

  10. CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal Ongoing atGreenhouse GasesRespond1CALIFORNIA VALLEY

  11. Whirlwind Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED JumpHills,2732°,WetzelTechnologiesWhetstone, Arizona:Valley

  12. ANTELOPE VALLEY SOLAR RANCH | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRAA LiquidAL2010-03.pdfAMO PEERANTELOPE VALLEY

  13. Aire Valley Environmental | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE JumpAeroWindcapitalInformationChemicalsAire Valley

  14. Powell Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation to ReducePoseidonPowder RiverPowell Valley

  15. Clean Cities: Rogue Valley Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12DenverNorthern ColoradoRogue Valley Clean

  16. Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: EnergyPiratini Energia S APlataforma Itaipu deValley Fuel Ethanol

  17. Lighthouse Solar Diablo Valley | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,Lakefront Tow(RedirectedLightManufacturingDiablo Valley

  18. Sheep Valley Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners Wind FarmSheep Valley Ranch

  19. Chippewa Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport | Open EnergyChippewa Valley Electric Coop Jump

  20. Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: Energy ResourcesSouth,GrapeGrass Valley

  1. Penoyer Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympiaAnalysis)PearlPennsylvania StatePenoyer Valley

  2. Blue Valley Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirchBlockVIServicesValley Energy Jump

  3. CASL Core Partner - Tennessee Valley Authority

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries BatteriesCAES Home Home About UsTennessee Valley

  4. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm <SiteLtd DiDixie HotDixie Valley

  5. Minnesota Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers Inc JumpFinancingMinnesota Valley

  6. Tennessee Valley Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheasternInformation Tengchong County ZhongdianTennessee Valley

  7. Clayton Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCity ofClark Energy CoopValley Geothermal

  8. Valley Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AGUserVHF Technologies SAValley ElectricValley

  9. Whitewater Valley Rural EMC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture Submitted byWhitewater Valley Rural EMC

  10. Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStormGLOBALGabbs Valley Geothermal

  11. Unalakleet Valley Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle AirshipsUnalakleet Valley Elec Coop Jump to:

  12. Grass Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is a stub. YouGrass Valley

  13. All Valley Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgouraAlbatech srl JumpSolar, Logo: All Valley

  14. Surprise Valley Electric Co-Op Trinity Shasta Lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cove California Electric Utility Service Areas California Energy Commission Systems Assessment-Op PacifiCorp Trinity Shasta Lake Redding PG&E Area served by both Surprise Valley Electric Co-Op & Pacific Vernon Aha MacavAzusa Pasadena Glendale Burbank City and County of S.F. Palo Alto Silicon Valley Power

  15. TFC-0004- In the Matter of Tri-Valley CARES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tri-Valley CARES filed an Appeal from a determination that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued on June 2, 2010. In that determination, NNSA denied in part a request for information that Tri-Valley CARES had submitted on September 8, 2008, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. § 552.

  16. USE OF NITROGEN BUDGETS AND N2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE ROLE OF DENITRIFICATION IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    IN BROWNFIELD STORMWATER WETLANDS Monica M. Palta 1, Peter Groffman2, Stuart Findlay2 1 School of Life Sciences in inorganic nitrogen cycling and removal in urban brownfield wetlands INTRODUCTION · Urban areas are net BROWNFIELD SITES SUPPORTING SEMI-PERMANENTLY FLOODED WETLANDS. White outlines delineate low-lying semi

  17. Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs and fens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    Contrasting wetland CH4 emission responses to simulated glacial atmospheric CO2 in temperate bogs, glacial, Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), methane (CH4), peatland, wetland. Summary · Wetlands were the largest (n = 8 per treatment) and measured gaseous CH4 flux, pore water dissolved CH4 and volatile fatty acid

  18. Observations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licciardi, Joseph M.

    constructed treatment wetland in Augusta, Georgia were used to quantify the size, distribution, velocity). In treatment wetlands, such heterogeneity nearly always results in reduced contaminant removal (WoObservations of short-circuiting flow paths within a free-surface wetland in Augusta, Georgia, U

  19. The Influence of Microtopography on Soil Nutrients in Created Mitigation Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Virginia, and examining the effects of disking during wetland creation. Replicate multiscale tangentially-extractable NH4­N and NO3­N, and Mehlich-3 extractable P, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Fe, and Mn. Means and variances of soil and Fe, lower Mn than cre- ated wetlands, and comparatively high variability in nutri- ent concentrations

  20. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories or TMIs. This issue of the Virginia Wetlands Report highlights this research by describing the process and why these inventories are important for management and sustainability of the Commonwealth's tidal wetland resources. What are they? Tidal Marsh Inventories contain maps and information about

  1. Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office, Edinburgh EH14 4AP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heal, Kate

    , to address diffuse pollution (particularly hydrocarbons) associated with the nearby Brucefield Industry Park1 Minutes of Constructed Wetlands Research Group meeting Forth Suite, SEPA Riccarton Office. It was set up several years ago, particularly to support the implementation of constructed farm wetlands

  2. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  3. Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Characterizing hydraulic properties of filter material of a Vertical Flow1 Constructed Wetland2 A Characterizing the hydraulic properties of filter material used in a vertical flow11 constructed wetland (VFCW of porous mineral material and13 organic matter that makes hydraulic characterization a difficult task. Here

  4. REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    REUSE AND RECYCLE OF BIO-RESIDUE (PERCOLATE) FROM CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATING SEPTAGE by Sukon of percolate from constructed wetland (CW) treating septage in agricultural application with the specific focus CW treating septage could exhibit positive responses of the plant growth which increase seed yield

  5. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  6. Growing season methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes at a sub-arctic wetland in Sweden 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardacre, Catherine J.; Blei, Emanuel; Heal, Mathew R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl bromide and methyl chloride fluxes were measured at several sites in a sub-arctic wetland near Abisko, Sweden (68°28?N 18°49?E) throughout the 2008 growing season. Averaged over 92 flux measurements the sub-arctic wetland was found to be a...

  7. CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, ECOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSTRUCTED FARM WETLANDS (CFWs) FOR REMEDIATION OF FARMYARD RUNOFF: WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY, Aberdeen, AB15 8QH, UK E-mail: fabrice.gouriveau@ed.ac.uk Summary: This research evaluates the treatment efficiency, ecological value and cost-effectiveness of two Scottish Constructed Farm Wetlands (CFW 1 & 2

  8. Hoopa Valley Small Scale Hydroelectric Feasibility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Miller

    2009-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This study considered assessing the feasibility of developing small scale hydro-electric power from seven major tributaries within the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation of Northern California (http://www.hoopa-nsn.gov/). This study pursued the assessment of seven major tributaries of the Reservation that flow into the Trinity River. The feasibility of hydropower on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation has real potential for development and many alternative options for project locations, designs, operations and financing. In order to realize this opportunity further will require at least 2-3 years of intense data collection focusing on stream flow measurements at multiple locations in order to quantify real power potential. This also includes on the ground stream gradient surveys, road access planning and grid connectivity to PG&E for sale of electricity. Imperative to this effort is the need for negotiations between the Hoopa Tribal Council and PG&E to take place in order to finalize the power rate the Tribe will receive through any wholesale agreement that utilizes the alternative energy generated on the Reservation.

