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1

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project; 13Sept1996  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION YAKIMA FISHERIES PROJECT (YFP) RECORD OF DECISION Summary. As Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), I have decided to implement Alternative 2 of the proposed Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin in south- central Washington. The project responds directly to a need for knowledge of viable means to rebuild and maintain naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 would experimentally supplement depressed populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon that spawn naturally, as well as undertake a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and significant fall fishery for coho salmon (now eliminated in the Basin).

3

Yakima Fisheries Project : Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s fish and wildlife program, would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. Fisheries resources in the Yakima River are severely reduced from historical levels and there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) the construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. The project has been considerably revised from the original proposal described in the first draft EIS. Examined in addition to No Action (which would leave present anadromous fisheries resources unchanged in the, Basin) are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing (via stock imported from another basin) naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 has been identified as the preferred action. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers one of many topics under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project's Monitoring and Evaluation Program (YKFPME). The YKFPME is funded under two BPA contracts, one for the Yakama Nation and the other for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (Contract number 22370, Project Number 1995-063-25). A comprehensive summary report for all of the monitoring and evaluation topics will be submitted after all of the topical reports are completed. This approach to reporting enhances the ability of people to get the information they want, enhances timely reporting of results, and provides a condensed synthesis of the whole YKFPME. The current report was completed by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Kassler, Todd (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Genetic Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In chapter 1 we report on studies of the population genetic structure, using DNA microsatellites, of steelhead collected from different locations in the Yakima River basin (Roza Dam, Ahtanum Creek, Toppenish Creek, and Satus Creek) in 2000 and 2001. Of 28 pairwise tests of genotypic differentiation, only the 2000 and 2001 Roza Dam collections and the 2000 and 2001 Satus Creek collections did not exhibit significant differences. Similarly, pairwise tests of genetic differentiation (FST) were significant for all comparisons except the between-years comparisons of Roza Dam, Toppenish Creek, and Satus Creek collections. All tests between populations sampled from different localities were significant, indicating that these collections represent genetically differentiated stocks. In chapter 2 we report on genetic comparisons, again using microsatellites, of the three spring chinook populations in the Yakima basin (Upper Yakima, Naches, and American) with respect to our ability to be able to estimate the proportions of the three populations in mixed smolt samples collected at Chandler. We evaluated this both in terms of mixed fishery analysis, where proportions are estimated, but the likely provenance of any particular fish is unknown, and classification, where an attempt is made to assign individual fish to their population of origin. Simulations were done over the entire ranged of stock proportions observed in the Yakima basin in the last 20+ years. Stock proportions can be estimated very accurately by either method. Chapter 3 reports on our ongoing effort at cryopreserving semen from wild Upper Yakima spring chinook. In 2002, semen from 91 males, more than 50% of those spawned, was cryopreserved. Representation over the spawning season was excellent. Chapters 4,5, and 6 all relate to the continuing development of the domestication study design. Chapter 4 details the ISRP consultations and evolution of the design from last year's preferred alternative to the current plan of using the Naches population as a wild control, and maintaining a hatchery-only control line alongside the supplemented line. During discussions this year a major issue was the possible impact to the research and to the supplementation effort, of gene flow from precocious males from the hatchery control line into the supplemented line. At the end of the contracting period, this issue still had not been resolved. Along with the discussion of development of the domestication research design, chapter 4 presents the current monitoring plan document, with discussion of the approach to the various traits to be analyzed. Chapters 5 and 6 deal with experimental power of the domestication monitoring design. There is still much work to be done on power, but in chapter 5 we explore our power to detect differences among the three lines for traits measured on individual adults. Power was found to be quite good for effects of 5% per generation over three generations for traits having a coefficient of variation (CV) of 10-20%, but low if the CV was 50%. Power is higher for comparisons between the hatchery control line and supplemented line than between the supplemented line and the wild control, a consequence of trying to avoid heavy impacts to the Naches population. Power could be improved considerably improved by sampling more Naches fish in years of high abundance. Chapter 6 presents the same power analysis, but attempts to explore the effect of precocious males from the hatchery control line spawning in the wild. It is clear that if gene flow from precocious males is more than one or two percent that the between line comparisons will be biased, making the supplemented line appear to be more similar to the hatchery control line than it should and more different from the wild control line than it should. However, it was also clear that more analysis is desirable, as the heightened or diminished power is really just an enhancement or reduction of a real difference. A more straightforward analysis of the proportion of observed differences that can be attributed to precoci

Busack, Craig A.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Loxterman, Janet (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

April 7, 2004 April 7, 2004 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-08) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the upper Yakima south of Cle Elum, WA. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS)

7

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Use of Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities (03/08/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECN-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities PL-6: F3204 Location: Yakima, Yakima County, Washington; and Easton, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of research and supplementation projects in the Yakima basin in an

8

Yakima River Species Interactions Studies; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the thirteenth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003, Pearsons et al. 2004). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong ecological interactions such as predation or competition (Busack et al. 1997). Our work has adapted to new information needs as the YKFP has evolved. Initially, our work focused on interactions between anadromous steelhead and resident rainbow trout (for explanation see Pearsons et al. 1993), then interactions between spring chinook salmon and rainbow trout, and recently interactions between spring chinook salmon and highly valued non-target taxa (NTT; e.g., bull trout); and interactions between strong interactor taxa (e.g., those that may strongly influence the abundance of spring chinook salmon; e.g., smallmouth bass) and spring chinook salmon. The change in emphasis to spring chinook salmon has largely been influenced by the shift in the target species planned for supplementation (Bonneville Power Administration et al. 1996; Fast and Craig 1997). Originally, steelhead and spring chinook salmon were proposed to be supplemented simultaneously (Clune and Dauble 1991). However, due in part to the uncertainties associated with interactions between steelhead and rainbow trout, spring chinook and coho salmon were supplemented before steelhead. This redirection in the species to be supplemented has prompted us to prioritize interactions between spring chinook and rainbow trout, while beginning to investigate other ecological interactions of concern. Prefacility monitoring of variables such as rainbow trout density, distribution, and size structure was continued and monitoring of other NTT was initiated in 1997. This report is organized into five chapters that represent major topics associated with monitoring stewardship, utilization, and strong interactor taxa. Chapter 1 reports the results of non-target taxa monitoring after the sixth release of hatchery salmon smolts in the upper Yakima River Basin. Chapter 2 reports on the impacts of supplementation and reintroduction of salmon to trout. Chapter 2 was submitted as a manuscript to the North American Journal of Fisheries Management. Chapter 3 is an essay that describes the problems associated

Pearsons, Todd N.; Temple, Gabriel M.; Fritts, Anthony L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 3 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third in a series of annual reports that address reproductive ecological research and comparisons of hatchery and wild origin spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. Data have been collected prior to supplementation to characterize the baseline reproductive ecology, demographics and phenotypic traits of the unsupplemented upper Yakima population, however this report focuses on data collected on hatchery and wild spring chinook returning in 2003; the third year of hatchery adult returns. This report is organized into three chapters, with a general introduction preceding the first chapter and summarizes data collected between April 1, 2003 and March 31, 2004 in the Yakima basin. Summaries of each of the chapters in this report are included below. A major component of determining supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is an increase in natural production. Within this context, comparing upper Yakima River hatchery and wild origin fish across traits such as sex ratio, age composition, size-at-age, fecundity, run timing and gamete quality is important because these traits directly affect population productivity and individual fish fitness which determine a population's productivity.

Knudsen, Curtis (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the fourth in a series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook populations in the Yakima River basin. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2004 and March 31, 2005 and includes analyses of historical baseline data, as well. Supplementation success in the Yakima Klickitat Fishery Project's (YKFP) spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) program is defined as increasing natural production and harvest opportunities, while keeping adverse ecological interactions and genetic impacts within acceptable bounds (Busack et al. 1997). Within this context demographics, phenotypic traits, and reproductive ecology have significance because they directly affect natural productivity. In addition, significant changes in locally adapted traits due to hatchery influence, i.e. domestication, would likely be maladaptive resulting in reduced population productivity and fitness (Taylor 1991; Hard 1995). Thus, there is a need to study demographic and phenotypic traits in the YKFP in order to understand hatchery and wild population productivity, reproductive ecology, and the effects of domestication (Busack et al. 1997). Tracking trends in these traits over time is also a critical aspect of domestication monitoring (Busack et al. 2004) to determine whether trait changes have a genetic component and, if so, are they within acceptable limits. The first chapter of this report compares first generation hatchery and wild upper Yakima River spring chinook returns over a suite of life-history, phenotypic and demographic traits. The second chapter deals specifically with identification of putative populations of wild spring chinook in the Yakima River basin based on differences in quantitative and genetic traits. The third chapter is a progress report on gametic traits and progeny produced by upper Yakima River wild and hatchery origin fish spawned in 2004 including some comparisons with Little Naches River fish. In the fourth chapter, we present a progress report on comparisons naturally spawning wild and hatchery fish in the upper Yakima River and in an experimental spawning channel at CESRF in 2004. The chapters in this report are in various stages of development. Chapters One and Two will be submitted for peer reviewed publication. Chapters Three and Four should be considered preliminary and additional fieldwork and/or analysis are in progress related to these topics. Readers are cautioned that any preliminary conclusions are subject to future revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Schroder, Steven L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Johnston, Mark V. (yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-05) 9/20/02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 20, 2002 September 20, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-05) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 TO: Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the domestication selection research task would be modified to include a hatchery control line, maintained entirely by spawning hatchery-origin fish. Project No.: F3204 Location: Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of

12

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocial Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Three areas of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocial salmon monitoring (abundance). This report is organized into three chapters to represent these three areas of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2002 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Hatchery reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; James, Brenda B.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Reproductive Ecology of Yakima River Hatchery and Wild Spring Chinook and Juvenile-to-Adult PIT-tag Retention; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from Oncorh Consulting to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the first in an anticipated series of reports that address reproductive ecological research and monitoring of spring chinook in the Yakima River basin. In addition to within-year comparisons, between-year comparisons will be made to determine if traits of the wild Naches basin control population, the naturally spawning population in the upper Yakima River and the hatchery control population are diverging over time. This annual report summarizes data collected between April 1, 2001 and March 31, 2002. In the future, these data will be compared to previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons.

Knudsen, Curtis M. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Implementation of the Yakima Basin Fish Passage Project -- Phase 2 would significantly improve the production of anadromous fish in the Yakima River system. The project would provide offsite mitigation and help to compensate for lower Columbia River hydroelectric fishery losses. The Phase 2 screens would allow greater numbers of juvenile anadromous fish to survive. As a consequence, there would be higher returns of adult salmon and steelhead to the Yakima River. The proposed action would play an integral part in the overall Yakima River anadromous fish enhancement program (fish passage improvement, habitat enhancement, hatchery production increases, and harvest management). These would be environmental benefits associated with implementation of the Fish Passage and Protective Facilities Phase 2 Project. Based on the evaluation presented in this assessment, there would be no significant adverse environmental impacts if the proposed action was carried forward. No significant adverse environmental effects have been identified from construction and operation of the Yakima Phase 2 fish passage project. Proper design and implementation of the project will ensure no adverse effects will occur. Based on the information in this environmental analysis, BPA's and Reclamation's proposal to construct these facilities does not constitute a major Federal action that could significantly affect the quality of the human environment. 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project--Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (11/7/00)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

November 7, 2000 November 7, 2000 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04) memorandum David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 TO : Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery facilities. Project No.: F3204 Location: Prosser and Toppenish, Yakima County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

16

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Policy/Technical Involvement and Planning, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) is a supplementation project sponsored by the Northwest Power Planning Council (Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program 1994, Measure 7.4K). The objectives of the YKFP are: (1) to test the hypothesis that new supplementation techniques can be used in the Yakima River Basin to increase natural production and to improve harvest opportunities while maintaining the long-term genetic fitness of the wild and native salmonid populations and keeping adverse ecological interactions within acceptable limits (Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environment Impact Statement, 1996); (2) provide knowledge about the use of supplementation, so that it may be used to mitigate effects on anadromous fisheries throughout the Columbia River Basin; (3) to maintain and improve the quantity and productivity of salmon and steelhead habitat, including those areas made accessible by habitat improvements; (4) to ensure that Project implementation remains consistent with the Council's Fish and Wildlife Program; and (5) to implement the Project in a prudent and environmentally sound manner. Current YKFP operations have been designed to test the principles of supplementation (Busack et al. 1997). The Project's experimental design has focused on the following critical uncertainties affecting supplementation: (1) The survival and reproductive success of hatchery fish after release from the hatchery; (2) The impacts of hatchery fish as they interact with non-target species and stocks; and, (3) The effects of supplementation on the long-term genetic fitness of fish stocks. The YKFP endorses an adaptive management policy applied through a project management framework as described in the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Planning Status Report (1995), Fast and Craig (1997), Clune and Dauble 1991. The project is managed by a Policy Group consisting of a representative of the Yakama Nation (YN, lead agency) and a representative of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The functions of the parties are described in an MOU between the YN and the WDFW. A Scientific and Technical Advisory Committee (STAC) consisting of one representative from each management entity reports to the Policy Group and provides technical input on policy and other issues. Additional committee's, such as the Monitoring Implementation and Planning Team (MIPT), serve as the discretion of STAC. The Policy Group and STAC meet periodically (usually monthly) to conduct the business of the YKFP. Although the YKFP is an all stocks initiative (BPA 1996), most effort to date has been directed at spring chinook salmon and coho salmon. This report is a compilation of the year's activities between August 1, 2001 and July 31, 2002. All findings should be considered preliminary until data collection is completed or the information is published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Easterbrooks, John A.; Pearsons, Todd N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effects of Domestication on Predation Mortality and Competitive Dominance; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the second of a series of progress reports that address the effects of hatchery domestication on predation mortality and competitive dominance in the upper Yakima River basin (Pearsons et al. 2004). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004. Raising fish in hatcheries can cause unintended behavioral, physiological, or morphological changes in chinook salmon due to domestication selection. Domestication selection is defined by Busack and Currens 1995 as, ''changes in quantity, variety, or combination of alleles within a captive population or between a captive population and its source population in the wild as a result of selection in an artificial environment''. Selection in artificial environments could be due to intentional or artificial selection, biased sampling during some stage of culture, or unintentional selection (Busack and Currens 1995). Genetic changes can result in lowered survival in the natural environment (Reisenbichler and Rubin 1999). The goal of supplementation or conservation hatcheries is to produce fish that will integrate into natural populations. Conservation hatcheries attempt to minimize intentional or biased sampling so that the hatchery fish are similar to naturally produced fish. However, the selective pressures in hatcheries are dramatically different than in the wild, which can result in genetic differences between hatchery and wild fish. The selective pressures may be particularly prominent during the freshwater rearing stage where most mortality of wild fish occurs. The Yakima Fisheries Project is studying the effects of domestication on a variety of adult and juvenile traits of spring chinook salmon (Busack et al. 2003). The overall experimental design is to compare a variety of traits, across generations, from three lines of Yakima basin chinook, a hatchery control, supplementation line, and a wild control. The hatchery line was derived from wild upper Yakima broodstock and is only allowed to spawn in the hatchery. The supplementation line is upper Yakima stock that spawns in the upper Yakima River. This stock is an integration of wild and hatchery supplementation fish. Starting in 2005, we plan to use a wild control line of fish that will be the offspring of wild broodstock collected in the Naches River system, a tributary to the Yakima River. The Naches River is not stocked with hatchery fish, and there is minimal stray from Upper Yakima supplementation, so we believe that these will serve as a control to compare any genotypic changes in the hatchery and the supplementation line. As generations of fish are tested, we believe we will be able to analyze the data using an analysis of covariance to test the hypothesis that the hatchery line will exhibit greater domestication over generations, the wild line will remain at baseline levels, and the supplementation line will be somewhere in between. In this report, we have used the terms ''hatchery'' or ''supplementation'' to refer to upper Yakima fish that are progeny of fish that spent one generation in the hatchery, and ''wild'' to refer to fish that have had no exposure to the hatchery other than the matings for this experiment. The terms are relative to the parents that produced the fish for these experiments. All progeny of these fish were mated and reared under the same laboratory conditions. This report addresses two juvenile traits: predation mortality, and competitive dominance. Other traits will be presented in other project reports. It is anticipated that it will take at least two to five generations to detect measurable responses in many domestication response variables (Busack et

Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Scott, Jennifer L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project --Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery (8/16/99)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 16, 1999 August 16, 1999 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEWI-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project, DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02 David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWN-4 Proposed Action: Yakima Fisheries Project - Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery PL-6: F3204 Location: Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington (CESRF) and Prosser Juvenile Research Facility, Prosser, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing studies, research, and artificial production of several salmonid species in the Yakima and Klickitat river basins. BPA analyzed

19

Spring Chinook Salmon Interactions Indices and Residual/Precocious Male Monitoring in the Upper Yakima Basin; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines some of the factors that can influence the success of supplementation, which is currently being tested in the Yakima Basin using upper Yakima stock of spring chinook salmon. Supplementation success in the Yakima Basin is defined relative to four topic areas: natural production, genetics, ecological interactions, and harvest (Busack et al. 1997). The success of spring chinook salmon supplementation in the Yakima Basin is dependent, in part, upon fish culture practices and favorable physical and biological conditions in the natural environment (Busack et al. 1997; James et al. 1999; Pearsons et al., 2003; Pearsons et al. 2004). Shortfalls in either of these two topics (i.e., failure in culturing many fish that have high long-term fitness or environmental conditions that constrain spring chinook salmon production) will cause supplementation success to be limited. For example, inadvertent selection or propagation of spring chinook that residualize or precocially mature may hinder supplementation success. Spring chinook salmon that residualize (do not migrate during the normal migration period) may have lower survival rates than migrants and, additionally, may interact with wild fish and cause unacceptable impacts to non-target taxa. Large numbers of precocials (nonanadromous spawners) may increase competition for females and significantly skew ratios of offspring sired by nonanadromous males, which could result in more nonanadromous spring chinook in future generations. Conditions in the natural environment may also limit the success of spring chinook supplementation. For example, intra or interspecific competition may constrain spring chinook salmon production. Spring chinook salmon juveniles may compete with each other for food or space or compete with other species that have similar ecological requirements. Monitoring of spring chinook salmon residuals, precocials, prey abundance, carrying capacity, and competition will help researchers interpret why supplementation is working or not working (Busack et al. 1997). Monitoring ecological interactions will be accomplished using interactions indices. Interactions indices will be used to index the availability of prey and competition for food and space. The tasks described below represent various subject areas of juvenile spring chinook salmon monitoring but are treated together because they can be accomplished using similar methods and are therefore more cost efficient than if treated separately. Topics of investigation we pursued in this work were: (1) strong interactor monitoring (competition index and prey index), (2) carrying capacity monitoring (microhabitat monitoring); (3) residual and precocious male salmon monitoring (abundance); (4) performance of growth modulation in reducing precocious males during spawning; (5) incidence of predation by residualized chinook salmon; and (6) benefits of salmon carcasses to juvenile salmonids. This report is organized into six chapters to represent these topics of investigation. Data were collected during the summer and fall, 2004 in index sections of the upper Yakima Basin (Figure 1). Previous results on the topics in this report were reported in James et al. (1999), and Pearsons et al. (2003; 2004). Hatchery-reared spring chinook salmon were first released during the spring of 1999. The monitoring plan for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project calls for the continued monitoring of the variables covered in this report. All findings in this report should be considered preliminary and subject to further revision as more data and analytical results become available.

Pearsons, Todd N.; Johnson, Christopher L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); James, Brenda B. (Cascade Aquatics, Ellensburg, WA)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Phase II Fish Screen Operation and Maintenance; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to assure that the benefits of BPA's capital investment in Yakima Basin Phase II fish screen facilities are realized by performing operations that assure optimal fish protection and long facility life through a rigorous preventative maintenance program, while helping to restore ESA listed fish stocks in the Yakima River Basin.

Schille, Patrick C. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery-and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Yakima Spring Chinook supplementation program, wild fish are brought into the Cle Elum Hatchery, artificially crossed, reared, transferred to acclimation sites, and released into the upper Yakima River as smolts. When these fish mature and return to the Yakima River most of them will be allowed to spawn naturally; a few, however, will be brought back to the hatchery and used for research purposes. In order for this supplementation approach to be successful, hatchery-origin fish must be able to spawn and produce offspring under natural conditions. Recent investigations on salmonid fishes have indicated that exposure to hatchery environments during juvenile life may cause significant behavioral, physiological, and morphological changes in adult fish. These changes appear to reduce the reproductive competence of hatchery fish. In general, males are more affected than females; species with prolonged freshwater rearing periods are more strongly impacted than those with shorter rearing periods; and stocks that have been exposed to artificial culture for multiple generations are more impaired than those with a relatively short exposure history to hatchery conditions.

Schroder, S.L. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA); Rau, J.A. (Cle Elum Supplementation Research, Cle Elum, WA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

Golder Associates, Inc.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration 41: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington EA-0941: Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal for the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration to fund that portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement pertaining to the Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian Restoration Project (Project) in a cooperative effort with the Yakama Indian Nation and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The proposed action would allow the sponsors to ensure property and conduct wildlife management activities for the Project within the boundaries of the Yakama Indian Reservation. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time.

24

EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

25

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Reaches Project : Ecological and Geomorphic Dtudies Supporting Normative Flows in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima River system historically produced robust annual runs of chinook, sockeye, chum and coho salmon and steelhead. Many different stocks or life history types existed because the physiography of the basin is diverse, ranging from very dry and hot in the high desert of the lower basin to cold and wet in the Cascade Mountains of the headwaters (Snyder and Stanford 2001). Habitat diversity and life history diversity of salmonids are closely correlated in the Yakima Basin. Moreover, habitat diversity for salmonids and many other fishes maximizes in floodplain reaches of river systems (Ward and Stanford 1995, Independent Scientific Group 2000). The flood plains of Yakima River likely were extremely important for spawning and rearing of anadromous salmonids (Snyder and Stanford 2001). However, Yakima River flood plains are substantially degraded. Primary problems are: revetments that disconnect main and side channel habitats; dewatering associated with irrigation that changes base flow conditions and degrades the shallow-water food web; chemical and thermal pollution that prevents proper maturation of eggs and juveniles; and extensive gravel mining within the floodplain reaches that has severed groundwater-channel connectivity, increased thermal loading and increased opportunities for invasions of nonnative species. The Yakima River is too altered from its natural state to allow anything close to the historical abundance and diversity of anadromous fishes. Habitat loss, overharvest and dam and reservoir passage problems in the mainstem Columbia River downstream of the Yakima, coupled with ocean productivity variation, also are implicated in the loss of Yakima fisheries. Nonetheless, in an earlier analysis, Snyder and Stanford (2001) concluded that a significant amount of physical habitat remains in the five floodplain reaches of the mainstem river because habitat-structuring floods do still occur on the remaining expanses of floodplain environment. Assuming main stem and ocean bottlenecks are not overriding, restoration of floodplain connectivity by elevating base flows throughout the corridor, removing revetments and refilling gravel pits by natural riverine transport of gravel where possible could be successful in substantially enhancing Yakima salmon and steelhead runs. Hence, the overarching purpose of this research was to determine the ecology of major floodplain reaches of the Yakima River: Cle Elum, Kittitas, Naches, Union Gap and Wapato. Specifically, the study documented groundwater-channel connectivity and flow relations; use and quality of side channel and other floodplain habitats by salmonid fishes; and classification and analysis of floodplain habitat using remote sensing and documentation of geomorphic processes, required for a robust understanding of the feasibility of revetment removal and establishment of a normative flow regime for the mainstem river.

Stanford, Jack A.; Lorang, Mark N.; Matson, Phillip L. (University of Montana, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Poison, MT)

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

EIS-0333: Maiden Wind Farm Project, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA抯 proposed action to execute power purchase and interconnection agreements for the purpose of acquiring up to 50 average megawatts (aMW) (up to about 200 MW) of the project developer抯 proposed Maiden Wind Farm.

30

Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Comparing the Reproductive Success of Yakima River Hatchery- and Wild-Origin Spring Chinook; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reproductive success in wild- and first generation hatchery-origin spring Chinook males was examined by allowing the fish to compete for spawning opportunities in two sections of an observation stream. Behavioral observations were used to characterize the frequency of aggression and courting activities. Microsatellite DNA from each male and fry collected from the observation stream were used in pedigree analyses to estimate reproductive success. The coefficient of variation in male reproductive success equaled 116 and 86% in the two populations. No differences were detected in reproductive success due to hatchery or wild origin. Nor were any behavioral differences found between hatchery and wild males. Although statistical power was low due to intrinsic variation a great deal of overlap existed in the reproductive success values of hatchery and wild males. Significant disparities existed among the males on their ability to produce offspring. Males achieving high reproductive success mated with numerous females, were socially dominant, aggressive, and tended to stay in localized areas, courting and spawning with females that were adjacent to one another.

Schroder, S.L.; Pearsons, T.N. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Knudsen, C.M. (Oncorh Consulting, Olympia, WA)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Category:Yakima, WA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yakima, WA Yakima, WA Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Yakima, WA" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 61 KB SVHospital Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVHospital Yakima WA P... 58 KB SVLargeHotel Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVLargeHotel Yakima WA... 58 KB SVLargeOffice Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVLargeOffice Yakima W... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVMediumOffice Yakima ... 57 KB SVMidriseApartment Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Yak... 59 KB SVOutPatient Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png SVOutPatient Yakima WA... 63 KB SVPrimarySchool Yakima WA Puget Sound Energy Inc.png

34

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Staff Recommendations for Remaining Projects in the RME/AP Category Review 5/18/2011 # Task1 SubCat ProjNum Title Sponsor ISRPRec BiOp Accord FY12Req BPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

199506425 Policy, Plan and Technical Support of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)-Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) Yes (Qualified) $197,917 Art 2012; project to wind down for close out within FY 2012. 102 B AP 200203100 Growth Modulation in Salmon

36

Moses Lake Fishery Restoration Project : FY 1999 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Moses Lake Project consists of 3 phases. Phase 1 is the assessment of all currently available physical and biological information, the collection of baseline biological data, the formulation of testable hypotheses, and the development of a detailed study plan to test the hypotheses. Phase 2 is dedicated to the implementation of the study plan including data collection, hypotheses testing, and the formulation of a management plan. Phase 3 of the project is the implementation of the management plan, monitoring and evaluation of the implemented recommendations. The project intends to restore the failed recreational fishery for panfish species (black crappie, bluegill and yellow perch) in Moses Lake as off site mitigation for lost recreational fishing opportunities for anadromous species in the upper Columbia River. This report summarizes the results of Phase 1 investigations and presents the study plan directed at initiating Phase 2 of the project. Phase 1of the project culminates with the formulation of testable hypotheses directed at investigating possible limiting factors to the production of panfish in Moses Lake. The limiting factors to be investigated will include water quality, habitat quantity and quality, food limitations, competition, recruitment, predation, over harvest, environmental requirements, and the physical and chemical limitations of the system in relation to the fishes.

