National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for y-1 balls bran

  1. Biomass Rapid Analysis Network (BRAN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01

    Helping the emerging biotechnology industry develop new tools and methods for real-time analysis of biomass feedstocks, process intermediates and The Biomass Rapid Analysis Network is designed to fast track the development of modern tools and methods for biomass analysis to accelerate the development of the emerging industry. The network will be led by industry and organized and coordinated through the National Renewable Energy Lab. The network will provide training and other activities of interest to BRAN members. BRAN members will share the cost and work of rapid analysis method development, validate the new methods, and work together to develop the training for the future biomass conversion workforce.

  2. Brans-Dicke cylindrical wormholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Simeone, Claudio

    2010-10-15

    Static axisymmetric thin-shell wormholes are constructed within the framework of the Brans-Dicke scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Examples of wormholes associated with vacuum and electromagnetic fields are studied. All constructions must be threaded by exotic matter, except in the case of geometries with a singularity of finite radius, associated with an electric field, which can have a throat supported by ordinary matter. These results are achieved with any of the two definitions of the flare-out condition considered.

  3. Ball valve extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herndon, Charles; Brown, Roger A.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and process for removing a ball valve is provided. The ball valve removal tool provides a handle sliding along the length of a shaft. One end of the shaft is secured within an interior cavity of a ball valve while the opposite end of the shaft defines a stop member. By providing a manual sliding force to the handle, the handle impacts the stop member and transmits the force to the ball valve. The direction of the force is along the shaft of the removal tool and disengages the ball valve from the ball valve housing.

  4. Ping Pong Ball Anemometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Speed (mph) Angle of Ping-Pong Ball () Create a Scatter Plot of Power vs. Angle below: Analysis: 1) Draw a line of best fit. 2) Find the y-intercept. 3) Pick...

  5. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Roy A.; von Holle, William G.

    1983-01-01

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300.mu. seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture.

  6. Detonator-activated ball shutter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McWilliams, R.A.; Holle, W.G. von.

    1983-08-16

    A detonator-activated ball shutter for closing an aperture in about 300[mu] seconds. The ball shutter containing an aperture through which light, etc., passes, is closed by firing a detonator which propels a projectile for rotating the ball shutter, thereby blocking passage through the aperture. 3 figs.

  7. Inflation and dark energy from the Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artymowski, Michał; Lalak, Zygmunt; Lewicki, Marek

    2015-06-17

    We consider the Brans-Dicke theory motivated by the f(R)=R+αR{sup n}−βR{sup 2−n} model to obtain a stable minimum of the Einstein frame scalar potential of the Brans-Dicke field. As a result we have obtained an inflationary scalar potential with non-zero value of residual vacuum energy, which may be a source of dark energy. In addition we discuss the probability of quantum tunnelling from the minimum of the potential. Our results can be easily consistent with PLANCK or BICEP2 data for appropriate choices of the value of n and ω.

  8. BaroBall - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BaroBall Control Valve with Volume Flow Measurement Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology BaroBall control valve BaroBall control valve Technology Marketing SummaryBarometric pumping is a remediation technique that removes volatile contaminants from soil in the vadose zone, above the water table. The BaroBall control valve increases the efficiency of barometric pumping and allows natural soil gas to flow out of an underground well, while restricting air flow from

  9. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, A.L.; Pasieka, D.F.

    1983-11-15

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball. 6 figs.

  10. Ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauler, Allen L. (Los Alamos, NM); Pasieka, Donald F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01

    A ball mounting fixture for a roundness gage is disclosed. The fixture includes a pair of chuck assemblies oriented substantially transversely with respect to one another and mounted on a common base. Each chuck assembly preferably includes a rotary stage and a wobble plate affixed thereto. A ball chuck affixed to each wobble plate is operable to selectively support a ball to be measured for roundness, with the wobble plate permitting the ball chuck to be tilted to center the ball on the axis of rotation of the rotary stage. In a preferred embodiment, each chuck assembly includes a vacuum chuck operable to selectively support the ball to be measured for roundness. The mounting fixture enables a series of roundness measurements to be taken with a conventional rotating gagehead roundness instrument, which measurements can be utilized to determine the sphericity of the ball.

  11. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felde, David K.; McKoon, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  12. Ball feeder for replenishing evaporator feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felde, D.K.; McKoon, R.H.

    1993-03-23

    Vapor source material such as uranium, which is to be dropped into a melt in an evaporator, is made into many balls of identical diameters and placed inside a container. An elongated sloping pipe is connected to the container and leads to the evaporator such that these balls can travel sequentially therealong by gravity. A metering valve in this pipe for passing these balls one at a time is opened in response to a signal when it is ascertained by a detector that there is a ball ready to be passed. A gate in the pipe near the evaporator momentarily stops the motion of the traveling ball and is then opened to allow the ball drop into the melt at a reduced speed.

  13. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1982-03-15

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengagable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  14. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, J.B.

    1984-03-13

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out is disclosed. Two gage balls are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit and a rigid member. One gage ball is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball. As the moving ball executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit. Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine. 3 figs.

  15. Telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryan, James B.

    1984-01-01

    A telescoping magnetic ball bar test gage for determining the accuracy of machine tools, including robots, and those measuring machines having non-disengageable servo drives which cannot be clutched out. Two gage balls (10, 12) are held and separated from one another by a telescoping fixture which allows them relative radial motional freedom but not relative lateral motional freedom. The telescoping fixture comprises a parallel reed flexure unit (14) and a rigid member (16, 18, 20, 22, 24). One gage ball (10) is secured by a magnetic socket knuckle assembly (34) which fixes its center with respect to the machine being tested. The other gage ball (12) is secured by another magnetic socket knuckle assembly (38) which is engaged or held by the machine in such manner that the center of that ball (12) is directed to execute a prescribed trajectory, all points of which are equidistant from the center of the fixed gage ball (10). As the moving ball (12) executes its trajectory, changes in the radial distance between the centers of the two balls (10, 12) caused by inaccuracies in the machine are determined or measured by a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) assembly (50, 52, 54, 56, 58, 60) actuated by the parallel reed flexure unit (14). Measurements can be quickly and easily taken for multiple trajectories about several different fixed ball (10) locations, thereby determining the accuracy of the machine.

  16. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas G. A. Wurden, Z. Wang, C. Ticos Los Alamos National Laboratory L Al NM 87545 USA Los Alamos, NM 87545 USA C. J. v. Wurden Los Alamos High School L Al NM 87544 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Presented at the PPPL Colloquium Sept. 17, 2008 U N C L A S S I F I E D Operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the DOE/NNSA LA-UR-08-06284 Outline of this talk *A discussion of ball lightning reports in nature *How can ball plasmas be made in the

  17. Silicon ball grid array chip carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Palmer, David W.; Gassman, Richard A.; Chu, Dahwey

    2000-01-01

    A ball-grid-array integrated circuit (IC) chip carrier formed from a silicon substrate is disclosed. The silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier is of particular use with ICs having peripheral bond pads which can be reconfigured to a ball-grid-array. The use of a semiconductor substrate such as silicon for forming the ball-grid-array chip carrier allows the chip carrier to be fabricated on an IC process line with, at least in part, standard IC processes. Additionally, the silicon chip carrier can include components such as transistors, resistors, capacitors, inductors and sensors to form a "smart" chip carrier which can provide added functionality and testability to one or more ICs mounted on the chip carrier. Types of functionality that can be provided on the "smart" chip carrier include boundary-scan cells, built-in test structures, signal conditioning circuitry, power conditioning circuitry, and a reconfiguration capability. The "smart" chip carrier can also be used to form specialized or application-specific ICs (ASICs) from conventional ICs. Types of sensors that can be included on the silicon ball-grid-array chip carrier include temperature sensors, pressure sensors, stress sensors, inertia or acceleration sensors, and/or chemical sensors. These sensors can be fabricated by IC processes and can include microelectromechanical (MEM) devices.

  18. {gamma} parameter and Solar System constraint in chameleon-Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saaidi, Kh.; Mohammadi, A.; Sheikhahmadi, H.

    2011-05-15

    The post Newtonian parameter is considered in the chameleon-Brans-Dicke model. In the first step, the general form of this parameter and also effective gravitational constant is obtained. An arbitrary function for f({Phi}), which indicates the coupling between matter and scalar field, is introduced to investigate validity of solar system constraint. It is shown that the chameleon-Brans-Dicke model can satisfy the solar system constraint and gives us an {omega} parameter of order 10{sup 4}, which is in comparable to the constraint which has been indicated in [19].

  19. Ball State building massive geothermal system

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ball State University is building America’s largest ground source district geothermal heating and cooling system. The new operation will save the school millions of dollars, slash greenhouse gases and create jobs. The project will also “expand how America will define the use of geothermal technology on a district-wide scale,” and provide health benefits such as reducing asthma rates for Indiana residents, says Philip Sachtleben, Ball State’s associate vice president of governmental relations. The system will cool and heat nearly 50 buildings on Ball State’s Muncie, Ind., campus, replace four coal-burning boilers and span more than 600 acres. The switch to geothermal will save the university $2.2 million in fuel costs and cut its carbon footprint in half.

  20. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, H.

    1997-07-15

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined. 5 figs.

  1. Automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, Hans

    1997-01-01

    An automatic ball bar for a coordinate measuring machine determines the accuracy of a coordinate measuring machine having at least one servo drive. The apparatus comprises a first and second gauge ball connected by a telescoping rigid member. The rigid member includes a switch such that inward radial movement of the second gauge ball relative to the first gauge ball causes activation of the switch. The first gauge ball is secured in a first magnetic socket assembly in order to maintain the first gauge ball at a fixed location with respect to the coordinate measuring machine. A second magnetic socket assembly secures the second gauge ball to the arm or probe holder of the coordinate measuring machine. The second gauge ball is then directed by the coordinate measuring machine to move radially inward from a point just beyond the length of the ball bar until the switch is activated. Upon switch activation, the position of the coordinate measuring machine is determined and compared to known ball bar length such that the accuracy of the coordinate measuring machine can be determined.