  9. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System  for  Real-­?Time  Management  of  Water  Quality  Management  of  hydrologic  systems  for  water  quality  system  development  for  seasonal  wetland  salt   management  in  a  river  basin  subjected  to  water  quality  

  10. Picture this...you are on a tour of wetlands. Let's make it a southeastern wetland tour, since the ecology lab where I work and conduct my research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    , perhaps only a few square miles, one is apt to find wetlands that fall all along this hydroperiod that are "good" for bullfrogs are not suitable for spadefoot toads, and a marbled salamander would only be caught

  11. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  12. Airborne particles in the San Joaquin Valley may affect human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphics for nonreaders, created for the event. The San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control

  13. An assessment of potential hydrologic and ecologic impacts of constructing mitigation wetlands, Rifle, Colorado, UMTRA project sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This-assessment examines the consequences and risks that could result from the proposed construction of mitigation wetlands at the New and Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites near Rifle, Colorado. Remediation of surface contamination at those sites is now under way. Preexisting wetlands at or near the Old and New Rifle sites have been cleaned up, resulting in the loss of 0.7 and 10.5 wetland acres (ac) (0.28 and 4.2 hectares [ha]) respectively. Another 9.9 ac (4.0 ha) of wetlands are in the area of windblown contamination west of the New Rifle site. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has jurisdiction over the remediated wetlands. Before remedial action began, and before any wetlands were eliminated, the USACE issued a Section 404 Permit that included a mitigation plan for the wetlands to be lost. The mitigation plan calls for 34.2 ac (1 3.8 ha) of wetlands to be constructed at the south end and to the west of the New Rifle site. The mitigation wetlands would be constructed over and in the contaminated alluvial aquifer at the New Rifle site. As a result of the hydrologic characteristics of this aquifer, contaminated ground water would be expected to enter the environment through the proposed wetlands. A preliminary assessment was therefore required to assess any potential ecological risks associated with constructing the mitigation wetlands at the proposed location.

  14. SEARCH The Oregonian Enter Keyword(s) FIND A BUSINESS Enter Keyword More From The Oregonian | Subscribe To The Oregonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    plotted, threatens Yakima crops Agriculture losses from climate change in Washington's Yakima Valley could and Washington State University extrapolated the effects of warming to the region by applying data from bad droughts going back 80 years. The computer projections indicate as much as a 70 percent reduction

  15. Passive solar homes in Delaware Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendig, J. [New Jersey Inst. of Tech., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines ten single family residences in the Delaware Valley area which include passive solar design features. The study identifies successful and failed solar features of the houses, evaluates solar performance of a few houses, and examines occupants satisfaction with their houses. The study described in this paper includes the following: description of the overall passive solar design and listing of solar features used in each house, survey of each house in its present condition documenting changes to the original design (if any), summary of occupant questionnaire and interviews of house owners regarding their evaluation of house performance. Owners in this study retained positive attitude to their homes in spite of the problems with some solar features. Modifications to the solar features have been significant, but in no case was the solar aspect abandoned.

  16. Wetland Plant Guide for Assessing Habitat Impacts of Real-Time Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Feldmann, Sara A.

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This wetland plant guide was developed to aid moist soil plant identification and to assist in the mapping of waterfowl and shorebird habitat in the Grassland Water District and surrounding wetland areas. The motivation for this habitat mapping project was a concern that real-time salinity management of wetland drainage might have long-term consequences for wildfowl habitat health--changes in wetland drawdown schedules might, over the long term, lead to increased soil salinity and other conditions unfavorable to propagation of the most desirable moist soil plants. Hence, the implementation of a program to monitor annual changes in the most common moist soil plants might serve as an index of habitat health and sustainability. Our review of the current scientific and popular literature failed to identify a good, comprehensive field guide that could be used to calibrate and verify high resolution remote sensing imagery, that we had started to use to develop maps of wetland moist soil plants in the Grassland Water District. Since completing the guide it has been used to conduct ground truthing field surveys using the California Native Plant Society methodology in 2004. Results of this survey and a previous wetland plant survey in 2003 are published in a companion LBNL publication summarizing 4 years of fieldwork to advance the science of real-time wetland salinity management.

  17. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified.

  18. Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative- SunWatts Rebate Program (Arizona)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Duncan Valley Electric Cooperative is providing rebates to for the purchase of renewable energy systems through its SunWatts program. Photovoltaic (PV) and wind energy systems 10 kilowatts (kW) or...

  19. Sulphur Springs Valley EC- SunWatts Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sulphur Springs Valley Electric Cooperative (SSVEC) has a loan program that allows its members to finance a portion of a photovoltaic (PV) or small wind system. Loans are available in an amount of...

  20. Seismic Reflection Studies in Long Valley Caldera, Califomia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Ross A.; Deemer, Sharon J.; Smithson, Scott B.

    1991-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic reflection studies in Long Valley caldera, California, indicate that seismic methods may be successfully employed to image certain types of features in young silicic caldera environments. However, near-surface ...

  1. J. J. Crosetti: Pajaro Valley Agriculture, 1927 to 1977

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regional HIstory Project, UCSC Library; Crosetti, J. J.; Jarrell, Randall

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Salinas Valley. You take the Tenneco Company, which is onethat conglomerates like Tenneco can claim? Crosetti: WellUnion 43, 45, 77 and UFW 48 Tenneco Company 60 The Grapes of

  2. Boulder Valley School District (Colorado) Power Purchase Agreement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Boulder Valley School District completed a power purchase agreement to install 1.4 MW of solar PV that are expected to reduce electricity bills in 14 schools by about 10% over the...

  3. Present State of the Hydrothermal System in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley caldera to be delineated. The model consists of two principal zones in which hot water flows laterally from west to east at depths less than 1 km within and around the...

  4. Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstratio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    waste (HLW) which had been generated by the prior commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center in West Valley New York. The...

  5. Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

  6. Red River Valley REA- Heat Pump Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Red River Valley Rural Electric Association (RRVREA) offers a loan program to its members for air-source and geothermal heat pumps. Loans are available for geothermal heat pumps at a 5% fixed...

  7. Quaternary Glaciations in the Lago Pueyrredón Valley, Argentina 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hein, Andrew S.

    This thesis develops a better knowledge of the extent and timing of glaciations in southern Argentina throughout the Quaternary. It provides a detailed understanding of successive major glacial outlet lobes in the Lago Pueyrredón valley...

  8. Isotopic Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References T. E. C. Keith, J. M. Thompson, R. A. Hutchinson, L. D. White (1992) Geochemistry Of Waters In The Valley Of Ten...

  9. Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada- Summary of Doe Studies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Exploration and Development at Dixie Valley, Nevada- Summary of...

  10. Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Deep Fluid Sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley...

  11. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    show distinct responses to the Chalfant Valley earthquakes. Authors Christopher D. Farrar, M.L. Sorey, S.A. Rojstaczer, A.C. Steinemann and M.D. Clark Published U.S. Geological...

  12. Moreno Valley Electric Utility- Solar Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Moreno Valley Electric Utility provides rebates to its electric customers for the purchase of photovoltaic (PV) systems. System must be on the same premises as the customer to qualify. Systems 30...

  13. Microsoft Word - Finely_NorthValley_CX.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Finely Creek and North Valley Creek property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-58888 Categorical Exclusion...

  14. The Owens Valley Fault Zone Eastern California and Surface Faulting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    base of the Alabama Hills and follows the floor of Owens Valley northward to the Poverty Hills, where it steps 3 km to the left and continues northwest across Crater Mountain...

  15. Silicon Valley Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Silicon Valley Power (SVP) offers a variety rebates to its business customers, capped at a maximum total incentive of $500,000 per customer per year. Rebates are available for the following:

  16. Golden Valley Electric Association- Commercial Lighting Retrofit Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BusBusiness $ense is a Golden Valley Electric Association (GVEA) program designed to increase the efficiency with which energy is used on GVEA's system. It provides rebates of up to $20,000 to...

  17. New River Geothermal Research Project, Imperial Valley, California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by deep test wells below 10,000' in four deep tests. Impacts Proof of a new tectonic theory for the Imperial Valley. Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009...