None given

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Integrating ecophysiology and plankton dynamics into projected changes in maximum fisheries catch potential under climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In addition, average surface water pH of the ocean has dropped by 0.1 units since pre- industrial timesIntegrating ecophysiology and plankton dynamics into projected changes in maximum fisheries catch 7TJ, UK 2 Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft

Pauly, Daniel

38

Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1.4 Deep Water................................................................................................. 143 1.2.3.4 Deep WaterMEFEPO Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881 Work Package 1

Hansen, Ren茅 Rydhof

39

I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

I I Lower Yakima Valley Wetlands and Riparian - Restoration Project \ , Final Environmental Assessment DOENo. 0941 c Bonneville Power kdmi.nistration, Yakama Indian Nation, Bureawof Indian Affairs % J e;r%mBlYTlON OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was .prepared as a n account of work sponsored by an agency of t h e United States Government. Neither t h e United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes a n y legal liability or responsibility for t h e accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial

40

Fabricate and Install Yakima Basin Phase II Fish Screens; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2006 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to restore ESA listed and resident fish stocks within the Yakima Basin by preventing mortality and/or injury to all life stages of anadromous and resident fish at irrigation diversions. This goal is being accomplished through an on-going effort by the Yakima Basin Phase II Technical Work Group (TWG), which is comprised of local, state, federal, tribal and private groups who prioritize and assign screening projects.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Staff, (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Habitat Program, Yakima, WA)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington

42

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1991 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The population of Yakima River spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) has been drastically reduced from historic levels reported to be as high as 250,000 adults (Smoker 1956). This reduction is the result of a series of problems including mainstem Columbia dams, dams within the Yakima itself, severely reduced flows due to irrigation diversions, outmigrant loss in irrigation canals, increased thermal and sediment loading, and overfishing. Despite these problems, the return of spring chinook to the Yakima River has continued at levels ranging from 854 to 9,442 adults since 1958. In October 1982, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted the Yakima Indian Nation to develop methods to increase production of spring chinook in the Yakima system. The Yakima Nation's current enhancement policy attempts to maintain the genetic integrity of the spring chinook stock native to the Yakima Basin. Relatively small numbers of hatchery fish have been released into the basin in past years. The goal of this study was to develop data that will be used to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. A major objective of this study is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. The second major objective of this study is to determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation. The last three major objectives of the study are to locate and define areas in the watershed that may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; to define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and to determine the physical and biological limitations on production within the system. 47 refs., 89 figs., 67 tabs.

Fast, David E.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fisheries Project The project is consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, as well as BPA's Hood River Fisheries Project EIS (DOEEIS-0241)...

46

Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1988 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Smolt outmigration was monitored at Wapatox on the Naches River and Prosser on the lower Yakima. The spring outmigration at Wapatox was estimated to be smolts. The survival from egg to smolt was calculated using the 1986 redd counts and the 1988 smolt outmigration at Prosser. The smolt to adult survival was calculated based on the 1983 smolt outmigration estimated at Prosser and the 1984 return of jacks (3 year old fish), the 1985 return of four year old adults, and the 1986 return of five year old fish to the Yakima River. 13 refs., 4 figs., 47 tabs.

Fast, David E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Yakima County, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yakima County, Washington: Energy Resources Yakima County, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.543606掳, -120.7558292掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.543606,"lon":-120.7558292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2008 (March 1, 2008 to February 1, 2009).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration, and continued project tasks in 2008. The objective was to evaluate factors that could limit kokanee in Banks Lake, including water quality, prey availability, harvest, and acute predation during hatchery releases. Water quality parameters were collected twice monthly from March through November. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in May and stratification was apparent by July. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to 15 meters deep, with temperatures of 21-23 C in the epilimnion and 16-19 C in the hypolimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 8 mg/L until August when they dropped near or below 5 mg/L deeper than 20-meters. Secchi depths ranged from 3.2 to 6.2 meters and varied spatially and temporally. Daphnia and copepod densities were the highest in May and June, reaching densities of 26 copepods/liter and 9 Daphnia/liter. Fish surveys were conducted in July and October 2008 using boat electrofishing, gill netting, and hydroacoustic surveys. Lake whitefish (71%) and yellow perch (16%) dominated the limnetic fish assemblage in the summer, while lake whitefish (46%) and walleye (22%) were the most abundant in gill net catch during the fall survey. Piscivore diets switched from crayfish prior to the release of rainbow trout to crayfish and rainbow trout following the release. The highest angling pressure occurred in May, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 45% of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. Ice fishing occurred in January and February at the south end of the lake. An estimated total of 4,397 smallmouth bass, 11,106 walleye, 371 rainbow trout, and 509 yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in 2008. No kokanee were reported in the creel; however, local reports indicated that anglers were targeting and catching kokanee. The economic benefit of the Banks Lake fishery was estimated at $2,288,005 during 2008. Abundance estimates from the hydroacoustic survey in July were 514,435 lake whitefish and 10,662 kokanee, with an overall abundance estimate of 626,061 limnetic fish greater than 100 mm. When comparing spring fry, fall fingerling and yearling net pen release strategies of kokanee, 95% were of hatchery origin, with the highest recaptures coming from the fall fingerling release group.

Polacek, Matt [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington

51

EIS-0169: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Record of Decision EIS-0169: Record of Decision Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project As Administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), I have...

52

EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

modified to include a hatchery control line, maintained entirely by spawning hatchery-origin fish. DOEEIS-0169-SA-05, Supplement Analysis for YakimaKlickitat Fisheries Project,...

53

EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington The purpose of this Supplement Analysis is to determine if a Supplemental EIS is needed to analyze the use of the WDFW's existing Yakima Hatchery for rearing and possibly incubating coho. Additional acclimation and research activities for coho are also analyzed. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-03, Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington (March 2000)

54

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project Annual Report : Fiscal Year 2001 (September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. The first year of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 m deep, with 19-20 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until mid summer when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-m deep. Secchi depths ranged from 3-10 m and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in May and July using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (24%) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (20%) dominated the nearshore species composition in May; however, by July yellow perch Perca flavescens (26%) were the second most common species to smallmouth bass (30%). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during May (72%) and July (90%). The May hydroacoustic survey revealed highest densities of fish in the upper 1/3 of the water column in the mid- to northern sections of the reservoir near Steamboat Rock. In the future, data from seasonal surveys will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Baldwin, Casey; Woller, Heather

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Development of a Network-Based Information Infrastructure for Fisheries and Hydropower Information in the Columbia River Basin : Final Project Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to help develop technology and a unified structure to access and disseminate information related to the Bonneville Power Administration's fish and wildlife responsibility in the Pacific Northwest. BPA desires to increase access to, and exchange of, information produced by the Environment Fish, and Wildlife Group in concert with regional partners. Historically, data and information have been managed through numerous centralized, controlled information systems. Fisheries information has been fragmented and not widely exchanged. Where exchange has occurred, it often is not timely enough to allow resource managers to effectively use the information to guide planning and decision making. This project (and related projects) have successfully developed and piloted a network-based infrastructure that will serve as a vehicle to transparently connect existing information systems in a manner that makes information exchange efficient and inexpensive. This project was designed to provide a mechanism to help BPA address measures in the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife program: 3.2H Disseminate Research and Monitoring Information and 5.1A.5 manage water supplies in accordance with the Annual Implementation Work Plan. This project also provided resources that can be used to assist monitoring and evaluation of the Program.

Scheibe, Timothy D.; Johnson, Gary E.; Perkins, Bill

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1: Hood River Fisheries Program 1: Hood River Fisheries Program EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program SUMMARY This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and wildlife associated with the construction and operation of Federal hydro-power facilities in the Columbia River Basin. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 4, 2008 EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project May 16, 2005 EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project, Hood River County, Oregon Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project

57

Relative risk site evaluations for Yakima Training Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All 20 U.S. Army Yakima Training Center (YTC) sites evaluated were given a `low` relative risk. At Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) 22, a `minimum` soils contaminant hazard factor was assigned even though 6,700 mg/kg TPH-diesel was found in surface soil. SWMU 22 is physically located on top of and with the fence surrounding Area of Concern (AOC) 4. Because the diesel is most likely associated with AOC 4, and plans are to clean up AOC 4, any further actions regarding these contaminated soils should be addressed as part of the planned actions for AOC 4. Contaminant hazard factors of `moderate` were assigned to the soil pathway for SWMUs 4 and 7 because dieldrin and arsenic, respectively, were found in surface soil samples at concentrations exceeding standards. A `moderate` contaminant hazard factor was also assigned to the sediment pathway for AOC 1 because arsenic detected in sediments in `Larry`s Swimming Pool` exceeded the standard. All other contaminant hazard factors were rated as minimal. The receptor factor for all sites and pathways was rated `limited,` except for SWMU 54 in which the groundwater receptor factor was rated `potential.` A `potential` rating was assigned to the groundwater pathway at this site to be conservative. The site is located on the south side of the syncline axis where the unconfined aquifer may be present and there are no monitoring wells at the site to confirm or deny the presence of groundwater contamination.

Smith, R.M.; Whelan, G.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Vegetation survey of knapweed on the Yakima Training Center - 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and discusses the results of a vegetation survey conducted in 1992 on a portion of the Yakima Training Center (YTC). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this survey and a similar survey in 1991 for the U.S. Department of the Army. The objectives of the survey were to evaluate the impact of the herbicide picloram on forbs where aerial applications of picloram were made in 1988, 1989, and 1991 to control knapweed infestations. Forbs are of special interest because they are an important part of the spring and summer diet of the western sage grouse, which is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service candidate species for the threatened and endangered list. We also conducted a limited evaluation of the effectiveness of the spray program in controlling the spread of knapweed. Percent plant canopy cover and number of forbs were measured on 120 transacts on the herbicide-treated and untreated control areas. Herbicide treatment in 1991 resulted in a significant reduction in knapweed based on percent cover and density. The treatment areas also all had lower percent canopy cover of perennial forbs and fewer perennial forbs compared to control areas. Canopy cover of shrubs and annual, biennial, and perennial forbs measured on the YTC increased between the 1991 and 1992 survey, which may indicate a recovery of these vegetation types after disturbance. These increases also could reflect the mild 1992 winter and superior growing conditions in the spring of 1992. We recommend that these vegetation transacts continue to be monitored for an additional growing season to evaluate (1) whether knapweed increases to its previous abundance in the 1991 herbicide-treated area, (2) the efficacy of herbicide application on transacts along roadways, and (3) the increase in invasive annuals in herbicide-treated areas and the possible effects on community vegetation structure and sage grouse habitat.

Downs, J.L.; Cadoret, N.A.; Rickard, W.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Physiologic, toxicologic, and population responses of brook trout to acidification: Interim report of the lake acidification and fisheries project: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report overviews investigations of the ''Lake Acidification and Fisheries'' (LAF) project into the effects of surface water acidification on brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations. Of the six life stages examined, freshly-fertilized eggs were the most sensitive to reduced pH. In contrast, aluminum was most toxic to fry, juvenile, and adult fish. Increased calcium concentrations reduced the toxic effects of acid/aluminum exposure at all life stages. Little evidence was found to indicate that exposure to acidic waters affects oocyte development or production, suggesting that direct mortality plays a larger role in losses of brook trout populations from acidic waters. For fry and adult fish, the major toxic mechanism of acid/aluminum exposure seems to be disturbance of normal ion regulation at the gill, but aluminum exposure can cause respiratory impairment as well. Using results from LAF toxicity studies and available field data, a modeling framework was developed that predicts the probability of presence or absence of brook trout populations, based ion surface water chemistry. In addition, this framework can be used to evaluate changes in this probability caused by changes in water chemistry (e.g., liming), stocking rates, or fishing pressure. 129 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

Mount, D.R.; Marcus, M.D. (eds.); Breck, J.E.; Christensen, S.W.; Gern, W.A.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Gulley, D.D.; McDonald, D.G.; Parkhurst, B.R.; Van Winkle, W.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line in Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS(DOE/EIS-0241) (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62) (9/14/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4, 2001 4, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-62) and the Hood River Fisheries Project Final EIS (DOE/EIS-0241). Thomas Morse Fish and Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Hood River Fish Habitat Project Project No: 1998-021-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.16 and 1.17 Spawning and rearing habitat enhancements; 2.1 Maintain healthy riparian plant communities; 4.9 Water conveyance: ditch and canal lining; 4.23 Intake and return diversion screens; 1.13 Culvert removal and replacement. Location: Odell, Hood River County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Confederated Tribes of the Warms

62

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1973 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 67 Prepared by STATISTICS a review of the fishery statistics for the year 1973 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment 1n the fish- eries, quantity of gear operated, number

63

A synthesis of ethnohistorical materials concerning the administration of Federal Indian policy among the Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce Indian people: Working draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purposes of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Indian Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and the Nez Perce Tribe have been accorded the status of ''Affected Indian Tribe'' and have become party to the proceedings to determine a suitable location for the nation's first commercial waste repository. Each of the Tribes has expressed concerns about the suitability of the Hanford Site in eastern Washington. These concerns, in general, address the proposed repository's effects on traditional spiritual beliefs and cultural practices, on tribal sovereignty and the Tribes' right to self-government, on the natural resources under tribal management jurisdiction, and on the health and socioeconomic characteristics of the Tribes' reservation communities. The Yakima, Umatilla, and Nez Perce have distinctive cultural traditions that may be adversely affected by activities related to the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP). Further, the Tribes enjoy a unique relationship with the federal government. Because of their distinctive cultures and governmental status, particular attention will be paid to expressed interests of the Tribes, and to ways in which these interests may be affected by the repository program. Monitoring is needed to describe current conditions among the Affected Tribes' populations, to describe BWIP site characterization activities affecting the Tribes, and to measure any changes in these conditions that may occur as a direct result of site characterization. This paper reports our first efforts at gathering historical information. It summarizes materials contained in two sources: the reports of field agents to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs (1854-1936), and the dockets of the Indian Claims Commission. 24 refs., 3 figs.

Liebow, E.B.; Younger, C.A.; Broyles, J.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Microsoft Word - SA-06-EIS-0169-Holmes Coho site.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: March 12, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-06) David Byrnes Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project - Under the Monitoring and Evaluation Program (M&E), the coho acclimation research task would be modified to include a new site located in the Upper Yakima north of Ellensburg, WA. Project No.: F3204 Location: Ellensburg, Kittitas County, Washington. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Co-Managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). 1. Introduction The Yakima Fisheries Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (YFP EIS) (USDOE/BPA 1996) analyzed impacts of undertaking fishery research and mitigation

65

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Fisheries Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fisheries Resources Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFisheriesResources&oldid612306" Category: NEPA Resources...

67

FISHERY STATISTICS UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES 1971 STATISTICAL DIGEST NO. 65 Prepared by STATISTICS ry statistics for the year 1971 . These statistics include data on the volume and value of landings of fishery products, employment in the fishe ries, quantity of gear operated, number of fishing craft e

68

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 8, 2000 March 8, 2000 EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington September 15, 1999 EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility September 1, 1999 EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington August 16, 1999 EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site

69

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington BPA, YIN and WDFW are proposing to collect broodstock, incubate eggs and rear fry in hatcheries; acclimate and release smolts; and study the natural production, ecological interactions, long-term fitness, and culturing/genetics of spring and fall chinook and coho salmon in the Yakima River basin. In the Klickitat basin, salmonid life history and physical habitat data would be collected. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-1: Supplement Analysis for Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington (May 1999)

70

Inland capture fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from a particular water body or for conservation initiatives...exploit common pool resources. Their...access to the water body and resource...fisheries and conservation objectives for...biodiversity in inland waters. J. Fish Biol...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

REPORT OF THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOCICAL LABORATORY GALVESTON, TEXAS FISCAL YEAR, GALVESTON, TEXAS Fiscal Year 1966 Milton J. Lindner, Director Robert E. Stevenson, Assistant Director Contribution No. 226, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory, Galveston, Texas Circular 268

72

THE PEARL FISHERY OF VENEZUELA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE PEARL FISHERY OF VENEZUELA Marine Biological Lafi'ir-toiy X.I B K. A. R TT JUN 2 41950 WOODS Albert M. Day, Director Special Scientific Report - Fisheries Ho. 26 THE PEARL FISHERY OF VENEZUELA Paul to Venezuela, made travel arrangements, arranged for the cooperation of Venecuelan agencies, and otheri

73

Appendix J FWS and NOAA Fisheries Biological Opinions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

J J FWS and NOAA Fisheries Biological Opinions U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix J FWS and NOAA Fisheries Biological Opinions Appendix J FWS and NOAA Fisheries Biological Opinions Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS FWS Biological Opinion United States Department of the Interk~r FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE New England Field Office 70 Commercial Street, Suite 300 Concord, New Hampshire 03301-5087 http://www.fws.gov/northeastlnewenglandfieldoffice Re: Final Biological Opinion, Cape Wind Associates, LLC, November 21, 2008 Wind Energy Project, Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts Formal Consultation # 08-F-0323 Mr.

74

Understanding Livelihoods Dependent on Fisheries Lao PDR Country Status Report i  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESOURCES RESEARCH CENTRE, LAOS & PARVIN SULTANA WORLDFISH CENTER UNDERSTANDING LIVELIHOODS DEPENDENT ON INLAND FISHERIES IN BANGLADESH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA (DFID/FMSP Project R8118) March 2003 University #12 and livelihoods 4 2. The Ecology and Biodiversity of Living Aquatic Resources 6 3. Exploitation of Fisheries 7 4

Lorenzen, Kai

75

THE BIG PICTURE: A "FISHERY SYSTEM APPROACH"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fishery management, with biodiversity an aspect of marine conservation that has received little attentionTHE BIG PICTURE: A "FISHERY SYSTEM APPROACH" LINKS FISHERY MANAGEMENT AND BIODIVERSITY Anthony Canada Email: t.charles@smu.ca Keywords : Fishery Management, Biodiversity, Fishery System Approach

Charles, Anthony

76

Fishery Resources Theodore R. Merrell, Jr. Northwest Fisheries Center, Auke Bay Fisheries  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fishery Resources Theodore R. Merrell, Jr. Fishery Resources Theodore R. Merrell, Jr. Northwest Fisheries Center, Auke Bay Fisheries of the ~ a b o r a t o r y , National ~ a r i n e Fisheries Sewice, National Ocear~ic and Atmospl~eric Administration, Vestern Aleutians Auke Bay, Alaska Tlte fishery resources in the zuestent Aleutian Islnnds are diverse, nbtrnrlant, nrid heavily exploited, primarily by Japanese nnd Soviet fishermen. Seven groups make u p the bulk of the crcrrent catch: snlmo~t (sockeye, chum, and pink), king crabs, Pacific hnlibut, Pncific ocean perch, sablefish, wnlleye pollock, mid Pacific cod. Three species of whales (syenn, fin, and sei) are also caplared. Tlre marine enuironmerrt is highly prodirctiue and is relaliuely trn- nffecterl by ,,ton's activities otlter f h a i ~ fishing. Prospects for co,ttinaed or espanded fishery ltnruesls

77

Potential social, institutional, and environmental impacts of selected energy-conservation measures in two Washington communities. [Seattle and Yakima  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The likely environmental, social, and institutional impacts of selected energy-conservation measures in two communities in Washington state are reported. The five conservation measures investigated in this study were: (1) retrofitting existing buildings; (2) district heating and Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES); (3) small automobiles and vehicle redesign; (4) land-use and housing modifications; and (5) electric-utility rate reform. Twenty potential impact areas were selected for analysis. These areas were divided into five categories of environmental impacts, economic impacts, community impacts, personal impacts, and overall quality of life in the community. The research was conducted in Seattle and Yakima, Washington. In each location, about two dozen public officials and business, labor, and community leaders were interviewed. Their diverse views are summarized. The Seattle respondents saw energy conservation as a highly desirable policy with a number of temporary, transitional problems arising as energy-conservation measures were implemented. Yakima respondents, in contrast, did not expect to encounter many serious energy problems in the foreseeable future and consequently viewed energy conservation as a relatively minor community concern. Moreover, they anticipated that many conservation measures, if implemented by the government, would encounter either apathy or resistance in their community. Two broad generalizations can bedrawn from these interviews: (1) energy conservation will basically be beneficial for the natural environment and our society; and (2) if energy conservation does become a dominant thrust in our society, it could stimulate and reinforce a much broader process of fundamental social change. (LCL)

Edelson, E.; Olsen, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Information System (FIS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Fisheries Information System (FIS) Program Management Plan Working Drafts Draft fis program management plan_4.doc 10/31/2007 1:15 PM #12;#12;Change History Subject: Change history for the FIS Program Management Plan Comments: Comments regarding this version of the FIS

79

34 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Panama City, FL 32408. Travis Ford and Laughlin Siceloff are with the University of New Hampshire, Depart important issue to fisheries managers, fishermen, and the public as there have been a wide range of marine, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra- tion, 3500 Delwood Beach Rd

80

...............BOOKS OUR CHANGING FISHERIES -Sidney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...............BOOKS OUR CHANGING FISHERIES - Sidney Shapiro, Editor, avaIlable from Superintend- ent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402, $9 a copy. This book was produced by specialists of the National Marine Fisheries Service. Its ~ditor, Dr. Sidney Shapiro, has

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

REPORT OF THE COMMERCIAL FISHERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY GALVESTON, TEXAS FISCAL YEAR, GALVESTON, TEXAS Fiscal Year 1967 Milton J. Lindner, Director Robert E. Stevenson, Assistant Director Contribution No. Z6l, Bureau of Connmercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory, Galveston, Texas Circular 295

82

Bruce R. Ward Fisheries Scientist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bruce R. Ward Fisheries Scientist Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection, 2204 Main Mall 4714 Cell Phone 604 556 WARD Fax 604 660 1849 Bruce.Ward@gems8.gov.bc.ca Bruce Ward is a Fisheries Scientist with British Columbia's Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection, Aquatic Ecosystem Science

83

EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility, Cle Elum, Washington The Yakima Fisheries Project is co-managed by the Yakama Nation (YN) and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). The project consists of the collection of salmonid broodstock, incubation of eggs and rearing of fry in hatcheries, the acclimation and release of smolts, and related ecological studies in the study of natural production. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Natural Spawning Channels, Increased On-site Housing, and Upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery. Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility,

84

A sociobioeconomic fisheries simulation model: the Texas inshore shrimp fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SO CIO BIO EC ONO MIC FISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHORE SHRIMP FISHERY A Thesis JUDITH T ERA UTHA M E R Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences SO CIO BIOS COND MIC PISHERIES SIM ULATION MODEL: THE TEXAS INSHO RE SH RIM P FISHER 7 A Thesis by JUDITH T KRAUTHA MER Approved as to style and content by: b'C. ~ Wilham...

Krauthamer, Judith T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities The purpose of this Supplement Analysis is to determine if a Supplemental EIS is needed to analyze the construction/modification upgrades to the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) fall chinook and coho experimental facilities at the Prosser and Marion Drain Hatcheries. Construction/modifications are in support of the experimental acclimation, rearing and incubating activities for coho and fall chinook. DOE/EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis for Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities (November 2000)

86

Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...into fisheries management. regime shifts|precautionary approach|fisheries management|management strategy...years, fisheries science and management...The current approach in fisheries science and management couples risk management...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Power Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Projects Power Projects Contact SN Customers Environmental Review-NEPA Operations & Maintenance Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > About SNR Power Projects Central Valley: In California's Central Valley, 18 dams create reservoirs that can store 13 million acre-feet of water. The project's 615 miles of canals irrigate an area 400 miles long and 45 miles wide--almost one third of California. Powerplants at the dams have an installed capacity of 2,099 megawatts and provide enough energy for 650,000 people. Transmission lines total about 865 circuit-miles. Washoe: This project in west-central Nevada and east-central California was designed to improve the regulation of runoff from the Truckee and Carson river systems and to provide supplemental irrigation water and drainage, as well as water for municipal, industrial and fishery use. The project's Stampede Powerplant has a maximum capacity of 4 MW.

88

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part A; Fisheries Creel Survey and Population Status Analysis, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. Creel and angler surveys estimated that anglers made 196,775 trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1998, with an economic value of $8.0 million dollars, based on the Consumer Price Index (CPI). In 1998 it was estimated that 9,980 kokanee salmon, 226,809 rainbow trout, 119,346 walleye, and over 14,000 smallmouth bass and other species were harvested. Creel data indicates that hatchery reared rainbow trout contribute substantially to the Lake Roosevelt fishery. The contribution of kokanee salmon to the creel has not met the expectations of fishery managers to date, and is limited by entrainment from the reservoir, predation, and possible fish culture obstacles. The 1998 Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Creel and Population Analysis Annual Report includes analyses of the relative abundance of fish species, and reservoir habitat relationships (1990-1998). Fisheries surveys (1990-1998) indicate that walleye and burbot populations appear to be increasing, while yellow perch, a preferred walleye prey species, and other prey species are decreasing in abundance. The long term decreasing abundance of yellow perch and other prey species are suspected to be the result of the lack of suitable multiple reservoir elevation spawning and rearing refugia for spring spawning reservoir prey species, resulting from seasonal spring-early summer reservoir elevation manipulations, and walleye predation. Reservoir water management is both directly, and indirectly influencing the success of mitigation hatchery production of kokanee salmon and rainbow trout. Tag return data suggested excessive entrainment occurred in 1997, with 97 percent of tag recoveries from rainbow trout coming from below Grand Coulee Dam. High water years appear to have substantial entrainment impacts on salmonids. The 1998 salmonid harvest has improved from the previous two years, due to the relatively water friendly year of 1998, from the harvest observed in the 1996-1997 high water years, which were particularly detrimental to the reservoir salmonid fisheries. Impacts from those water years are still evident in the reservoir fish populations. Analysis of historical relative species abundance, tagging data and hydroacoustical studies, indicate that hydro-operations have a substantial influence on the annual standing crop of reservoir salmonid populations due to entrainment losses, and limited prey species recruitment, due to reservoir elevation level fluctuation, and corresponding reproductive success.

Spotts, Jim; Shields, John; Underwood, Keith

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

There is no clear criterion for determining sustainabil-ity of freshwater fisheries. Freshwater fisheries worldwide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecological processes and may thus serve as microcosms for larger fisheries. Activities and conditions on land for the resource, and (3) associated humans. Fishery assessment therefore often includes quantifying static- economics. Thorough fishery assessment may require a multidisciplinary team. Fisheries Indicators

Kwak, Thomas J.

90

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ENTO 489 Field Entomology Field Project Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.com Wildlife and Fisheries Science Wildlife and Fisheries Science Class of 2006 Class of 2005 Project, and weekends when needed. 路 We will not collect on days if the cloud cover is more than 80% and/or if the wind

Behmer, Spencer T.

92

THE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY METER IN FISHERY INVESTIGATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY METER IN FISHERY INVESTIGATIONS I Marine Biological Laboratory! WOODS RESISTIVITY METER IN FISHERY INVESTIGATIONS By Robert E. Lennon Fishery Research Biologist Appalachian Sport) BiblioKiMpliy : p. ]!. 1. Electric meters. 2. Water--Analysis. 3. Electric fishing. I. Title. ( Series

93

The Marine Biodiversity and Fisheries Catches of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Marine Biodiversity and Fisheries Catches of the Pitcairn Island Group Palomares, M.L.D., D. Chaitanya, S. Harper, D. Zeller and D. Pauly. 2011. The Marine Biodiversity and Fisheries Catches;#12;THE MARINE BIODIVERSITY AND FISHERIES CATCHES OF THE PITCAIRN ISLAND GROUP M.L.D. Palomares, D

Pauly, Daniel

94

EIS-0505: Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line Project, Yakima, Grant, Benton and Kittitas Counties, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bureau of Land Management is preparing, with DOE抯 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, an EIS that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct a 60- to 67-mile long 230-kV transmission line. BPA抯 proposed action is to interconnect the transmission line to an existing BPA substation. Additional information is available at http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/spokane/plans/vph230/.