  2. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for

  3. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    South Carolina RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization Challenge Operations at ... the extent and distribution of gamma radiation in a given hot cell, glovebox or room. ...

  4. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Hsieh, Chung-Kao

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection.

  5. Resonant frequency method for bearing ball inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, B.T.; Chungkao Hsieh.

    1993-11-02

    The present invention provides for an inspection system and method for detecting defects in test objects which includes means for generating expansion inducing energy focused upon the test object at a first location, such expansion being allowed to contract, thereby causing pressure wave within and on the surface of the test object. Such expansion inducing energy may be provided by, for example, a laser beam or ultrasonic energy. At a second location, the amplitudes and phases of the acoustic waves are detected and the resonant frequencies' quality factors are calculated and compared to predetermined quality factor data, such comparison providing information of whether the test object contains a defect. The inspection system and method also includes means for mounting the bearing ball for inspection. 5 figures.

  6. Gas turbine igniter with ball-joint support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steber, C.E.; Travis, R.J.; Rizzo, J.A.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a support for an igniter for a combustor of a gas turbine, the combustor being of a type including a casing and a liner within the casing. It comprises: a ball joint; means for supporting the ball joint disposed a substantial distance outward from the casing; a body section of the igniter affixed in the ball joint; means for permitting the ball joint, and the body section to rotate through a substantial range; an igniter tip on the body section; and a hole in the liner. The igniter tip entering through the hole and into an interior of the liner. The hole being a tight fit to the igniter tip, whereby leakage past the igniter tip through the hole is limited. The substantial range being sufficient to permit fitting the igniter tip in the hole in the presence of manufacturing tolerances, and to permit the igniter tip to track the hole in the presence of differential thermal expansion during operation.

  7. Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2008, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium Free Floating Atmospheric Pressure Ball Plasmas Dr. Glen Wurden Los Alamos National Laboratory Presentation: PDF icon Free...

  8. Thermodynamics of charged rotating black branes in Brans-Dicke theory with quadratic scalar field potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M. H.; Pakravan, J.; Hendi, S. H.

    2006-11-15

    We construct a class of charged rotating solutions in (n+1)-dimensional Maxwell-Brans-Dicke theory with flat horizon in the presence of a quadratic potential and investigate their properties. These solutions are neither asymptotically flat nor (anti)-de Sitter. We find that these solutions can present black brane, with inner and outer event horizons, an extreme black brane or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitably. We compute the finite Euclidean action through the use of counterterm method, and obtain the conserved and thermodynamic quantities by using the relation between the action and free energy in grand-canonical ensemble. We find that these quantities satisfy the first law of thermodynamics, and the entropy does not follow the area law.

  9. Areal array jetting device for ball grid arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frear, D.R.; Yost, F.G.; Schmale, D.T.; Essien, M.

    1997-08-01

    Package designs for microelectronics devices have moved from through-hole to surface mount technology in order to increase the printed wiring board real estate available by utilizing both sides of the board. The traditional geometry for surface mount devices is peripheral arrays where the leads are on the edges of the device. As the technology drives towards high input/output (I/O) count (increasing number of leads) and smaller packages with finer pitch (less distance between peripheral leads), limitations on peripheral surface mount devices arise. A solution to the peripheral surface mount issue is to shift the leads to the area under the device. This scheme is called areal array packaging and is exemplified by the ball grid array (BGA) package. In a BGA package, the leads are on the bottom surface of the package in the form of an array of solder balls. The current practice of joining BGA packages to printed wiring boards involves a hierarchy of solder alloy compositions. A high melting temperature ball is typically used for standoff. A promising alternative to current methods is the use of jetting technology to perform monolithic solder ball attachment. This paper describes an areal array jetter that was designed and built to simultaneously jet arrays of solder balls directly onto BGA substrates.

  10. Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure studies above 6Mbar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for ...

  11. A Look Through the Crystal Ball at the Future of Automobile Battery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Look Through the Crystal Ball at the Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Title A Look Through the Crystal Ball at the Future of Automobile Battery Recycling Publication Type...

  12. Expanding (n+1)-dimensional wormhole solutions in Brans-Dicke cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahimi, E.; Riazi, N.

    2010-01-15

    We have obtained two classes of (n+1)-dimensional wormhole solutions using a traceless energy-momentum tensor in the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. The first class contains wormhole solutions in an open geometry, while the second contains wormhole solutions in both open and closed universes. In addition to wormhole geometries, naked singularities and maximally symmetric space-time also appear among the solutions as special cases. We have also considered the traversability of the wormhole solutions and have shown that they are indeed traversable. Finally, we have discussed the energy-momentum tensor which supports this geometry and have checked for the energy conditions. We have found that wormhole solutions in the first class of solutions violate the weak energy condition (WEC). In the second class, the wormhole geometries in a closed universe do violate the WEC, but in an open universe with a suitable choice of constants the supporting matter energy-momentum tensor can satisfy the WEC. However, even in this case the full effective energy-momentum tensor including the scalar field and the matter energy-momentum tensor still violates the WEC.

  13. Measurements of the Motion of Plasma Filaments in a Plasma Ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campanell, M.; Laird, J.; Provost, T.; Vasquez, S.; Zweben, S. J.

    2010-01-26

    Measurements were made of the motion of the filamentary structures in a plasma ball using high speed cameras and other optical detectors. These filaments traverse the ball radially at ~106 cm/sec at the driving frequency of ~26 kHz, and drift upward through the ball at ~1 cm/sec. Varying the applied high voltage and frequency caused the number, length, and diameter of the filaments to change. A custom plasma ball was constructed to observe the effects of varying gas pressure and species on the filament structures.

  14. Three-dimensional Plasmas R. L. Dewar; P. Cuthbert; R. Ball 70...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Three-dimensional Plasmas R. L. Dewar; P. Cuthbert; R. Ball 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY;...

  15. Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guise, Nicholas D. Fallek, Spencer D.; Stevens, Kelly E.; Brown, K. R.; Volin, Curtis; Harter, Alexa W.; Amini, Jason M.; Higashi, Robert E.; Lu, Son Thai; Chanhvongsak, Helen M.; Nguyen, Thi A.; Marcus, Matthew S.; Ohnstein, Thomas R.; Youngner, Daniel W.

    2015-05-07

    State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with {sup 171}Yb{sup +} ions in a second BGA trap.

  16. Coupling for joining a ball nut to a machine tool carriage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved coupling for joining a lead screw ball nut to a machine tool carriage. The ball nut is coupled to the machine tool carriage by a plurality of laterally flexible bolts which function as hinges during the rotation of the lead screw for substantially reducing lateral carriage movement due to wobble in the lead screw.

  17. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, F.G.; Frear, D.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-05

    An apparatus and process are disclosed for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users. 7 figs.

  18. Method and apparatus for jetting, manufacturing and attaching uniform solder balls

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Frederick G.; Frear, Darrel R.; Schmale, David T.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and process for jetting molten solder in the form of balls directly onto all the metallized interconnects lands for a ball grid array package in one step with no solder paste required. Molten solder is jetted out of a grid of holes using a piston attached to a piezoelectric crystal. When voltage is applied to the crystal it expands forcing the piston to extrude a desired volume of solder through holes in the aperture plate. When the voltage is decreased the piston reverses motion creating an instability in the molten solder at the aperture plate surface and thereby forming spherical solder balls that fall onto a metallized substrate. The molten solder balls land on the substrate and form a metallurgical bond with the metallized lands. The size of the solder balls is determined by a combination of the size of the holes in the aperture plate, the duration of the piston pulse, and the displacement of the piston. The layout of the balls is dictated by the location of the hooks in the grid. Changes in ball size and layout can be easily accomplished by changing the grid plate. This invention also allows simple preparation of uniform balls for subsequent supply to BGA users.

  19. Porosity in collapsible Ball Grid Array solder joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, C.A. |

    1998-05-01

    Ball Grid Array (BGA) technology has taken off in recent years due to the increased need for high interconnect density. Opposite to all the advantages BGA packages offer, porosity in collapsible BGA solder joints is often a major concern in the reliability of such packages. The effect of pores on the strength of collapsible BGA solder-joints was studied by manufacturing samples with different degrees of porosity and testing them under a shear load. It was found that the shear strength of the solder joints decreased in a linear fashion with increasing porosity. Failure occurred by internal necking of the interpore matrix. It was confirmed that entrapment of flux residues leads to porosity by manufacturing fluxless samples in a specially made furnace, and comparing them with samples assembled using flux. Also, contamination of Au electrodeposits (in substrate metallization) was determined to cause significant porosity. It was found that hard-Au (Co hardened Au) electrodeposits produce high degrees of porosity even in the absence of flux. Finally, increasing the time the solder spends in the molten state was proven to successfully decrease porosity.

  20. Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure studies

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    above 6Mbar (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure studies above 6Mbar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Implementation of micro-ball nanodiamond anvils for high-pressure studies above 6Mbar Authors: Dubrovinsky, Leonid ; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia ; Prakapenka, Vitali B. ; Abakumov, Artem M. [1] ; Bayreuth) [2] ; UC) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Antwerp) ( Publication Date:

  1. Degradation of Trichloroethene with a Novel Ball Milled Fe-C

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanocomposite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Degradation of Trichloroethene with a Novel Ball Milled Fe-C Nanocomposite Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 25, 2017 Title: Degradation of Trichloroethene with a Novel Ball Milled Fe-C Nanocomposite Authors: Gao, Jie ; Wang, Wei ; Rondinone, Adam J. ; He, Feng ; Liang, Liyuan Publication Date: 2015-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 1249593 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal

  2. Spin and orbital ordering in Y1-xLaxVO₃

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, J.-Q.; Zhou, J.-S.; Cheng, J. G.; Goodenough, J. B.; Ren, Y.; Llobet, A.; McQueeney, R. J.