  18. Technical Geologic Overview of Long Valley Caldera for the Casa...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the central caldera and later a portion of the caldera west of the Resurgent Dome. Well data established that the principal geothermal reservoir in Long Valley was not...

  19. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical" Basin and Range Geothermal System, From Thermal and Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

  1. Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Natural Resources

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

  2. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  3. Seismicity related to geothermal development in Dixie Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryall, A.S.; Vetter, U.R.

    1982-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A ten-station seismic network was operated in and around the Dixie Valley area from January 1980 to November 1981; three of these stations are still in operation. Data from the Dixie Valley network were analyzed through 30 Jun 1981, and results of analysis were compared with analysis of somewhat larger events for the period 1970-1979. The seismic cycle in the Western Great Basic, the geologic structural setting, and the instrumentation are also described.

  4. Influence of a river valley constriction on upstream sedimentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnebrew, Quin

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the downstream constriction. The Buckhorn Plantation, shown by the pattern, lies immediately upstream from the river valley constriction. roughness, the degree of the channel contraction, and the constriction entrance geometry. Conditions Inducing Flood...) for various constriction geometries and found that squared constriction entrances will produce a backwater effect more readily than a rounded entrance for all degrees of channel contraction (Chow, 1959). The geometry of the valley above the constriction...

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurment (ARM) Data from the Ganges Valley, India for the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    In 2011 and 2012, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective was to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region. During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) field studies, aerosols from the Ganges Valley region were shown to affect cloud formation and monsoon activity over the Indian Ocean. The complex field study used the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to measure radiative, cloud, convection, and aerosol characteristics over the mainland. The resulting data set captured pre-monsoon to post-monsoon conditions to establish a comprehensive baseline for advancements in the study of the effects of atmospheric conditions of the Ganges Valley.

  6. Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Constructed Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand of Surface Water Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apfelbaum, Steven; Duvall, Kenneth; Nelson, Theresa; Mensing, Douglas; Bengtson, Harlan; Eppich, John; Penhallegon, Clayton; Thompson, Ry

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the Phase I study segment of contract #DE-NT0006644 with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Applied Ecological Services, Inc. and Sterling Energy Services, LLC (the AES/SES Team) explored the use of constructed wetlands to help address stresses on surface water and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling and makeup water requirements. The project objectives were crafted to explore and develop implementable water conservation and cooling strategies using constructed wetlands (not existing, naturally occurring wetlands), with the goal of determining if this strategy has the potential to reduce surface water and groundwater withdrawals of thermoelectric power plants throughout the country. Our team’s exploratory work has documented what appears to be a significant and practical potential for augmenting power plant cooling water resources for makeup supply at many, but not all, thermoelectric power plant sites. The intent is to help alleviate stress on existing surface water and groundwater resources through harvesting, storing, polishing and beneficially re-using critical water resources. Through literature review, development of conceptual created wetland plans, and STELLA-based modeling, the AES/SES team has developed heat and water balances for conventional thermoelectric power plants to evaluate wetland size requirements, water use, and comparative cooling technology costs. The ecological literature on organism tolerances to heated waters was used to understand the range of ecological outcomes achievable in created wetlands. This study suggests that wetlands and water harvesting can provide a practical and cost-effective strategy to augment cooling waters for thermoelectric power plants in many geographic settings of the United States, particularly east of the 100th meridian, and in coastal and riverine locations. The study concluded that constructed wetlands can have significant positive ancillary socio-economic, ecosystem, and water treatment/polishing benefits when used to complement water resources at thermoelectric power plants. Through the Phase II pilot study segment of the contract, the project team partnered with Progress Energy Florida (now Duke Energy Florida) to quantify the wetland water cooling benefits at their Hines Energy Complex in Bartow, Florida. The project was designed to test the wetland’s ability to cool and cleanse power plant cooling pond water while providing wildlife habitat and water harvesting benefits. Data collected during the monitoring period was used to calibrate a STELLA model developed for the site. It was also used to inform management recommendations for the demonstration site, and to provide guidance on the use of cooling wetlands for other power plants around the country. As a part of the pilot study, Duke Energy is scaling up the demonstration project to a larger, commercial scale wetland instrumented with monitoring equipment. Construction is expected to be finalized in early 2014.

  7. The San Joaquin Valley Westside Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Linneman, J. Christopher; Tanji, Kenneth K.

    2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Salt management has been a challenge to westside farmerssince the rapid expansion of irrigated agriculture in the 1900 s. Thesoils in this area are naturally salt-affected having formed from marinesedimentary rocks rich in sea salts rendering the shallow groundwater,and drainage return flows discharging into the lower reaches of the SanJoaquin River, saline. Salinity problems are affected by the importedwater supply from Delta where the Sacramento and San Joaquin Riverscombine. Water quality objectives on salinity and boron have been inplace for decades to protect beneficial uses of the river. However it wasthe selenium-induced avian toxicity that occurred in the evaporationponds of Kesterson Reservoir (the terminal reservoir of a planned but notcompleted San Joaquin Basin Master Drain) that changed public attitudesabout agricultural drainage and initiated a steady stream ofenvironmental legislation directed at reducing non-point source pollutionof the River. Annual and monthly selenium load restrictions and salinityand boron Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) are the most recent of thesepolicy initiatives. Failure by both State and Federal water agencies toconstruct a Master Drain facility serving mostly west-side irrigatedagriculture has constrained these agencies to consider only In-Valleysolutions to ongoing drainage problems. For the Westlands subarea, whichhas no surface irrigation drainage outlet to the San Joaquin River,innovative drainage reuse systems such as the Integrated Farm DrainageManagement (IFDM) offer short- to medium-term solutions while morepermanent remedies to salt disposal are being investigated. Real-timesalinity management, which requires improved coordination of east-sidereservoir releases and west-side drainage, offers some relief toGrasslands Basin farmers and wetland managers - allowing greater salinityloading to the River than under a strict TMDL. However, currentregulation drives a policy that results in a moratorium on all drainagereturn flows.

  8. Urban air quality of Kathmandu valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, C.K. [Royal Nepal Academy of Science and Technology, Kathmandu (Nepal)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The oval shaped tectonic basin of Kathmandu valley occupying about 600 sq. km. of area is situated in the middle sector of Himalayan range. There are three districts in the alley, i.e. Kathmandu, Litilpur, and Bhaktapur. Out of the three the most populated is the Kathmandu city (the capital of Kingdom of Nepal) which has 668,000 population in an area of approximately 50 sq. km. The city population consumes energy about 1/3 of total imports of Nepal in the form of gasoline, diesel, kerosene, furnace oil and cooking gas. This has resulted heavy pollution of air in the city leading bronchitis, and throat and chest diseases. Vehicle has increased several fold leading in recent months to 100,000 in number in a road of about 900 kms., out of which 25% is only metalled. Most of two and three wheelers are polluting the air by emission gases as well as dust particulate. SO{sub 2} has been found to go as high as 202 micro grams per cubic meter and NO{sub 2} to 126 micro gram particularly in winter months when a thick layer of fog covers the valley up to 10:00 AM in the morning. All the gases are mixed within the limited air below the fog and the ground. This creates the problem. Furthermore, municipal waste of 500 m{sup 3} a day and also liquid waste directly dumping in Bagmati river to the tune of 500,000 liters per day makes city ugly and filthy. Unless pollution of air, water, and land are controlled in time, Nepal will lose much of its foreign exchange earnings from tourist industry. It is found that tourist arrivals are considerably reduced in recent years and most of hotels occupancy is 50 to 60% in peak time. Nepal is trying to introduce legal frame work for pollution control but it will take time to be effective like in other developing countries unless government is strong.