95

Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exploring the Standard Model Exploring the Standard Model       You've heard a lot about the Standard Model and the pieces are hopefully beginning to fall into place. However, even a thorough understanding of the Standard Model is not the end of the story but the beginning. By exploring the structure and details of the Standard Model we encounter new questions. Why do the most fundamental particles have the particular masses we observe? Why aren't they all symmetric? How is the mass of a particle related to the masses of its constituents? Is there any other way of organizing the Standard Model? The activities in this project will elucidate but not answer our questions. The Standard Model tells us how particles behave but not necessarily why they do so. The conversation is only beginning. . . .

96

32 Marine Fisheries Review Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Azores and Madeira (DGPA, 1998). Historically, fisheries have targeted elasmobranchs to supply the liver-oil-products peaked (oil prices reached US$4.00 ~ US$5.00 per liter) and then declined from 1987 to 1999 (oil prices generally decreased over time, with a corresponding increase in price per kilo- gram. The most important

97

Fisheries VOL 36 NO 12 DECEMBER 2011 WWW.FISHERIES.ORG 583 CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Tracking Network Canada: A Network Approach to Addressing Critical Issues in Fisheries and their impact on ocean ecosystems, animal movements, and ecology and the dynamics of marine animal popu- lationsFisheries 路 VOL 36 NO 12 路 DECEMBER 2011 路 WWW.FISHERIES.ORG 583 Feature: CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT

Cooke, Steven J.

98

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 18540 of 28,905 results. 31 - 18540 of 28,905 results. Download EIS-0169-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Use of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's Yakima Hatchery and Acclimation and Research Activities, Yakima, Yakima County, Washington, Easton, Kittitas County, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0169-sa-03-supplement-analysis Download Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems 2010 Peer Review Presentations- Secure Communications National lab researchers, industry partners, and academia from the Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems Program in the DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held a 2-day... http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/cybersecurity-energy-delivery-systems-2010-peer-review-presentations-secure Download Radioactive Material or Multiple Hazardous Materials

99

Fisheries biology: a study in population dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

the examples were taken from marine fish studies. The book is not, and does not claim to be, a general handbook on fisheries production or man- agement.

2000-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Article Daniel Pauly The Sea Around Us Project: Documenting and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., on the interactions between marine mammals and fisheries, on fuel con- sumption by fleets, on the catches of small Impacts on Marine Ecosystems The Sea Around Us Project, initiated by the Pew Charitable Trusts, started in mid 1999. Its goal was (and still is) to investigate the impact of fisheries on marine ecosys

Pauly, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These statistics include data on the volume and value of landed catches, employment, quantity of gear operatedStatistical Digest No. 70 Statistics of the United States 1976 Washington National Marine Fisheries Service #12;#12;Statistical Digest No. 70 Fishery Statistics of the United States

102

Mr. Samuel Rauch, III NOAA Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the NOAA Fisheries Service develop a seafood sustainability registration program. In May 2012 MAFAC agreed was formed to carry out the following objectives associated with this goal: 1. Identify a US seafood, and NOAA Fisheries should consider additional ways to educate #12;2 seafood buyers, sellers, and consumers

103

Marine Fisheries Review Vol. 35, NO. 9  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine Fisheries Review Vol. 35, NO. 9 September 1973 CONTENTS Articles 1 The Future Wallace IS Effects of an Artificial Habi tat on the Marine Sport Fishery and Economy of Murrells Inlet. South Carolina. Che ter C. Buchanan 22 Fuel Shortages and the Fisherman, Joseph P ileggi 26 Shrimp

104

PRECONSTRUCTION STUDY OF THE FISHERIES OF THE ESTUARINE AREAS TRAVERSED BY THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER-GULF OUTLET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Project of the Corps of Engineers is a deep-water navigation channei from New of such a wide and deep channel connected at the Gulf end with water of high salinity. The channel water outside of the project area. FiSHERY BULLETIN: votUME 63, NO. 2 (1964) will raise salinities over

105

Cape Wind Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

G G Biological Assessment U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS Cape Wind Energy Project January 2009 Final EIS Appendix G Biological Assessment Cape Wind Energy Project Nantucket Sound Biological Assessment Minerals Management Service for Consultation with the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries May 2008 Appendix G Biological Assessment Cape Wind Energy Project i May 2008 U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service MMS TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................ 1-1 1.1 Project History .............................................................................................................

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - artisanal shrimp fishery Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inshore fishery. The shrimp fishery in this area was con sidered stable... and offshore fisheries since the 1950's. Shrimp exploitation increased to maximum levels of around...

107

Marine Fisheries On the cover: A corral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, Fish Muscle Changes, Aluminum in Fish, and Ludwig Named 21 The Tuna Fisheries of South Africa, Angola, and Ghana; Finland's Fish Trade; World Fish Meal and Oil Production; Mexican Fish Meal; Rafts

108

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations 路 Healthy and productive coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Original Paradigm #12;We had Consumers & Coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Control

109

Fisheries Science & Management: a Brief History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a brief history 路Late 1800s: industrial revolution allowed rapid expansion of exploitation 路E in 1882 #12;Fisheries sci & mgt: a brief history 路Late 1800s: industrial revolution allowed rapid

Limburg, Karin E.

110

Fisheries management and flags of convenience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The over-exploitation of the world's fish resources and the depletion of many fish stocks have brought into focus the need for effective fisheries management and conservation measures. Many states have adopted international ...

Papaioannou, Maria Andriana

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Foreign Fishery Developments Japan's Use of Processed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreign Fishery Developments Japan's Use of Processed Fish Products Declines Total 7,691.9 7 expenses were Y2,890,household household expenses from net income (fisherman income minus sev- eral taxes), the disposable income was Y1

112

Managing Data-Poor Fisheries Workshop: Case Studies, Models and Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fisheries to transition to science-based management fromin the transition of fisheries to science-based management.

Starr, Richard M.; Culver, Carolynn S.; Pomeroy, Caroline

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project (DOE-eis-0325)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Record of Decision March 2003 Bonneville Power Administration Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Record of Decision Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to construct the proposed Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project in Benton, Douglas, Grant, Kittitas, and Yakima Counties, Washington. BPA has decided to implement the Agency Preferred Alternative identified in the Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0325, January 2003), with the exception of Option 1 of the Sickler-Schultz Reroute. Due to landowner concerns, BPA will now implement Option 2 of the Sickler-Schultz Reroute. The Agency Preferred Alternative consists of constructing a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission

114

THE ATLANTIC COAST SURF CLAM FISHERY John W. Ropes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a diesel engine and pump for the hydraulic dredge, t h r 0 ugh -the - hull inlet pipes tothe pump, a gate Biologist (Research), National Marine Fisheries Service, Middle Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Center, Resource

115

Marine Fisheries On the cover: A copper rockfish.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the advertised product to be used or pur- chased because of this NMFS publication. Sec- ond class postage paid Developments Fishery Notes Publications Marine Pollution Plan, Fish Seizure. Magnetite in Tuna. Fishery Export

116

EA-1988: NFSC (Northwest Fisheries Science Center) Earthen Drainage Channel, Burley Creek Hatchery, Port Orchard, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with DOE抯 Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, prepared an EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of a NOAA Northwest Fisheries Science Center proposal to construct an earthen drainage channel at its Burley Creek Hatchery in Kitsap County, Washington. The project would facilitate increased discharge of treated effluent from the hatchery facility into the adjacent Burley Creek. BPA抯 proposal is to fund the project. The project website is http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/Burley_Creek/.

117

The Fisheries of Chile UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Donald L. :\\IcK rnan, Director The Fisheries of Chile By SIDNEY SHAPIRO Circular 234 Washington, D.C Fisheries of Chile By SIDNEY SHAPIRO, Forelgn Fisheries SpeClallst Bureau of Commercial F ishenes, Washmgton, D.C. ABSTRACT Trends and developments in the Chilean fishenes are discussed, wIth speCl 1 emphasis

118

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY, GALVESTON, TEXAS FISCAL of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory, Galveston, Texas Fiscal Year 1965 Milton J, Lindner, Director Laboratory, Galveston, Tex, Circular 246 Washington, D.C. June 1966 #12;The Bureau of Commercial Fisheries

119

Cefas contract report: -SLEA2 Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cefas contract report: - SLEA2 Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Updated Cefas: Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Submitted to: Department of Energy and Climate Change Recommendations for Spawning Finfish 颅 English & Welsh Blocks Oil and Gas Fisheries Risk Assessment Advice Updated

120

Fisheries Centre, University of British Columbia, Canada Fisheries Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Diesel Engine by the Tombo Project, Sierra Leone 57 S.E. During Evaluation of Diesel Engines an extremely important period in Sierra Leone in particular, and Africa in general: it was when, in the three

Pauly, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Science for sustainable fisheries management: An interdisciplinary approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the greatest weaknesses of the current research system is that it remains fragmented, introspective and lacking in creative connectivity, both between the participating disciplines and with wider sources of knowledge and expertise. It has been apparent for many years that the future for policy related research in fisheries and the marine environment lies in an interdisciplinary approach incorporating the natural, economic and social sciences. This will be central to broadening the objectives of policy to include such diverse notions as ecosystem integrity, economic viability and social equity, and to develop effective approaches to integrated management and marine spatial planning. But why are truly interdisciplinary perspectives still slow to develop, and how can such an approach to knowledge production be enabled and realised? In this paper we review the case for interdisciplinary research and call for renewed and deliberate efforts to build capacity for interdisciplinary working within research projects, programmes and institutions.

Jeremy Phillipson; David Symes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Bioeconomic Analysis of the Northern Baltic Salmon Fishery: Coexistence versus Exclusion of Competing Sequential Fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a bioeconomic model of the northern Balticsalmon fishery that takes into account thesimultaneous harvest of wild and reared salmon. Weassess the optimal harvest allocation between thecommercial offs...

Marita Laukkanen

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission David Itano Pelagic Fisheries Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taipei, Tonga, Tuvalu, United States of America, Vanuatu. 路 Participating territories American Samoa Union, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, France, Japan, Kiribati, Korea, Republic of Marshall composition 路 Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) Australia, Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

124

Marine Fisheries 67(4), 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administrator for Fisheries Clyde L. MacKenzie, Jr. Donald E. Pearson and Samuel V. G. McNally Patricia Pinto da NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Vice Admiral Conrad C. Lautenbacher, Jr., U.S. Navy (Ret by R. L. Todd, from a specimen in the U. S. National Museum. Illustration is available as Image figb

125

The Traditional Central California Setnet Fishery Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption and safety conditions aboard setnet vessels. The foremost objective of this study was to determine attributable to it, and to gather information about vessel fuel use. The setnet fleet was known to consist-Vietnamese) setnet fishery was calculated to consist of 266 fishermen fishing from /33 different vessels

126

Economics and Hawaii's Marine Fisheries Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics and Hawaii's Marine Fisheries Introduction Fishing and seafood consumption permeate society in Hawaii, although neither the total volume of seafood har vesting nor the market value of sea food is a particularly large share of the state's economic activity.! Seafood consumption

127

Foreign Fishery Developments Australia Reports Growth in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are estimated to have spent almost $200 million on seafood in 1975-76. according to a report in Australian Fisheries. A survey there has shown that some $123 million was spent on seafood for consumption at home." Later studies have also shown both per capita fish and seafood consump- tion and fish prices

128

Marine Fisheries On the cover: Two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Redfish Lake, Idaho, in Fall 1991. NMFS photo by Joni Packard. Articles 53(3), 1991 Restricted Access vs by the Scientific Publica tions Office, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA, 7600 Sand Point Way N.E., BinCl57oo

129

NOAAINMFS Developments National Marine Fisheries Service Reorganizes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), the Service has realigned its organization and functions in keeping with new and expanded responsibilities to units in the field, and streamlines the organization of headquarters staff units. A new position, techniques, and pro- cedures to achieve fisheries resource quotas which will protect the stocks; and predicts

130

Foreign Fishery Developments Abalone Culture in Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreign Fishery Developments Abalone Culture in Japan Adam G. C. Body Introduction Abalone, known as awabe in Japan, is a popular and traditional food maintain ing a good, consistent market value. Up transplanted from areas of high spatfall, aquaculture research centers were set up in each of Japan's 37

131

Foreign Fishery Developments Soviet Union and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreign Fishery Developments Soviet Union and Japan Agree on 1978 Quotas The Soviet Union and Japan year in Moscow. Japan's total 1978 allocation in the Soviet zone was set at 850,000 metric tons (t ex- trapolation of the 1977 quotas, which were 700,000 t for Japan during March-December and 335

132

Microsoft Word - SA-07-EIS-0169-biocontrol.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2003 14, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek (DOE/EIS-0169-SA-07) David Byrnes - KEWL-4 Fish & Wildlife Project Manager Proposed Action: Under the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), the Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility (CESRF) Management Plan calls for noxious weed control at the hatchery and acclimation sites. Biological control agents are being proposed for use at the hatchery and Jack Creek acclimation sites to reduce weeds along BPA-owned property, hatchery structures, roads, and wildlife preserve lands. The Kittitas County Noxious Weed Control Board has targeted the management of diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa) and Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria genistifolia ssp. Dalmatica) as

133

OPT's Reedsport Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPT's Reedsport Project OPT's Reedsport Project Summary of Licensing and Permitting As of April 13, 2011 Single PowerBuoy 庐 and DOE Project The scope of the DOE Reedsport Deployment and Ocean Test project (DE-EE0003646) is the installation of a single autonomous PowerBuoy at Reedsport, Oregon followed by two (2) years of operation in the Oregon Territorial Sea (TRL 7/8 Relevant Environment). Since the single PowerBuoy will not be grid connected, the lead Federal Agency for this effort is the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. OPT filed a Joint Permit Application and draft Biological Assessment with the Corps and has secured the following permits and/or authorizations for the single PowerBuoy deployment which are posted on the DOE's NEPA EF1 website: o Corps Permit NWP-2007-62, which includes conditions from National Marine Fisheries

134

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS AND...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Complex Program, Klickitat and Yakima Counties, Washington Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and Yakama...

135

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Compression and Flyer Plate Experiments Involving Plutonium at the Z and Saturn Accelerators September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis YakimaKlickitat Fisheries...

136

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing means could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and again develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (CJEF, located at Yakima River kilometer 48) from March 12 to June 13, 2002. In total, 899 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 19.8% (899 of 4,525) of the entire 2001-2002 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. Kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks and were fed freeze-dried krill, Moore-Clark pellets, altered Moore-Clark pellets (soaked in krill extract and dyed), or a combination of the altered Moore-Clark/unaltered Moore-Clark pellets. Formalin was used to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were then subsequently split into two groups for either 1 or 2-month reconditioning. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning in two groups, corresponding with reconditioning duration, with releases on May 20/28, 2002. Survival rates for both short-term experiments were high. Long-term reconditioned kelts were subsequently split into three groups that were given three different diet formulations and then released on December 10, 2002. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. A total of 60 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although survival rates were higher in 2002, even higher survival rates would be desirable; overall the authors were encouraged by the positive results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Trial Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Independent Scientific Advisory Board Northwest Power Planning Council National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Advisory Board Northwest Power Planning Council National Marine Fisheries and wildlife programs, and the National Marine Fisheries Service Recovery Program for Columbia River Basin. 3) Evaluate National Marine Fisheries Service recovery activities for Columbia River Basin stocks

138

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1988-1989 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1987), the Council directed the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries as partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]. The hatcheries will produce kokanee salmon for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen program. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) a year-round, reservoir-wide, creel survey to determine angler use, catch rates and composition, and growth and condition of fish; (2) assessment of kokanee, rainbow, and walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) feeding habits and densities of their preferred prey, and; (3) a mark and recapture study designed to assess the effectiveness of different locations where hatchery-raised kokanee and net pen reared rainbow trout are released. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan, developed by the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and National Park Service, that examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program. The projected duration of the monitoring program is through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from August 1988 to December 1989.

Peone, Tim L.; Scholz, Allan T.; Griffith, James R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

BPA Project #2006-004-00 Presentation to ISRP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit 路Years of soil disturbance, uncontrolled vehicle use, and fires have contributed to widespread Mitigation (200201400) 路 Hanford Monument/ALE 路 Lower Yakima Valley Riparian/W (199206200) 路 Yakima Basin stock fence Maintenance of 8.6 miles of fire breaks along private ownership interface 路 Protected

140

Broadening the perspective on seafood production: Life cycle thinking and fisheries management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Decisions made by fisheries managers strongly influence the overall resource use and environmental impacts associated with the seafood product from capture fisheries. These findings come (more)

Hornborg, Sara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - act provisions fisheries Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA): Investments in U.S. Seafood Processing Capacity Summary: Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act...

142

NOAA Fisheries Observers An Integral Part of Observing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collection, tag recapture 路 Fisheries management, resource assessments, and bycatch reduction methodology, Papua New Guinea, Fed. States of Micronesia, Solomon Islands, Kiribati, and Vietnam) #12;11 Northeast

143

Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

stocks, to insure conservation, to facilitate long-term protection of essential fish habitats, and to realize the full potential of the nation's fishery resources....

144

An integrative approach to fisheries ecology and management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

eries oceanography: An integrative approach to fisheries ecology and management. Blackwell Science. xii + 347 p. 30. ISBN 0-632-05566-9. My favorite book...

2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

145

Subsidies to tuna fisheries in the Western Central Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tuna fisheries in the Western and Central Pacific Ocean are among the most valuable resources in the region. These fisheries, worth an estimated $4.1 billion each year, play a pivotal role in supporting incomes and development goals in the region. However, due to the twin, and potentially inter-related effects of harmful fishing practices such as the use of fish aggregating devices, overcapacity, and fisheries subsidies, many of these tuna fisheries are currently at risk of over-exploitation梡utting the livelihoods of countless local fishers at risk. This study finds that government fisheries subsidies in the region represent 37% of the ex-vessel value of tuna fisheries in the region. Fuel subsidies are estimated at US$ 335 million and non-fuel subsidies are estimated at US$ 1.2 billion for the year 2009. Developed countries are responsible for more than half of the subsidies spent in the predominantly developing region, underlying the fact that the majority of tuna value extracted from the national waters of developing countries in the region benefit larger, developed countries. The total resource rent, or return to society, from tuna fisheries, once adjusted for subsidies is a net negative US$750 million in 2009. Fisheries subsidies are enabling foreign fleets to operate at sub-market rates, putting local fleets out of competition for their own fishery resources.

U. Rashid Sumaila; Andrew Dyck; Adam Baske

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Community-based governance of artisanal fisheries, Ngazidja Island, Comoros.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tropical small-scale fisheries represent the main livelihood and protein source for a substantial portion of the global population. Growing pressures on marine resources, however, have (more)

Hauzer, Melissa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

National Marine Fisheries Service | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Service Service Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Marine Fisheries Service Name National Marine Fisheries Service Address 1315 East West Highway Place Silver Spring, Maryland Zip 20910 Phone number 301-427-8400 Website http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/index Coordinates 38.9922542掳, -77.0307277掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9922542,"lon":-77.0307277,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

Alaska Region National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2003 Atka Mackerel Catch by Week and Area 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 Tons 11-Jan 8-Feb 8-M ar 5-Apr 3-M are through November 22, 2003 #12;BSAI Reporting Areas #12;2003 BSAI Pollock Catch by Week and Fishery 0 10 TonsofPollock 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 Jan-03 Feb-03 Mar-03 Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Jul-03 Aug

149

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family Salmonidae. Rates of repeat spawning for post-development Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. It is expected that currently observed iteroparity rates for wild steelhead in the Basin are severely depressed due to development and operation of the hydropower system and various additional anthropogenic factors. Increasing the natural expression of historical repeat spawning rates using fish culturing methods could be a viable technique to assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to reinitiate feeding, growth, and redevelop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for wild steelhead populations within the Basin. To test kelt steelhead reconditioning as a potential recovery tool, we captured wild emigrating steelhead kelts from the Yakima River and evaluated reconditioning (short and long-term) success and diet formulations at Prosser Hatchery on the Yakima River. Steelhead kelts from the Yakima River were collected at the Chandler Juvenile Monitoring Facility (CJMF, located on the Yakima River at river kilometer 75.6) from 12 March to 28 May 2003. In total, 690 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 30.8% (690 of 2,235) of the entire 2002-2003 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. All steelhead kelts were reconditioned in circular tanks, fed freeze-dried krill and received hw-wiegandt multi vit dietary supplement; long-term steelhead kelts also received Moore-Clark pellets. Oxytetracycline was administered to reconditioned fish to boost immune system response following the stress of initial capture. Formalin was also administered to prevent outbreaks of fungus and we also intubated the fish that were collected with Ivermectin{trademark} to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Captured kelts were separated into two experimental groups: short-term and long-term reconditioning. Success indicators for the short-term experiment include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of fish that initiated a feeding response. Short-term kelts were reconditioned for 3 to 7 weeks. Surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on June 4, 2003. Survival-to-release was very good for the short-term experiment, with a rate of 89.9%. Long-term steelhead kelts were held for 5-9 months then released on December 8, 2003. Long-term success indicators include the proportion of fish that survived the reconditioning process and the proportion of surviving fish that successfully remature. Survival and rematuration for long-term kelts increased as well with 62.4% surviving to release and 91.7% rematuring. A total of 47 reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery and to evaluate in-season homing fidelity. As in previous years, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Valuable knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. The authors were very pleased with the high survival rates. Information collected during this feasibility study has been significantly incorporated into the experimental design for upcoming years of research, and is expected to continue to increase survival of long-term reconditioned fish and successful expression of iteroparity.

Hatch, Douglas R.; Branstetter, Ryan (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Blodgett, Joe (Yakama Nation, Toppenish, WA)

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries and Limnological Research : 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program resulted from a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project. This project will model biological responses to reservoir operations, evaluate the effects of releasing hatchery origin kokanee salmon and rainbow trout on the fishery, and evaluate the success of various stocking strategies. In 1996, limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, and tagging data were collected. Mean reservoir elevation, storage volume and water retention time were reduced in 1996 relative to the last five years. In 1996, Lake Roosevelt reached a yearly low of 1,227 feet above mean sea level in April, a yearly high of 1,289 feet in July, and a mean yearly reservoir elevation of 1,271.4 feet. Mean monthly water retention times in Lake Roosevelt during 1996 ranged from 15.7 days in May to 49.2 days in October. Average zooplankton densities and biomass were lower in 1996 than 1995. Daphnia spp. and total zooplankton densities peaked during the summer, whereas minimum densities occurred during the spring. Approximately 300,000 kokanee salmon and 400,000 rainbow trout were released into Lake Roosevelt in 1996. The authors estimated 195,628 angler trips to Lake Roosevelt during 1996 with an economic value of $7,629,492.

Cichosz, Thomas A.; Underwood, Keith D.; Shields, John; Scholz, Allan; Tilson, Mary Beth

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fisheries Adaptations to Climate Change by Terry Johnson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fisheries Adaptations to Climate Change by Terry Johnson Alaska Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program of three billion people. Most people who depend on fisheries live in developing countries where incomes and livelihoods of people who depend on marine resources. Climate change involves a complex of effects

152

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE BUREAU OF FISHERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by t h e Superintendent of Document., Washington , D. C. Price 55 cent. #12;FISHERY INDUSTRIES-Continued Fisheries oCthe New England tat -Con. Historical review................路....... Vessel fisberiesCFlorida............路路...... Historical review ......路.......路......路路 F;,heries o( Florida.......................... Review

153

RIFLE GAP RESERVOIR FISHERY INVESTIGATION Photo: Willow Hibbs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in western Colorado, hosts a popular recreational fishery. Historically, stocked rainbow and brown trout have Department of Fish, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University Tel: 970-491-5002 email, Wildlife and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University March 2009 #12;Rifle Gap Reservoir Fishery

154

Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Symposium on Red Tide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

21 Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Symposium on Red Tide By James E. Sykes Marine Biological, Donald L. McKernan, Director Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Symposium on Red Tide By James E. Sykes causing Red-Tide blooms as deduced from field observations 2 Red- Tide research at the Florida State

155

Selected References on the History of Marine Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selected References on the History of Marine Fisheries An initial goal for this special 50th, a bibliography on the history of marine fisheries. Presum ably, the list would be neither long nor time consuming to construct. Indeed, initial database and index searches pro duced little of value-a bare handful of citations

156

Dickie B. Revera Galveston Laboratory. Southeast Fisheries Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SeNice. NOAA. Galveston. Texas 7755 J-5997 Donna J. Shaver Padre Island National Seashore. National. Galveston. Texas 77553 Charles w. Caillouet Jr. Marcel J. Duronslet Galveston Laboratory. Southeast Fisheries Science Center National Marine Fisheries SeNice. NOAA. Galveston. Texas 7755 J-5997 Manuscript

157

MArine science School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

government management agencies such as the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife--Marine Field Experience (Independent Study) ....... 1 颅 2 Fisheries FISH F288/BIOL F288--Fish and Fisheries of Alaska........................3 FISH F301--Biology of Fishes

Hartman, Chris

158

Review of U.S. West Coast Commercial Shark Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

long periods. These fisheries generally produced minimum ex-vessel prices and fluctuating yields history of elasmobranch fisheries generally indicates the need for a high catch per unit of effort because, vitamin-rich liver oils, pet food, leather, as curios, and for reduction to protein and fertilizer

159

QUICK FACTS Only 22% of the world's fisheries are sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUICK FACTS Only 22% of the world's fisheries are sustainable Only 0.7% of the oceans are under from 0.5% to at 1.0% of GDP to increase access. 路 Adopt participatory ecosystem approach to fisheries.Increased large scale industrial fishing and poor regulations have worsen the problem. Lack of affordable access

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

160

Foreign Fishery Developments Mediterranean Bluefin Tuna Airlifted to Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foreign Fishery Developments Mediterranean Bluefin Tuna Airlifted to Japan Japan-Soviet Fishery dealt a seri- ous blow by the various new restric- tions introduced in the S-year Japan- Soviet in Japan has revived a once-abandoned airlift of fresh bluefin tuna from the Mediterranean. Two earlier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AQUACULTURE AND FISHERIES TECHNOLOGY, Fisheries Effective Fall 2005 College of the Environment & Life Sciences (CELS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Resources Lab AFS 321 World Fishing Methods AFS 341 Marine Propulsion Systems AFS 342 Marine, bycatch reduction, fish population dynamics, multi-species fisheries management and marine sanctuaries 210 Introduction to the Marine Environment AFS 211 Introduction to the Marine Environment Lab AFS 315

Rhode Island, University of

162

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska芒聙聶s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to 芒聙聹see芒聙聺 through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

163

FAS 6355c Fisheries Management Course Syllabus, Fall 2012, 4 Credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, fisheries economics, and management and planning processes 3) Gain practical skills in fisheries to overfishing and/or habitat degradation. Managing fisheries sustainably and restoring fisheries that have been. When this is the case, on-campus and distance students will interact directly through a variety

Lorenzen, Kai

164

A Review of the Offshore Shrimp Fishery and the 1981 Texas Closure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Review of the Offshore Shrimp Fishery and the 1981 Texas Closure EDWARD F. KLIMA, KENNETH N- view the Texas and Louisiana offshore shrimp fisheries and describe the catch, relative abundance, and recruitment to the offshore fishery from June through August 1981 and compare the 1981 fishery

165

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation : 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual report summarizes previously unreported data collected to fulfill the contractual obligations for BPA project No.1990-044-00, 'Coeur d'Alene Subbasin Fisheries Habitat Enhancement', during the 2006 calendar year. Even though the contract performance period for this project crosses fiscal and calendar years, the timing of data collection and analysis, as well as implementation of restoration projects, lends itself to this reporting schedule. The 2006 performance period marked the first year that BPA implemented its Process Improvement Initiative with the Pisces system serving as the vehicle for developing statements of work and tracking project performance. This document attempts to provide some consistency between the project objectives, around which past reports have been structured, and the new work element format adopted for use in Pisces. The report is formatted into three primary sections that respectively provide results and discussion of: (1) monitoring and evaluation of biological and physical habitat indicators; (2) implementation of restoration and enhancement projects; and (3) education and outreach work performed during 2006. The relevant work elements and/or milestones found in the statement of work are listed under these section headings and described in the body of the report.

Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.; Firehammer, Jon A.

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cost of the project to labor only. The efficacy of the examples will be assessed through their useProject Year 2012-2013 Project Title Sight-Reading at the Piano Project Team Ken Johansen, Peabody) Faculty Statement The goal of this project is to create a bank of practice exercises that student pianists

Gray, Jeffrey J.

167

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

design goals for this project include low cost (less than $30 per paddle) and robustness. The projectProject Year 2001 Project Team Faculty: Allison Okamura, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School Project Title Haptic Display of Dynamic Systems Audience 30 to 40 students per year, enrolled

Gray, Jeffrey J.

168

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

169

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Louise Pasternack, Chemistry Department, Krieger School, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project Title Introductory Chemistry Lab Demonstrations Audience an interactive virtual lab manual that will facilitate understanding of the procedures and techniques required

Gray, Jeffrey J.

170

BIOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FISHERY RESOURCES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a hydroelectric power plant in Passamaquoddy and Cobscook Bays. This electricity-producing project has two

171

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Karl) Zhang, Undergraduate Student, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering; Cheryl Kim Audio, Digital Video Project Abstract The goal of this project is to develop online modular units

Gray, Jeffrey J.

172

Line Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Line Projects BPA identifies critical infrastructure and...

173

Min-kota Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Min-kota Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Min-kota Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Min-kota Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Min-kota Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Philip, South Dakota Coordinates 44.0394329掳, -101.6651441掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

174

Hi-Tech Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hi-Tech Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hi-Tech Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Bluffdale, Utah Coordinates 40.4896711掳, -111.9388244掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

175

Dashun Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dashun Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Dashun Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Dashun Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Dashun Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mecca, California Coordinates 33.571692掳, -116.0772244掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

176

Arrowhead Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Arrowhead Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Arrowhead Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Susanville, California Coordinates 40.4162842掳, -120.6530063掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

177

Oceanridge Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanridge Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Oceanridge Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Oceanridge Fisheries Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Oceanridge Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Aquaculture Location Mecca, California Coordinates 33.571692掳, -116.0772244掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

178

Chapter 2: Fisheries Subsidies Negotiations within the WTO Framework  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to increased international awareness of the importance of fisheries subsidies, this issue has made its way into WTO negotiations and at a series of Ministerial Conferences in the past decade.222 At first, ...

Chen-Ju Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fishery Bulletin Index Energetics 125 Energy consumption rates 332  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

655 Fishery Bulletin Index Energetics 125 Energy consumption rates 332 Volume 103(1颅4), 2005 Apodichthys flavidus 476 Coral reefs 360 Food habits 445, 626 Argentina 482 Correspondence analysis 256

180

Ecosystem approach to inland fisheries: research needs and implementation strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fisheries into ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters...natural and social science approaches to address coupled...ecosystem approaches for management of inland waters...natural and social science approaches to address coupled...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Priorities for the 21st Century NOAA Fisheries' Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR WEATHER AND WATER INFORMATION MEASURES & METRICS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix A GLOSSARY landings of commercial fisheries have averaged 4.3 million metric tons valued at $3.4 billion over the last

182

Marine fisheries review, Vol. 54, No. 1, 1992. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents: characteristics of billfish anglers in the u.s. atlantic ocean; effects of the santa barbara, calif., oil spill on the apparent abundance of pelagic fishery resources; remote camera and trapping survey of the deep-water shrimps heterocarpus laevigatus and h. ensifer and the geryon crab chaceon granulatus in palau; and on the distribution and fishery potential of the japanese red crab chaceon granulatus in the palauan archipelago, western caroline islands.

Hobart, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that incorporate video taped procedures for student preview. Solution This project will create videos for more to study the procedure and techniques before coming to class. Our previous fellowship project addressedProject Year 2009 Project Title Enhancing Biology Laboratory Preparation through Video

Gray, Jeffrey J.

184

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, there is no resource available to view the procedure before class. Solution The purpose of this project is to capture available to view the procedure before class. The purpose #12;of this project is to capture variousProject Year 2007 Project Team Kristina Obom, Faculty, Advanced Academic Programs, Krieger School

Gray, Jeffrey J.

185

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2013-2014 Project Title German Online Placement Exam Project Team Deborah Mifflin to increased cost. As well, it lacked listening comprehension, writing and speaking components providing support, we will use Blackboard for this project. The creation will require numerous steps

Gray, Jeffrey J.

186

Columbia River Channel Improvement Project Rock Removal Blasting: Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a monitoring plan to evaluate take as outlined in the National Marine Fisheries Service 2002 Biological Opinion for underwater blasting to remove rock from the navigation channel for the Columbia River Channel Improvement Project. The plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Portland District.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Seeking Graduate Students for Quantitative Marine Science Research Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Example past project include: 1. Marine spatial planning of offshore wind farms in relation to existing Use Rights Fisheries, or TURFs) in relation to scales of fish dispersal. http.g., through AAUS). Tropical Pacific diving and fish identification skills also preferred. Field work and thus

Moline, Mark

188

EIS-0505: EPA Notice of Availability of Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line Project, Yakima, Grant, Benton, and Kittitas Counties, Washington

189

Projectivities and Projective Embeddings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we aim to prove some of the main achievements in the theory of generalized polygons. First, we want to show what the little projective group and the groups of projectivities of some Moufang po...

Hendrik van Maldeghem

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Regime, phase and paradigm shifts: making community ecology the basic science for fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Peterson, C. H. 1997 The management of fisheries and marine ecosystems. Science 277, 509515. Botsford...lights, and holistic approaches to fisheries management with minimal stock assessment...the Pacific Ocean. Science 299, 217221. Christensen...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Marine protected areas and the value of spatially optimized fishery management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science and Management, c Earth Research Institute, and d Department of Geography, University on marine spatial planning, including spatial fisheries management. Some spatial management approaches to increase fishery returns, but the potential for the broader class of spatial management approaches

Siegel, David A.

192

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaskan pollock fishery Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I: Fishery Development Summary: pollock, Thera gra chalcogramma; and also at the ma jor industrial fishery of the U.S. east coast and Gulf... and quality control recommendations....

193

Project Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Questions Keeler-Pennwalt Wood Pole Removal Line Projects Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Spacer Damper Replacement Program Wind Projects Project Overview BPA...

194

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operators, matrix indexing, vector computations, loops, functions, and plotting graphs, among others basic arithmetic operators, matrix indexing, and vector computations in MATLAB. After creatingProject Year 2011-2012 Project Title Online Tutorial for MATLAB Project Team Eileen Haase, Whiting

Gray, Jeffrey J.

195

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2005 Project Team Krysia Hudson, Faculty, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Instruction for Educational Resources Project Title Enhanced Web-based Learning Environments for Beginning Nursing Students (e.g., demonstrations of procedures or tasks) into the WBL systems, it will be possible to increase

Gray, Jeffrey J.

196

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Michael McCloskey, Cognitive Science/Neuroscience, Krieger of Arts & Sciences Project Title Cognitive Neuropsychology Audience The initial audience to access. The current procedure calls for individual students or researchers to contact the faculty member

Gray, Jeffrey J.

197

Project Year Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve into teams and having each team use a different m-health data collection tool (e.g., cellular phones, smart health patterns. The Tech Fellow, Jacqueline Ferguson, will assist in creating an m-health project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

198

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Year 2002 Project Team Faculty: Gregory Hager, Computer Science, Whiting School of Engineering Fellow: Alan Chen, Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title Robotics is complicated, time-consuming, and costly, making a robot for an introductory-level class is not practical

Gray, Jeffrey J.

199

Project Proposal Project Logistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Proposal 路 Project Logistics: 颅 2-3 person teams 颅 Significant implementation, worth 55 and anticipated cost of copying to/from host memory. IV. Intellectual Challenges - Generally, what makes this computation worthy of a project? - Point to any difficulties you anticipate at present in achieving high

Hall, Mary W.

200

Preliminary Syllabus August 25, 2014 FAS 6355c / FAS 4932 Fisheries Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and management and planning processes 3) Gain practical skills in fisheries assessment, interview techniques to overfishing and/or habitat degradation. Managing fisheries sustainably and restoring fisheries that have been planning and reflection-in-action; and a repertoire of case studies. The course also aims to foster

Hill, Jeffrey E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model):355-377. Please consult that version for citations #12;2 Optimal-Sustainable Management of Multi-Species Fisheries: Lessons from a Predator-Prey Model Abstract: In this paper we define fisheries management as sustainable

Woodward, Richard T.

202

NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service http://www.voices.nmfs.noaa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oral history collection to consider donating a copy to the Voices from the Fisheries Database. Who can Database. The ID and password allow you to place fisheries oral histories on the Voices from the Fisheries, recording and donating oral history interviews with those who have been involved in some aspect of our

203

NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-573 A Biological Review of the Tortugas Pink Shrimp Fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avenue U Galveston, Texas 77551 October 2008 #12;NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-573 A Biological Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center Galveston Laboratory 4700 National Technical Information Center National Marine Fisheries Service 5825 Port Royal Galveston

204

Sea Turtle Assessment Status and Research Needs National Marine Fisheries Service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea Turtle Assessment Status and Research Needs National Marine Fisheries Service U.S. Department Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-131 July 2013 #12;#12;Sea Turtle Assessment Status and Research Needs National Marine for Fisheries #12;ii Recommended citation: National Marine Fisheries Service. 2013. Sea Turtle Assessment Status

205

Microsoft Word - CX_YNSturgeonMgmt_2012.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Government Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration DATE: December 27, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dave Roberts Project Manager - KEW Proposed Action: Continuation of Yakama Nation Sturgeon Management Project Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2008-455-00 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.20 Small-scale activities undertaken to protect cultural resources (such as fencing, labeling, and flagging) or to protect, restore, or improve fish and wildlife habitat, fish passage facilities (such as fish ladders and minor diversion channels), or fisheries. Location: Prosser and Marion Drain, Benton and Yakima counties, Washington

206

Water Conservation Study for Manastash Creek Water Users, Kittias County, Washington, Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manastash Creek is tributary of the Yakima River and is located southwest and across the Yakima River from the City of Ellensburg. The creek drains mountainous terrain that ranges in elevation from 2,000 feet to over 5,500 feet and is primarily snowmelt fed, with largest flows occurring in spring and early summer. The creek flows through a narrow canyon until reaching a large, open plain that slopes gently toward the Yakima River and enters the main stem of the Yakima River at river mile 154.5. This area, formed by the alluvial fan of the Creek as it leaves the canyon, is the subject of this study. The area is presently dominated by irrigated agriculture, but development pressures are evident as Ellensburg grows and develops as an urban center. Since the mid to late nineteenth century when irrigated agriculture was established in a significant manner in the Yakima River Basin, Manastash Creek has been used to supply irrigation water for farming in the area. Adjudicated water rights dating back to 1871 for 4,465 acres adjacent to Manastash Creek allow appropriation of up to 26,273 acre-feet of creek water for agricultural irrigation and stock water. The diversion of water from Manastash Creek for irrigation has created two main problems for fisheries. They are low flows or dewatered reaches of Manastash Creek and fish passage barriers at the irrigation diversion dams. The primary goal of this study, as expressed by Yakama Nation and BPA, is to reestablish safe access in tributaries of the Yakima River by removing physical barriers and unscreened diversions and by adding instream flow where needed for fisheries. The goal expressed by irrigators who would be affected by these projects is to support sustainable and profitable agricultural use of land that currently uses Manastash Creek water for irrigation. This study provides preliminary costs and recommendations for a range of alternative projects that will partially or fully meet the goal of establishing safe access for fisheries in Manastash Creek by reducing or eliminating diversions and eliminating fish passage barriers. Further study and design will be necessary to more fully develop the alternatives, evaluate their environmental benefits and impacts and determine the effect on Manastash Creek water users. Those studies will be needed to determine which alternative has the best combination of benefits and costs, and meets the goal of the Manastash Creek water users.

Montgomery Watson Harza (Firm)

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

FISHERY MARKET DEVELOPMENT SERIES NO. 17 Dr. Bruce R. Stillings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.~5 M/7 t'SLAFSSBB ANB I1LALTI1 FISHERY MARKET DEVELOPMENT SERIES NO. 17 by Dr. Bruce R. Stillings are excellent food, we have no scientific basis for the commonly held view that sexual potency is increased when

209

Foreign Fishery Developments Inter-American Development Bank Lends To  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tions and human resources: and the identification and prefeasibility study of poss ible investment ing to the NMFS Office of International Fisheries, the Irish Gov- ernment and the IFO have differed capabilities to protect tishery stocks from overfishing and favor extension of Ireland 's territo- rial sea

210

Columbia River : Terminal Fisheries Research Report : Annual Report 1994.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin.

Hirose, Paul; Miller, Marc; Hill, Jim

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

EXAMPLES OF CONTEMPORARY TOPICS Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the potential for ecosystem service markets in Tennessee and how might they affect forest management? 20. What analysis as a tool for bioenergy/biorefinery evaluation 2) What is the best bioenergy crop for the US-scale bioenergy crop development on wildlife and fisheries habitat 7) Top technologies for biomass conversion 8

Gray, Matthew

212

ANNUAL REPORT of the CO M MERCIAL FISHERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochemical indices of quality . 路 路 . 路 路 路 路 路 . . 路 路 . 路 11 Engineering studies on freezing and cold Improving the quality of whiting . . 路 8 Time-temperature tolerance of frozen fishery products B Effect of distribution on quality. 路 . . . . 路 . 路 路 . 8 Laboratory studles on factors affecting quality. . . 9

213

Report to the North Pacific Fishery Management Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmon Savings Incentive Plan James Mize, IPA Representative This report is to the North Pacific Fishery agreement ("IPA") and a Performance Standard designed to minimize bycatch to the extent practicable in all 91 require participants engaged in an IPA to submit to the Council an annual report including: (1

214

Strategic Review of Enhancements and Culture-based Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-237. __________________________________________________________________________________ ABSTRACT: Enhancements are interventions in the life cycle of common pool aquatic resources. Enhancement-based fisheries in fresh waters where they account for some 20% of capture, or 10% of combined capture and culture and a more active management of aquatic resources, leading to increased productivity, conservation, and wider

Lorenzen, Kai

215

MFR PAPER 1165 Japan's tuna fishery faces a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MFR PAPER 1165 Japan's tuna fishery faces a major depression as catch rates decline, oil prices of the more obvious reasons for the present state are these: I. Tripling of oil prices in the last year. 2 market are not also having their prob- lems at this time. The increased oil prices, having gone from $40

216

Socioeconomic Perspectives on Marine Fisheries in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Central and Western Pacific Ocean. They include warm water coral reef ecosystems that support reef fish and extremely productive continental shelf ecosystem of the colder North Pacific Ocean off Alaska. Vital. These diverse ecosystems give rise to distinct differences in marine life, regional fisheries, cultures

217

ABC Allowable Biological Catch AFSC Alaska Fisheries Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Industrial Re- search Organization (Australia) DAS 颅 Days At Sea EBM 颅 Ecosystem-Based Management EBS GLOBEC 颅 GLOBal ocean ECosystem dynamics GOA 颅 Gulf of Alaska GOM 颅 Gulf of Mexico HMS 颅 Highly Migratory NMFS 颅 National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA 颅 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NRC

218

National Marine Fisheries Service Maine Department of Marine Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wildlife Service Penobscot Indian Nation Atlantic Salmon Recovery Framework #12;DRAFT 颅 8/16/2010 2August 2010 DRAFT National Marine Fisheries Service Maine Department of Marine Resources U.S. Fish Atlantic Salmon Recovery Framework Table of Contents Background and Justification

219

Table of Contents: Chapter 3 1 Organization of the Inventory Chapter 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 18 2.7.2 Yakima Basin Salmon Recovery Board Lead Entity (SHB 2496) 19 2.7.3 Yakima River Basin Water Service 6 2.2.4 National Forest Service 6 2.2.5 Natural Resources Conservation Service 6 2.2.6 NOAA Fisheries 7 2.2.7 Yakima Training Center 7 2.3 Tribes 7 2.3.1 Yakama Nation 7 2.4 State Government 8 2

220

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Ian Sims, Student, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title and Jazz Theory/Keyboard I & II. Technologies Used Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML

Gray, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

222

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71 - 22180 of 26,764 results. 71 - 22180 of 26,764 results. Download EIS-0169-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Bonneville Power Administration Yakima Fisheries Project- Fall Chinook and Coho Research Program, Yakima and Klickitat River Basins, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0169-sa-01-supplement-analysis Download Policy Flash 2011-90 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/policy-flash-2011-90 Download Policy Flash 2011-89 http://energy.gov/management/downloads/policy-flash-2011-89 Page Program Planning & Management Forms (5000-5999) http://energy.gov/cio/program-planning-management-forms-5000-5999 Download Audit Report: CR-FS-96-03 Report on Matters Identified at Strategic Petroleum Reserve During Audit of Statement of Financial Position http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-cr-fs-96-03

223

Fisheries vol 36 no 7 july 2011 www.fisheries.org332 Potential Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Horizon Oil Spill on Commercial Fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico Feature: FISHERIES RESEARCH Impacto known accidental oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Eco- system (LME), a region valued for its of Mexico large marine ecosystem (LME), it is im- perative to quantify the potential impacts

Pauly, Daniel

224

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: 拢1.1M Funding Source: Departmental Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: November 2010 End Date : March 2011 Occupation Date: March 2011 For further information contact Project Manager as listed above

225

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5 operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's 拢20.imperial.ac.uk/biomedeng Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: 拢13,095,963 Funding Source: SRIF II and Capital

226

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors on the Faculty of Medicine, please visit: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: 拢3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: Start

227

Open-access databases as unprecedented resources and drivers of cultural change in fisheries science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Open-access databases with utility in fisheries science have grown exponentially in quantity and scope over the past decade, with profound impacts to our discipline. The management, distillation, and sharing of an exponentially growing stream of open-access data represents several fundamental challenges in fisheries science. Many of the currently available open-access resources may not be universally known among fisheries scientists. We therefore introduce many national- and global-scale open-access databases with applications in fisheries science and provide an example of how they can be harnessed to perform valuable analyses without additional field efforts. We also discuss how the development, maintenance, and utilization of open-access data are likely to pose technical, financial, and educational challenges to fisheries scientists. Such cultural implications that will coincide with the rapidly increasing availability of free data should compel the American Fisheries Society to actively address these problems now to help ease the forthcoming cultural transition.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Utz, Ryan [National Ecological Observatory Network

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

229

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Engineer's Guide to the Structures of Baltimore Audience Students from the Krieger School of Arts City, interfaced through a course website, the team will integrate descriptions of structural behavior format. Technologies Used HTML/Web Design, MySQL Project Abstract Structural analysis is typically taught

Gray, Jeffrey J.

230

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information systems (GIS) tools to design maps that integrate data for visualizing geographic concepts School of Engineering Project Title GIS & Introductory Geography Audience Undergraduate students on how to use the Internet for geographic research, and an interactive introduction to GIS through online

Gray, Jeffrey J.

231

Project Management Project Managment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

颅 Inspired by agile methods #12;Background 路 Large-scale software development & IT projects, plagued relations #12;One Agile Approach to Scheduling 路 The creative nature of game development resist heavy up Problems 颅incompatible platforms, 3rd party etc. #12;Is Games Development Similar? 路 Yes & No

Stephenson, Ben

232

Spatial Characterization of Puerto Rican Commercial Fisheries: Gear Usage Across Habitat Classes and Bathymetry Ranges.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The spatial characterization of Puerto Rican commercial fisheries describing fishing gear use in relation to habitat classes and bathymetry ranges was achieved through the collection (more)

Koeneke, Roberto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - agriculture fisheries forestry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 18 ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade Summary: of Forestry Administration, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry & Fisheries,...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving sustainable fisheries Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(ABC) -A term used by a management agency, which refers to the range of Summary: and seafood dealers. Fishery Management Plan (FMP) - A plan to achieve specified management...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - artisanal parrotfish fisheries Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

methods of artisanal ... Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Fishery Bulletin Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 94 EU contract FISH2004...

236

Project Accounts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Accounts 禄 Project Accounts Project Accounts Overview Project accounts are designed to facilitate collaborative computing by allowing multiple users to use the same account. All actions performed by the project account are traceable back to the individual who used the project account to perform those actions via gsisshd accounting logs. Requesting a Project Account PI's, PI proxies and project managers are allowed to request a project account. In NIM do "Actions->Request a Project Account" and fill in the form. Select the repository that the Project Account is to use from the drop-down menu, "Sponsoring Repository". Enter the name you want for the account (8 characters maximum) and a description of what you will use the account for and then click on the "Request Project Account" button. You

237

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: A state of the art facility, at Hammersmith information visit the Faculty of Medicine web pages http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: 拢60 000 000 Funding Source: SRIF II (Imperial College), GSK, MRC

238

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The refurbishment of the instrumentation equipment. This project encompasses refurbishment work on over 1,150m2 of laboratory space across four, the completed project will allow researchers to expand their work in satellite instrumentation, the fabrication

239

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re.union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: 拢1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan and Imperial College Union reserves Construction Project Programme: Start on Site: August 2006 End Date: March

240

Volume Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Math 13900. Volume Project. For the following project, you may use any materials. This must be your own original creation. Construct a right pyramid with a base...

rroames

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

DRAFT FOR SECRETARIAL REVIEW Proposed Amendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT FOR SECRETARIAL REVIEW Proposed Amendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish Impact Review/ Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis April 2010 Lead Agency: National Marine Fisheries Abstract: This Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis

242

Back杢o杢he杅uture: a fresh policy initiative for fisheries and a restoration ecology for ocean ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...developments in ecosystem modelling, and...science-based restoration ecology aimed...fisheries and aquatic ecosystems (Pitcher et al...process for the restoration of fisheries and aquatic ecosystems. (Modified from...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife implemented the Banks Lake Fishery Evaluation Project (BLFEP) in September 2001 with funds from the Bonneville Power Administration. Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 of the BLFEP was used to gather historic information, establish methods and protocols, collect limnology data, and conduct the first seasonal fish surveys. FY 2002 was used to continue seasonal fish and lakewide creel surveys and adjust methods and protocols as needed. Water quality parameters were collected monthly from February to May and bi-monthly from June to August. Banks Lake water temperatures began to increase in April and stratification was apparent by June at all 3 limnology collection sites. By late August, the thermocline had dropped to nearly 20 meters deep, with 16-17 C temperatures throughout the epilimnion. Dissolved oxygen levels were generally above 10 mg/L until August when dissolved oxygen dropped near or below 5 mg/L below 20-meters deep. Secchi depths ranged from 2.5-8 meters and varied by location and date. Nearshore and offshore fish surveys were conducted in October 2002 and May and July 2003 using boat electrofishing, fyke net, gill net, and hydroacoustic surveys. Yellow Perch Perca flavescens (32 %) and cottid spp. (22 %) dominated the nearshore species composition in October; however, by May yellow perch (12 %) were the third most common species followed by smallmouth bass Micropterous dolomieui (34 %) and lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis (14 %). Lake whitefish dominated the offshore catch during October (78 %) and May (81 %). Fish diet analysis indicated that juvenile fishes consumed primarily insects and zooplankton, while adult piscivores consumed cottids spp. and yellow perch most frequently. For FY 2002, the following creel statistics are comprehensive through August 31, 2003. The highest angling pressure occurred in June 2003, when anglers were primarily targeting walleye and smallmouth bass. Boat anglers utilized Steamboat State Park more frequently than any other boat ramp on Banks Lake. Shore anglers used the rock jetty at Coulee City Park 76 % of the time, with highest use occurring from November through April. An estimated total of 11,915 ({+-}140 SD) smallmouth bass, 6,412 ({+-}59 SD) walleye, 5,470 ({+-}260 SD) rainbow trout, and 1,949 ({+-}118 SD) yellow perch were harvested from Banks Lake in FY 2002. Only 3 kokanee were reported in the catch during the FY 2002 creel survey. In the future, data from the seasonal surveys and creel will be used to identify potential factors that may limit the production and harvest of kokanee, rainbow trout, and various spiny-rayed fishes in Banks Lake. The limiting factors that will be examined consist of: abiotic factors including water temperature, dissolved oxygen levels, habitat, exploitation and entrainment; and biotic factors including food limitation and predation. The BLFEP will also evaluate the success of several rearing and stocking strategies for hatchery kokanee in Banks Lake.