    2011-12-02

    The spin and orbital ordering in Y1-xLaxVO₃ (0.30 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) has been studied to map out the phase diagram over the whole doping range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. The phase diagram is compared with that for RVO₃ (R = rare earth or Y) perovskites without A-site variance. For x > 0.20, no long-range orbital ordering was observed above the magnetic ordering temperature TN; the magnetic order is accompanied by a lattice anomaly at a Tt ≤ TN as in LaVO₃. The magnetic ordering below Tt ≤ TN is G type in the compositional range 0.20 ≤ xmore » ≤ 0.40 and C type in the range 0.738 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Magnetization and neutron powder diffraction measurements point to the coexistence below TN of the two magnetic phases in the compositional range 0.4 < x < 0.738. Samples in the compositional range 0.20 < x ≤ 1.0 are characterized by an additional suppression of a glasslike thermal conductivity in the temperature interval TN < T < T* and a change in the slope of 1/χ(T). We argue that T* represents a temperature below which spin and orbital fluctuations couple together via λL∙S.« less

  3. Control design and robustness analysis of a ball and plate system by using polynomial chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coln, Diego; Balthazar, Jos M.; Reis, Clia A. dos; Bueno, tila M.; Diniz, Ivando S.; Rosa, Suelia de S. R. F.

    2014-12-10

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model of a ball and plate system, a control law and analyze its robustness properties by using the polynomial chaos method. The ball rolls without slipping. There is an auxiliary robot vision system that determines the bodies' positions and velocities, and is used for control purposes. The actuators are to orthogonal DC motors, that changes the plate's angles with the ground. The model is a extension of the ball and beam system and is highly nonlinear. The system is decoupled in two independent equations for coordinates x and y. Finally, the resulting nonlinear closed loop systems are analyzed by the polynomial chaos methodology, which considers that some system parameters are random variables, and generates statistical data that can be used in the robustness analysis.

  4. Red & Black Ball raises nearly $82,000 for youth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Red & Black Ball raises $81,000 for youth Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Red & Black Ball raises nearly $82,000 for youth The Family YMCA receives windfall for Española and Los Alamos teen centers. April 4, 2016 From left: LANL Government Affairs Office Director Patrick Woehrle, LANL Community Programs Office Director Kathy Keith, Laboratory Director Charles McMillan,

  5. Structural and microstructural changes in monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} during the ball-milling with stainless steel assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanic, G. . E-mail: stefanic@irb.hr; Music, S.; Gajovic, A.

    2006-04-13

    High-energy ball-milling of monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} was performed in air using the planetary ball mill with a stainless steel milling assembly. Structural and microstructural changes during the ball-milling were monitored using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The results of line broadening analysis indicated a decrease in the crystallite size and an increase in the microstrains with the ball-milling time increased up to {approx}150 min. The results of quantitative phase analysis indicated the presence of a very small amount of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} phase in this early stage of ball-milling. The onset of m-ZrO{sub 2} {sup {yields}} t-ZrO{sub 2} transition occurred between 10 and 15 h of ball-milling, which resulted in a complete transition after 20 h of ball-milling. Further ball-milling caused a decrease of the t-ZrO{sub 2} lattice parameters followed by a probable transition into c-ZrO{sub 2}. It was concluded that the stabilization of t- and c-ZrO{sub 2} polymorphs at RT can be attributed to the incorporation of aliovalent cations (Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+}) introduced into the sample due to the wear and oxidation of the milling media.

  6. Geologic investigation of roof and floor strata: longwall demonstration, Old Ben Mine No. 24. Prediction of coal balls in the Herrin Coal. Final technical report: Part 2. [Mineralized peat balls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMaris, P.J.; Bauer, R.A.; Cahill, R.A.; Damberger, H.H.

    1983-04-01

    Coal-ball areas, large deposits of mineralized peat in the coal seam, obstructed longwall mining in the Herrin Coal at Old Ben Mine No. 24. In-mine mapping located coal balls under transitional roof - areas where the roof lithology alternates between the Energy Shale and the Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone. Specifically, coal balls occur under eroded exposures or windows of the marine Anna Shale/Brereton Limestone in the Energy Shale. Two types of coal-ball areas have been identified, based on stratigraphic position in the coal seam: type I is restricted to the top of the seam, and type II occurs at midseam and below. To predict the distribution of coal balls, as well as explain their formation, a depositional model was developed: First, freshwater sediments buried the Herrin peat. Decomposition of the sealed peat continued, producing high CO/sub 2/ partial pressures; then selective erosion took place as a river removed the cover along sinuous paths, cutting through to the peat in some places. With the seal broken, CO/sub 2/ was released, and freshwaters that contained Ca and Mg ions flushed out organic acids. Later, marine mud buried both the freshwater sediments and the exposed peat, which accounts for the transitional roof over the Herrin Coal and the coal balls under the marine shale windows in the Energy Shale. The depositional model was supported by the first comprehensive set of geochemical data for coal balls. Coal balls generally contained less than 4 percent organic carbon and very low levels of detrital minerals. Although individual sites of concentrated coal balls cannot be predicted, the specific linear roof exposures associated with these coal-ball areas can be identified by mapping. Based on previously mapped areas, the trends of these linear exposures can be projected.

  7. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal System with Support from Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above approach to American energy, the Energy Department today congratulated Ball State University for its campus-wide ground-source geothermal system, the nation's largest geothermal heating and cooling system.

  8. Ball State Completes Largest U.S. Ground-Source Geothermal System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ball State University has completed its campus-wide ground-source geothermal system, the nation's largest geothermal heating and cooling system, DOE announced on March 20. DOE played a part in the project by providing a $5 million grant through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  9. A Ball Lightning Model as a Possible Explanation of Recently Reported Cavity Lights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, David; /SLAC

    2009-08-04

    The salient features of cavity lights, in particular, mobile luminous objects (MLO's), as have been experimentally observed in superconducting accelerator cavities, are summarized. A model based upon standard electromagnetic interactions between a small particle and the 1.5 GHz cavity excitation field is described. This model can explain some features of these data, in particular, the existence of particle orbits without wall contact. While this result is an important success for the model, it is detailed why the model as it stands is incomplete. It is argued that no avenues for a suitable extension of the model through established physics appear evident, which motivates an investigation of a model based upon a more exotic object, ball lightning. As discussed, further motivation derives from the fact that there are significant similarities in many of the qualitative features of ball lightning and MLO's, even though they appear in quite different circumstances and differ in scale by orders of magnitude. The ball lightning model, which incorporates electromagnetic charges and currents, is based on a symmetrized set of Maxwell's equations in which the electromagnetic sources and fields are characterized by a process called dyality rotation. It is shown that a consistent mathematical description of dyality rotation as a physical process can be achieved by adding suitable (phenomenological) current terms to supplement the usual current terms in the symmetrized Maxwell's equations. These currents, which enable the conservation of electric and magnetic charge, are called vacuum currents. It is shown that the proposed ball lightning model offers a good qualitative explanation of the perplexing aspects of the MLO data. Avenues for further study are indicated.

  10. Modeling of an adsorption unit packed with amidoxime fiber balls for the recovery of uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morooka, S.; Kato, T.; Inada, M.; Kago, T.; Kusakabe, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Amidoxime fiber adsorbents are prepared by treating commercial poly(acrylonitrile) fibers with NH{sub 2}OH in methanol and then with an aqueous NaOH solution. The rate of adsorption of uranium from seawater is 0.1-0.3 (g of U/kg of dry fiber)/day. The fiber is placed in 2-cm-diameter spherical shells of plastic net, and these fibrous balls are packed in a column. Seawater is assumed to flow through the packed bed by the kinetic force of the ocean current. The permeation velocity of liquid in each ball is evaluated with a small electrode that detects the electrochemical limiting current. When the permeation velocity is slow, most uranyl ions are adsorbed only in the peripheral part of the ball. In this paper a model of the packed bed absorption unit is proposed and a numerical calculation gives optimum values of design parameters.

  11. Hydro-ball in-core instrumentation system and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tower, Stephen N.; Veronesi, Luciano; Braun, Howard E.

    1990-01-01

    A hydro-ball in-core instrumentation system employs detector strings each comprising a wire having radiation sensitive balls affixed diametrically at spaced positions therealong and opposite tip ends of which are transportable by fluid drag through interior passageways. In the passageways primary coolant is caused to flow selectively in first and second opposite directions for transporting the detector strings from stored positions in an exterior chamber to inserted positions within the instrumentation thimbles of the fuel rod assemblies of a pressure vessel, and for return. The coolant pressure within the detector passageways is the same as that within the vessel; face contact, disconnectable joints between sections of the interior passageways within the vessel facilitate assembly and disassembly of the vessel for refueling and routine maintenance operations. The detector strings may pass through a very short bend radius thereby minimizing space requirements for the connections of the instrumentation system to the vessel and concomitantly the vessel containment structure. Improved radiation mapping and a significant reduction in potential exposure of personnel to radiation are provided. Both top head and bottom head penetration embodiments are disclosed.

  12. Non-stationary dynamics in the bouncing ball: A wavelet perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behera, Abhinna K., E-mail: abhinna@iiserkol.ac.in; Panigrahi, Prasanta K., E-mail: pprasanta@iiserkol.ac.in [Department of Physical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Kolkata, Mohanpur 741246 (India); Sekar Iyengar, A. N., E-mail: ansekar.iyengar@saha.ac.in [Plasma Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP), Sector 1, Block-AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-12-01

    The non-stationary dynamics of a bouncing ball, comprising both periodic as well as chaotic behavior, is studied through wavelet transform. The multi-scale characterization of the time series displays clear signatures of self-similarity, complex scaling behavior, and periodicity. Self-similar behavior is quantified by the generalized Hurst exponent, obtained through both wavelet based multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis and Fourier methods. The scale dependent variable window size of the wavelets aptly captures both the transients and non-stationary periodic behavior, including the phase synchronization of different modes. The optimal time-frequency localization of the continuous Morlet wavelet is found to delineate the scales corresponding to neutral turbulence, viscous dissipation regions, and different time varying periodic modulations.