  9. Fish ecology of a wetland in the southern Western Ghats, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubh, Archis Robert

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish assemblages and abiotic environmental conditions in a wetland in the Western Ghats, southern India, were investigated from August 2000 to July 2001. Rainfall showed a seasonal pattern of dry, major wet, and minor wet seasons. The hydrology...

  10. Division of Water, Parts 660-661: Tidal Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations require permits for any activity which directly or indirectly may have a significant adverse effect on the existing condition of any tidal wetland, including but not limited to...

  11. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  12. Analysis of the efficacy of a constructed wetland in treating human fecal contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondepudi, Kathyayani Shobhna

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of a system of constructed wetlands in treating non-point source pollution, particularly, human fecal contamination, was evaluated by collecting and analyzing water samples using both conventional culture-based ...

  13. Division of Water, Parts 662-665: Freshwater Wetlands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No person may alter any freshwater wetland or adjacent area without having first submitted an application and obtained an interim permit for the alteration from the department. Some exemptions...

  14. Evaluation of a shoreline cleaner for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzell, Cydney Jill

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and bioaugmentation. This latest phase of research (1998) is a continuation of studies to evaluate non-invasive oil removal techniques from sensitive wetland environments. For this controlled oil release experiment, 21 plots were divided into three treatment regimes...

  15. Potential for N pollution swapping from riparian buffer strips and an instream wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boukelia, Willena Esther

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffuse agricultural pollution is a major contributor to poor water quality in many parts of the world. Consequently agri-environment policy promotes the use of riparian buffer strips and/or denitrifying wetlands to ...

  16. Non point source pollution modelling in the watershed managed by Integrated Conctructed Wetlands: A GIS approach. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vyavahare, Nilesh

    2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-point source pollution has been recognised as main cause of eutrophication in Ireland (EPA Ireland, 2001). Integrated Constructed Wetland (ICW) is a management practice adopted in Annestown stream watershed, located in the south county...

  17. Wetland Model in an Earth Systems Modeling Framework for Regional Environmental Policy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June, 2011 © Massachusetts Institute of Technology All rights reserved variations. Wetlands play an important role in the storage and regulation of the global water budget so

  18. The Importance of Emergent Vegetation in Reducing Sediment Resuspension in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,-Resuspension in Wetlands, USA 57007 r I .. ABSTRACT Wind-induced resuspension of bottom sediment was measured with sediment traps in Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota. Resuspension was significantly greater

  19. Jurisdictional waters of the United States Wetlands Assessment Analysis and Delineation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siems-Alford, Susan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The subject property was evaluated for its content of jurisdictional wetlands, based on U.S. Army corps of Engineers criteria, using interpretation of historical aerial photography, topographic maps, hydrology indicators, and data gathered from site...

  20. Establishment of submergent vegetation and invertebrates in a wetland constructed on mine soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Alan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water depths (20, 50, and 80 cm) within an experimental wetland on Texas Utilities' Big Brown Mine in eastern Texas. Percent cover was determined during both seasons, and above-ground biomass (AGB) and associated macroinvertebrates were sampled at all...

  1. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  2. Plant species as a significant factor in wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvel, Tracey W

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Constructed wetlands are one of the newest wastewater treatment technologies. They should reduce the Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) and utilize a large amount of the influent. The BOD determines how much oxygen is used bymicro organisms while...

  3. The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing amphibians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaustein, Andrew R.

    The effects of multiple stressors on wetland communities: pesticides, pathogens and competing. Larval amphibian growth and development were affected by carbaryl and the amphibian assemblage treatment effects among the treatments on amphibian growth and development. 4. We encourage future research

  4. Geochemical evolution of Mexicali Valley groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makdisi, R.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Thompson, J.M.; Coplen, T.B.; Sanchez R., J.

    1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopic and chemical compositions of Mexicali Valley groundwaters vary widely. Observed variations reflect different water origins, mineral-water reactions, lateral variations of delta facies as well as evaporation. Regional treatment of the groundwater data shows that northern and central regions are a mixture of old and new Colorado River water. Variations in water chemistry result from different groundwaters origins and the effects of lateral delta facies changes. Dissolution of gypsum and precipitation of carbonates, silicates, and phosphates are suggested. The eastern Mesa de San Luis and southern region water originates primarily from the Gila River catchment area. This water is undersaturated with respect to gypsum and carbonates and is oversaturated with respect to silicates. Most of the western groundwaters are a mixture of Colorado River and geothermal waters in the proximity of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field. Recharge to the geothermal aquifer is from the west as well as the north and east. Calcite is being precipitated out as the groundwater temperatures rise in response to the geothermal anomaly. Other western groundwaters reflect a dominant mixture of Colorado River water and evaporated lake water. Some Western groundwater samples suggest dilution by local rainwater and/or irrigation water.

  5. Phosphorus water quality model evaluation and comparison for natural and constructed wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paasch, Mary Margaret

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Kadlec and Knight, 1996). Basins with great areal extent of wetlands produce lower phosphorus loads and mcreased wetland areas could reduce phosphorus loading (Boggess et al. , 1995). One of the many consequences of elevated phosphorus concentrations... may be considered as upper boundaries on phosphorus concentrations. Phosphorus loads are typically greatest from urban land, with lower loading from agricultural land, and the least phosphorus loading occurring from forests (Boggess et al. , 1995...

  6. Wetlands, Microbes, and the Carbon Cycle: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tringe, Susannah

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Susannah Tringe, who leads the Metagenome Program at the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a collaboration in which Berkeley Lab plays a leading role, takes us behind the scenes to show how DNA from unknown wild microbes is extracted and analyzed to see what role they play in the carbon cycle. Tringe collects samples of microbial communities living in the wetland muck of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, organisms that can determine how these wetlands store or release carbon.

  7. Seasonally-managed wetland footprint delineation using Landsat ETM+ satellite imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Epshtein, O.

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One major challenge in water resource management is the estimation of evapotranspiration losses from seasonally managed wetlands. Quantifying these losses is complicated by the dynamic nature of the wetlands’ areal footprint during the periods of flood-up and drawdown. In this study we present a data-lean solution to this problem using an example application in the San Joaquin River Basin of California, USA. Through analysis of high-resolution (30 meter) Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) satellite imagery, we develop a metric for more fully capturing the extent of total flooded wetland area. The procedure is validated using year-long, continuously-logged field datasets at two separate wetlands within the study area. Based on this record, the proposed classification using a Landsat ETM+ Band 5 (mid-IR wavelength) to Band 2 (visible green wavelength) ratio improves estimates by 30-50% relative to previous attempts at wetland delineation. Requiring modest ancillary data, the results of our study provide a practical and efficient option for wetland management in data-sparse regions or un-gauged watersheds.

  8. West Valley facility spent fuel handling, storage, and shipping experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The result of a study on handling and shipping experience with spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The purpose of the study was to document the experience with handling and shipping of relatively old light-water reactor (LWR) fuel that has been in pool storage at the West Valley facility, which is at the Western New York Nuclear Service Center at West Valley, New York and operated by DOE. A subject of particular interest in the study was the behavior of corrosion product deposits (i.e., crud) deposits on spent LWR fuel after long-term pool storage; some evidence of crud loosening has been observed with fuel that was stored for extended periods at the West Valley facility and at other sites. Conclusions associated with the experience to date with old spent fuel that has been stored at the West Valley facility are presented. The conclusions are drawn from these subject areas: a general overview of the West Valley experience, handling of spent fuel, storing of spent fuel, rod consolidation, shipping of spent fuel, crud loosening, and visual inspection. A list of recommendations is provided. 61 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Nematode ?Ecological Study ?of ?a ?Wetland? Restoration?In?Progress? at? Bolsa? Chica, California:? Implications? for? Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  10. Nematode Ecological Study Of A Wetland Restoration-In-Progress At Bolsa Chica, California: Implications For Biomonitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Ian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate estuarine wetland at Carpinteria, California: plantBrooks, director of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, for9 Figure 2?2: Map of Carpinteria Salt Marsh indicating

  11. A History of Irrigation in the Arkansas River Valley in Western Kansas, 1880-1910

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, Conner

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of western Kansas, in particular the community around Garden City, Kansas. This history attempts to relate the development of irrigation in the Arkansas Valley through its formative years, 1880-1910. The term "Arkansas River Valley" as used here refers...