Polacek, Matt; Knuttgen, Kamia; Shipley, Rochelle

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys: Cowlitz River Basin, 1934-1942 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Cowlitz River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead. The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, [open quotes]to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes[close quotes]. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946. Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Marine Policy 31 (2007) 308313 The rise of seafood awareness campaigns in an era of collapsing fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to marine ecosystems. Recently, the response to the fisheries crisis has included a considerable effort in industrial fishing coupled with fisheries mismanagement. The result has been overfishing, the collapse of innumer- able fish populations (e.g., [7]) and the destruction of ocean habitat (e.g., [8]). Fisheries

Pauly, Daniel

246

Project Controls  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guianas-Brazil Shrimp Fishery and Related U.S. Research Activity Alexander Dragovich-free fishery began to crumble in 1970, as Brazil declared a 200-mile economic zone. To fish in Brazilian waters in the series of 2- and I-year agreements was signed on 9 May 1972 between the United States and Brazil

248

Food security and marine capture fisheries: characteristics, trends, drivers and future perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...precautionary approaches (FAO 1996...environmental management strategies...management science In the context...Fishery management science has also...scientific approach in the developed...Governance, science and society...ecosystem approach to fisheries...conservation and management (eds Quentin...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CHANGES IN CATCH AND EFFORT IN THE ATLANTIC MENHADEN PURSE-SEINE FISHERY 1940-68  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made larger. Follow- ing World War I, diesel ilnd gasoline engines gradually replaced steam engines of measuring fishing effort, and (3) to document changes that 'have occurred in the fishery: 1 National Marine fishing areas, Atlantic men- haden fishery. 766 FIsm:RY BULLETIN: VOL. 69, NO.4 engines, and seines were

250

It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It's intuitively obvious that habitat is important to fishes and the fisheries they support to account for it in fisheries management. This is especially true for marine fishes like gag grouper fisherman worth his or her salt has a closely-guarded collection of GPS coordinates and an electronic fish

Florida, University of

251

Participation of U. S. Trawlers in the Offshore Shrimp Fisheries of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Participation of U. S. Trawlers in the Offshore Shrimp Fisheries of French Guiana, Surinam. MIDDLE GROUNDS ~ ..... 7776 EAST .~~OUNDS ROCK 74 7S737271. 路~9 70 ABSTRACT- The offshore shrimp fishery obtained from processing plant rec- ords. In previous reports on this fish- ery (Jones and Dragovich, 1973

252

EcoGIS GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EcoGIS 锟 GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management May 2009 NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75 #12;Recommended Citation Nelson, D.M., T. Haverland, and E. Finnen. 2009. EcoGIS 锟 GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75. 38

253

DEVELOPMENT AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION OF A SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NORTHERN ANCHOVY FISHERY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPMENT AND EXAMPLE APPLICATION OF A SIMULATION MODEL OF THE NORTHERN ANCHOVY FISHERY MICHAEL F. TILLMANl AND DONALD STADELMAN2 ABSTRACT A computer simulation model of the reduction fishery for northern simulation model has been developed which pro- vides the means for evaluating the biological and economic

254

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

March 20, 2003 March 20, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-133: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 19, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-132: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 12, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-06: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project March 10, 2003 EIS-0225-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Continued Operation of the National Nuclear Security Administration, Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components March 10, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-130: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 7, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-129: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program March 6, 2003 EIS-0285-SA-128: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program

255

Kelt Reconditioning: A Research Project to Enhance Iteroparity in Columbia Basin Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeat spawning is a life history strategy that is expressed by some species from the family salmonidae. Natural rates of repeat spawning for Columbia River steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss populations range from 1.6 to 17%. Increasing this repeat spawning rate using fish culture techniques could assist the recovery of depressed steelhead populations. Reconditioning is the process of culturing post-spawned fish (kelts) in a captive environment until they are able to grow and develop mature gonads. Kelt reconditioning techniques were initially developed for Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and sea-trout S. trutta. The recent Endangered Species Act listing of many Columbia Basin steelhead populations has prompted interest in developing reconditioning methods for local populations. The primary purpose of this project in 2000 was to test the general feasibility of collecting, feeding, and treating steelhead kelts in a captive environment. Steelhead kelts were collected from the Yakima River at the Chandler Juvenile Evaluation Facility (Rkm 48) from 12 March to 13 June 2000. Kelts were reconditioned at adjacent Prosser Hatchery in both rectangular and circular tanks and fed a mixed diet of starter paste, adult sized trout pellets, and freeze-dried krill. Formalin was used to control outbreaks of fungus, and we tested the use of ivermectin to control internal parasites (e.g., Salmincola spp.). Some the kelts that died during the reconditioning process were analyzed via pathology and gonad histology to ascertain the possible cause of death and to describe their reproductive development at the time of death. All surviving specimens were released for natural spawning on 12 December 2000. Overall success of the reconditioning process was based on the proportion of fish that survived captivity, gained weight, and on the number of fish that successfully underwent gonadal recrudescence. Many of the reconditioned kelts were radio tagged to assess their spawning migration behavior and success following release from Prosser Hatchery. In total, 512 kelts were collected for reconditioning at Prosser Hatchery. Captive specimens represented 37% (512/1,380) of the entire 1999-2000 Yakima River wild steelhead population, based on fish ladder counts at Prosser Dam. At the conclusion of the experiments ({approx}240 days from capture), 91 fish (18%) had survived and were released to spawn in the wild. Ultrasound examination--to determine sex and reproductive development--determined that 87 (96%) of 91 specimens were female, and we estimated 62 fish (12% of the total collected) had successfully reconditioned. Unfortunately, the majority (82%) of the kelts collected died during the experiment, with the bulk of the moralities occurring during the first 100 days of captivity. Much was learned from the mortalities and modifications were made to the facility to reduce loss for future projects. Overall, the kelts reconditioned during this project will substantially bolster the number of repeat spawners in the Yakima River. Knowledge regarding kelt husbandry, food type preferences, condition, and rearing environments were obtained during this research endeavor. Although the reconditioning success rate achieved (estimated at 12%) was substantially lower than we initially hoped yet still six times higher than the natural rate of respawning and the authors are encouraged by the results of this innovative project. Information collected during this feasibility study will be incorporated into the experimental design for the upcoming year of research and is expected to increase survival.

Evans, Allen F.; Beaty, Roy E.; Hatch, Douglas R. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Science Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argonne Argonne Science Project Ideas! Our Science Project section provides you with sample classroom projects and experiments, online aids for learning about science, as well as ideas for Science Fair Projects. Please select any project below to continue. Also, if you have an idea for a great project or experiment that we could share, please click our Ideas page. We would love to hear from you! Science Fair Ideas Science Fair Ideas! The best ideas for science projects are learning about and investigating something in science that interests you. NEWTON has a list of Science Fair linkd that can help you find the right topic. Toothpick Bridge Web Sites Toothpick Bridge Sites! Building a toothpick bridge is a great class project for physics and engineering students. Here are some sites that we recommend to get you started!

257

Projection Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a general rule, broad-band sources which employ projection optics are the most difficult to evaluate. In addition to the problems encountered in evaluating exposed lamps, one must characterize the projected...

David Sliney; Myron Wolbarsht

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Circle Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project asks students to decide if a collection of points in space do or do not lie on a ... The project is accessible to linear algebra students who have studied...

259

Hydropower Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report covers the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office's hydropower project funding from fiscal years 2008 to 2014.

260

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Project Acronym AMOP Project title (in French)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-role on the evolution of climate (greenhouse gases production) and living resources from ecosystems to fisheries Industrial Research International cooperation International cooperation with: United States - MWN United and the worrying problem of the ocean deoxygenation due to global warming and human activities, OMZs have not been

262

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the program * Project overall objectives * Technical status * Project summary * Conclusions and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * This research project develops a reservoir scale CO 2 plume migration model at the Sleipner project, Norway. The Sleipner project in the Norwegian North Sea is the world's first commercial scale geological carbon storage project. 4D seismic data have delineated the CO 2 plume migration history. The relatively long history and high fidelity data make

263

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Monitoring Program; 1990 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As partial mitigation for the loss of anadromous salmon and steelhead incurred by construction of Grand Coulee Dam, the Northwest Power Planning Council directed Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to construct two kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt (NPPC 1987 [Section 903 (g)(l)(C)]). The hatcheries are to produce 8 million kokanee salmon fry or 3.2 million adults for outplanting into Lake Roosevelt as well as 500,000 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Lake Roosevelt net-pen programs. In section 903 (g)(l)(E), the Council also directed BPA to fund a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the kokanee hatcheries. The monitoring program included the following components: (1) conduction of a year-round creel census survey to determine angler pressure, catch rates and composition, growth and condition of fish caught by anglers, and economic value of the fishery. Comparisons will be made before and after hatcheries are on-line to determine hatchery effectiveness; (2) conduct an assessment of kokanee, rainbow trout, and walleye feeding habits, growth rates, and densities of their preferred prey at different locations in the reservoir and how reservoir operations affect population dynamics of preferred prey organisms. This information will be used to determine kokanee and rainbow trout stocking locations, stocking densities and stocking times; (3) conduct a mark-recapture study designed to assess effectiveness of various release times and locations for hatchery-raised kokanee and net-pen raised rainbow so fish-loss over Grand Coulee Dam will be minimized, homing to egg collection sites will be improved and angler harvest will be increased. The above measures were adopted by the Council based on a management plan developed by Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center, Spokane Indian Tribe, Colville Confederated Tribes, Washington Department of Wildlife, and the National Park Service. This plan examined the feasibility of restoring and enhancing Lake Roosevelt fisheries (Scholz et al. 1986). In July 1988, BPA entered into a contract with the Spokane Indian Tribe to initiate the monitoring program and continue research through 1995. This report contains the results of the monitoring program from January to December 1990.

Griffith, Janelle R.; Scholz, Allan T. (Eastern Washington University, Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Research Center, Cheney, WA)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Test and Evaluation of Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing wells Project Number: FE0009599 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background information - Project Concept (MICP) - Ureolytic Biomineralization, Biomineralization Sealing * Accomplishments to Date - Site Characterization - Site Preparation - Experimentation and Modeling - Field Deployable Injection Strategy Development * Summary

265

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LBNL's Consolidated Sequestration Research Program (CSRP) Project Number FWP ESD09-056 Barry Freifeld Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits and Goals of GEO-SEQ * Technical Status - Otway Project (CO2CRC) - In Salah (BP, Sonatrach and Statoil) - Ketzin Project (GFZ, Potsdam) - Aquistore (PTRC) * Accomplishments and Summary * Future Plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed: - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage capacity estimation - Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence.

266

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline I. Benefits II. Project Overview III. Technical Status A. Background B. Results IV. Accomplishments V. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals. - Prediction of CO 2 storage capacity. * Project benefits. - Workforce/Student Training: Support of 3 student GAs in use of multiphase flow and geochemical models simulating CO 2 injection. - Support of Missouri DGLS Sequestration Program. 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Project Goals and Objectives. 1. Training graduate students in use of multi-phase flow models related to CO 2 sequestration. 2. Training graduate students in use of geochemical models to assess interaction of CO

267

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center for Coal's Center for Coal's FY10 Carbon Sequestration Peer Review February 8 - 12, 2010 2 Collaborators * Tissa Illangasekare (Colorado School of Mines) * Michael Plampin (Colorado School of Mines) * Jeri Sullivan (LANL) * Shaoping Chu (LANL) * Jacob Bauman (LANL) * Mark Porter (LANL) 3 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Project technical status * Accomplishments to date * Future Plans * Appendix 4 Benefit to the program * Program goals being addressed (2011 TPP): - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefit: - This project is developing system modeling capabilities that can be used to address challenges associated with infrastructure development, integration, permanence &

268

Discontinued Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This page lists projects that received a loan or a loan guarantee from DOE, but that are considered discontinued by LPO for one of several reasons.

269

project management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

the Baseline Change Proposal process. Two 400,000-gallon fire protection water supply tanks and associated pumping facilities were added. Later in the project, an additional...

270

Custom Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Incentive Payment - The ESIP works with utility, industry, and BPA to complete the measurement and verification, reporting and development of a custom project completion...

271

Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program, Part B; Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program is the result of a merger between two projects, the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 to continue work historically completed under the separate projects, and is now referred to as the Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program. The 1998 Annual Report, Part B. Limnology, Primary Production, and Zooplankton in Lake Roosevelt, Washington examined the limnology, primary production, and zooplankton at eleven locations throughout the reservoir. The 1998 research protocol required a continuation of the more complete examination of limnological parameters in Lake Roosevelt that began in 1997. Phytoplankton and periphyton speciation, phytoplankton and periphyton chlorophyll a analysis, complete zooplankton biomass analysis by taxonomic group, and an increased number of limnologic parameters (TDG, TDS, etc.) were examined and compared with 1997 results. Total dissolved gas levels were greatly reduced in 1998, compared with 1997, likely resulting from the relatively normal water year experienced in 1998. Mean water temperatures were similar to what was observed in past years, with a maximum of 22.7 C and a minimum of 2.6 C. Oxygen concentrations were also relatively normal, with a maximum of 16.6 mg/L, and a minimum of 0.9 mg/L. Phytoplankton in Lake Roosevelt was primarily composed of microplankton (29.6%), Cryptophyceae (21.7%), and Bacillriophyceae (17.0 %). Mean total phytoplankton chlorophyll a maximum concentration occurred in May (3.53 mg/m{sup 3}), and the minimum in January (0.39 mg/m{sup 3}). Phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations appear to be influenced by hydro-operations and temperature. Trophic status as indicated by phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations place Lake Roosevelt in the oligomesotrophic range. Periphyton colonization rates and biovolume were significantly greater at a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft) when compared with a 4.6 m (15 ft) depth, and during the shorter incubation periods (two and four weeks). Mean zooplankton densities were greatest for Copepoda (88 %), then Daphnia spp. (10%) and other Cladocera (2.1%), while the zooplankton biomass assessment indicated Daphnia spp. had the greatest biomass (53.6%), then Copepoda (44.0%) and other Cladocera (2.5%). Mean overall zooplankton densities were the lowest observed since 1991. The cause was unclear, but may have been an artifact of human error. It seems unlikely that hydro-operations played a significant part in the reduction of zooplankton in light of the relatively friendly water year of 1998.

Shields, John; Spotts, Jim; Underwood, Keith

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hi-Tech Fisheries Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Hi-Tech Fisheries Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Bluffdale, Utah Coordinates 40.4896711掳, -111.9388244掳 Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

273

FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153167 The behavioural dynamics of fishers: management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 FISH and FISHERIES , 2004, 5, 153 by his/her own goals or constraints. Despite this reality, the complex dynamics of fishing has and behavioural dynamics of fishing to provide insight into fisher behaviour and its implications

Boyer, Edmond

274

New directions in management strategy evaluation through cross-fertilization between fisheries science and terrestrial conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conservation and fisheries management could gain from applying the approach in this new context...framework for evaluating management strategies as established...considered how to extend the approach to conservation science through three topical...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Cooperation in a Stochastic Transboundary Fishery: The Effects of Implementation Uncertainty Versus Recruitment Uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines how non-binding cooperative agreements on fisheries management can be sustained when the management plans in participating countries are implemented imperfectly, and compares the effects of...

Marita Laukkanen

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The tragedy of enclosure : fish, fisheries science, and U.S. foreign policy, 1920-1960  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Longevity of Pacific Ocean Perch (Sebastes Alutus)."Resources of the North Pacific Ocean." Vancouver, B.C. :Fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean and the Law of the Sea

Finley, Mary Carmel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Tragedy of Enclosure: Fish, Fisheries Science, and U.S. Foreign Policy, 1920-1960  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fisheries in the North Pacific Ocean and the Law of the Seaon the Longevity of Pacific Ocean Perch (Sebastes Alutus)."Resources of the North Pacific Ocean." Vancouver, B.C. :

Finley, Mary C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Artificial habitats and the restoration of degraded marine ecosystems and fisheries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The challenge to any ecological restoration effort is to define the condition or ... other words, to answer the question: 揜estoration to what? Examples of aquatic ecosystem restoration from Hong Kong (fisheries...

William Seaman

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

2.-ADDRESS OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE GENERAL COMMITTEE ON THE WORLD'S FISHERIES CONGRESS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,rious problems which iiecessarily arise in seeking a rational and fruitful administration of fishery interests the same area, even when nature's methods are not contravened and rendered abortive by the methods

280

The feasibility of creating private property rights in ocean fisheries resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE FEASIBILITY OF CREATING PRIVATE PPOPERTY RIGHTS IN OCEAN FISHERIES RESOURCES A Thesis by Gordon Mathews Euler Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requiremerts for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Management THE I EASIGILITY OF CREATING PRIVATE PROPERTY RIGHTS IN OCEAN FISHERIES RESOURCES A Thesis by Gordon Mathews Euler Approved as to style and content by: ' (Chairman of Co, ittee) ( (Head...

Euler, Gordon Mathews

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Whistling Ridge Energy Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PDCI) Upgrade Project Whistling Ridge Energy Project Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects Wind Projects Whistling Ridge Energy Project Bonneville Power...

282

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sn酶hvit CO Sn酶hvit CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 4 Principal Investigators: L. Chiaramonte, *J.A. White Team Members: Y. Hao, J. Wagoner, S. Walsh Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Summary & Accomplishments * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is focused on mechanical

283

Project title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Project title: Roseville Elverta (RSC-ELV) OPGW Replacement Project Requested By: David Young Mail Code : N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Submitted: 5/4/2011 Date Required: 5/7/2011 Description of the Project: Purpose and Need The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. There is an existing OPGW communications fiber on the transmission towers between Roseville and Elverta

284

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

InSalah CO InSalah CO 2 Storage Project Project Number: FWP-FEW0174 Task 2 Principal Investigator: W. McNab Team Members: L. Chiaramonte, S. Ezzedine, W. Foxall, Y. Hao, A. Ramirez, *J.A. White Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Benefit to Program * Project Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * The research project is combining sophisticated

285

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy, Seismology, Space Geodesy, Seismology, and Geochemistry for Monitoring Verification and Accounting of CO 2 in Sequestration Sites DE-FE0001580 Tim Dixon, University of South Florida Peter Swart, University of Miami U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to program * Goals & objectives * Preliminary InSAR results (site selection phase) * Project location * Project installed equipment * Specific project results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Focused on monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) * If successful, our project will demonstrate the utility of low cost, surface

286

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 DE-FE0001159 Advanced Technologies for Monitoring CO 2 Saturation and Pore Pressure in Geologic Formations Gary Mavko Rock Physics Project/Stanford University 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Motivating technical challenge * Approach * Technical Status - Laboratory results - Theoretical modeling * Summary Mavko: Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99% of injected CO 2 remains in injection zones. * Project benefits statement.

287

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Volume Injection of CO Large Volume Injection of CO 2 to Assess Commercial Scale Geological Sequestration in Saline Formations in the Big Sky Region Project Number: DE-FC26-05NT42587 Dr. Lee Spangler Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Kevin Dome characteristics * Project design philosophy * Infrastructure * Modeling * Monitoring * Project Opportunities 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

288

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Research on Probabilistic and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical (HTM) Modeling of CO 2 Geological Sequestration (GS) in Fractured Porous Rocks Project DE-FE0002058 Marte Gutierrez, Ph.D. Colorado School of Mines U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program (Program goals addressed and Project benefits) * Project goals and objectives * Technical status - Project tasks * Technical status - Key findings * Lessons learned * Summary - Accomplishments to date 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

289

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Complexity and Choice of Complexity and Choice of Model Approaches for Practical Simulations of CO 2 Injection, Migration, Leakage, and Long- term Fate Karl W. Bandilla Princeton University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Project Number DE-FE0009563 2 Presentation Outline * Project Goals and Objectives * Project overview * Accomplishments * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The aim of the project is to develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate level of model complexity for CO 2 sequestration modeling at a given site. This will increase the confidence in modeling results, and reduce computational cost when appropriate.

290

Yakima Subbasin Plan Inventory of Existing Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the subbasin but also the utility and success of those activities. Below is a preview of the web-based form. The preview of the web-based form is provided below so that you may collect the information you will need to the web-based survey is http://clientzone.golder.com/YSBI/Site/Login.asp As you are filling out the web

291

Communication, its possible role in marine commercial fisheries management: a pilot observation and interview study of the marine commercial fisheries of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-45. consider it essent1al to address the problems and var1ous components of fisheries as a total system and not in isolation from each other. Th1s thes1s 1s based on these premises: l) in developing viable commercial fishing industries multiple...) corroborates this possibility for marine fisheries when he suggests that it is very difficult to say how one should acquire information on a culture or industry. Further, he implies that many procedures that appear dis- organized and unscientific do give...

DeGeorges, Nicolas Jacques

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

EIS-0505: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line Project, Yakima, Grant, Benton and Kittitas Counties, Washington The...

293

EIS-0505: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0505: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line Project, Yakima, Grant, Benton and Kittitas Counties, Washington The Bureau of...

294

EIS-0505: Notice of Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intent to Prepare Environmental Impact Statement Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line Project, Yakima, Grant, Benton and Kittitas Counties, Washington The Bureau of...

295

Analysis of fish bycatch and observer effect within the New Zealand ling bottom long-lining commercial fishery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research aims to make a contribution to management of the ling bottom long-line (BLL) fishery by: - providing improved understanding of fish bycatch in (more)

Burns, R. J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS: CCS: Life Cycle Water Consumption for Carbon Capture and Storage Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints

297

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leakage Mitigation Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number: FE0004478 Robin Gerlach Al Cunningham, Lee H Spangler Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation & Benefit to the Program (required) * Benefit to the Program and Project Overview (required) * Background Information * Accomplishments to Date - Injection strategy development (control and prediction) - Large core tests - ambient pressure - Large core tests - high pressure - Small core tests - high pressure - MCDP, permeability and porosity assessments * Progress Assessment and Summary

298

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Leakage Mitigation CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies Project Number FE0004478 Lee H Spangler, Al Cunningham, Robin Gerlach Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation * Background information * Large core tests - ambient pressure * Large core tests - high pressure 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Project benefits statement. The Engineered Biomineralized Sealing Technologies

299

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CCS CCS Project Number 49607 Christopher Harto Argonne National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Increased control of reservoir pressure, reduced risk of CO2 migration, and expanded formation storage capacity. * Project benefits statement. - This work supports the development of active reservoir management approaches by identifying cost effective and environmentally benign strategies for managing extracted brines (Tasks 1 + 2). - This work will help identify water related constraints on CCS deployment and provide insight into

300

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Multiphase of Multiphase Flow for Improved Injectivity and Trapping 4000.4.641.251.002 Dustin Crandall, URS PI: Grant Bromhal, NETL ORD Morgantown, West Virginia U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Breakdown of FY12 project tasks * Facilities and personnel * Task progress to date * Planned task successes * Tech transfer and summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Resources International, Inc. Advanced Resources International, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent. * Project benefits statement: - This research seeks to develop a set of robust mathematical modules to predict how coal and shale permeability and

302

DOE/EIS-0340; Grand Ronde 聟 Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 NORTHEAST OREGON HATCHERY PROGRAM GRANDE RONDE - IMNAHA SPRING CHINOOK HATCHERY PROJECT DOE/EIS-0340 Draft Environmental Impact Statement Northeast Oregon Hatchery Program Grande Ronde - Imnaha Spring Chinook Hatchery Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0340) Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Cooperating Federal Agencies: U.S. Department of Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS); U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries); U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Cooperating Tribes: Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Cooperating State Agencies: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW)

303

EIS-0265-SA-94: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: Supplement Analysis 4: Supplement Analysis EIS-0265-SA-94: Supplement Analysis Watershed Management Program - Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Browitt Property Acquisition Bonneville Power Administration proposes to purchase approximately 42 acres of privately-owned land in the Yakima River Basin in Kittitas County, Washington as part of the Yakima River Side Channels Project. The goal of this project is to contribute toward the rebuilding of Yakima Basin spring chinook salmon and steelhead populations by improving survival during their first year of life. This will be accomplished by protecting and restoring off-channel rearing habitats associated with the mainstem of the Yakima River. (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-94): Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS - Yakima Basin Side Channels Project, Browitt Property

304

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUMNER SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS Project Number DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Fountainview Wednesday 8-21-12 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Acknowledgements & Disclaimer Acknowledgements * The work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Grant DE-FE0002056 and DE- FE0006821, W.L. Watney and Jason Rush, Joint PIs. Project is managed and

305

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 Collaborators Zhengrong Wang, Yale University Kevin Johnson, University of Hawaii 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 storage capacity - Demonstrate fate of injected CO 2 and most common contaminants * Project benefits statement: This research project conducts modeling, laboratory studies, and pilot-scale research aimed at developing new technologies and new systems for utilization of basalt formations for long term subsurface storage of CO 2 . Findings from this project

306

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

behavior of shales as behavior of shales as seals and storage reservoirs for CO2 Project Number: Car Stor_FY131415 Daniel J. Soeder USDOE/NETL/ORD U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Program Goals - Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent. - Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage efficiency while ensuring containment effectiveness * Project Objectives - Assess how shales behave as caprocks in contact with CO 2 under a variety of conditions - Assess the viability of depleted gas shales to serve as storage reservoirs for sequestered CO

307

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 leakage and cap rock remediation DE-FE0001132 Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science and Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishments to date * Summary 2 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * Project benefits statement. - The project develops a coupled reservoir and geomechanical modeling approach to simulate cap rock leakage and simulate the success of remediation

308

LUCF Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RZWR'HVLJQDQG RZWR'HVLJQDQG +RZWR'HVLJQDQG ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ ,PSOHPHQW&DUERQ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ 0HDVXULQJDQG0RQLWRULQJ $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) $.WLYLWLHVIRU/8&) 3URMH.WV 3URMH.WV Sandra Brown Winrock International sbrown@winrock.org Winrock International 2 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV 3URMH.WGHVLJQLVVXHV z Baselines and additionality z Leakage z Permanence z Measuring and monitoring z Issues vary with projects in developed versus developing countries Winrock International 3 /HDNDJH /HDNDJH z Leakage is the unanticipated loss or gain in carbon benefits outside of the project's boundary as a result of the project activities-divide into two types: - Primary leakage or activity shifting outside project area - Secondary leakage or market effects due to

309

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Web-based CO Web-based CO 2 Subsurface Modeling Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Project Number DE-FE0002069 Christopher Paolini San Diego State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and goals. * Web interface for simulating water-rock interaction. * Development of, and experience teaching, a new Carbon Capture and Sequestration course at San Diego State University. * Some noteworthy results of student research and training in CCS oriented geochemistry. * Status of active student geochemical and geomechancal modeling projects.

310

Project Title:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 291 Project Information Date: 3/1 1/2010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to repair this line it was decided to trench a line aproximately 100 feet and tie it into the line at 71-3- 1. What are the environmental sx-3. This will get us out of the old flow line which has been repaired 5-6 times. this will mitigate the chances impacts? of having spills in the future. 2. What is the legal location? This flowline runs from the well77-s-1 0 to the B-2-10 manifold.+ "/-,~?X3 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 10 hours(1 day) to complete 4. What major equipment will be used backhoe and operator and one hand if any (work over rig. drilling rig.

311

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Co-Sequestration Co-Sequestration Studies Project Number 58159 Task 2 B. Peter McGrail Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Focus Area and DOE Connections * Goals and Objectives * Scope of Work * Technical Discussion * Accomplishments to Date * Project Wrap-up * Appendix (Organization Chart, Gantt Chart, and Bibliography 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed: - Technology development to predict CO 2 and mixed gas storage capacity in various geologic settings - Demonstrate fate of injected mixed gases * Project benefits statement:

312

Project X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided by Project X would be a cost- effective approach toin Section I and for the cost estimate necessary as part ofby DOE order 413.3b. The cost range required for CD-0 will

Holmes, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Design of Experiment (DoE) & Response Surface (RS) Uncertainty Analysis Project Number: DE-FE-0009238 Mingkan Zhang 1 , Ye Zhang 1 , Peter Lichtner 2 1. Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 2. OFM Research, Inc., Santa Fe, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project major goals and benefits; * Detailed project objectives & success criteria; * Accomplishments to date; * Summary of results; * Appendix (organization chart; Gantt chart; additional results). Dept. of Geology & Geophysics, University of Wyoming

314

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Region Region DE-FE0001812 Brian J. McPherson University of Utah U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Acknowledgements * NETL * Shell * Tri-State * Trapper Mining * State of Colorado 3 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 4 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Project / Program Goals * Technical Status: Finalizing 10-Point Protocol for CO 2 Storage Site Characterization * Key Accomplishments * Summary 5 Benefit to the Program Program Goals Being Addressed by this Project

315

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program Research, Monitoring and Evaluation Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are currently of special concern regionally and are important to the culture and subsistence needs of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. The mission of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is to restore and maintain these native trout and the habitats that sustain them in order to provide subsistence harvest and recreational fishing opportunities for the Reservation community. The adfluvial life history strategy exhibited by westslope cutthroat and bull trout in the Lake Coeur d'Alene subbasin makes these fish susceptible to habitat degradation and competition in both lake and stream environments. Degraded habitat in Lake Coeur d'Alene and its associated streams and the introduction of exotic species has lead to the decline of westslope cutthroat and listing of bull trout under the endangered species act (Peters et al. 1998). Despite the effects of habitat degradation, several streams on the Reservation still maintain populations of westslope cutthroat trout, albeit in a suppressed condition (Table 1). The results of several early studies looking at fish population status and habitat condition on the Reservation (Graves et al. 1990; Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996) lead the Tribe to aggressively pursue funding for habitat restoration under the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) resident fish substitution program. Through these efforts, habitat restoration needs were identified and projects were initiated. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program is currently involved in implementing stream habitat restoration projects, reducing the transport of sediment from upland sources, and monitoring fish populations in four watersheds on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation (Figure 1). Restoration projects have included riparian plantings, addition of large woody debris to streams, and complete channel reconstruction to restore historical natural channel forms. In addition, ponds have been constructed to trap sediment from rill and gully erosion associated with agricultural practices, and to provide flow enhancement and ameliorate elevated stream temperatures during the summer base flow period. The implementation of restoration efforts that target the key habitats and lifestages for resident westslope cutthroat trout on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation is one means the Tribe is using to partially mitigate for lost anadromous fisheries. In this context, restoration is consistent with the definition provided by Ebersole et al. (1997), who described stream restoration as the reexpression of habitat capacity in a stream system. At the reach scale, habitat capacity is affected by biotic (e.g., riparian vegetation) and physical (e.g., flooding) processes. Superimposed on the natural biotic and physical processes are anthropogenic stressors (e.g., logging, roads and grazing) that suppress habitat capacity and can result in simplified, degraded stream reaches. The effectiveness of habitat restoration, measured as an increase in native trout abundance, is dependent on reducing limiting factors (e.g., passage barriers, high water temperatures, sediment transport from source areas) in areas that are critical for spawning and rearing lifestages. This plan outlines a monitoring strategy to help determine the effectiveness of specific restoration/enhancement treatments and to track the status of trout populations in four target watersheds.