  13. Temperature modeling for analysis and design of the sintering furnance in HTR fuel type of ball

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saragi, Elfrida; Setiadji, Moch

    2013-09-09

    One of the factors that determine the safety of the operation of the sintering furnace fuel HTR ball is the temperature distribution in the ceramic tube furnace. The temperature distribution must be determined at design stage. The tube has a temperature of 1600 C at one end and about 40 C at the other end. The outside of the tube was cooled by air through natural convection. The tube is a furnace ceramic tube which its geometry are 0.08, 0.09 and 0.5 m correspondingly for the inner tube diameter, outer tube diameter and tube length. The temperature distribution of the tube is determined by the natural convection coefficient (NCF), which is difficult to be calculated manually. The determination of NCF includes the Grasshoff, Prandtl, and Nusselt numbers which is a function of the temperature difference between the surrounding air with the ceramic tube. If the temperature vary along the tube, the complexity of the calculations increases. Thus the proposed modeling was performed to determine the temperature distribution along the tube and heat transfer coefficient using a self-developed software which permit the design process easier.

  14. Description of a solder pulse generator for the single step formation of ball grid arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmale, D.T.; Frear, D.R.; Yost, F.G.; Essien, M.

    1997-02-01

    The traditional geometry for surface mount devices is the peripheral array where the leads are on the edges of the device. As the technology drives towards high input/output (I/O) count (increasing number of leads) and smaller packages with finer pitch (less distance between peripheral leads), limitations on peripheral surface mount devices arise. The leads on these fine pitch devices are fragile and can be easily bent. It becomes increasingly difficult to deliver solder past to leads spaced as little as 0.012 inch apart. Too much solder mass can result in bridging between leads while too little solder can contribute to the loss of mechanical and electrical continuity. A solution is to shift the leads from the periphery of the device to the area under the device. This scheme is called areal array packaging and is exemplified by the ball grid array (BGA) package. A system has been designed and constructed to deposit an entire array of several hundred uniform solder droplets onto a printed circuit board in a fraction of a second. The solder droplets wet to the interconnect lands on a pc board and forms a basis for later application of a BGA device. The system consists of a piezoelectric solder pulse unit, heater controls, an inert gas chamber and an analog power supply/pulse unit.

  15. On the amorphization behavior and hydrogenation performance of high-energy ball-milled Mg{sub 2}Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Hongchao; Hou, Xiaojiang; Zhang, Tiebang, E-mail: tiebangzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Hu, Rui; Li, Jinshan; Xue, Xiangyi

    2013-06-15

    Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy was prepared by high energy ball-milling starting with polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni which was prepared with the help of a metallurgy method by using a SPEX 8000D mill. The microstructural and phase structure characterization of the prepared materials was performed via scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The thermal stabilities were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. The apparent activation energies were determined by means of the Kissinger method. The first and second crystallization reactions take place at ? 255 C and ? 410 C, and the corresponding activation energy of crystallization is E{sub a1} = 276.9 and E{sub a2} = 382.4 kJ/mol, respectively. At 3 MPa hydrogen pressure and 250 C, the hydrogen absorption capacities of crystalline, partially and fully amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy are 2.0 wt.%, 3.2 wt.% and 3.5 wt.% within 30 min, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: We mainly focus on the amorphization behavior of crystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in the high energy ball-milling process and the crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy in a follow-up heating process. The relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties is established and explained by models. - Highlights: Amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni has been obtained by high energy ball milling the as-cast alloy. The amorphization behavior of polycrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni is presented. The crystallization behavior of the amorphous Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy is illustrated. Establish the relationship of milling, microstructure and hydrogenation properties.

  16. Amorphization and crystallization processes of the ball-milled Al-Y-Fe-TM alloys (TM=Ni, Co, Cu, and Fe) (Prop. 2003-037)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Timothy W.; Choo, Hahn; Porter, Wallace D; Speakman, Scott A; Fan, Chang; Liaw, Peter K

    2006-01-01

    High-energy ball milling was used to synthesize aluminum-based alloys containing amorphous and nanocrystalline phases to investigate the compositional effects of transition metals (TM) on the amorphization and crystallization processes of the ball-milled Al{sub 85}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}TM{sub 3} alloys (TM = Ni, Co, Cu, and Fe) were investigated. The crystallization kinetics of the ball-milled Al-Y-Fe-TM nanocomposite powders were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The DSC results of Al{sub 83}Y{sub 7}Fe{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} show that the crystallization temperature and the activation energy of crystallization are 668 K and 310 kJ/mol, respectively. In-situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction showed that the crystallization was a complex process involving growth of the nanocrystalline phase along with crystallization of the amorphous matrix phase.

  17. Improved Thermoelectric Performance of p-type Skutterudite YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Jung Y; Ye, Zuxin; Tessema, Misle; Salvador, James R.; Waldo, Richard; Yang, Jiong; Zhang, Weiqing; Yang, Jihui; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Thermoelectric performance of p-type skutterudites currently lags that of the corresponding n-type materials and improvement of this important class of materials have become the focus of considerable research effort world-wide. Recent calculations find promising band structural features in p-type skutterudite materials of the type AeFe3NiSb12 ( Ae = Ca, Sr, or Ba) which could potentially lead to excellent thermoelectric properties. Recent work on the Yb- filled analog of the these formulations (YbFe3NiSb12) however finds that the onset of intrinsic conduction at lower than expected temperatures deteriorates the performance above 500 K leading to poor performance in the temperature range of interest for automotive waste heat recovery applications. We therefore seek a way to increase the band gap in order to find a way to minimize the deleterious effects of intrinsic conduction. Here we present ab initio band structure calculations and the synthesis and thermoelectric properties of YbxFe4-yPtySb12 (0.8 x 1, y = 1 and 0.5). Ab initio calculations find that the band gap increases for YbFe3PtSb12 as compared to the Ni-containing analog, though no such increase in the band gap energy was found for as compared to YbFe3.5Ni0.5Sb12. The y = 1 samples shows a characteristic transition to intrinsic conduction with a decrease in the Seebeck coefficient at temperatures above 700 K. The increased carrier concentration in y = 0.5 virtually eliminates any evidence of intrinsic conduction and the Seebeck coefficients for these samples increase monotonically up to 750 K, resulting in power factors approaching 27 W/cm K2 at 750 K. These power factors combined with low thermal conductivity result in a ZT = 0.9 at 750 K for Yb0.95Fe3.5Pt0.5Sb12.

  18. Microstructure and properties of rapidly solidified beryllium-transition metal alloys. [With small amounts of Ti, Zr and Y (1-3 wt %)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, L.A.; Richardson, S.

    1988-01-01

    Alloys of beryllium with small amounts of Ti, Zr and Y (1-3 wt %) were rapidly solidified using an arc hammer splat technique. Each of these elements forms a dilute eutectic with beryllium, and has very low solid solubility in the alpha phase. In the case of Ti, the Be-rich compound is TiBe/sub 12/, and for Zr and Y, the compound is MBe. The objective of the work was to achieve a fine, uniform dispersion of particles of the intermetallic compound. Since these compounds have very high melting points, it was expected that rapidly solidified microstructures would be relatively stable at elevated temperatures. This microstructural stability should result in improved high temperature properties for the alloys. Microstructures have been characterized using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microhardness measurements have been made in order to determine the effects of rapid solidification and to evaluate the effects of high temperature exposure on microstructural stability and property retention. The results will be presented in light of the potential of these alloys for intermediate temperature application. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Dielectric and photocatalytic properties of sulfur doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by ball milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalalah, Mohammed; Faisal, M.; Bouzid, Houcine; Ismail, Adel A.; Al-Sayari, Saleh A.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Designing of visible light responsive photocatalyst utilizing ball milling. Sulphur used as dopant in commercial TiO{sub 2} P25 at different atomic percentage. S doping resulted in an intense increase in absorption in the visible light region. Newly design photocatalyst exhibited excellent photocatalytic performance. 0.11 at.% S-doped TiO{sub 2} shows 3-times higher activity than that of TiO{sub 2} P25. - Abstract: Sulfur (S) doped commercial TiO{sub 2} P-25 has been achieved by changing the amount of thiourea using ball milling technique. The results of XRD clearly reveal biphasial anatase and rutile mixtures for all prepared samples and doping of S does not change the morphology of the TiO{sub 2}. The optical absorption edge of S-doped TiO{sub 2} was red shifted with indirect bandgap energy of 2.8 eV. The dielectric studies confirm that the dielectric constant of TiO{sub 2} increases after doping, however it becomes more conductive. Newly designed S-doped TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts exhibited excellent photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light. The overall photocatalytic activity of 0.11 at.% S-doped TiO{sub 2} was significantly 3-times higher than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} P-25 and complete degradation of MB has taken place after 90 min of irradiation under visible light while only 35% dye degraded when the reaction has been carried out in the presence of undoped TiO{sub 2}.

  20. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujan, G.K. Haseeb, A.S.M.A. Afifi, A.B.M.

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping of flux with appropriate metallic nanoparticles can be successfully used to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers at the solder/substrate interface which is expected to lead to better reliability of electronic devices. - Highlights: • A novel nanodoped flux method has been developed to control the growth of IMCs. • Ni doped flux improves the wettability, but Co, Mo and Ti deteriorate it. • Ni and Co doped flux gives planer IMC morphology through in-situ alloying effect. • 0.1 wt.% Ni and Co addition into flux gives the lowest interfacial IMC thickness. • Mo and Ti doped flux does not have any influence at the interfacial reaction.