  12. The diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico Kumar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the most comprehensive study to date of the diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal -- a bowl-shaped mountain valley of two million people with a growing air pollution ...

  13. Diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: 2. Modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panday, Arnico K.

    After completing a 9-month field experiment studying air pollution and meteorology in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, we set up the mesoscale meteorological model MM5 to simulate the Kathmandu Valley's meteorology with a ...

  14. EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern...

  15. Economic Essays on Water Resources Management of the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leidner, Andrew

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The study area for this dissertation is the Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley (Valley). The overarching theme is water and includes regional water management, water management institutions, and water supply decision-making as it relates to community...

  16. Results of the Flowmeter-Injection Test in the Long Valley Exploratory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Results of the Flowmeter-Injection Test in the Long Valley Exploratory Well (Phase II), Long Valley, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. EM Employees at West Valley Help Beat Goal for Food Banks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WEST VALLEY, N.Y. – EM employees and their contractor counterparts at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) have supported their local food banks for several years, and this year was no exception.

  18. West Valley Demonstration Project Annual Site Environmental Report Calendar Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West Valley Nuclear Services Company (WVNSCO) and URS Group, Inc.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Site Environmental Report for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) for Calendar Year 2004. The report summarizes the environmental protection program at the West Valley Demonstration Project for CY 2004.

  19. DOCUMENTATION OF A TORNADIC SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOCUMENTATION OF A TORNADIC SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM IN THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA A thesis read Documentation of a Tornadic Supercell Thunderstorm in the San Joaquin Valley, California ___________________________________________ Erwin Seibel Professor of Oceanography #12;iv DOCUMENTATION OF A TORNADIC SUPERCELL THUNDERSTORM

  20. H02 WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM WATER CHEMISTRY SAMPLING AND RESULTS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, M; Michael Serrato, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-02 Wetland Treatment System (Figure 1) is used to remove heavy metals (e.g., copper and zinc) from the H-Area process and storm water discharge. Routine flow enters an equalization basin by inlets on either the east (Location 1) or west end (Location 2). The west end influent constitutes 75% of the average flow into the basin which has an average residence time of approximately 3 days at low pool (i.e., 120 gal/min. through a volume of 0.5 million gallons). The water then exits via the basin outlet on the east end. Next, the water flows to a splitter box (Location 3) which evenly separates the flow between two wetland cells for a design flow of 60 gal/min. per wetland cell with a residence time in the cell of approximately 2 days. The wetland effluent is then combined (Location 4) and flows through a spillway before reaching the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) measurement point near Road 4. During initial operation, it was observed that the pH of the water leaving the equalization basin was elevated compared to the influent pH. Furthermore, the elevated pH remained through the wetland cells so that there was an average pH of 10 leaving the wetland cells during the daytime which exceeds the upper NPDES limit of 8.5. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the cause of the increase in pH within the equalization basin of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. Possible mechanisms included algal activity and inorganic chemistry interactions (e.g., interactions with the clay and/or bentonite liner). Water quality parameters were evaluated throughout the H-02 Wetland Treatment system and over time in order to determine the cause of high pH values measured in the basin and wetland. Fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) and accompanying changes in pH would be expected in systems where algae are an influencing factor. An unexpected increase or decrease in the concentration of inorganic substances may indicate operational changes or an inorganic chemistry influence on pH. In addition, alternative methods to alleviate or mitigate the pH increase were evaluated. This study documents the results of sampling activities undertaken and conveys the analytical results along with suggestions for operation of the H-02 Wetland Treatment System. The water samples collected and the water quality data generated from this activity are for analytical purposes only, and as such, were not collected in support of compliance activities.

  1. The Diurnal Cycle of Air Pollution In the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Diurnal Cycle of Air Pollution In the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal by Arnico K. Panday A OF AIR POLLUTION IN THE KATHMANDU VALLEY, NEPAL by Arnico K. Panday Submitted to the Department of Earth study to date of the diurnal cycle of air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal ­ a bowl

  2. February 17, 2005 Traffic: See current conditions on all Valley freeways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGraw, Kevin J.

    ° Flagstaff 34° |Traffic Weather Site search| | | | | |Front Page Valley & State Sports Business Arizona Wheels Yes Ahwatukee Chandler Gilbert Glendale/Peoria Mesa Phoenix Scottsdale Southwest Valley Sun CitiesFebruary 17, 2005 Traffic: See current conditions on all Valley freeways PHOENIX 56° Tucson 53

  3. STAND DYNAMICS IN TILIO-ACERION WOODLANDS OF THE CLYDE VALLEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAND DYNAMICS IN TILIO-ACERION WOODLANDS OF THE CLYDE VALLEY BY RICHARD THOMPSON AND ANDREW PEACE: Thompson, R (2005), Stand dynamics in Tilio-Acerion woodlands of the Clyde Valley. Highland Birchwoods, Munlochy #12;STAND DYNAMICS IN TILIO-ACERION WOODLANDS OF THE CLYDE VALLEY by Richard Thompson* and Andrew

  4. Valley-Dependent Brewster Angles and Goos-Hanchen Effect in Strained Graphene Zhenhua Wu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valley-Dependent Brewster Angles and Goos-Ha¨nchen Effect in Strained Graphene Zhenhua Wu,1 F. Zhai local strains in graphene can be tailored to generate a valley- polarized current. By suitable be used to construct a valley filter in graphene without the need for any external fields. DOI: 10

  5. [Having a] Life in the Happy Valley 1.2 Cris Pedregal Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    [Having a] Life in the Happy Valley ­ 1.2 Cris Pedregal Martin Department of Computer Science known as ``The Happy Valley,'' henceforth simply ``the Valley.'' Specifically, we discuss food, cultural will strongly influence your well­being, your happiness, and ultimately your ability to function aca­ demically

  6. EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

  7. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report calendar year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1998 by environmental monitoring personnel for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. The data collected provide an historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels from natural and manmade sources in the survey area and document the quality of the groundwater on and around the WVDP and the quality of the air and water discharged by the WVDP.

  8. Vitrification facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DesCamp, V.A.; McMahon, C.L.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project`s vitrification facilities from the establishment of the West Valley, NY site as a federal and state cooperative project to the completion of all activities necessary to begin solidification of radioactive waste into glass by vitrification. Topics discussed in this report include the Project`s background, high-level radioactive waste consolidation, vitrification process and component testing, facilities design and construction, waste/glass recipe development, integrated facility testing, and readiness activities for radioactive waste processing.

  9. DOE Awards Small Business Contract for West Valley NY Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CINCINNATI – The Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a task order (contract) to Chenega Global Services, LLC of Anchorage, Alaska, for administrative and technical support services at the West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York. The contract has a one-year performance period with a value of $1.3 million, and contains two one-year extension options with a total value of $4.12 million. Chenega Global Services is a certified small and disadvantaged business under the Small Business Administration.