Vitale, Angelo; Lamb, Dave; Peters, Ronald

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 16, 2004 January 16, 2004 EIS-0246-SA-37: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, On the Spokane Indian Reservation, near Wellpinit, Stevens County, Washington November 10, 2003 EIS-0349: Record of Decision Electrical Interconnection of the BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis September 5, 2003 EIS-0349: Draft Environmental Impact Statement BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project July 21, 2003 EIS-0317: Record of Decision Kangley-Echo Lake Transmission Line Project July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek

317

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2, 2004 August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project Volume 2 August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Figures BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project August 2, 2004 EIS-0349: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendices BP Cherry Point Cogeneration Project June 23, 2004 EIS-0026-SA-02: Supplement Analysis Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant April 7, 2004 EIS-0169-SA-08: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Boone Pond Acclimation Site, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington March 12, 2004 EA-1486: Final Environmental Assessment East and West Diversion Screening Proposal Methow Valley Irrigation District Project

318

Project Fact Sheet Project Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

medical and dental centre; shop and caf茅 area for students and vacation accommodation centre. The new & Figures: Budget: 拢51,074,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan Construction Project Programme: Start on Site

319

Preparing for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Project Implementation Financing Project Implementation Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference Project Implementation Seminar Series Save Energy Now LEADER Web Conference...

320

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Monitoring Geological CO Monitoring Geological CO 2 Sequestration using Perfluorocarbon and Stable Isotope Tracers Project Number FEAA-045 Tommy J. Phelps and David R. Cole* Oak Ridge National Laboratory Phone: 865-574-7290 email: phelpstj@ornl.gov (*The Ohio State University) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 22, 2013 2 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Goal: Develop methods to interrogate subsurface for improved CO 2 sequestration, field test characterization and MVA, demonstrate CO 2 remains in zone, and tech transfer. Objectives: 1. Assessment of injections in field. PFT gas tracers are analyzed by GC-ECD to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Project Homepage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Middle School Home Energy Audit Middle School Home Energy Audit Project Homepage NTEP Home - Project Homepage - Teacher Homepage - Student Pages Abstract: This set of lessons provides an opportunity for midlevel students to gain a basic understanding of how energy is turned into power, how power is measured using a meter, the costs of those units and the eventual reduction of energy consumption and cost to the consumer. Introduction to Research: By conducting energy audits of their own homes and completing exercises to gain baclground information, students begin to see the importance of energy in their daily lives. By using the Internet as a research tool, students gain develop research skills as they gain knowledge for their project. They use e-mail to collaborate with energy experts and share results with other

322

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Title: DEVELOPING A Title: DEVELOPING A COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESMENT FRAMEWORK FOR GEOLOGICAL STORAGE OF CO2 Ian Duncan University of Texas U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 1. Benefit to the Program 2. Goals and Objectives 3. Technical Status Project 4. Accomplishments to Date 5. Summary 3 Benefit to the Program The research project is developing a comprehensive understanding of the programmatic (business), and technical risks associated with CCS particularly the likelihood of leakage and its potential consequences. This contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent CO

323

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Acknowledgments Dave Harris, Kentucky Geological Survey Dave Barnes, Western Michigan University John Rupp, Indiana Geological Survey Scott Marsteller, Schlumberger Carbon Services John McBride, Brigham Young University * Project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal Institute * ConocoPhillips: in-kind match * Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation: matching funding * SeisRes 2020, Houston: VSP acquisition and processing

324

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Analyze Spatial and Temporal to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO 2 Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring Project Number DE-FE0001852 Dr. Brenda B. Bowen Purdue University (now at the University of Utah) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction to the project * Tasks * Student training * Student research successes * Lessons learned and future plans 3 Benefit to the Program * Addresses Carbon Storage Program major goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

325

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Results from Simulation Project Results from Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO 2 Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of Midwest United States DOE Award No. DE-FE0001034 Ohio Dept. of Dev. Grant CDO/D-10-03 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting August 21-23, 2012 Joel Sminchak and Neeraj Gupta Battelle Energy Systems sminchak@battelle.org, 614-424-7392 gupta@battelle.org, 614-424-3820 BUSINESS SENSITIVE 2 Presentation Outline 1. Technical Status 2. Background (CO 2 Sources, Geologic Setting) 3. Injection Well history 4. Geocellular Model Development 5. Geological Data (Geological dataset, Geostatistics) 6. Geocellular porosity/permeability model development 7. Pipeline Routing Analysis

326

Research projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Yuan 禄 Research projects Yuan 禄 Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

327

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SECARB Anthropogenic Test: SECARB Anthropogenic Test: CO 2 Capture/Transportation/Storage Project # DE-FC26-05NT42590 Jerry Hill, Southern Sates Energy Board Richard A. Esposito, Southern Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - CO 2 Capture - CO 2 Transportation - CO 2 Storage * Accomplishments to Date * Organization Chart * Gantt Chart * Bibliography * Summary Benefit to the Program 1. Predict storage capacities within +/- 30% * Conducted high resolution reservoir characterization of the Paluxy saline formation key

328

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigation of the CO Investigation of the CO 2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Project Number DE-FE-0004731 Jennifer Wilcox, Tony Kovscek, Mark Zoback Stanford University, School of Earth Sciences U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Outline * Project Benefits * Technical Status * Imaging at mm- to micron-scales using CT - Permeability measurements and application of the Klinkenberg effect - Molecular Dynamics simulations for permeability and viscosity estimates * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Stanford University 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program major goals

329

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fidelity Computational Analysis of Fidelity Computational Analysis of CO2 Trappings at Pore-scales Project Number: DE-FE0002407 Vinod Kumar (vkumar@utep.edu) & Paul Delgado (pmdelgado2@utep.edu) University of Texas at El Paso U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Collaborators: Dr. C. Harris (Shell Oil Company/Imperial College), Dr. G. Bromhal (NETL), Dr. M. Ferer (WVU/NETL), Dr. D. Crandall (NETL-Ctr), and Dr. D. McIntyre (NETL). 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Pore-network modeling - Conductance derivation for irregular geom. - Pore-to-CFD Computations

330

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY Bittersweet Energy Inc. Partners FE0002056 Devilbiss Coring Service Basic Energy Services Wellington Field Operator Industrial and Electrical Power Sources of CO 2 Southwest Kansas CO 2 -EOR Initiative Industry Partners (modeling 4 Chester/Morrowan oil fields to make CO2 ready) +drilling and seismic contractors TBN

331

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Number (DE-FE0002056) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 W. Lynn Watney & Jason Rush (Joint PIs) Kansas Geological Survey Lawrence, KS 66047 Brighton 1&2 2:40 August 20, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE Modeling CO 2 Sequestration in Saline A quifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir to Evaluate Regional CO 2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau A quifer System, South-Central Kansas Co-Principal Investigators Co-Principal Investigators Kerry D. Newell -- stratigraphy, geochemistry

332

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO 2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks DE-FE0004847 Jennifer Hall Columbia University in the City of New York U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Conservative and Reactive Tracer Techniques * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * The goal of the project is to develop and test novel geochemical tracer techniques for quantitative monitoring, verification and accounting of stored CO 2 . These techniques contribute to the Carbon Storage Program's

333

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO 2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection Facility Project Number DOE Grant FE0001833 Paul Metz Department of Mining & Geological Engineering University of Alaska Fairbanks U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix: Not Included in Presentation 3 Benefit to the Program * Carbon Storage Program Major Goals: - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to

334

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scale CO Scale CO 2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Project Number: DE-FE0010554 George J. Koperna, Jr. Shawna Cyphers Advanced Resources International U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Program Goals * Benefits Statement * Project Overview - Goals - Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix USDOE/NETL Program Goals * Support industry's ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent. * Develop and validate technologies to ensure 99 percent storage permanence. * Develop technologies to improve reservoir storage

335

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SUMNER COUNTY, KANSAS DE-FE0006821 W. Lynn Watney, Jason Rush, Joint PIs Kansas Geological Survey The University of Kansas Lawrence, KS U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Brighton 1&2 Wednesday 8-21-13 1:10-1:35 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 2 Small Scale Field Test Wellington Field Regional Assessment of deep saline Arbuckle aquifer Project Team DOE-NETL Contract #FE0006821 KANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY 3 L. Watney (Joint PI), J. Rush (Joint PI), J. Doveton, E. Holubnyak, M. Fazelalavi, R. Miller, D. Newell, J. Raney

336

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seal Repair Using Seal Repair Using Nanocomposite Materials Project Number DE-FE0009562 John Stormont, Mahmoud Reda Taha University of New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Ed Matteo, Thomas Dewers Sandia National Laboratories 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction and overview * Materials synthesis * Materials testing and characterization * Annular seal system testing * Numerical simulation * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * BENEFITS STATEMENT: The project involves the development and testing of polymer-cement nanocomposites for repairing flaws in annular wellbore seals. These materials will have superior characteristics compared to conventional

337

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Project Number DE-FE0002112 PIs Drs. John Kaszuba and Kenneth Sims Virginia Marcon University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status - Results - Conclusions - Next Steps * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA). MVA technologies seek to monitor, verify, and

338

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impact of CO Impact of CO 2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology Project Number (DEFE0002421) Dr. Yiran Dong Drs. Bruce W. Fouke, Robert A. Sanford, Stephen Marshak University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Technical status * Results and discussion * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program This research project has developed scientific, technical and institutional collaborations for the development of

339

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira Mohammad Piri and Felipe Pereira University of Wyoming U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status o Experimentation: core-flooding and IFT/CA o Pore-scale modeling modeling * Accomplishments to Date * Summary University of Wyoming 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: o 'Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent.' * Benefits statement: o The research project is focused on performing reservoir conditions experiments to measure steady-state relative permeabilities,

340

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MVA Tools MVA Tools Sam Clegg, Kristy Nowak-Lovato, Ron Martinez, Julianna Fessenden, Thom Rahn, & Lianjie Huang Los Alamos National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview - Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix - Organization Chart - Bibliography 3 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Surface MVA - Frequency Modulated Spectroscopy - Quantitatively identify CO2, H2S and CH4 seepage from geologic sequestration sites - Distinguish anthropogenic CO2 from natural CO2 emissions * CO2 carbon stable isotope measurements

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the UBC Project Services web-based project management portal project on campus within Project Services, and with the rest of the UBC community. We began this project by defining

342

Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1986 Interim Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We believe our results have clearly shown Kerr hydroelectric operations and operational constraints have negatively affected Flathead River trout and northern pike populations and the aquatic habitat which support them. Even so, it is possible to mitigate many of these impacts and develop a very important fishery. Trout abundance in the lower Flathead averaged only 19 fish per kilometer, the lowest abundance of trout for a river of this size in Montana. Little main channel spawning by trout was observed and most spawning probably occurs in tributaries. Lower river tributaries support resident populations of brook, rainbow, brown, and cutthroat trout; and a small resident population of bull trout is present in the South Fork of the Jocko River. Using weirs, spawning runs of rainbow and brown trout from the main river were monitored entering the Jocko River and the Post/Mission Creek system. Utilization of Crow Creek by main river trout stocks of trout was limited to the 6 km segment below Crow Dam. Evaluations of tributary spawning gravels showed high levels of silt which would suggest poor survival of trout eggs. Excessive harvest in the tributaries was indicated by analysis of age class structure and abundance of trout greater than 200 mm.

Bradshaw, William H.; DosSantos, Joseph M.; Darling, James M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 BROWN 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits & overview of deriving acrylates from coupling carbon dioxide and ethylene * Chemical catalysis approach: background and battles left to fight * Experimental assessment of the viability of thermochemical acrylate production * Perspectives for the future BROWN 3 Benefit to the Program * This project identifies the critical catalyst features necessary to promote carbon dioxide coupling with ethylene to acrylate at molybdenum catalysts. This research demonstrates the viability of acrylate production

344

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool to Improve CO2 Sequestration DE FE0004542 Larry Murdoch, Clemson University Stephen Moysey, Clemson University Leonid Germanovich, Georgia Tech Cem Ozan, Baker Hughes Sihyun Kim, Georgia Tech Glenn Skawski, Clemson University Alex Hanna, Clemson University Johnathan Ebenhack, Clemson University Josh Smith, Clemson University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Proof-of-Feasibility of Using Wellbore Deformation as a Diagnostic Tool, Larry Murdoch Project Review Meeting, 23 Aug. 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Preliminaries

345

Hallmark Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device communication Increased connectivity and automation in the control systems that manage the nation's energy infrastructure have improved system functionality, but left systems more vulnerable to cyber attack. Intruders could severely disrupt control system operation by sending fabricated information or commands to control system devices. To ensure message integrity, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems require a method to validate device-to- device communication and verify that information has come from a trusted source and not been altered in transit. The Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP) provides message

346

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DE-FE0001836: DE-FE0001836: Numerical modeling of geomechanical processes related to CO 2 injection within generic reservoirs Andreas Eckert & Runar Nygaard Missouri University of Science & Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Objectives, Benefits and Outcomes * Technical status: Project summary - Teaching - Reservoir scale (Geomechanics & Fluid flow simulation) - Borehole scale (Wellbore integrity & wellbore trajectory planning) * Conclusions * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies that will support industries'

347

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DE-FE0002225: DE-FE0002225: Actualistic and geochemical modeling of reservoir rock, CO 2 and formation fluid interaction, Citronelle oil field, Alabama West Virginia University & University of Alabama Presenter: Dr. Amy Weislogel (WVU) Co-PI: Dr. Rona Donahoe (UA) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Overview & Project Map * Reservoir Geochemical Characterization * Formation Fluid Geochemistry * Geochemical Modeling * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies that will support industries'

348

Cloudnet Project  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Cloudnet is a research project supported by the European Commission. This project aims to use data obtained quasi-continuously for the development and implementation of cloud remote sensing synergy algorithms. The use of active instruments (lidar and radar) results in detailed vertical profiles of important cloud parameters which cannot be derived from current satellite sensing techniques. A network of three already existing cloud remote sensing stations (CRS-stations) will be operated for a two year period, activities will be co-ordinated, data formats harmonised and analysis of the data performed to evaluate the representation of clouds in four major european weather forecast models.

Hogan, Robin

349

Amendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis analyzes Amendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan Island Habitat Conservation Area Environmental Assessment/ Regulatory Impact Review/ Final RegulatoryAmendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

350

Red Snapper Ecology and Fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Based on a symposium held in San  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Red Snapper Ecology and Fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Based on a symposium held in San working on diverse aspects of the ecology and fishery management of the species. There are 22 chapters life history and ecology spanning all ontogenetic stages, including larval behavior and distribution

Aguirre, Windsor E.

351

Natural Climate Insurance for Pacific Northwest Salmon and Salmon Fisheries: Finding our way through the Entangled Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Natural Climate Insurance for Pacific Northwest Salmon and Salmon Fisheries: Finding our way) Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans/School of Marine Affairs Climate Impacts and Fisheries Sciences, Box 355020, Seattle, WA 98195-5020; email: bfrancis@u.washington.edu Submitted to an AFS

Mantua, Nathan

352

PROJECT REQUEST FORM PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT REQUEST FORM Last Name: Email: PROJECT HOLDER INFORMATION UCID:Last Name: Email: Institute if different than Project Holder) First Name: Project Short Name: (50 characters max) (for eFIN view only) Project Title: PROJECT INFORMATION Start Date (MM/DD/YYYY): End Date (MM/DD/YYYY): For Questions or HELP

de Leon, Alex R.

353

A study of Texas rivers with attention to river access and recreational fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U e x 1876 TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences 10001 January 5, 1998 Bob Smith 123 River Boulevard Troutville, TX 12345 Dear Bob: Next week you will receive a request to complete a questionnaire about your... Hall ~ College Station, Texas 77833-2258 ~ (i)09) 835-5777, FAX (409) 8x(5-3786 18 e U x U II TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Department of Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences lsts 10001 January 12, 1998 Bob Smith 123 River Boulevard Troutville, TX 12345...

Baker, Troy L

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

Reducing Uncertainty in Fisheries Management: The Time for Fishers' Ecological Knowledge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who knowingly fish illegally should lose their licenses permanently. 1.63 1.61 ** -1.35 St. Croix needs more fishery officers. 0.58 ** -0.70 0.73 Fishery officers should be more visible within the fishing community. -0.05 -0.06 0.03 Penalties... for illegally fishing are not severe enough to deter licensed fishers. 0.85 0.98 * 1.43 Regulations against unlicensed commercial fishing should be enforced strongly. 1.28 1.04 1.42 Management should expand the use of daily catch limits. ** -1.56 ** 0...

Carr, Liam

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

355

A model for the management of the Texas brown shrimp fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics A MODEL FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF THE TEXAS BROWN SHRIMP FISHERY A Thesis by GLENN CHARLES TYDLACKA Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman oE Commi e) pg w~ (Member) (M j) Augvst 1979 ABSTRACT... A Model for the Management of the Texas Brown Shrimp Fishery. (August 1979) Glenn Charles Tydlacka, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advi" ory Committee: Dr. Wade L. Griffin The management of the shrimp fi-hery in Texas is an important...

Tydlacka, Glenn Charles

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Project Fact Sheet Project Brief  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RCS1 Sub-station HV Installation completed in April 2011 In defects until April 2012 For more Project Manager: Rob Pask Phase 2a RCS1 Sub-station enclosing works completed in December 2010 Phase 2b when completed will provide a new 11,000 volt electrical substation, switching gear and associated

357

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigating the Fundamental Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Project Number DE-FE0000397 Lee H Spangler Energy Research Institute Montana State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Computational tool development * Laboratory studies to understand subsurface CO 2 behavior * Analog studies to inform risk analysis * Near surface detection technologies / testing * Mitigation method development 3 Benefit to the Program Program goals being addressed. * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO

358

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and FE/NETL CTS Cost Models and Benefits Assessment of Carbon Storage R&D Program David Morgan Benefits Division Office of Program Planning and Analysis National Energy Technology Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY 2 Presentation Outline * Overview of benefits assessment * Overview of FE/NETL models used to assess benefits of CO 2 capture and storage * Benefits evaluation of Storage Program's R&D projects using a model to estimate costs of CO 2 storage in a saline aquifer * Description of model used to estimate costs of

359

Project 307  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) INTEGRATING MONO ETHANOL AMINE (MEA) REGENERATION WITH CO 2 COMPRESSION AND PEAKING TO REDUCE CO 2 CAPTURE COSTS Background In Phase I, Trimeric Corporation, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin, performed engineering and economic analyses necessary to determine the feasibility of novel MEA processing schemes aimed at reducing the cost of CO 2 capture from flue gas. These novel MEA-based CO 2 capture schemes are designed for integration into coal-fired power plants with the aim of reducing costs and improving efficiency. Primary Project Goal The primary goal of this project was to reduce the cost of MEA scrubbing for the recovery of CO 2 from flue gas by improved process integration. CONTACTS Sean I. Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager

360

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1-23, 2012 1-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the program * Project overview: Why 14 C for MVA? * Technical status: Cartridges, injections, lasers * Summary * Organizational chart * Collaborators 3 Benefit to the Program * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. Permanent storage of CO 2 can be demonstrated by adding carbon-14 ( 14 C) prior to injection. This research project aims to demonstrate this by tagging fossil CO 2 with 14 C at a field site. When completed, this system will show that 14 C can be a safe and effective tracer for sequestered CO 2 . A laser-based 14 C measurement method is being adapted for continuous monitoring. This technology contributes to the Carbon Storage Program's effort of ensuring 99 percent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leakage Pathways and Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO 2 Project DE-FC26-0xNT4 FE0001786 James P. Evans Utah State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Relationship to overall program goals * Overview of seal bypass * Technical status; bypass systems - Field based studies - Technological advances * Accomplishments and Summary * Appendices 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goals addressed * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent.

362

Project 301  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2006 2006 Combustion Technologies CONTACTS Robert R. Romanosky Advanced Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Arun C. Bose Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4467 arun.bose@netl.doe.gov ADVANCED, LOW/ZERO EMISSION BOILER DESIGN AND OPERATION Background Over the past years, environmental concerns regarding pollutants have grown dramatically. Current annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are 12% higher than they were in 1992. In addition, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions are projected to increase by an additional 34% over the next 20 years. About one third of carbon emissions in the

363

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Michael G. Waddell Earth Sciences and Resources Institute University of South Carolina U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project goals and benefits * Overview of the geology of the South Georgia Rift basin in SC * Results of petrographic and core analysis from the Rizer #1 * Future investigations in the SGR * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program Program Goals: * Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent. * Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected

364

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High-T and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments DE-FE0001127 Investigators: Hai Xiao, Hai-Lung Tsai, Missouri University of Science and Technology Junhang Dong, University of Cincinnati Program Manager: Norm Popkie, Gasification Division, NETL DOE Project Kickoff Meeting in the NETL Pittsburgh December 15, 2009 Outline * Background * Objectives * Project Elements * Management Plan * Research Plan and Approaches * Risk Management * Summary Background * Demands: High-performance, reliable, in situ sensors are highly demanded for advanced process control and lifecycle management in existing and future advanced power and fuel systems - Improved efficiency/safety/reliability/availability/maintainability

365

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mart Oostrom Mart Oostrom Pacific Northwest National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline 飦 Project overview 飦 Sub-Task 1: Investigation of CO 2 migration in heterogeneous porous media 飦 Sub-Task 2: Modeling CCUS deployment in China 飦 Summary Collaboration with China on Clean Energy Research 3 Benefit to the Program The Clean Energy Partnership was established by a memorandum of understanding between the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in May of 2009 with the goal of significantly reducing the environmental emissions and improving the efficiency of

366

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO 2 Migration in the Subsurface PI: Jeffrey Daniels Co-PI: Robert Burns & Franklin Schwartz Students: Michael Murphy & Kyle Shalek The Ohio State University U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 FOA Number: DE-FOA-0000032 NETL Award Number: DE-FE0002441 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program Goal: Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones

367

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Influence of Local Capillary Trapping on Containment System Effectiveness DE-FE0004956 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin Local capillary trapping (FE0004956), Bryant, UT-Austin

368

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon gasification * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst development * Techno-economic analysis * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

369

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improved Caprock Integrity and Improved Caprock Integrity and Risk Assessment Techniques Project Number (FE0009168) Michael Bruno, PhD, PE GeoMechanics Technologies U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Introduction and Motivation 2 A primary requirement for long-term geologic storage and containment of carbon dioxide is ensuring caprock integrity. Large-scale CO2 injection requires improved and advanced simulation tools and risk assessment techniques to better predict and help control system failures, and to enhance performance of geologic storage. GeoMechanics Technologies is developing enhanced simulation and risk analysis approaches to assess and

370

Irene Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Irene Station, African Weather Bureau Irene Station, African Weather Bureau The photos on this site come from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project. Additional photos can be found on the SHADOZ Project Web Site. Photo of the Dobson 89 Instrument The Irene Weather Office Agnes Phahlane sits behind the Dobson and collects Total Ozone Data The lab at the Irene station Cal Archer Prepares an ozonesonde Flight Preparations The balloon is readied The release Back to the SAFARI 2000 Photo Page Index Other Sites: Skukuza, MISR Validation Site | Skukuza, Eddy Covariance Site | C-130 Flight Photos | Sua Pan Site | Irene Weather Station | Fire Studies | Kalahari Transect | Kalahari Transect Sites for Canopy Structure Data | ORNL DAAC Home || ORNL Home || NASA || Privacy, Security, Notices || Data

371

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO 2 Plume Migration DOE-FE0004962 Steven Bryant The University of Texas at Austin U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation and relevance to Program * Project goals * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary * Future plans Inexpensive plume monitoring (FE0004962), Bryant and Srinivasan, UT-Austin

372

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on CCS Energy Market Competitiveness Catherine A. Peters Jeffery P. Fitts Michael A. Celia Princeton University Paul D. Kalb Vatsal Bhatt Brookhaven National Laboratory Elizabeth J. Wilson Jeffrey M. Bielicki Melisa Pollak University of Minnesota DOE Award DE-FE0000749 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits to CCUS research program * Project Goals & Objectives * Technical Status 飪 Thrust I - Reservoir-scale simulations of leakage potential with permeability evolution

373

Project Description  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Project Description Project Description The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007), and Presidential Executive Order 13423 all contain requirements for Federal facilities to decrease energy consumption and increase the use of renewable energy by the year 2015. To provide leadership in meeting these requirements, DOE, in partnership with the General Services Administration (GSA), has installed a rooftop solar electric, or PV, system on the roof of DOE's headquarters in Washington, D.C. The 205 kilowatt (kW) installation is one of the largest of its kind in the Nation's capital. A display in the For- restal building will show the power output of the PV system during the day and the energy produced over

374

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Modeling CO for Modeling CO 2 Processes: Pressure Management, Basin-Scale Models, Model Comparison, and Stochastic Inversion ESD09-056 Jens T. Birkholzer with Abdullah Cihan, Marco Bianchi, Quanlin Zhou, Xiaoyi Liu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Dorothee Rebscher, Barbara Fialeix Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview and Technical Status - Task 1: Optimization of Brine Extraction for Pressure Management and Mitigation - Task 2: Basin-scale Simulation of CO 2 Storage in the Northern Plains - Prairie Basal Aquifer - Task 3: Sim-SEQ Model Comparison

375

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO Beneficial Use of CO 2 in Precast Concrete Production DE-FE0004285 Yixin Shao, Yaodong Jia Liang Hu McGill University 3H Company U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Presentation outline * Goals and objectives * Benefits to the program * Project overview * Technical status * Accomplishment to date * Summary 2 Objective Masonry blocks Fiber-cement panels Prefabricated buildings Concrete pipes To develop a carbonation process to replace steam curing in precast concrete production for energy reduction, and carbon storage and utilization. Goals * CO 2 sequestration capacity by cement:

376

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Kansas Center for Research University of Kansas Center for Research Kansas Geological Survey U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 Presentation Outline * Benefits, objectives, overview * Methods * Background & setting * Technical status * Accomplishments * Summary Benefit to the Program * Program goal addressed: Develop technologies that will support the industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤 30 percent. * Program goal addressed: This project will confirm - via a horizontal test boring - whether fracture attributes derived from 3-D seismic PSDM Volumetric Curvature (VC) processing are real. If

377

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Project benefits and objectives * Carbon reactivity studies * Catalyst mechanism studies * Catalyst development * Test results * Summary 3 Benefit to the Program * Program goal: Reduce CO 2 emissions by developing beneficial uses that meet the DOE net cost metric of $10/MT for captured CO 2 that will mitigate CO 2 emissions in areas where geological storage may not be an optimal solution * Benefits statement: Development of a commercial process for converting CO 2 and a carbon source into a commodity chemical at a

378

FUSRAP Project  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Project Project 23b 14501 FUSRAP TECHNICAL BULLETIN N O . - R 3 v . L DATE: 1.2 9-99 SUBJECT : Pr.pec.d BY T r m L u d Approval Summary of the results for the Springdale characterization activities performed per WI-94-015, Rev. 0. TUO separate radiological characterization surveys and a limited cherical characterization survey were performed on the Springdale Site in Octcjer and December, 1993. The design of the radiological surveys were to supplement and define existing ORNL surveys. The limited cher.ica1 characterization survey was performed to assist in the completion of waste disposal paperwork. Radiological contamination is primarily ir. the 'belt cutting and belt fabrication'areas of the building with a small erea of contamination in the south end of the building. The chemiccl sac~le

379

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0-22, 2013 0-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Benefit to the Program * Project Overview: Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefit to the Program * Advanced simulation tool for quantifying transport in porous and fractured geological formations during CO 2 sequestration that includes all mechanisms: convection, diffusion, dissolution and chemical reactions * A simulator that can fully model these processes does not currently exist * Simulator will contribute to our ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations, to within 卤30 percent 4 Project Overview: Goals and Objectives Comprehensive reservoir simulator for investigation of CO 2 non-isothermal, multiphase flow and long-term storage in

380

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thomas J. Wolery Thomas J. Wolery Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 LLNL-PRES-574632 2 Team Members * Roger Aines * Bill Bourcier * Tom Wolery * Tom Buscheck * Tom Wolfe (consultant) * Mike DiFilippo (consultant) * Larry Lien (Membrane Development Specialists) 3 Presentation Outline * Overview of Active CO 2 Reservoir Management (ACRM) * Subsurface Reservoir Management: Made Possible by Brine Production, Yielding Many Benefits * Brine Disposal Options - What brines are out there? - What are the treatment options? 4 Benefit to the Program * This project is identifying and evaluating

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Accelerating projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter describes work at ORNL in the period around 1950, when the laboratory was evolving from its original mission of research aimed at producing the atomic bomb, to a new mission, which in many ways was unclear. The research division from Y-12 merged with the laboratory, which gave an increased work force, access to a wide array of equipment, and the opportunity to work on a number of projects related to nuclear propulsion. The first major project was for a nuclear aircraft. From work on this program, a good share of the laboratories work in peaceful application of nuclear energy would spring. A major concern was the development of light weight shielding to protect the crew and materials in such a plane. To do such shielding work, the laboratory employed existing, and new reactors. The original plans called for the transfer of reactor work to Argonne, but because of their own research load, and the needs of the lab, new reactor projects were started at the lab. They included the Low Intensity Test Reactor, the Swimming Pool Reactor, the Bulk Shielding Reactor, the Tower Shielding Facility, and others. The laboratory was able to extend early work on calutrons to accelerator development, pursuing both electrostatic accelerators and cyclotrons. The aircraft project also drove the need for immense quantities of scientific data, with rapid analysis, which resulted the development of divisions aimed at information support and calculational support. The laboratory also expanded its work in the effects of radiation and cells and biological systems, as well as in health physics.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research Projects | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Projects Basic Energy Science Projects AA (Fossil Energy) Projects EERE-VT Projects EERE-ED Projects ARPA-E Projects...