  1. Influence of ball milling on atomic structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} glassy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taghvaei, Amir Hossein, E-mail: Amirtaghvaei@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shiraz University of Technology, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Stoica, Mihai [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Politehnica University of Timisoara, P-ta Victoriei 2, Timisoara (Romania); Bednar?ik, Jozef [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kaban, Ivan [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fr Werkstoffwissenschaft, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Shahabi, Hamed Shakur; Khoshkhoo, Mohsen Samadi [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Janghorban, Kamal [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eckert, Jrgen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fr Werkstoffwissenschaft, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The influence of ball milling on the atomic structure and magnetic properties of the Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} metallic glass with a high thermal stability and excellent soft magnetic properties has been investigated. After 14 h of milling, the obtained powders were found to consist mainly of an amorphous phase and a small fraction of the (Co,Fe){sub 21}Ta{sub 2}B{sub 6} nanocrystals. The changes in the reduced pair correlation functions suggest noticeable changes in the atomic structure of the amorphous upon ball milling. Furthermore, it has been shown that milling is accompanied by introduction of compressive and dilatational sites in the glassy phase and increasing the fluctuation of the atomic-level hydrostatic stress without affecting the coordination number of the nearest neighbors. Ball milling has decreased the thermal stability and significantly affected the magnetic properties through increasing the saturation magnetization, Curie temperature of the amorphous phase and coercivity. - Highlights: Ball milling affected the atomic structure of Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 22}Ta{sub 8}B{sub 30} metallic glass. Mechanically-induced crystallization started after 4 h milling. Milling increased the fluctuation of the atomic-level hydrostatic stress in glass. Ball milling influenced the thermal stability and magnetic properties.

  2. Ping Pong Ball Anemometers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Learning Goal(s) Students will be able to construct and calibrate an anemometer to measure wind speed. They will be able to create a graph and an equation of Angle vs. Wind Speed...

  3. Synthesis of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and iron oxides/SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites by long-term ball milling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pozo Lpez, G.; Cond, A.M.; Urreta, S.E.; Silvetti, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Ironiron oxides/silica composites are synthesized by long term dry ball-milling. Bcc iron and ?-quartz powders are used as precursors. Surface effects enhance coercivity in iron/silica nanocomposites. In spite of their small size, about 10 nm, iron particles are ferromagnetic. Ferro and superparamagnetic particles are found in maghemite/silica composites. - Abstract: Iron oxide/SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites are synthesized by dry ball-milling a mixture of bcc Fe and ?-quartz powders for prolonged times. A sequence of nanocomposites is obtained, with small magnetic particles dispersed in a non magnetic, amorphous matrix. The powders are characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The magnetic hysteresis properties are investigated in the range 50300 K. After 120 h milling, deformed, non-spherical, ?-Fe nanocrystallites of about 10 nm in size and very few small (<10 nm) maghemite particles are found. At room temperature, iron particles are ferromagnetic and a large effective magnetic anisotropy is estimated, which is mainly attributed to surface effects. Between 160 and 200 h milling, maghemite nanoparticles are observed while after 220 h grinding, hematite phase appears; after 340 h milling, the sample consists of ferromagnetic hematite particles with a broad size distribution (550 nm) embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  4. Insulating and metallic spin glass in KxFe2-?-yNiySe2 (0.06 ? y ? 1.44 ) single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Wang, Kefeng; Lei, Hechang; Lazarevic, N.; Warren, J. B.; Bozin, E. S.; Popovic, Z. V.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-05-04

    We report electron doping effects by Ni in KxFe2-?-yNiySe? (0.06 ? y ? 1.44) single crystal alloys. A rich ground state phase diagram is observed. Thus, a small amount of Ni (~ 4%) suppressed superconductivity below 1.8 K, inducing insulating spin glass magnetic ground state for higher Ni content. With further Ni substitution, metallic resistivity is restored. For high Ni concentration in the lattice the unit cell symmetry is high symmetry I4/mmm with no phase separation whereas both I4/m + I4/mmm space groups were detected in the phase separated crystals when concentration of Ni < Fe. The absence of superconductivity coincides with the absence of crystalline Fe vacancy order.

  5. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  6. Microsoft Word - luo-y1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1996, Randall 2003). Large-scale forcing data produced by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM; Stokes and Schwartz 1994, Ackerman and Stokes 2003) program at the Southern...

  7. Crystal structure, characterization and thermoelectric properties of the type-I clathrate Ba{sub 8-y}Sr{sub y}Al{sub 14}Si{sub 32} (0.6{<=}y{<=}1.3) prepared by aluminum flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roudebush, John H.; Toberer, Eric S.; Hope, Hakon; Jeffrey Snyder, G.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2011-05-15

    The title compound was prepared as single crystals using an aluminum flux technique. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction indicate that this composition crystallizes in the clathrate type-I structure, space group Pm3-bar n. Electron microprobe characterization indicates the composition to be Ba{sub 8-y}Sr{sub y}Al{sub 14.2(2)}Si{sub 31.8(2)} (0.77<y<1.3). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data (90 and 12 K) were refined with the Al content fixed at the microprobe value (12 K data: R{sub 1}=0.0233, wR{sub 2}=0.0441) on a crystal of compositions Ba. The Sr atom preferentially occupies the 2a position; mixed Al/Si occupancy was found on all framework sites. These refinements are consistent with a fully occupied framework and nearly fully occupied cation guest sites as found by microprobe analysis. Temperature dependent electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity have been measured from room temperature to 1200 K on a hot-pressed pellet. Electrical resistivity reveals metallic behavior. The negative Seebeck coefficient indicates transport processes dominated by electrons as carriers. Thermal conductivity is between 22 and 25 mW/cm K. The sample shows n-type conductivity with a maximum figure of merit, zT of 0.3 at 1200 K. A single parabolic band model predicts a five-fold increase in zT at 800 K if carrier concentration is lowered. -- Graphical abstract: The inorganic type-I clathrate phase with nominal composition Ba{sub 7}Sr{sub 1}Al{sub 14}Si{sub 32} has been prepared by Al flux. Single crystal diffraction at 90 and 12 K reveal that the framework is fully occupied with the cation sites nearly fully occupied. The lattice thermal conductivity is low thereby suggesting further optimization of the carrier concentration will lead to a high zT. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} Ba{sub 7}Sr{sub 1}Al{sub 14}Si{sub 32} is a light element phase ideal for thermoelectric power generation. {yields} Ba{sub 7}Sr{sub 1}Al{sub 14}Si{sub 32} is a high melting point cubic structure ideal for efficient power generation. {yields} The framework is fully occupied with the cation sites nearly fully occupied. {yields} Further optimization of the carrier concentration is expected to lead to a high zT.

  8. Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... to affect home prices and home foreclosure rates (see Hamilton 2009; Ravn and Shan 2013). ... Energy Information Administration. 25 Hamilton, J.D. (2009), "Causes and Consequences ...

  9. Ball assisted device for analytical surface sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    ElNaggar, Mariam S; Van Berkel, Gary J; Covey, Thomas R

    2015-11-03

    A system for sampling a surface includes a sampling probe having a housing and a socket, and a rolling sampling sphere within the socket. The housing has a sampling fluid supply conduit and a sampling fluid exhaust conduit. The sampling fluid supply conduit supplies sampling fluid to the sampling sphere. The sampling fluid exhaust conduit has an inlet opening for receiving sampling fluid carried from the surface by the sampling sphere. A surface sampling probe and a method for sampling a surface are also disclosed.

  10. Review of the Y-1-12 Implementation Verification Review Processes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The objective of this review was to evaluate the extent to which the site management and operating contractor, B&W Y-12, a partnership of Babcock & Wilcox and Bechtel Corporation, ...

  11. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and serves as a model for other major facilities and universities across the nation. The Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)...

  12. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Rae, Philip; Clements, Bradford E.

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  13. System for remotely servicing a top loading captive ball valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, Stephen M.; Porter, Matthew L.

    1996-01-01

    An attachment for facilitating servicing of a valve, the valve including: an assembly composed of a valve seat defining a flow path, a flow control member movable relative to the valve seat for blocking or unblocking the valve seat, and a control device including a stem coupled to the flow control member and operable for moving the flow control member relative to the valve seat; a housing for receiving the assembly, the housing having an opening via which the assembly can be removed from, and installed in, the housing, and the housing having a plurality of threaded studs which surround the opening and project away from the housing; a valve housing cover for closing and sealing the opening in the housing, the cover having a first bore for passage of the stem of the control device when the assembly is installed in the housing and a plurality of second bores each located for passage of a respective stud when the cover closes the opening in the housing. A plurality of threaded nuts are engageable with the studs for securing the cover to the housing when the cover closes the opening in the housing, wherein the attachment comprises: a plurality of nut guide devices removable from the housing and each operatively associated with a respective stud for retaining a respective nut and guiding the respective nut into alignment with the respective stud to enable the respective nut to be rotated into engagement with the respective stud; and aligning the nut guide devices with the studs.

  14. System for remotely servicing a top loading captive ball valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berry, S.M.; Porter, M.L.

    1996-06-25

    An attachment for facilitating servicing of a valve is disclosed including: an assembly composed of a valve seat defining a flow path, a flow control member movable relative to the valve seat for blocking or unblocking the valve seat, and a control device including a stem coupled to the flow control member and operable for moving the flow control member relative to the valve seat; a housing for receiving the assembly, the housing having an opening via which the assembly can be removed from, and installed in, the housing, and the housing having a plurality of threaded studs which surround the opening and project away from the housing; a valve housing cover for closing and sealing the opening in the housing, the cover having a first bore for passage of the stem of the control device when the assembly is installed in the housing and a plurality of second bores each located for passage of a respective stud when the cover closes the opening in the housing. A plurality of threaded nuts are engageable with the studs for securing the cover to the housing when the cover closes the opening in the housing, wherein the attachment comprises: a plurality of nut guide devices removable from the housing and each operatively associated with a respective stud for retaining a respective nut and guiding the respective nut into alignment with the respective stud to enable the respective nut to be rotated into engagement with the respective stud; and aligning the nut guide devices with the studs. 7 figs.

  15. Ball State Completes Largest U.S. Ground-Source Geothermal System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    To provide heating, geothermal heat pumps use a fluid to transfer heat from the Earth to buildings. For cooling, the pumps remove heat from buildings and transfer it back into the ...

  16. Beyond crystal balls: crosscutting solutions in global health to prepare for an unpredictable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez Alonso, Wladimir; McCormick, Benjamin Joseph J.; Miller, Mark A.; Schuck-Paim, Cynthia; Asrar, Ghassem R.