  10. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1999 by environmental monitoring personnel for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. The data collected provide an historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels from natural and manmade sources in the survey area and document the quality of the groundwater on and around the WVDP and the quality of the air and water discharged by the WVDP.

  11. Plantation settlement in the Brazos River Valley, 1820-1860

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornhorst, Jacquelyn Wooley

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +ary cultivation vras neces- sary ard +he mi'd climate insurepl good crops. Yet, not to. p many of the settlers ven! west of the Brazos Valley at first because -' t va the general impre sion in the early days that only the timber d. portion of the ta!e vas... STER GE ART S Eay I'9il i~'ajor 8 bjeci. : History FLANTATZON SETTLEYiZBT IN THE BRAVOS RIVER VALLEYS 1820-1860 A Thesis by Jac ~uelyn 'Jooley Eornhorst ARRrov H as to style ann content by: 8 a~ (Chg. raan oc Co~=. u. ttee) Plw~ &~ (I ies...

  12. Analysis of environmental constraints on expanding reserves in current and future reservoirs in wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harder, B.J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Louisiana wetlands require careful management to allow exploitation of non-renewable resources without destroying renewable resources. Current regulatory requirements have been moderately successful in meeting this goal by restricting development in wetland habitats. Continuing public emphasis on reducing environmental impacts of resource development is causing regulators to reassess their regulations and operators to rethink their compliance strategies. We examined the regulatory system and found that reducing the number of applications required by going to a single application process and having a coherent map of the steps required for operations in wetland areas would reduce regulatory burdens. Incremental changes can be made to regulations to allow one agency to be the lead for wetland permitting at minimal cost to operators. Operators need cost effective means of access that will reduce environmental impacts, decrease permitting time, and limit future liability. Regulators and industry must partner to develop incentive based regulations that can provide significant environmental impact reduction for minimal economic cost. In addition regulators need forecasts of future E&P trends to estimate the impact of future regulations. To determine future activity we attempted to survey potential operators when this approach was unsuccessful we created two econometric models of north and south Louisiana relating drilling activity, success ratio, and price to predict future wetland activity. Results of the econometric models indicate that environmental regulations have a small but statistically significant effect on drilling operations in wetland areas of Louisiana. We examined current wetland practices and evaluated those practices comparing environmental versus economic costs and created a method for ranking the practices.

  13. Wetlands mitigation: Parnership between an electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, M.C.; Sibrel, C.B.; Gough, G.A. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nine hectares (23 acres) of a degraded section of Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel, Maryland, USA, were converted to wetland habitat by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company in 1994. The wetlands were created as mitigation for 5.7 ha (14 acres) of wetlands that were impacted as part o the construction of 8.5-km (5.3-mile) 500-kV over-head transmission line on the refuge. The area consists of a created forested wetland of 5.5 ha(13.5 acres), a seasonally inundated green-free reservoir of 7.6 ha (6.5 acres), and an impounded pond wetland of 1.2 ha (3 acres). Construction included the planting of 6131 trees, 4276 shrubs, and 15,102 emergent plants. Part of the site has been studied intensively since completion and survival of trees and shrubs after two years was 88%. Measurements of these transplants have shown growth greater than on other created sites in Maryland. Grasses and other herbaceous vegetation were dominant plants in the meter-square plots in the first two years of sampling of the created forested wetland. Wildlife surveys for birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles have revealed diverse communities. Although these communities represent species consistent with open habitat, more typical forest species should colonize the area as it undergoes succession into a more mature forested wetland. The creation, management, and research of this mitigation site represents an excellent example of a partnership between a private electric power company and a federal wildlife refuge. This partnership has increased local biodiversity and improved regional water quality of the Patuxent River and the Chesapeake Bay. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Wetland Flow and Salinity Budgets and Elements of a Decision Support System toward Implementation of Real-Time Seasonal Wetland Salinity Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Rahilly, P.; Johnson, C.B.

    2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The project has provided science-based tools for the long-term management of salinity in drainage discharges from wetlands to the San Joaquin River. The results of the project are being used to develop best management practices (BMP) and a decision support system to assist wetland managers adjust the timing of salt loads delivered to the San Joaquin River during spring drawdown. Adaptive drainage management scheduling has the potential to improve environmental compliance with salinity objectives in the Lower San Joaquin River by reducing the frequency of violation of Vernalis salinity standards, especially in dry and critically dry years. The paired approach to project implementation whereby adaptively managed and traditional practices were monitored in a side-by-side fashion has provided a quantitative measure of the impacts of the project on the timing of salt loading to the San Joaquin River. The most significant accomplishments of the project has been the technology transfer to wetland biologists, ditch tenders and water managers within the Grasslands Ecological Area. This “learning by doing” has build local community capacity within the Grassland Water District and California Department of Fish and Game providing these institutions with new capability to assess and effectively manage salinity within their wetlands while simultaneously providing benefits to salinity management of the San Joaquin River.

  15. Spectroscopic Evidence of Uranium Immobilization in Acidic Wetlands by Natural Organic Matter and Plant Roots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Dien; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Jaffé, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Segre, Carlo U.; Chen, Ning; Jiang, De-Tong; et al

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeochemistry of uranium in wetlands plays important roles in U immobilization in storage ponds of U mining and processing facilities but has not been well understood. The objective of this work was to study molecular mechanisms responsible for high U retention by Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments under varying redox and acidic (pH = 2.6–5.8) conditions using U L?-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Uranium in the SRS wetland sediments existed primarily as U(VI) bonded as a bidentate to carboxylic sites (U–C bond distance at ?2.88 Å), rather than phenolic or other sites of natural organic matter (NOM). In microcosms simulatingmore »the SRS wetland processes, U immobilization on roots was 2 orders of magnitude higher than on the adjacent brown or more distant white sands in which U was U(VI). Uranium on the roots were both U(IV) and U(VI), which were bonded as a bidentate to carbon, but the U(VI) may also form a U phosphate mineral. After 140 days of air exposure, all U(IV) was reoxidized to U(VI) but remained as a bidentate bonding to carbon. This study demonstrated NOM and plant roots can highly immobilize U(VI) in the SRS acidic sediments, which has significant implication for the long-term stewardship of U-contaminated wetlands.« less

  16. Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

  17. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  18. The Newsletter of the Duke University Wetland Center, Nicholas School of the Environment onstruction on three separate pro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality and stream habitat across 210 acres of watershed in Durham County. The restoration of an unnamed is connected with SWAMP's three earlier phases built between 2004 and 2007: (1) a stream/wetland restoration restoration site at DUWC's Stream and Wetland Assessment and Management Park near West Campus. The most recent

  19. Examining the Effects of Ecotourism Involvement and Tourism Benefits on Florida Tour Operators' Conservation Contributions to Wetland Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Li-Pin

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on wetland ecosystems attracted relatively less academic attention than rainforests and coral reefs. Florida, listed as one of the states with the greatest share of wetland loss in the U.S. due to rapid growth in agriculture, tourism, and urban development...

  20. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Avignon, France, 26-30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    wetland systems for onsite treatment of domestic sewage Hans Brix Department of Biological SciencesProceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control environment. Therefore official guidelines for a number of onsite treatment solutions have been produced

  1. Skagit Valley Research Collection / Ian E. Efford (collector)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    Skagit Valley Research Collection / Ian E. Efford (collector) Compiled by Christopher Hives (1997 of Creation / Physical Description o Collector's Biographical Sketch o Scope and Content o Notes File List-1982. 13 cm of textual records. 35 photographs. Collector's Biographical Sketch Ian Efford was an ecologist

  2. EIS-0434: Hualapai Valley Solar Interconnection Project, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hualapai Valley Solar, LLC, proposes to construct, operate and maintain a 340-megawatt, solar-powered generating facility in Mohave County, near Kingman, Ariz. The proposed project would use concentrating solar-power-trough technology to capture the sun's heat to make steam, which would power a traditional steam turbine generator.