383

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

William Bourcier William Bourcier Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 Saline Aquifer Brine Production Well Brine Injection Well Chiller Pretreatment Desalination Brine Permeate To power plant or other use Storage pump CO 2 injection Concept is to extract and desalinate aquifer brines to create fresh water and space for CO 2 storage cap-rock 3 Presentation Outline * Overview, Purpose, Goals and Benefits * Technical status - Brine treatment and disposition - Reservoir management * Accomplishments * Summary and Planned work Goals and Objectives Technical Goals Potential advantages of brine

384

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Metrics for Screening CO Metrics for Screening CO 2 Utilization Processes Peter Kabatek Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Services / WorleyParsons U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * NETL's Carbon Storage Program * Introduction of the metrics * Review of the case study technology * Application of metrics to the case study technology * Discussion of metrics interpretation and grouping 3 NETL Carbon Storage Program * The Carbon Storage Program contains three key elements: - Infrastructure - Global Collaborations - Core Research and Development: * Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (MVA) * Geologic Storage

385

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Reservoir Simulation Model * Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. CO2 Leakage(X,Y,Q) Artificial Intelligence & Data Mining Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 : * Conference call * Site selection criteria - November 17 th 2009: * A meeting during the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Meeting in Pittsburgh

386

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Factors Influencing Factors Influencing CO 2 Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales Contract No. DE-FE0004633 Michael Godec, Vice President Advanced Resources International mgodec@adv-res.com U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Program Benefits * Goals and Objectives * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix 3 Benefits to the Program * Program Goals Addressed - Develop technologies that will support industries' ability to predict CO 2 storage capacity in geologic formations to within 卤30 percent.

387

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Training and Research Peter M. Walsh University of Alabama at Birmingham U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CCUS Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania August 21-23, 2012 DE-FE0002224 * Evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks serving as barriers to upward migration of CO 2 sequestered in geologic formations. * Education and training of undergraduate and graduate students, through independent research on geologic sequestration. * Education, through an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. * Simulation of CO 2 migration and trapping in storage

388

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building the Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction - Objective - Industrial Review Committee - Background * Steps Involved - Geological and Reservoir Simulation Modeling - Leakage Modeling & Real-Time Data Processing - Pattern Recognition & Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS) * Accomplishments to Date * Summary Objective * Develop an in-situ CO 2 leak detection technology based on the concept of Smart Fields. - Using real-time pressure data from permanent downhole gauges to estimate the location and the rate of CO 2 leakage. Industrial Advisory Committee (IAC) * Project goes through continuous peer-review by an Industrial Review Committee. * Meetings: - November 6 th 2009 :

389

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix Introduction * Most storage modeling studies assume a discrete reservoir/caprock interface with simple (uniform) flow conditions. * We address the question of whether or not heterogeneities at the interface influence transmission of CO 2 into the caprock 3 4 Reservoir Caprock Reservoir Introduction The nature of reservoir/caprock interfaces 4 Organization 5 Peter Mozley (PD/PI) NMT Sedimentology James Evans (Co-PI) USU Structure Thomas Dewers (Co-I) Jason Heath (Staff) SNL Modeling Mark Person (Cooperating Scientist) NMT Modeling Stefan Raduha NMT Sedimentology

390

Predator Removal: Effect on Fisheries Yields in Lake Victoria (East Africa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the 5-,um To brightening to the solar flare could support any ofthe above explanations...Academic Press, New York, 1966). 16. Solar Geophysical Data, 401 Part I (January...by the fisheries departments of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. My EAFFRO colleagues J...

GERALD G. MARTEN

1979-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Magazine of Engineering and the Sciences at UC Santa Barbara Fisheries Salvation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Going green gets organic solvents out of organic chemistry. Start-up of the world's largest Count? Q&A with Kimberly Turner Green Chemistry & CoQ10 TWELVE, FALL 2008 #12;Isaac Asimov recently engineering and her MEMS research, and from fisheries management through green chemistry and nutraceuticals

Bigelow, Stephen

392

Marine tourism, fisheries and community: creating barometers of economic change New Zealand Tourism Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Marine tourism, fisheries and community: creating barometers of economic change New Zealand Tourism Research Institute www.nztri.org Tutukaka Coast Resident Survey The Economic Impacts of Tourism a better understanding of the economic impacts that tourism activities are having on the Tutukaka Coast

393

Marine tourism, fisheries and community: creating barometers of economic change New Zealand Tourism Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Marine tourism, fisheries and community: creating barometers of economic change New Zealand Tourism Research Institute www.nztri.org Tutukaka Coast Business Survey The Economic Impacts of Tourism a better understanding of the economic impacts that tourism activities are having on the Tutukaka Coast

394

Marine tourism, fisheries and community: creating barometers of economic change New Zealand Tourism Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Marine tourism, fisheries and community: creating barometers of economic change New Zealand Tourism Research Institute www.nztri.org Tutukaka Coast Visitor Survey The Economic Impacts of Tourism designed to gain a better understanding of the economic impacts that tourism activities are having

395

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW NORTH PACIFIC FISHERIES RESEARCH PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT/REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW FOR THE NORTH PACIFIC FISHERIES RESEARCH PLAN environmental assessment/regulatory impact review (EA/RIR) for the Research Plan was initially reviewed . . . . . . . . 4 1.2.2 Regulatory Impact Review . . . . . . . . 5 1.3 Description of the Domestic Fishing Fleet

396

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review FOR AMENDMENT 45 TO THE FISHERY MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR GROUNDFISH OF THE GULF OF ALASKA AND THE ASSOCIATED REGULATORY AMENDMENT TO COMBINE THE THIRD AND FOURTH QUARTERLY POLLOCK ALLOWANCES IN THE WESTERN AND CENTRAL REGULATORY AREAS OF THE GULF OF ALASKA Prepared

397

Final Environmental Assessment/ Regulatory Impact Review/ Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for Amendment 93 to the Fishery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Environmental Assessment/ Regulatory Impact Review/ Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Review/Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis analyzing proposed management measures that would apply for Amendment 93 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska Chinook Salmon Prohibited

398

The rising tide of fisheries instruments and the struggle to keep afloat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Conch Significant Trade Review, International Queen...Commission: community action plan for the eradication of...2001 FAO International Plan of Action. In FAO Fisheries...World Bank. FAO 1994 Review of the state of world...FAO 1999 International plan of action for reducing...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

FW204 -INTRODUCTION TO FISHERY BIOLOGY (3 CREDITS) COURSE OUTLINE FALL 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concepts of fisheries biology that will be developed in greater detail in subsequent classes (e.g., FW400nd edition1 路 Supplemental readings (website or handed out in class)2 路 Warner College of Natural using the scale on the following page. Final grades may be adjusted to reflect overall class performance

400

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12156 Signature of ocean warming in global fisheries catch William W. L changes in sea surface temperature5 . This study shows that ocean warming has already affected global. Cheung1 , Reg Watson2 & Daniel Pauly3 Marine fishes and invertebrates respond to ocean warming through

Pauly, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Arctic fisheries catches in Russia, USA, and Canada: baselines for neglected northern Siberia (Russia), Arctic Alaska (USA), and the Canadian Arctic, extends over seven coastal Large.e., 770,000, 89,000, and 94,000 t by Russia, USA, and Canada, respectively for the same time period

Pauly, Daniel

402

NOM's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is working to reduce these threats to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOM's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) is working to reduce these threats to help conserve threats to marine turtles, NMFS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have developed recovery plans you see turtles and/or jellyfish at the surface, slow down and ma隆nta隆n a ded隆cated lookout. 0 Wear

403

LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09528 The trophic fingerprint of marine fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fishing impacts on marine biodiversity, we recommend greater efforts to measure true abundance trends to fisheries requires managers to conserve marine biodiversity, not just focus on fished stocks8 . Biodiversity-scale test of whether catch MTL is a good indicator of ecosystem MTL, marine biodiversity and ecosystem

Gottgens, Hans

404

A decision support system for fisheries management using operations research and systems science approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a general framework, using a systems science approach, for developing a decision support system (DSS) for fisheries management. Decision support systems are quantitative tools for managers to evaluate outcomes of their policies prior to implementation. Our fishery model considers multiple stocks and fisheries simultaneously in balancing catch among targeted and protected fish abundances. Since in the Northeastern US multispecies fishery the distribution of abundance, catch-per-unit-effort and bycatch vary geographically, we focus on a spatial management approach to address their spatial variability. The core component of this DSS applies operations research techniques of simulation and optimization to determine the optimal inter-annual and intra-annual fishing plans in terms of fishing efforts in each sub-area and the time period. The result is the recommended amount to catch from each fish species at each sub-area at any time period so that while management objectives for sustainability of fish stocks are satisfied, the value of landings is maximized. The graphical user interface of the proposed DSS helps users to define inputs, to set constraints and sub-area boundaries, and to visualize the outcomes.

Farhad Azadivar; Tu Truong; Yue Jiao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The Spatial Expansion and Ecological Footprint of Fisheries (1950 to Present)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/longitude ocean grid system and trace the change in their status over the 56-year time period. This result highlights the global scale expansion in marine fisheries, from the coastal waters off North Atlantic population of flatfish and other bottom fish they were targeting, and they had to move offshore, gradually

Pauly, Daniel

406

Mi'kmaq Fisheries in Atlantic Canada: Traditions, Legal Decisions and Community Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mi'kmaq Fisheries in Atlantic Canada: Traditions, Legal Decisions and Community Management Chris Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Abstract Historically, the Mi'kmaq, the indigenous people of Atlantic relationships and government policies. Today, recent court decisions upholding Mi'kmaq rights to the Atlantic

Charles, Anthony

407

NOAA/NMFS Developments U.S.-Japan Fishery Trade Talks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transactions which in the past have been foreclosed. Because of the absence of that market, the U.S. indus- try to the large Japanese market for seafoods. The understanding was reached after a series of meetings opportunities in Japan, assist in resolving problems in specific fisheries trade transactions, and assist U

408

The Commercial Bait Shrimp Fishery in Galveston Bay, Texas, 1959-87  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Commercial Bait Shrimp Fishery in Galveston Bay, Texas, 1959-87 KENNETH N. BAXTER, CARLTON H-_---.J~_ ___'__ __'__ __'__ 10 gO ___' Figure I.-Galveston Bay bait index versus Texas offshore actual catch, 1960-1986. Marine, especially in Florida and Texas (De Sylva, 1954; Woodburn et al., 1957; Chin, 1960; Saloman, 1965; Inglis

409

APRIL 3 10:3011:30am Rm 102 Status and Future of Recreational Fisheries in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anderson, Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) APRIL 8 5:00颅6:00pm Rm 107 Evolution of Saltwater Recreational Fisheries in Washington State Tony Floor, Director, Fishing Affairs, NW Marine Trade APRIL 17 10:30am颅12:20pm Rm 102 A) Involving Youth in Recreational Fishing B) Management and Status

Anderson, Richard

410

Assessment of bycatch associated with the inshore shrimp fishery in Matagorda Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the inshore shrimp fishery, characterize the composition of this bycatch, and identify temporal relationships of constituent species. Monthly mean bycatch biomass levels ranged from 3.32 (December 1998) to 8.71 kg (August 1998) and were highest during summer...

Sparks, Debbie Laura

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The 1994 Net Ban Constitutional Amendment: a case study of marine fisheries management in Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On November 8, 1994 the Florida electorate voted 2,876,091 to 1,135,110 in favor of proposed amendment #3 to the state constitution. The amendment effectively reallocated the state's nearshore fisheries to predominantly recreational "hook and line...

Grimes, Shepherd Russell

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The Origin, Evolution, and Demise of the U.S. Sea Turtle Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Origin, Evolution, and Demise of the U.S. Sea Turtle Fisheries W. N. WITZELL "While I gazed." Introduction Fishing was America's first industry, and turtling played an important role in the nation already developed spiritual and gastronomic relationships with sea turtles. There are indications

413

Fisheries Research 78 (2006) 309322 A Poisson and negative binomial regression model of sea turtle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fisheries Research 78 (2006) 309颅322 A Poisson and negative binomial regression model of sea turtle February 2005; received in revised form 28 November 2005; accepted 15 December 2005 Abstract Sea turtle measures, including a swordfish harvest ban, have been adopted to protect sea turtles. This study explores

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

414

A COMPARTMENTALIZED SIMULATION MODEL OF THE SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND YELLOWTAIL FLOUNDER, LlMANDA FERRUGINEA, FISHERY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARTMENTALIZED SIMULATION MODEL OF THE SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND YELLOWTAIL FLOUNDER, LlMANDA FERRUGINEA, FISHERY MICHAEL P. SISSENWINE' ABSTRACT A compartmentalized simulation model of the Southern New. The model shares many of the characteristics of Walters' (1969) "generalized computer simulation model

415

Food for Thought 21st century fisheries management: a spatio-temporally explicit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on biomass and mortality, expressed annually and across large management units. However, because fish be based on commercial stocks and ecosystem targets. Fishers could choose how to spend their RTIs, e of a particular fishery. Additionally, and in keeping with the fact that the paper is in the Food for Thought

Codling, Edward A.

416

Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fish Oil Research, 1920-87, in the National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA MAURICE E. STANSBY fatty acids (which occur almost exclusively in the oil of fish) may have beneficial effects in re ducing research has also been carried out by laboratories of this agency on other aspects of fish oils which have

417

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND AND RESIDUE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FISHERY WASTE EFFLUENTS: A METHOD TO DETERMINE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND effluents, especially for total suspended and settleable solids, and oil and grease. The relationship between chemical oxygen demand and residue was determined on a limited number of samples from four types

418

Measuring Benefits from a Marketing Cooperative in the Copper River Fishery Sunny L. Jardinea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of inferior-quality fish. Specifically, we use a difference-in-differences estimation strategy to measure, however, is the presence of market failures that lead to the production of inferior- quality fish rights in fisheries, which creates incentives for fishermen to engage in a race to fish and neglect

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

419

J. Northw. Atl. Fish. Sci., Vol. 22: 173-187 Competition Between Fisheries and Marine Mammals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

caught by marine mammals consisted of deep sea squids and very small deep sea fishes not harvestable and their relatively recent dependence on primary production, which may have led to what we call `food web competition production required to sustain the food web upon which the fisheries and the marine ' Present address

420

Microsoft Word - PI_NEPA-CX_KittitasCountyCEAcquisition.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2, 2010 2, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Sandra Fife Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) would provide funds to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) for the purchase of a conservation easement on 432.3 acres of the Hundley property for fish habitat mitigation in Kittitas County, Washington. BPA would hold a conservation easement on the property and the easement would be protected and co-managed by WDFW, the Yakama Nation's Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) and the Kittitas Conservation Trust (KCT). Budget Information: Work Order #00191727 Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1997-051-00, BPA-004607 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-59) (8/14/01)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

14, 2001 14, 2001 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0265/SA-59) David Byrnes Fish and Wildlife Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Reestablish Safe Access into Tributaries of the Yakima Subbasin, Tucker Creek Fish Passage Project Project No: 98-034-00 Watershed Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Watershed Management Program EIS): 1.15 Fish Passage Enhancement - Fishways/Screening, 1.16 Spawning Habitat Enhancements, 1.17 Rearing Habitat Enhancements, 1.5 Install Grade Control Structures and Check Dams. Location: Tucker Creek, Kittitas County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Yakama Nation Fisheries

422

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

423

Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Rulison 1970 Environmerstal Surveillance Summary Report J - - Colorado Department of Health DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. STATE OF COLORADO P R O J E C T R U L I S O N Environments 1 S u r v e i l l a n c e Summary R e p o r t C o l o r a d o D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h D i v i s i o n o f O c c u p a t i o n a l and R a d i o l o g i c a l 3 e a l t h This page intentionally left blank FOREWORD Project Rulison is an experimental Plowshare project undertaken cooperatively by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Department of Interior for the government, and Austral Oil Company and CER Geo- nuclear Corporation for private industry. As required by law, the AEC

424

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Microfabrication Project Proposal Form Principle Investigator: (Person responsible for project)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfabrication Project Proposal Form Principle Investigator: (Person responsible for project: ___________________________________ Department: _____________________ _________________ __ Phone Number: _________________________ Project Information: Project Title: ________________________________________________________________ Funding Agency

426

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS Revised - May 2013 Agricultural Research Center Washington State University #12;Table of Contents THE PROJECT SYSTEM, AN INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 5 DEVELOPING AN ARC PROJECT

Collins, Gary S.

427

Project 371  

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Brent Marquis Brent Marquis Project Manager Sensor Research and Development 17 Godfrey Dr. Orono, ME. 04473 207-866-0100 ext. 241 SEMI-CONDUCTOR METAL OXIDE TECHNOLOGY FOR IN SITU DETECTION OF COAL-FIRED COMBUSTION GASES Description Sensor Research and Development Corporation is developing a robust prototype sensor system for in situ, real-time detection, identification, and measurement of coal-fired combustion gases. The sensor system is comprised of several unique semi-conducting metal oxide (SMO) sensor arrays in tandem with novel gas prefiltration techniques. The sensor array will be able to selectively detect and measure nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), and ammonia (NH 3 ). The SMO sensor array is the heart of the combustion gas analyzer being developed

428

Project Title  

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Ketzin Collaboration Ketzin Collaboration ESD-09-056 Barry Freifeld Earth Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Goals and objectives * Success Criteria * Technical Status * Latest developments in Integrated Monitoring * Summary and Lessons Learned 3 Image from: www.co2ketzin.de 4 Benefit to the Program * Program goal being addressed: - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent of injected CO 2 remains in the injection zones. * The Ketzin collaboration leverages information gained through the mid-scale geological sequestration experiment in Ketzin, Germany.

429

Project 298  

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Reaction Engineering Reaction Engineering International Salt Lake City, UT www.reaction-eng.com CONTACTS Bruce W. Lani Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 412-386-5819 bruce.lani@netl.doe.gov Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 412-386-6134 thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov Michael Bockelie Reaction Engineering International 801-364-69255 bockelie@reaction-eng.com WEBSITE http://www.netl.doe.gov NO X CONTROL OPTIONS AND INTEGRATION FOR U.S. COAL FIRED BOILERS (RICH REAGENT INJECTION) Background Enacted regulations pertaining to the NO X SIP Call and potential future regulations in proposed legislation such as the President's Clear Skies Act or EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule require power producers to seek the most cost effective methods to achieve compliance. In order to address present and

430

Project 398  

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6 6 Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Gary J. Stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Ronald Breault Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4486 ronald.breault@netl.doe.gov Michael Swanson Principal Investigator University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center 15 North 23rd Street P.O. Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202 701-777-5239 mswanson@eerc.und.nodak.edu ADVANCED HIGH TEMPERATURE, HIGH-PRESSURE TRANSPORT REACTOR Description Today, coal supplies over 55 percent of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being

431

Project Title  

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Jennifer A. Kozak, Jennifer A. Kozak, 1,2 Dr. Fritz Simeon, 2 Prof. T. Alan Hatton,* ,2 and Prof. Timothy F. Jamison* ,1 1 Department of Chemistry and 2 Department of Chemical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Motivation, Goals, Objectives * Background * Cyclic Carbonate Synthesis via Catalytic Coupling of CO 2 and Epoxides * New Catalysts and Reaction Scope * Mechanism - A New Paradigm for Activating Epoxides * Conclusions 3 Benefit to the Program * Identify the Program goals being addressed. - Develop technologies to demonstrate that 99 percent

432

Project Title  

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Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready 14 C Isotopic Analyzer DEFE 0001116 Bruno D.V. Marino PhD CEO, Founder Planetary Emissions Management, Inc. 485 Massachusetts Ave. Cambridge, MA 02139 bruno.marino@pem-carbon.com www.pem-carbon.com U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 Benefits of a 14 CO 2 Field Analyzer to DOE MVA Program Goals Program Goals: 飩99% Containment 飩dentify/Quantify 飩CS Credits Direct Tracking Verification Tight/Leaky Account for Natural Baseline MVA Atmosphere MVA Groundwater Ecosystem Health, Community Safety

433

Project 339  

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Combustion Combustion Technologies CONTACTS Robert R. Romanosky Advanced Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Jenny Tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 jenny.tennant@netl.doe.gov Dr. Tomasz Wiltowski Southern Illinios University Dept. of Mechanical Engineering & Energy Processes Carbondale, IL 62901-4709 618-536-5521 tomek@siu.edu QUALIFICATIONS OF CANDLE FILTERS FOR COMBINED CYCLE COMBUSTION APPLICATIONS Background In order to make oxygen-fired combined cycle combustion feasible, it is necessary to have a reliable high temperature particulate cleanup system. It is well established

434

Project 350  

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Gas Hydrates Gas Hydrates CONTACTS Ray Boswell Acting Technology Manager Gas Technology Management Division 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov James Ammer Director Gas Technology Management Division 304-285-4383 james.ammer@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Project Manager Gas Technology Management Division 304-285-4157 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov Joseph Wilder Research Group Leader Simulation, Analysis and Computational Science Division 304-285-0989 joseph.wilder@netl.doe.gov NETL - DIRECTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF WORLD-CLASS GAS HYDRATE RESERVOIR SIMULATORS Development of reliable simulators that accurately predict the behavior methane hydrates in nature is a critical component of NETL's program to appraise the gas supply potential of hydrates. NETL is leading the development of a suite of modeling tools that are providing

435

Project Title  

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Building the Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Introduction * Organization * Benefit to Program * Project Overview * Technical Status * Accomplishments to Date * Summary * Appendix Introduction * Most storage modeling studies involve a caprock/reservoir interface, and assume a discrete contact with simple (uniform) flow conditions. * We address the question of whether or not heterogeneities at the interface influence transmission of CO 2 into the caprock 3 Introduction The nature of reservoir/caprock interfaces 4 Triassic-Jurassic Strata, San Rafael Swell, UT Organization 5 Peter Mozley (PD/PI) NMT Sedimentology James Evans (Co-PI) USU Structure Thomas Dewers (Co-I) Jason Heath (Staff) SNL Modeling Mark Person

436

Project Title  

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Verification and Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready 14 C Isotopic Analyzer CCS Public Outreach: Pathway to Tradable CCS Securities DEFE 0001116 Bruno D.V. Marino PhD CEO, Founder Planetary Emissions Management, Inc. One Broadway, 14 th Floor Cambridge, MA 02142 bruno.marino@pem-carbon.com www.pem-carbon.com U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 20-22, 2013 All RIGHTS RESERVED 漏 Benefits: Public Outreach CCS-MVA LINKED TRADABLE SECURITY Increase Public Confidence in CCS Increase Public involvement in CCS "Leakage Rate" Product Distinct from GHG "Credits"

437

PROJECT TITLE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Richmond Richmond PROJECT TITLE: EECBG - Solar Compactors and Recycling Units Page 1 of2 STATE: VA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000013 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000878 NEPA Control Number cm Number GFO-0000878-003 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners, consultants, designers), organizations (such as utilities), and state

438

Project 370  

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crshadd@sandia.gov crshadd@sandia.gov O 2 /CO 2 RECYCLE COAL COMBUSTION TO MINIMIZE POLLUTANTS Description O 2 /CO 2 recycle coal combustion is a promising, retrofittable technique for electric power production, while producing a nearly pure stream of CO 2 for subsequent use or sequestration. Most pollutant emissions, including NO x , are lower in this process, compared to conventional pulverized coal combustion. However, laboratory and pilot-scale tests to date have shown a wide variation in the fractional reduction of NO x when adopting this technology, suggesting that further improvements in NO x reduction are possible, given a better understanding of the dominant routes of NO x production and destruction in these systems. Goals The goal of this project is to determine the relative influence of three different