    2015-09-24

    Actionable knowledge not based on a narrow subset of threats and conditions can better guide policy, build societal resilience and ensure effective prevention in an uncertain world.

  17. Degradation of Trichloroethene with a Novel Ball Milled Fe-C...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 300; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0304-3894 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  18. RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy RTP Green Fuel: A Proven Path to Renewable Heat and Power RTP Green Fuel: A Proven Path to Renewable Heat and Power Steve Lupton presentation at the May 9, 2012, Pyrolysis Oil Worskshop on RTP green fuel. PDF icon pyrolysis_lupton.pdf More Documents & Publications Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today Technical Information

  19. Professional Division Laborers' International Union of North...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOCAL 335 PDL BANNER Welcome Representing the professional employees of the Bonneville Power Administration Ball Image What is PDL? Ball Image PDL History Ball Image...

  20. Effect of sintering in ball-milled K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} thermoelectric nano-composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatzikraniotis, E.; Ioannou, M.; Chrissafis, K.; Chung, D.Y.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Kyratsi, Th.

    2012-09-15

    K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13} has many attractive features for thermoelectric applications. Recently, K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13}-based nanocomposite materials, consisting of nano-crystalline, micro-crystalline and amorphous phases, have been fabricated based on powder technology techniques. The Seebeck coefficient has been enhanced while the thermal conductivity has been decreased presenting, thus, interesting behavior. The behavior of the materials under heat treatment conditions is now of interest, as the application of sintering process is necessary for the development of thermoelectric modules. In this work, the crystallization of the K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13}-based nano-composites is studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The results show that crystallization follows a multiple-step process with different activation energies. The thermoelectric properties are also discussed in the range that crystallization occurs. - Graphical Abstract: {beta}-K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13}-based nanocomposites follow a multiple-step crystallization process. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K{sub 2}Bi{sub 8}Se{sub 13}-based composites consisting of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sintering results multiple-step crystallization with variable activation energies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelectric properties follow a step-like behavior during sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties are attributed to the strain relaxation, nucleation and grain growth.

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers. Measurements of diffuse solar...

  2. Jiangsu Huasheng Tianlong Photoelectric Co Ltd formerly Changzhou...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Changzhou, Jiangsu Province, China Zip: 213000 Product: A Chinese manufacturer of steel ball equipment, furnaces, monocrystalline equipment and ceramic ball equipment. Coordinates:...

  3. Charged black holes in string-inspired gravity II. Mass inflation and dependence on parameters and potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Jakob; Yeom, Dong-han

    2015-09-07

    We investigate the relation between the existence of mass inflation and model parameters of string-inspired gravity models. In order to cover various models, we investigate a Brans-Dicke theory that is coupled to a U(1) gauge field. By tuning a model parameter that decides the coupling between the Brans-Dicke field and the electromagnetic field, we can make both of models such that the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward strong or weak coupling directions after gravitational collapses. We observe that as long as the Brans-Dicke field is biased toward any (strong or weak) directions, there is no Cauchy horizon and no mass inflation. Therefore, we conclude that to induce a Cauchy horizon and mass inflation inside a charged black hole, either there is no bias of the Brans-Dicke field as well as no Brans-Dicke hair outside the horizon or such a biased Brans-Dicke field should be well trapped and controlled by a potential.

  4. (2R)-4-Oxo-4[3-(Trifluoromethyl)-5,6-diihydro:1,2,4}triazolo[4,3-a}pyrazin-7(8H)-y1]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine: A Potent, Orally Active Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Inhibitor for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D.; Wang, L.; Beconi, M.; Eiermann, G.; Fisher, M.; He, H.; Hickey, G.; Kowalchick, Jennifer; Leiting, Barbara; Lyons, K.; Marsilio, F.; McCann, F.; Patel, R.; Petrov, A.; Scapin, G.; Patel, S.; Roy, R.; Wu, J.; Wyvratt, M.; Zhang, B.; Zhu, L.; Thornberry, N.; Weber, A.

    2010-11-10

    A novel series of {beta}-amino amides incorporating fused heterocycles, i.e., triazolopiperazines, were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. (2R)-4-Oxo-4-[3-(trifluoromethyl)-5,6-dihydro[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyrazin-7(8H)-yl]-1-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)butan-2-amine (1) is a potent, orally active DPP-IV inhibitor (IC{sub 50} = 18 nM) with excellent selectivity over other proline-selective peptidases, oral bioavailability in preclinical species, and in vivo efficacy in animal models. MK-0431, the phosphate salt of compound 1, was selected for development as a potential new treatment for type 2 diabetes.

  5. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6, blast measurements. Part 3. Pressure near ground level. Section 4. Blast asymmetry from aerial photographs. Section 5. Ball-crusher-gauge measurements of peak pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    Aerial motion pictures from manned aircraft were taken of the Dog, Easy, and George Shots and from a drone aircraft on Dog Shot to determine whether asymmetries in the blast waves could be detected and measured. Only one film, that taken of Dog Shot from a drone, was considered good enough to warrant detailed analysis, but this failed to yield any positive information on asymmetries. The analysis showed that failure to obtain good arrival-time data arose from a number of cases, but primarily from uncertainities in magnification and timing. Results could only be matched with reliable data from blast-velocity switches by use of large corrections. Asymnetries, if present, were judged to have been too small or to have occurred too early to be detected with the slow-frame speed used. Recommendations for better results include locating the aircraft directly overhead at the time of burst and using a camera having greater frame speed and provided with timing marks.

  6. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it comes to repulsion, you can think of two people facing each other, throwing a basketball back and force. Throwing the ball and catching the ball pushes the people further...

  7. CX-011648: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Davis-Parker 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line- Marker Ball(s) Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/17/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  8. Zero-Gravity Centrifugal Force | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to create centrifugal force create its on gravity? Example if you were spinning a iron ball in space, just as the earth spins, does the iron ball create its on gravity? scott...

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  10. DEVICE FOR CONVEYING AND ROTATING OBJECTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frantz, C.E.; Roslund, J.

    1958-01-21

    A device is described for conveying cylindrical material with a combined rotary and axial motion. The material rides on a series of balls which are retained in a guide plate and rotated by bearing against a rotating drum. The drum has a series of conical sections or grooves cut in its outer surface on which the balls ride. The grooves and balls match in such a way that all the balls are caused to rotate about an axis at an angle to the drum axis. This skewed rotation of the ball imparts a longitudinal as well as a rotary motion to the cylinders being conveyed.

  11. Remove Condensate with Minimal Air Loss; Industrial Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... level point, or a float activates a pneumatic signal to an air cylinder to open a ball ... For additional information on industrial energy efficiency measures, contact the EERE ...

  12. Nuclear Storage Overpack Door Actuator and Alignment Apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreyko, Gregory M.

    2005-05-11

    The invention is a door actuator and alignment apparatus for opening and closing the 15,000-pound horizontally sliding door of a storage overpack. The door actuator includes a ball screw mounted horizontally on a rigid frame including a pair of door panel support rails. An electrically powered ball nut moves along the ball screw. The ball nut rotating device is attached to a carriage. The carriage attachment to the sliding door is horizontally pivoting. Additional alignment features include precision cam followers attached to the rails and rail guides attached to the carriage.

  13. 1.TIF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... tunnels for retrieving balls (3X) used as an emergency ... for Nuclear Power Plant Accident Consequence Analysis . ... the standards and guide- lines of the Historic American ...

  14. Richard E. Smalley, Buckminsterfullerene (the Buckyball), and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Nanotechnology: An Interview with Dr. Richard Smalley The Brave New World of Buckytubes (video) Soccer-Ball-Shaped Molecules Detected in Space (video) The Nanotube Site

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted July 9, 2013 Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9, ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Benmokhtar, Fatiha (6) Gaskell, David (6) Kalantarians, Narbe (6) ... ; Ball, Jacques ; et al Exclusive pi0 electroproduction at a beam energy of ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Everything20 Electronic Full Text13 Citations7 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter ... ; Ball, Jacques ; et al Exclusive pi0 electroproduction at a beam energy of ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes (10) Hanretty, Charles (10) Battaglieri, Marco ... ; Ball, Jacques ; et al Exclusive pi0 electroproduction at a beam energy of ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Everything10 Electronic Full Text7 Citations3 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter ... ; Ball, Jacques ; et al Exclusive pi0 electroproduction at a beam energy of ...

  20. Quantifying the Speculative Component in the Real Price of Oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches to Predicting the Gasoline Price at the Pump EIA Workshop on Financial and Physical Oil market Linkages September 29, 2015 Washington, ...

  1. Nuclear storage overpack door actuator and alignment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreyko, Gregory M. (North Huntingdon, PA)

    2005-05-10

    The invention is a door actuator and alignment apparatus for opening and closing the 15,000-pound horizontally sliding door of a storage overpack. The door actuator includes a ball screw mounted horizontally on a rigid frame including a pair of door panel support rails. An electrically powered ball nut moves along the ball screw. The ball nut rotating device is attached to a carriage. The carriage attachment to the sliding door is horizontally pivoting. Additional alignment features include precision cam followers attached to the rails and rail guides attached to the carriage.

  2. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectrum of Three dimensional Plasmas R L Dewar P Cuthbert R Ball PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY EIGENVALUES...

  3. Two Novel Ultra-Incompressible Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and at lower cost. The incorporation of nitrogen (black balls) into the rhenium (light grey) hcp lattice (AB stacking sequence of rhenium atoms) at increasing pressure and...

  4. Cherokee County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ball Ground, Georgia Canton, Georgia Holly Springs, Georgia Mountain Park, Georgia Nelson, Georgia Waleska, Georgia Woodstock, Georgia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Energy Monte Carlo (EMCEE) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with a specific set of distributions. Both programs run as spreadsheet workbooks in Microsoft Excel. EMCEE and Emc2 require Crystal Ball, a commercially available Monte Carlo...

  6. Omni-directional and holonomic rolling platform with decoupled rotational and translational degrees of freedom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pin, F.G.; Killough, S.M.