  3. Citrus Variety Trends in the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alderman, D. C. (DeForest Charles)

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citrus Variety Trends in the Lower Rio Grande Valley CONTENTS ......................................................................................................... Digest ...... 3... thousands of citrus trees and the growers were faced with a tremendous replanting program, which, in turn, had focused interest on varieties. Fruit production figures, yields per acre, and monetary returns per acre for five varieties of grapefruit...

  4. West Valley transfer cart control system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.C.; Crutcher, R.I.; Halliwell, J.W.; Hileman, M.S.; Moore, M.R.; Nodine, R.N.; Ruppel, F.R.; Vandermolen, R.I.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detail design of the control system for the West Valley Nuclear Services Vitrification Facility transfer cart has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report documents the requirements and describes the detail design of that equipment and control software. Copies of significant design documents including analysis and testing reports and design drawings are included in the Appendixes.

  5. Dixie Valley Binary Cycle Production Data 2013 YTD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Vitaly

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Proving the technical and economic feasibility of utilizing the available unused heat to generate additional electric power from a binary power plant from the low-temperature brine at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Power Plant. Monthly data for Jan 2013-September 2013

  6. WATER COMMODIFICATION IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Manuel

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called ?colonias...

  7. WATER COMMODIFICATION IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Bianca 1989-

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called colonias...

  8. Sustainability of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrugt, Jasper A.

    productivity and sustainability. Currently, there is a good understanding of the fundamental soil hydrological scale and at the long term, so that the sustainability of alternative management strategies canSustainability of irrigated agriculture in the San Joaquin Valley, California Gerrit Schoups* , Jan

  9. WATER COMMODIFICATION IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Manuel

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called ?colonias...

  10. WATER COMMODIFICATION IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Bianca 1989-

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas is one of the poorest regions with the largest population lacking suitable water supply in the entire United States. The region is characterized by low-income, rural and peri-urban communities called colonias...

  11. The T-REX valley wind intercomparison project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidli, J; Billings, B J; Burton, R; Chow, F K; De Wekker, S; Doyle, J D; Grubisic, V; Holt, T R; Jiang, Q; Lundquist, K A; Ross, A N; Sheridan, P; Vosper, S; Whiteman, C D; Wyszogrodzki, A A; Zaengl, G; Zhong, S

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An accurate simulation of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is very important, as the evolution of the boundary layer sets the stage for many weather phenomena, such as deep convection. Over mountain areas the evolution of the boundary layer is particularly complex, due to the nonlinear interaction between boundary layer turbulence and thermally-induced mesoscale wind systems, such as the slope and valley winds. As the horizontal resolution of operational forecasts progresses to finer and finer resolution, more and more of the thermally-induced mesoscale wind systems can be explicitly resolved, and it is very timely to document the current state-of-the-art of mesoscale models at simulating the coupled evolution of the mountain boundary layer and the valley wind system. In this paper we present an intercomparison of valley wind simulations for an idealized valley-plain configuration using eight state-of-the-art mesoscale models with a grid spacing of 1 km. Different sets of three-dimensional simulations are used to explore the effects of varying model dynamical cores and physical parameterizations. This intercomparison project was conducted as part of the Terrain-induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX; Grubisic et al., 2008).

  12. Hydrology of modern and late Holocene lakes, Death Valley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grasso, D.N.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Above-normal precipitation and surface-water runoff, which have been generally related to the cyclic recurrence of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, have produced modern ephemeral lakes in the closed-basin Death Valley watershed. This study evaluates the regional hydroclimatic relations between precipitation, runoff, and lake transgressions in the Death Valley watershed. Recorded precipitation, runoff, and spring discharge data for the region are used in conjunction with a closed-basin, lake-water-budget equation to assess the relative contributions of water from these sources to modern lakes in Death Valley and to identify the requisite hydroclimatic changes for a late Holocene perennial lake in the valley. As part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Program, an evaluation of the Quaternary regional paleoflood hydrology of the potential nuclear-waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was planned. The objectives of the evaluation were (1) to identify the locations and investigate the hydraulic characteristics of paleofloods and compare these with the locations and characteristics of modern floods, and (2) to evaluate the character and severity of past floods and debris flows to ascertain the potential future hazards to the potential repository during the pre-closure period (US Department of Energy, 1988). This study addresses the first of these objectives, and the second in part, by assessing and comparing the sizes, locations, and recurrence rates of modern, recorded (1962--83) floods and late Holocene paleofloods for the 8,533-mi{sup 2}, closed-basin, Death Valley watershed with its contributing drainage basins in the Yucca Mountain site area.

  13. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.L.; cummins, C.L.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1994, well point water and bucket samples were collected for tritium and volatile organic compounds in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The well point samples were collected from seven locations and the bucket samples from four locations. Results support that T and VOCs originating from 643-E are outcropping in the wetlands near this ditch. Based on differences in tritium contents at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths; however, when VOCs were normalized, based on differences in T, resulting well point and bucket VOCs were comparable in most cases.

  14. Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement, Cattaraugus County, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the ''Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement'' is to provide information on the environmental impacts of the Department of Energy's proposed action to ship radioactive wastes that are either currently in storage, or that will be generated from operations over the next 10 years, to offsite disposal locations, and to continue its ongoing onsite waste management activities. Decommissioning or long-term stewardship decisions will be reached based on a separate EIS that is being prepared for that decisionmaking. This EIS evaluates the environmental consequences that may result from actions to implement the proposed action, including the impacts to the onsite workers and the offsite public from waste transportation and onsite waste management. The EIS analyzes a no action alternative, under which most wastes would continue to be stored onsite over the next 10 years. It also analyzes an alternative under which certain wastes would be shipped to interim offsite storage locations prior to disposal. The Department's preferred alternative is to ship wastes to offsite disposal locations.

  15. PDC bits find application in San Joaquin Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.P.; Wood, J.E.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) bits have been successfully and economically used to drill sand and shale sections in the oilfields of the Southern San Joaquin Valley of California. ''Successful'' refers to reducing the number of days to drill a well by four to six days, and ''Economical'' refers to reducing the cost per foot for the sand and shale intervals drilled with PDC bits. Enhancements of design variables including variations in back rake and side rake angles, and improved selection (numbers and sizes) of nozzles have helped PDC bits be economical in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. In addition to conventional vertical wells, PDC bits used in conjunction with mud motors and steering tools have also been successfully used to directionally drill wells in this area.

  16. Laboratory work in support of West Valley glass development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past six years, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has conducted several studies in support of waste glass composition development and testing of glass compositions suitable for immobilizing the nuclear wastes stored at West Valley, New York. As a result of pilot-scale testing conducted by PNL, the glass composition was changed from that originally recommended in response to changes in the waste stream, and several processing-related problems were discovered. These problems were solved, or sufficiently addressed to determine their likely effect on the glass melting operations to be conducted at West Valley. This report describes the development of the waste glass composition, WV-205, and discusses solutions to processing problems such as foaming and insoluble sludges, as well as other issues such as effects of feed variations on processing of the resulting glass. An evaluation of the WV-205 glass from a repository perspective is included in the appendix to this report.