439

Project 346  

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Sara Pletcher Sara Pletcher Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-385-4236 sara.pletcher@netl.doe.gov Gary M. Blythe URS Corporation PO Box 201088 Austin, TX 78720 512-419-5321 gary_blythe@urscorp.com BENCH SCALE KINETICS OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN FGD LIQUORS Background When research into the measurement and control of Hg emissions from coal-fired power plants began in earnest in the early 1990s, it was observed that oxidized mercury can be scrubbed at high efficiency in wet FGD systems, while elemental mercury cannot. In many cases, elemental mercury concentrations were observed to increase slightly across wet FGD systems, but this was typically regarded as within the variability of the measurement methods. However, later measurements have

440

Project 261  

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NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR ADVANCED NOVEL CORROSION SENSOR FOR ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY POWER SYSTEMS Description The overall objective of this proposed project is to develop a new technology for on-line corrosion monitoring based on an innovative concept. The specific objectives and corresponding tasks are (1) develop the sensor and electronic measurement system; (2) evaluate and improve the system in a laboratory muffle furnace; and (3) evaluate and improve the system through tests conducted in a pilot-scale coal combustor (~1 MW). Fireside corrosion refers to the metal loss caused by chemical reactions on surfaces exposed to the combustion environment. Such corrosion is the leading mechanism for boiler tube failures and is a serious concern for current and future energy plants due to the introduction of technologies targeting emissions

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441

Project 278  

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Karen Cohen Karen Cohen Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-6667 karen.cohen@netl.doe.gov Ken Nemeth Executive Director Southern States Energy Board 6325 Amherst Court Norcross, GA 30092 770-242-7712 nemeth@sseb.org Sequestration SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (SECARB) Background The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the seven partnerships of state agencies, universities, and private companies that will form the core of a nationwide network that will help determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. All together, the partnerships include more than 240 organizations, spanning 40 states, three Indian nations, and

442

FLUXNET Project  

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Validation > FLUXNET Validation > FLUXNET The FLUXNET Project Overview [FLUXNET Logo] FLUXNET is a global network of micrometeorological tower sites that use eddy covariance methods to measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. More that 500 tower sites from about 30 regional networks across five continents are currently operating on a long-term basis. The overarching goal of FLUXNET is to provide information for validating remote sensing products for net primary productivity (npp), evaporation, and energy absorption. FLUXNET provides information to FLUXNET investigators and to the public. The primary functions of FLUXNET are: To provide information about tower location, site characteristics, data availability, and where to obtain the data

443

Project 296  

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McDermott Technology McDermott Technology Alliance, OH www.mcdermott.com CONTACTS Bruce W. Lani Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 412-386-5819 bruce.lani@netl.doe.gov Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 412-386-6134 thomas.feeley@netl.doe.gov Hamid Farzan Babcock & Wilcox Company 330-860-6628 HFarzan@babcock.com WEBSITE http://www.netl.doe.gov NO X CONTROL FOR UTILITY BOILER OTR COMPLIANCE Background Enacted regulations pertaining to the NO X SIP Call and potential future regulations in proposed legislation such as the President's Clear Skies Act or EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule require power producers to seek the most cost effective methods to achieve compliance. In order to address present and anticipated NO X emissions control legislation targeting the current fleet of U.S. coal-fired boilers, the Department

444

Project 253  

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Anna Lee Tonkovich Anna Lee Tonkovich Technical Contact Velocys, Inc. 7950 Corporate Blvd. Plain City, OH 43064 614-733-3330 tonkovich@velocys.com Sequestration UPGRADING METHANE STREAMS WITH ULTRA-FAST TSA Background Most natural gas streams are contaminated with other materials, such as hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and nitrogen. Effective processes for removal of H 2 S and CO 2 exist, but because of its relative inertness, nitrogen removal is more difficult and expensive. This project will focus on the separation of nitrogen from methane, which is one of the most significant challenges in recovering low-purity methane streams. The approach is based on applying Velocys' modular microchannel process technology (MPT) to achieve ultra-fast thermal swing adsorption (TSA). MPT

445

Project 397  

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6 6 Gasification Technologies CONTACTS Gary J. Stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov John Stipanovich Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-6027 john.stipanovich@netl.doe.gov Derek Aldred Principal Investigator Stamet, Inc. 8210 Lankershim Blvd. #9 North Hollywood, CA 91605 818-768-1025 dlaldred@stametinc.com CONTINUOUS PRESSURE INJECTION OF SOLID FUELS INTO ADVANCED COMBUSTION SYSTEM PRESSURES Description Operators and designers of high-pressure combustion systems universally agree that one of the major problems inhibiting the success of this technology relates to solid

446

Project 303  

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CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF OXYGEN-BASED CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF OXYGEN-BASED PC BOILER Background Because of growing concern that a link exists between global climatic change and emission of greenhouse gases, such as CO 2 , it is prudent to develop new coal combustion technologies to meet future emissions standards, should it become necessary to limit CO 2 emissions to the atmosphere. New technology is needed to ensure that the U.S. can continue to generate power from its abundant domestic coal resources. This project will design an optimized combustion furnace to produce a low-cost, high-efficiency power plant that supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) goal of developing advanced combustion systems that have the potential to control CO 2 through an integrated power system that produces a concentrated

447

Project Title  

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Geologic Geologic Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of Southeastern New York and Northern New Jersey (DE-FE0002352) Daniel J. Collins, PG, RG Sandia Technologies, LLC U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Infrastructure for CCS August 20-22, 2013 * Acknowledgment: This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy [National Energy Technology Laboratory] under Award Number DE- FE0002352, Contract No. 18131 from the New York State Energy Research & Development Authority [NYSERDA], and "In Kind" Cost Share from Schlumberger Carbon Services, Weatherford Laboratories, National Oilwell Varco, New York State Museum, and Rutgers University.

448

Project 143  

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George Rizeq George Rizeq Principal Investigator GE Global Research 18A Mason Irvine, CA 92618 949-330-8973 rizeq@research.ge.com FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CARBON DIOXIDE Description Projections of increased demands for energy worldwide, coupled with increasing environmental concerns have given rise to the need for new and innovative technologies for coal-based energy plants. Incremental improvements in existing plants will likely fall short of meeting future capacity and environmental needs economically. Thus, the implementation of new technologies at large scale is vital. In order to prepare for this inevitable paradigm shift, it is necessary to have viable alternatives that have been proven both theoretically and experimentally

449

Project 270  

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SILICON CARBIDE MICRO-DEVICES FOR SILICON CARBIDE MICRO-DEVICES FOR COMBUSTION GAS SENSING UNDER HARSH CONDITIONS Description Reducing pollution and improving energy efficiency require sensitive, rugged sensors that can quantitatively detect gases that are produced in advanced combustion systems. Most materials cannot withstand the high temperature, chemically reactive environments encountered in power plants. This project is focused on developing solid state sensors based on the wide bandgap semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC), which can tolerate high temperatures and pressures as well as corrosive gases. Drawing upon the tools of semiconductor physics, surface science and chemistry, at the level of individual atoms and molecules, an understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms leading to

450

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 1 July 2011 Doc. No. S07978 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2011 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented April through June 2011 and provides a schedule for near-term activities at the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) site and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) located in and near Monticello, Utah. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986, respectively. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented remedial actions at the MVP in 1986 and at the MMTS in 1989, to conform to requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability

451

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FFA Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2009 FFA Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2009 July 2009 Doc. No. S05572 Page 1 Monticello National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: April 1-June 30, 2009 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented April through June 2009, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) sites. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status 1.1 Disposal Cell and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspections of the repository identified livestock damage to a

452

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

31, 2011 31, 2011 April 2011 Doc. No. S07666 Page 1 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: January 1-March 31, 2011 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented January through March 2011 and provides a schedule for near-term activities at the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) site and the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) located in and near Monticello, Utah. The MMTS and MVP were placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) in 1989 and 1986, respectively. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) implemented remedial actions at the MVP in 1986 and at the MMTS in 1989, to conform to requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability

453

Project 320  

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Philip Goldberg Philip Goldberg Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-5806 philip.goldberg@netl.doe.gov Marek Wojtowicz Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. 87 Church Street East Hartford, CT 06108 860-528-9806 marek@AFRinc.com Sequestration CARBON DIOXIDE RECOVERY FROM COMBUSTION FLUE GAS USING CARBON- SUPPORTED AMINE SORBENTS Background In Phase I, Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. will initiate development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from combustion/incineration flue gas. The sorbent, based on amines supported on low-cost activated carbon, will be produced from scrap tires. Liquid-based amine systems are limited to relatively low concentrations to avoid corrosion. Corrosion should not be a

454

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RISK ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF RISK ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF STORED CO 2 IN ORGANIC ROCKS UNDER NON- EQUILIBRIUM CONDITIONS DOE (NETL) Award Number: DE-FE0002423 Investigator: Vivak (Vik) Malhotra DOE supported undergraduate student participants: Jacob Huffstutler, Ryan Belscamper, Stephen Hofer, Kyle Flannery,, Bradley Wilson, Jamie Pfister, Jeffrey Pieper, Joshua T. Thompson, Collier Scalzitti-Sanders, and Shaun Wolfe Southern Illinois University-Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois 62901-4401 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Carbon Storage Program * Program goals being addressed: - To attempt to answer whether CO

455

Project Status  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hybrid Generation Simulator Hybrid Generation Simulator HybSim漏 1.0 DAVID TRUJILLO SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORY Presented by Joshua Bartlett - University of Michigan Introduction * HybSim漏 1.0 copyrighted 2006 * First license to University of Michigan Introduction HybSim漏 Model What - "Hybrid Simulator"; Tool designed to evaluate the economic and environmental benefits of adding renewable energy to the fossil fuel generation mix in remote and difficult-accessible locations. Why - Benefits of energy storage, decision analysis, risk analysis, load growth issues, load management, economic analysis, planning (what-ifs) Who - Availability to coops, field techs, project managers, administrative personnel Where - Remote villages, military installations, remote industrial systems; any climate

456

PROJECT TITLE:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Baltimore Baltimore PROJECT TITLE: EECBG - GHG Scrubbing System Page 1 of2 STATE: MD Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-EE0000738 GFO-0000738-002 0 Based all my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: All Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

457

Project 328  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 CONTACTS Gary J. Stiegel Gasification Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4499 gary.stiegel@netl.doe.gov Jenny Tennant Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4830 Jenny.Tennant@netl.doe.gov Gasification Technologies Conceptual drawing of Rocketdyne's gasification system ADVANCED GASIFICATION SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT Description Rocketdyne will apply rocket engine technology to gasifier design, allowing for a paradigm shift in gasifier function, resulting in significant improvements in capital and maintenance costs. Its new gasifier will be an oxygen-blown, dry-feed, plug-flow entrained reactor able to achieve carbon conversions of nearly 100 percent by rapidly heating low coal particles

458

Project 199  

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Heino Beckert Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov Ramin Yazdani Senior Civil Engineer Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department 292 West Beamer Street Woodland, CA 95695 530-666-8848 ryazdani@yolocounty.org Sequestration Yolo County Landfill Methane Production Compared to Other Landfills FULL-SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL Background Sanitary landfilling is the dominant method of solid waste disposal in the United States, accounting for the disposal of about 217 million tons of waste annually (U.S. EPA, 1997). The annual production of municipal waste in the United States has more than doubled since 1960. In spite of increasing rates of reuse and recycling, population and

459

Project 258  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING MONITORING POWER PLANT EFFICIENCY USING THE MICROWAVE-EXCITED PHOTOACOUSTIC EFFECT TO MEASURE UNBURNED CARBON Objective The objective of this project is to explore the use of the microwave-excited photoacoustic (MEPA) effect for quantitative analysis of unburned carbon in fly ash, an extremely important parameter to the electric utility industry. Specific objectives include: * Determine factors that influence accuracy and precision of the MEPA effect; * Evaluate the microwave spectra of fly ash and other divided solids of importance to the power industry; and * Determine the feasibility of an on-line carbon-in-ash monitor based on the MEPA effect. Benefits High carbon levels in coal ash indicate poor combustion efficiency, resulting in additional fuel requirements and higher emissions of pollutants, such as acid-rain

460

Project311  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lang Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov John Bowser Principal Investigator Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. 325 Water Street Wilmington, DE 19804 302-999-7996 john.bowser@compactmembrane.com Sequestration CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM LARGE POINT SOURCES Background Capture of carbon dioxide at the source of its emission has been a major focus in greenhouse gas emission control. Current technologies used for capturing CO 2 suffer from inefficient mass transfer and economics. In Phase I, Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. will fabricate and test a membrane-based absorption system for the removal of carbon dioxide from a simulated power-plant flue gas. The stability of the membrane system under various operating conditions

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

MONTICELLO PROJECTS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

09 09 January 2010 Doc. No. S06172 Page 1 1.3 Peripheral Properties (Private and City-Owned) * No land use or supplemental standards compliance issues were observed or reported by LTSM on-site staff. Monticello National Priorities List Sites Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: October 1-December 31, 2009 This report summarizes project status and activities implemented October through December 2009, and provides a schedule of near-term activities for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) sites. This report also includes disposal cell and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection reports, site meteorological data, and a performance summary for the ex situ groundwater treatment system.

462

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water-Rock Interactions Water-Rock Interactions and the Integrity of Hydrodynamic Seals FWP FE-10-001 Bill Carey Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Benefit to the Program * Program Goal: Ensure retention of 99% of injected CO 2 * Focus: Wellbore integrity * Approach: Use field, experimental and computational methods - Determine long-term compatibility of wellbore materials with CO 2 - Determine leakage mechanisms - Predict well performance * Benefit: The research will provide a basis for evaluating the long-term performance of wells, guide remediation

463

Project 333  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jos茅 D. Figueroa Jos茅 D. Figueroa Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov C. Jeffrey Brinker Sandia Fellow, Sandia National Laboratories Professor of Chemical & Nuclear Engineering The University of New Mexico Advanced Materials Laboratory 1001 University Blvd. SE, Suite 100 Albuquerque, NM 87106 505-272-7627 cjbrink@sandia.gov Sequestration NOVEL DUAL FUNCTIONAL MEMBRANE FOR CONTROLLING CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUELED POWER PLANTS Background There is growing concern among climate scientists that the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG), particularly carbon dioxide, in the atmosphere is affecting the global climate in ways that could have serious consequences. One approach to reducing GHG emissions

464

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

漏 2012 Paulsson, Inc. (PI) Development of a 1,000 Level 3C Fiber Optic Borehole Seismic Receiver Array Applied to Carbon Sequestration DE-FE0004522 Bj枚rn N.P. Paulsson Paulsson, Inc. U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 庐 漏 2012 Paulsson, Inc. (PI) 漏 2012 Paulsson, Inc. (PI) * Goals: Design, build, and test a high performance borehole seismic receiver system to allow cost effective geologic Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) * Objectives: A: Develop technology to allow deployment of a 1,000 level drill pipe deployed 3C Fiber Optic Geophone (FOG) receiver array for deep

465

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Space Geodesy and Geochemistry Applied to Monitoring and Verification of Carbon Capture and Storage Award # DE-FE0002184 Peter Swart University of Miami Tim Dixon University of South Florida U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * What is the Award For? * What Research Work is being Supported? * Geochemical Research What is the Award For? * Provides Support for the Training of Two Graduate Students - Student 1: Involved in analysis of SAR images - Student 2: Involved in modeling of sub-surface geochemistry and application of models for policy decisions

466

Project Title  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fluid-driven fracture fluid-driven fracture DE-FE0002020 Joseph F. Labuz Civil Engineering University of Minnesota U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 2 Presentation Outline * Benefits statement * Goal, objectives * Technical status: fracture code, experimental results (poro, AE) * Accomplishments * Summary 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 Lateral displacement [mm] Load [kN] 0 300 600 900 1200 1500 AE events inelastic deformation peak 3 Benefit to the Program * Goal: develop technologies to predict CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations. * Benefits statement: develop 3D boundary element code & experimental techniques

467

Project Management Lessons Learned  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The guide supports DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, and aids the federal project directors and integrated project teams in the execution of projects.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

468

Proposed Amendment Text for Amendment 85 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Gulf of Alaska  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or on the harvest of 90 percent of the participant's cooperative allocation, if the harvest of the allocation began that elect to remain in the fishery. #12;Rbaker G:\\FMGROUP\\Amendment 85 (GOA) Rockfish July stand down

469

The Use and Abuse of Environmental Knowledge: A Bloomington School Interpretation of the Canadian Fisheries Act of 1868  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper will focus on the ambitious plan for regulation embodied in the Dominion Fisheries Act of 1868, a law passed by the Canadian federal parliament in its very first year of existence. The 1868 law was ...

Andrew David Allan Smith

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Fishery and Ontogenetic Driven Changes in the Diet of the Spiny Dogfish, Squalus acanthias, in Patagonian Waters, Argentina  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diet of the spiny dogfish in northern and central Patagonian waters was studied from the by-catch of the bottom trawling fisheries directed to Argentine hake Merluccius hubbsi and Argentine red shrimp Pleotic...

Mariano Koen Alonso; Enrique Alberto Crespo

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Bite performance and feeding kinematics in loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) within the context of longline fishery interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feeding biomechanics and foraging behavior are likely contributors to loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) bycatch in the pelagic longline fishery. To investigate these contributions, loggerhead bite performance was measured in several size...

Guzman, Alejandra

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

The Mutton Snapper (Lutjanus analis) Spawning Aggregation Fishery at Gladden Spit, Belize: Inter-annual and Within-season Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................................. 33 2.5. Summary ................................................................................................ 40 CHAPTER III WITHIN-SEASON DYNAMICS OF THE MUTTON SNAPPER (Lutjanus analis) SPAWNING AGGREGATION FISHERY AT GLADDEN SPIT... ............................................................................. 45 3.3. Results .................................................................................................... 54 3.4. Discussion .............................................................................................. 60 3.5. Summary...

Granados-Dieseldorff, Pablo

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

473

Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Western Interconnection Synchrophasor Project Resources & Links Demand Response Energy Efficiency Emerging Technologies Synchrophasor measurements are a type of...

474

Windy Gap Firming Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Windy Gap Firming Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOEEIS-0370 (cooperating agency) Western's proposed...

475

Project Title Project Sponsor (funding agency)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and procedures applicable to the above project; and we confirm that the PI is eligible to apply in accordance Project Title Project Sponsor (funding agency) Declaration of Principal Investigator (PI) I certify that: I agree that my participation in the project must be in accordance with all

Saskatchewan, University of

476

Livingston Solar Canopy Project The Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livingston Solar Canopy Project The Project: This project entails the installation of more than 40,000 high efficiency solar panels on canopy structures over two major surface parking areas. In conjunction with the existing 1.4 megawatt solar energy facility on this campus, this project will generate

Delgado, Mauricio

477

Chopwell Wood Health Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chopwell Wood Health Project An innovative project of school visits and General Practitioner. The project took place at Chopwell Wood a 360 hectare mixed woodland managed by the Forestry Commission to carry on being involved in the project. Next stage of the project Although the project leader has now

478

Occurrence, movements, and behavior of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in association with the shrimp fishery in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was to examine bottienose dolphin associations with shrimp fishing in Galveston Bay. The shrimping industry is one of the most important fisheries in the United States. In 1991, the Texas shrimp industry's landings were among the lop five shrimp harvests...OCCURRENCE, MOVEMENTS, AND BEHAVIOR OF BOTTLENOSE DOLPHINS (TURSIOPS TRUNCATUS) IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE SHRIMP FISHERY IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by DAGMAR CATHERINE FERTL Submitted to the office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Fertl, Dagmar Catherine

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of Kerr Dam operations on the fisheries of the Lower Flathead System. Supported by Bonneville Power Administration funding, and conducted by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, the study began in December of 1982 and is scheduled for completion in December of 1987. This report covers the 1983-84 field season and includes the status of target fish species populations in the Flathead River and tributaries, and initial work in South Bay of Flathead Lake. Additionally it addresses how Kerr operations may effect the reproduction of salmonids and northern pike. Combined trout population estimates for rainbow, brown, brook, and bull trout, averaged 13 fish/km of the lower Flathead River. The number of bull trout and cutthroat trout captured was so low that estimation of their individual populations was not possible. An interim closure to trout harvest on the lower Flathead River was recommended and approved by the Tribal Council until study results can be further analyzed and management options reviewed. Population estimates for northern pike ranged from six/kilometer in poorer habitat, to one hundred three/km in the best habitat in the main Flathead River. Seven pike were radio tagged and their movements monitored. Movements of over 89 km were recorded. One fish left the Flathead River and moved down the Clark Fork to the Plains area. Fish weirs were constructed on the Jocko River and Mission Creek to assess spawning runs of trout from the main river. Thirty-two adult rainbow passed the Jocko weir and twenty-eight passed the Mission weir during the spring spawning season. Twenty adult brown trout were captured at the Jocko weir and five at Mission weir in the fall. The Jocko weir suffered minor damage due to bed load movement during high flows of spring runoff. The structure of trout populations in the lower Flathead River points to spawning and recruitment problems caused by hydroelectric operations and sedimentation. Among the consequences of the present operational regime are constant, rapid changes in river discharge during spawning and Incubation seasons of trout species present in the lower river. Hamilton and Buell (1976) reported that similar fluctuation might exceed tolerance limits of adults and inhibit spawning behavior, dewater redds, strand fry, and displace juveniles to habitats less suitable for survival. Similar problems are felt to exist on the lower river. Constant fluctuations over backwater vegetation have been linked to major problems in successful northern pike spawning and recruitment by preventing access to spawning sites, and dewatering eggs and attached fry. Phase I of the South Bay investigation was completed this year resulting in a detailed study program for the next three years. Dominant habitat types were mapped, and physical habitat and biological monitoring methods were evaluated and selected. Permanent habitat transects, water quality stations, fish sampling, gillnetting, seining, and trapping sites were established.

Darling, James E.; Pajak, Paul; Wunderlich, Mary P.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Sustainability Project Fund Application Form Requirements Project Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Project Fund Application Form Requirements Project Title: Budget Requested: Applicant/Project Leader: Faculty/Department: Email: Daytime Phone: Project Team: (Please include. Project Overview Project summary: 路 Provide a brief background, describing the project, objectives

Volesky, Bohumil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "yakima fisheries project" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Report on an internship at the International Development and Services Division of the National Marine Fisheries Service, Washington, D.C.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Office of International Fisheries, for it actually participates in resource development rather than simply monitoring an industry from a commercial perspective. This division was primarily created as a technical and management support group... assistance. As mentioned, the United States has not stressed fisheries external assistance. The BIFAD presentation attempted to re-prioritize fisheries as an integral food yielding industry in LDC'S. Through information derived from conversations...

Vergara, Victor Manuel

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MANAGEMENT PLANS MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans 飩 Overview 飩 Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects 飩 Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing of Project Planning Elements 飩 Elements of Deactivation Project Planning 飩 Examples From Project Management Plans Overview The purpose here is to assist project managers and project planners in creating a project plan by providing examples and pointing to information that have been successfully used by others in the past. Section 4.2 of DOE Guide 430.1-3, DEACTIVATION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE discusses the content and purpose of deactivation project management plans. It is presented as a suggested outline followed by other potential subjects. For the convenience of readers, that information is repeated below.

483

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

71 - 31080 of 31,917 results. 71 - 31080 of 31,917 results. Download EIS-0169-SA-04: Supplement Analysis Yakima Fisheries Project-Construction/modification upgrades to the Prosser Hatchery and the Marion Drain Hatchery Facilities http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0169-sa-04-supplement-analysis Download EIS-0355: Amended Record of Decision Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, UT http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0355-amended-record-decision Download EIS-0358: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of the Proposed Wellton-Mohawk Generating Facility, Yuma County, Arizona http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0358-notice-intent-prepare-environmental-impact-statement Download UMore Park Wind Turbine Project Loggerhead Shrike Survey,

484

Supplement Analyses (SA) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 2, 2003 October 2, 2003 EA-0307-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Colville Resident Trout Hatchery Project Supplement Analysis August 27, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-35: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon, Malheur County August 22, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-34: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana July 14, 2003 EIS-1069-SA-07: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Kilickitat Fisheries Project, Noxious Weed Control at Cle Elum and Jack Creek, Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility and Jack Creek Acclimation Site, Kittitas County, Washington May 21, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana May 20, 2003 EIS-0246-SA-32: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program

485

Microsoft Word - Spring-Chinook_CX_6.28.11.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 21, 2011 July 21, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Patricia Smith Project Manager - KEWL-4 Proposed Action: Small-scale spring Chinook and coho reintroduction Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 1995-063-25 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.20 Small-scale activities undertaken to protect, restore, or improve fish and wildlife habitat, fish passage facilities (such as fish ladders or minor diversion channels), or fisheries. Location: Cle Elum, Yakima County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to allow the use of excess Cle Elum Hatchery supplementation line (S-line) spring Chinook adults and coho adults in a reintroduction

486

Washington | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 5, 2002 September 5, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-107: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program September 2, 2002 EIS-0169-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project, Cle Elum, Kittitas County, Washington August 30, 2002 EIS-0332: Final Environmental Impact Statement McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project August 29, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-99: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement - Olympia-Grand Coulee No.1 August 22, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-105: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 21, 2002 EIS-0285-SA-104: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program August 1, 2002 EIS-0344: Draft Envrionmental Impact Statement

487

California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations: Reports. Volume 36, January 1 to December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI) performs research in the area of sampling physical, chemical, and biological variables in the California Current. The information received is stored in databases and gives a better understanding of the physics and chemistry of the California Current. Their effect on the food chain make it possible to view current oceanographic and biological conditions in the context of the long term. Measurements taken during 1994 and early 1995 on CalCOFI cruises have indicated a return to normal conditions after anomalous conditions that dominated the two preceding years. The data have permitted an increasingly prompt assessment of the state of the California Current system off southern California. This report also contains papers presented at the CalCOFI conference in 1994 regarding the 1991--92 El Nino and its impact on fisheries. In addition, individual scientific contributions are included which provide an additional understanding of the processes involved in the California Current.

Olfe, J. [ed.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Can MPAs Sustain Scallop Fisheries? Bryce Beukers-Stewart, Jo Beukers-Stewart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Erin Closed Area 9 TIMES HIGHER! Biomass (2006) 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 51-60 61-70 71-80 81 of marine protected areas to improve fisheries sustainability Closed Area #12;Scallop Recovery in Port Erin Closed Area Density (1989-2006) 0 5 10 15 20 25 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 Density

Marchant, Rob

489

Project Sponsor Professor Peter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Sponsor Professor Peter McGearoge Project Director Nicki Matthew Audit / Quality Mazars Architect IT ServicesProcess Owners Build Team Lead Nicki Matthew Project Manager 颅 Unit4 Joe Cairney Student Lifecycle Project Board InfrastructureDBA's TBC TBC TBC Process 1 Process 2 Project Sponsor 颅 Unit

Levi, Ran

490

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Structure Elke Karrenberg Project Manager, Head of Personnel Development Phone +49 6131 39-20634 Dr. Jana Leipold Project Staff, Personnel Development Consultant Phone +49 6131 39-25433 Antje Swietlik Project Staff Phone +49 6