    1994-12-20

    A wheel assembly includes a support, a cage rotatably mounted on the support and having a longitudinal rotation axis, a first ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis of the cage, and a second ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis or the cage and to the rotation axis of the first ball wheel. A control circuit includes a photodetector signal which indicates ground contact for each ball wheel, and a tachometer which indicates actual drive shaft velocity. 6 figures.

  7. Omni-directional and holonomic rolling platform with decoupled rotational and translational degrees of freedom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pin, Francois G.; Killough, Stephen M.

    1994-01-01

    A wheel assembly includes a support, a cage rotatably mounted on the support and having a longitudinal rotation axis, a first ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis of the cage, and a second ball wheel rotatably mounted in the cage and having a rotation axis orthogonal to the rotation axis or the cage and to the rotation axis of the first ball wheel. A control circuit includes a photodetector signal which indicates ground contact for each ball wheel, and a tachometer which indicates actual drive shaft velocity.

  8. tdball | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tdball Ames Laboratory Profile Teresa Ball Custodian I Facilities Services 241C Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-4360 Email Address: tdball...

  9. Rapides Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Louisiana Cleco Power LLC Places in Rapides Parish, Louisiana Alexandria, Louisiana Ball, Louisiana Boyce, Louisiana Cheneyville, Louisiana Deville, Louisiana Forest Hill,...

  10. Sioux County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 6 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Sioux County, North Dakota Cannon Ball, North Dakota Fort Yates, North Dakota North Sioux, North Dakota Selfridge, North...

  11. Temperature actuated shutdown assembly for a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sowa, Edmund S.

    1976-01-01

    Three identical bimetallic disks, each shaped as a spherical cap with its convex side composed of a layer of metal such as molybdenum and its concave side composed of a metal of a relatively higher coefficient of thermal expansion such as stainless steel, are retained within flanges attached to three sides of an inner hexagonal tube containing a neutron absorber to be inserted into a nuclear reactor core. Each disk holds a metal ball against its normally convex side so that the ball projects partially through a hole in the tube located concentrically with the center of each disk; at a predetermined temperature an imbalance of thermally induced stresses in at least one of the disks will cause its convex side to become concave and its concave side to become convex, thus pulling the ball from the hole in which it is located. The absorber has a conical bottom supported by the three balls and is small enough in relation to the internal dimensions of the tube to allow it to slip toward the removed ball or balls, thus clearing the unremoved balls or ball so that it will fall into the reactor core.

  12. Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Daniel G. (Knoxville, TN); Gerth, Howard L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

  13. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  14. EA-1940: Proposed Federal Loan Guarantee for Montana Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana Advanced Biofuels (MAB) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support construction of a multi-feedstock biorefinery that would produce approximately 115 million gallons per year of ethanol in Great Falls, Montana. The biorefinery would utilize renewable biomass in the form of barley and wheat to produce ethanol and other by-products, including wheat gluten, barley bran, and barley meal. NOTE: The EA is cancelled because the applicant withdrew from the program.

  15. Y

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    " , . - - - . . . - - c . 1 8 u 9 - 4 I , , , , , 0 O " , , " , " , I Y 1 * * " , A o s . ' ' " ( R o 0 A W ) 8 1 8 - m R L W - . . - . - - . . - - - - . - - . ....

  16. Removal of mercury from coal via a microbial pretreatment process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The mercury can be recovered in pure form from the sorbents via additional processing. Inventors: Borole, Abhijeet P. 1 ; Hamilton, Choo Y. 1 + Show Author Affiliations ...

  17. Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Y. (1 January 2006) Three-Dimensional Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data on a PC, Methodology and Applications to the Coso Geothermal Field Additional References Retrieved from...

  18. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Them M&manta were made to the Westingbtme Eleatric Corporation, Atomic Power Division. y.;:. :.:. , ' . 1 I - .. ; a-y'j ;I-: I . . ,- .- : .. : i *' : ' I ;' , : , : : ' .. ...

  19. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably ...

  20. Bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact and method for preparing thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yusheng; He, Duanwei

    2004-07-06

    Bulk, superhard, B-C-N nanocomposite compact and method for preparing thereof. The bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compact is a well-sintered compact and includes nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B-C-N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compact has a Vicker's hardness of about 41-68 GPa. It is prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture, and sintering the encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a pressure of about 5-25 GPa and at a temperature of about 1000-2500 K.

  1. ELECTROSTATIC AIR CLEANING DEVICE AND METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silverman, L.; Anderson, D.M.

    1961-07-18

    A method and apparatus for utilizing friction-charged particulate material from an aerosol are described. A bed of the plastic spheres is prepared, and the aerosol is passed upwardly through the bed at a rate just large enough to maintain the bed in a fluidized state wim over-all circulation of the balls. Wire members criss-crossing through the bed rub against the balls and maintain their surfaces with electrostatic charges. The particulate material in the aerosol adheres to the surfaces of the balls.

  2. Savannah River Site Basin Cleanup Comes Full Circle to Los Angeles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sun-blocking options. But the rhombus-shaped balls were the most cost effective and had a history of success in other water bodies in the U.S. What is unique to the rhombus-shaped...

  3. Method for mounting laser fusion targets for irradiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, R. Jay; Farnum, Eugene H.; McCall, Gene H.

    1977-07-26

    Methods for preparing laser fusion targets of the ball-and-disk type are disclosed. Such targets are suitable for irradiation with one or two laser beams to produce the requisite uniform compression of the fuel material.

  4. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace-Transformational Ironmaking Process

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the batch furnace from the batch furnace y Demonstration ... GoNo Go Decision Manufacturing of Green Ball Pellets ... Task 5.0 Auxiliary Systems y Task 6.0 Verification Studies ...

  5. Highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Layton C.; Jensen, Steven A.

    2001-01-01

    A highly damped kinematic coupling for precision instruments. The kinematic coupling provides support while causing essentially no influence to its nature shape, with such influences coming, for example, from manufacturing tolerances, temperature changes, or ground motion. The coupling uses three ball-cone constraints, each combined with a released flexural degree of freedom. This arrangement enables a gain of higher load capacity and stiffness, but can also significantly reduce the friction level in proportion to the ball radius divided by the distance between the ball and the hinge axis. The blade flexures reduces somewhat the stiffness of the coupling and provides an ideal location to apply constrained-layer damping which is accomplished by attaching a viscoelastic layer and a constraining layer on opposite sides of each of the blade flexures. The three identical ball-cone flexures provide a damped coupling mechanism to kinematically support the projection optics system of the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system, or other load-sensitive apparatus.

  6. ULTRA HIGH VACUUM VALVE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fry, W.A.

    1962-05-29

    A valve for high vacuum applications such as the CStellarator where chamber pressures as low as 2 x 10/sup -10/ mm Hg are necessary is designed with a line-of-sight path through the valve for visual inspection of the contents of reactants in such chambers. The valve comprises a turnable resilient metal ball having an aperture therethrough, means for selectively turning the ball to rotate the axis of its line-of-sight path, and soft, deformable opposing orifices that are movable relatively toward said ball to seal with opposite ball surfaces upon said movement of said axis of said line-of-sight path. The valve also includes a bellows seal connected between said orifices and internal actuating means that eliminates the requirement for gasketed turnable valve closing stems. (AEC)

  7. ARM - Glossary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of a pea to that of golf balls. halo Rings or arcs that ... A measure of the returned power, which is sensitive to the ... masses, usually in groups, lines, or waves, the individual ...

  8. Microsoft Word - FINAL_NETL EOS Task 3.0.rev0.20120824.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... combines the predictive power of the G-S PC-SAFT method ... Pyrex 7740 tubes and balls can be inserted into this ... Solid lines are the corresponding PC-SAFT-FV theory ...

  9. Savannah River Site Basin Cleanup Comes Full Circle to Los Angeles Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – Several news headlines referred to 96 million shade balls covering a Los Angeles reservoir, and they seemed oddly familiar to Savannah River Site (SRS) employees.

  10. OSTIblog Posts by Sharon Jordan | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sharon Jordan, OSTI Assistant Director, and John Kunze, California Digital Libra Published ... Bucky Ball used in OSTI's recent YouTube video. The model shows a carbon atom at each ...

  11. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Examples of enlightening visualizations are structural models of molecules like the carbon-60 Bucky Ball used in OSTI's recent YouTube video. The model shows a carbon atom at each ...

  12. HEI Report 133 Characterization of Metals Emitted from Motor...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... the help of Min-Suk Bae. Dr Robert Smith and students at the University of ... Atmos Environ 37:1163-1173. Aust AE, Ball JC, Hu AA, Lighty JS, Smith KR, Straccia AM, ...

  13. Microsoft Word - 11033655 DVP.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... dedicated double check ball bailers. Was one pumptubing volume purged prior to sampling? ... Was the flow rate less than 500 mLmin? If a portable pump was used, was there a 4-hour ...

  14. Comments Received on the Coordination of Federal Authorizations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comment from Jeff Berns February 16, 2016 Comment from Judith Lee & Bob Cunningham February 16, 2016 Comment from Sarah Ball and Richard Loughery of EEI March 22, 2016 Comment from ...

  15. Solar Decathlon 2013: Meet the Teams | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Louisville, Ball State University and University of Kentucky -- is building a low-cost, solar-powered house that can easily be deployed after a disaster. Inspired by a tornado that...

  16. BPA-2011-01336-FOIA Correspondence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 In reply refer to: DKE Mark Rosencrantz Ball Janik LLP 818 Stewart Street, Suite 1110 Seattle, WA 98101 FOIA BPA-2011-01336-F Dear Mr. Rosencrantz: Thank you for your request...

  17. BPA-2011-01336-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 28, 2011 In reply refer to: DK-7 Mr. Mark Rosencrantz Ball Janik 818 Stewart Street, Suite 1 1 10 Seattle, Washington 9810 RE: FOIA BPA-201 l-01336-F Dear Mr....