  17. A simulation of the Neolithic transition in the Indus valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmen, Carsten

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) was one of the first great civilizations in prehistory. This bronze age civilization flourished from the end of the the fourth millennium BC. It disintegrated during the second millennium BC, this decline is despite much research effort not yet well understood. Less research has been devoted on the becoming of this great civilization which shows continuous cultural precursors at least since the seventh millennium BC. To understand the decline, we believe it is necessary to investigate better the precursors and the rise of the IVC, i.e. the establishment of agriculture, dense populations and technological developments between 8000 and 3000 years BC. We employ a huge dataset of $>10000$ archaeologically typed artifacts, still our capability to investigate the system is hindered by poorly resolved chronology, and by a lack of field work in the intermediate areas between the Indus valley and Mesopotamia. We thus employ a complementary, numerical simulation based approach to dev...

  18. Ambient Radon-222 Monitoring in Amargosa Valley, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.H. Karr; J.J. Tappen; D. Shafer; K.J. Gray

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a program to characterize and baseline selected environmental parameters in the region around the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, ambient radon-222 monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, the community closest to the proposed repository site. Passive integrating radon monitors and a continuous radon monitoring instrument were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) (http://www.cemp.dri.edu/index.html) station located in the Amargosa Valley Community Center near the library. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated radon measurements as well as verify meteorological data collected by the continuous radon monitoring instrument. Additionally, different types of environmental enclosures that housed the monitors and instrument were used to determine if particular designs influenced the ambient radon measurements.

  19. Radiation safety at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, R.L.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the Radiation Safety Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This Program covers a number of activities that support high-level waste solidification, stabilization of facilities, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the Project. The conduct of the Program provides confidence that all occupational radiation exposures received during operational tasks at the Project are within limits, standards, and program requirements, and are as low as reasonably achievable.

  20. Citrus Varieties for the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, J. F. (John Fielding); Friend, W. H. (William Heartsill)

    1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lf BRARY, /A & NI COLLEGE, b TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR, College Station, Texas CITRUS VARIETIES FOR THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY Mr. H. FRIEND AND J. F. WOOD Division of Horticulture LIBRARY \\gxict... perishable nature of this type of fruit. Limes and lemons may be grown by persons who are financially able to equip their orchards with heaters. There are many types of citrus fruits that may be grown as ornamentals or for special purposes, but none...

  1. EIS-0337: West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement is to provide information on the environmental impacts of the Department of Energy’s proposed action to ship radioactive wastes that are either currently in storage, or that will be generated from operations over the next 10 years, to offsite disposal locations, and to continue its ongoing onsite waste management activities.

  2. WETwin: a structured approach to evaluating wetland management options in data-poor contexts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .P. Uyttendaelec a International Water Management Institute (IWMI);b University of Geneva, enviroSPACE Laboratory; c ANTEA Group, Belgium; d Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK);e Irstea, UMR G-eau; f and structured approach to evaluate wetland management interventions and integrate impact, feasibility

  3. RETENTION AND CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF URANIUM IN A WETLAND ON THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, D.; CHANG, H.: SEAMAN, J.; Jaffe, P.; Groos, P.; Jiang, D.; Chen, N.; Lin, J.; Arthur, Z.; Scheckel, K.; Kaplan, D.

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium speciation and retention mechanism onto Savannah River Site (SRS) wetland sediments was studied using batch (ad)sorption experiments, sequential extraction desorption tests and U L{sub 3}-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy of contaminated wetland sediments. U was highly retained by the SRS wetland sediments. In contrast to other similar but much lower natural organic matter (NOM) sediments, significant sorption of U onto the SRS sediments was observed at pH <4 and pH >8. Sequential extraction tests indicated that the U(VI) species were primarily associated with the acid soluble fraction (weak acetic acid extractable) and NOM fraction (Na-pyrophosphate extractable). Uranium L3- edge XANES spectra of the U-retained sediments were nearly identical to that of uranyl acetate. The primary oxidation state of U in these sediments was as U(VI), and there was little evidence that the high sorptive capacity of the sediments could be ascribed to abiotic or biotic reduction to the less soluble U(IV) species. The molecular mechanism responsible for the high U retention in the SRS wetland sediments is likely related to the chemical bonding of U to organic carbon.

  4. Closing the carbon budget of estuarine wetlands with tower-based measurements and MODIS time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Closing the carbon budget of estuarine wetlands with tower-based measurements and MODIS time series, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China, wDepartment of Environmental have distinct carbon flux dynamics ­ the lateral carbon flux incurred by tidal activities, and methane

  5. Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil mineral genesis and distribution in a saline lake landscape of the Pantanal Wetland, Brazil S Geografia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil b Soil & Water Sciences Program, Department São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 20 August

  6. 7th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference Utrecht 2004, 25-30 July

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    of water and therefore comply with all treatment standards. Water is removed through evaporation from wetlands for on-site treatment of wastewater Hans Brix Aarhus University, Institute of Biological Sciences infiltration, but at many sites soil infiltration is not possible. The Danish EPA has produced guidelines

  7. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  8. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  9. WETLAND FUNCTIONS and VALUES Adapted from National Science Foundation, 1995, and Mitch, William J., 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Maintenance of nutrient stocks within wetland, production of dissolved and partially decayed organic matter Timber production, food for fish and shellfish downstream, support of recreational and commercial fishing of water quality, clear water, high quality fish populations in streams Habitat and Food Web Support

  10. Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    . To reduce these negative impacts, a variety of stormwater best management practices (BMPs) have been have on the temperature of storm- water runoff. With the wide implementation of storm- water BMPs Stormwater BMPs for Trout Waters Coldwater Stream Design Guidance for Stormwater Wetlands, Wet

  11. Evaluation of two commercial bioaugmentation products for enhanced removal of petroleum from a wetland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Mark Allen

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as an oil spill response tool. The research is conducted at a facility established following an accidental oil spill on the San Jacinto River in October 1994. Previous research evaluated the intrinsic repudiation of petroleum in a wetland, as well as the use...

  12. DOE-Supported Project Demonstrates Benefits of Constructed Wetlands to Treat Non-Traditional Water Sources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In a pilot-scale test supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy, Clemson University researchers have shown that manmade or "constructed" wetlands can be used to treat non-traditional water sources which could then be used in power plants or for other purposes.

  13. Mineralogical and Microbial Controls on Iron Reduction in a Contaminated Aquifer-Wetland System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Andrea Melissa

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    minerals are important controls on iron reduction in natural systems. For the first phase of this research a series of sequential chemical extractions was performed on a core taken from a landfill-leachate-contaminated wetland-aquifer system at the Norman...

  14. DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

  15. Nitrogen cycling, plant biomass, and carbon dioxide evolution in a subsurface flow wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Jeffrey J

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to ascertain the fate of nitrogen in a constructed wetland and the rate of bioremediation as indicated by carbon dioxide evolution. Research included a study of nitrogen uptake by plants and nitrification. A tracer isotope of nitrogen,¹?N, was used to follow...

  16. f " International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control. Vienna 1996 XIII/4 -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    96/0852 f í " International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control. Vienna 1996 XIII/4 - 1 TREATMENT OF SLUDGE FROM SEPTIC TANKS IN A REED-BED FILTERS PILOT PLANT. Alain Liénard and treatment of wastewater. Zones of collective and individual (on-site) treatment have to be defined. Local

  17. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters.

  18. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Cane Valley, Arizona. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site in Cane Valley near Monument Valley, Arizona. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has relocated and stabilized this site`s tailings and other contaminated material in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Ground Water Project that evaluates potential health and environmental risks. It will help determine the approach required to address contaminated ground water at the site.

  19. Airborne particles in the San Joaquin Valley may affect human health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central Valley alter the lungs of healthy adult rats. Envevidence of changes in the lungs, systemic circulation andto recover cells from the lungs. For experi- ments to date,

  20. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalAnd-OrNearInfraredAtFishLakeValleyArea(Deymonaz,EtAl.,2008)&oldid386621...