  18. Microsoft Word - 7.26_PBacklund - Master _FINAL_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ball screw system lists operating conditions between 0-40 C and 5%-95% relative humidity. These conditions would be exceeded on a hot day or if it rains. Using hydraulic rams...

  19. Microsoft Word - PVSC 2014 Final-JJ.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richmond, CA 94804, USA Greg Ball DNV GL-Energy, San Francisco, CA 94104, USA Abstract - PV ground faults have caused many fires in the U.S. and around the world. One cause of...

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of California...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Subject: List of California Sites; May 17, 1989 CA.05-3 - AEC Memorandum; Ball to Smith; Subject: 500 Pounds UO3 - SR-1952; July 10, 1951 CA.05-4 - AEC Memorandum; Blatzs to ...

  1. Confirmed: Stellar Behemoth Self-Destructs in Type IIb Supernova

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    features. So, catching the supernova sufficiently early is hard-you've got to be on the ball, as our team was," says Filippenko. "This discovery was totally shocking, it opens up...

  2. First Direct Imaging of Swollen Microgel Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of simpler molecules-might curl back on themselves repeatedly until they resemble a loopy ball of tangled yarn. More surprising is the fact that the tangle can have unusual...

  3. 2003 - 05 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2003 Tue, 2003-05-06 00:00 It's a Ball. No, It's a Pretzel. Must Be a Proton. (The New York Times) Sat, 2003-05-03 00:00 Atomic Buffet (New Scientist

  4. THE SUN MAKES YOU NUMBER ONE!

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SUN MAKES YOU NUMBER ONE! (A S to ry From th e S3TEC Team) Hi friend! W here did you get the energy to make that lunch? Oh no! x H ow will I i°l be first now? the sun! Why, I got it from the same place as all the life around us.. M atter is also made of balls of energy. You see, light from the sun is made of balls of energy that move very fast. The sun's energy makes this food hot- and it / can make your little-car go forward! / W hen the fast-moving light balls knock into the matter balls,

  5. Index of /documents/public/root/material/4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size Description DIR Parent Directory - ROOTGUIs.pdf 14-Jul-2009 00:34 1.1M DIR ROOTGUIPROGRAMS 13-Jul-2009 18:24 - TarBallGUIPrograms.tar 13-Jul-2009 18:25 15...

  6. Technical Fact Sheets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks 3-D Model for Deactivation & Decommissioning D&D and Risk Assessment Tools RadBall Technology For Hot Cell Characterization Review of Beryllium ...

  7. Expulsion Leads to a New Catalyst | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    don't like each other. Oil and water tend to separate. Water on a Teflon-coated frying pan balls up to minimize its contact with the Teflon. Combining state-of-the-art...

  8. TESTING OF THE RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-10

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, nonelectrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. Positive results from initial deployment trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and the anticipated future potential use of RadBall throughout the U.S. Department of Energy Complex have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further test, underpin, and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. The study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment were successful in that for each trial radiation tracks were visible. The deployment of RadBall can be accomplished in different ways depending on the size and characteristics of the contaminated area (e.g., a hot cell that already has a crane/manipulator available or highly contaminated room that requires the use of a remote control device with sensor and video equipment to position RadBall). This report also presents SRNL-designed RadBall accessories for future RadBall deployment (a harness, PODS, and robot).

  9. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BaroBall TM : Control Valve with Volume Flow Measurement Barometric pumping is a remediation technique that removes volatile contaminants from soil in the vadose zone above the water table. The BaroBall TM control valve increases the efficiency of barometric pumping and allows natural soil gas to flow out of an underground well, while restricting air flow from the surface into the well. Air flowing into the well from the surface will dilute and possibly spread contaminants still present in the

  10. Precision adjustable stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A stage center block is mounted on each of two opposite sides by a pair of spaced ball bearing tracks which provide stability as well as simplicity. The use of the spaced ball bearing pairs in conjunction with an adjustment screw which also provides support eliminates extraneous stabilization components and permits maximization of the area of the center block laser transmission hole.

  11. Vibrating fuel grapple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chertock, deceased, Alan J.; Fox, Jack N.; Weissinger, Robert B.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor refueling method utilizing a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core which incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head, enabling additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  12. Vibrating fuel grapple. [LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chertock, A.J.; Fox, J.N.; Weissinger, R.B.

    A reactor refueling method is described which utilizes a vibrating fuel grapple for removing spent fuel assemblies from a reactor core. It incorporates a pneumatic vibrator in the grapple head which allows additional withdrawal capability without exceeding the allowable axial force limit. The only moving part in the vibrator is a steel ball, pneumatically driven by a gas, such as argon, around a track, with centrifugal force created by the ball being transmitted through the grapple to the assembly handling socket.

  13. Reusable, tamper-indicating seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J.

    1978-01-01

    A reusable, tamper-indicating seal comprises a drum confined within a fixed body and rotatable in one direction therewithin, the top of the drum constituting a tray carrying a large number of small balls of several different colors. The fixed body contains parallel holes for looping a seal wire therethrough. The base of the drums carries cams adapted to coact with cam followers to lock the wire within the seal at one angular position of the drum. A channel in the fixed body -- visible from outside the seal -- adjacent the tray constitutes a segregated location for a small plurality of the colored balls. A spring in the tray forces colored balls into the segregated location at one angular position of the drum, further rotation securing the balls in position and the wires in the seal. A wedge-shaped plough removes the balls from the segregated location, at a different angular position of the drum, the wire being unlocked at the same position. A new pattern of colored balls will appear in the segregated location when the seal is relocked.

  14. Self locking coupling mechanism for engaging and moving a load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, R.L.; Casamajor, A.B.; Parsons, R.E.

    1980-09-12

    A coupling mechanism for engaging and lifting a load has a housing with a guide passage for receiving a knob which is secured to the load through a neck of smaller diameter. A hollow ball in the housing has an opening which receives the knob and the ball is then turned to displace the opening from the housing passage and to cause the neck to enter a slot in the ball thereby securing the load to the coupling mechanism as elements of the housing block travel of the neck back into the opening when the ball is turned to the load holding orientation. As engagement of the load and locking of the coupling mechanism are accomplished simultaneously by the same ball motion, operation is simplified and reliability is greatly increased. The ball is preferably turned by a motor through worm gearing and the coupling mechanism may be controlled from a remote location. Among other uses, the coupling mechanism is adaptable to the handling of spent nuclear reactor fuel elements.

  15. Self locking coupling mechanism for engaging and moving a load

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Richard L.; Casamajor, Alan B.; Parsons, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Coupling mechanism (11) for engaging and lifting a load (12) has a housing (19) with a guide passage (18) for receiving a knob (13) which is secured to the load (12) through a neck (15) of smaller diameter. A hollow ball (23) in the housing (19) has an opening (27) which receives the knob (13) and the ball (23) is then turned to displace the opening (27) from the housing passage (18) and to cause the neck (15) to enter a slot (29) in the ball (23) thereby securing the load (12) to the coupling mechanism (11) as elements (49) of the housing (19) block travel of the neck (15) back into the opening (27) when the ball (23) is turned to the load holding orientation. As engagement of the load (12) and locking of the coupling mechanism are accomplished simultaneously by the same ball (23) motion, operation is simplified and reliability is greatly increased. The ball (23) is preferably turned by a motor (32) through worm gearing (36) and the coupling mechanism (11) may be controlled from a remote location. Among other uses, the coupling mechanism (11) is adaptable to the handling of spent nuclear reactor fuel elements (12).

  16. OBSERVATION O F T H E FORBIDDEN MAGNETIC DIPOLE TRANSITION 62P%+72P%IN ATOMIC THALLIUM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F

  17. ATR/TOR-201X(XXXX)-XXXX

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-01848 Plutonium Disposition Study Options Independent Assessment Phase 1 Report Option 1: MOX Fuel Option 4: Downblend April 13, 2015 Matthew J. Hart 1 , Nichols F. Brown 2 , Mark J. Rokey 1 , Harold J. Huslage 3 , Denise J. Castro-Bran 4 , Norman Y. Lao 5 , Roland J. Duphily 5 , Vincent M. Canales 2 , Joshua P. Davis 6 , Whitney L. Plumb-Starnes 7 , Jya-Syin W. Chien 5 1 Civil Applications Directorate, Civil and Commercial Programs Division 2 Schedule and Cost

  18. Popular Science Recognizes Innovative Solar Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL

  19. Plutonium_Disposition_Phase_2_TOR_082015_FINAL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02671 Plutonium Disposition Study Options Independent Assessment Phase 2 Report August 20, 2015 Matthew J. Hart 1 , Nichols F. Brown 2 , Mark J. Rokey 1 , Harold J. Huslage 3 , J. Denise Castro-Bran 4 , Norman Y. Lao 5 , Roland J. Duphily 5 , Vincent M. Canales 2 , Joshua P. Davis 6 , Whitney L. Plumb-Starnes 7 , Jya-Syin W. Chien 5 1 Civil Applications Directorate, Civil and Commercial Programs Division 2 Schedule and Cost Analysis Department, Acquisition Analysis

  20. RADBALLTECHNOLOGY TESTING AND MCNP MODELING OF THE TUNGSTEN COLLIMATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall{trademark}, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall{trademark} consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall{trademark} technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall{trademark} testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  1. Method and system for ultra-precision positioning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Locke, Stanley F.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2005-01-11

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultra-precision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball-screw or a piezoelectric actuator working separate or in conjunction displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a center-line of the ball-screw. The linking device consists of a first link which directs a first portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the center-line of the ball-screw, and a second link for directing a second portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented substantially parallel to the center-line of the ball-screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and are positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, the slide plate, the ball-screw, and the linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered, or tipped and tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

  2. Ultra-precision positioning assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montesanti, Richard C.; Locke, Stanley F.; Thompson, Samuel L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultra-precision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball-screw or a piezoelectric actuator working separate or in conjunction displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a center-line of the ball-screw. The linking device consists of a first link which directs a first portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the center-line of the ball-screw, and a second link for directing a second portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented substantially parallel to the center-line of the ball-screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and are positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, the slide plate, the ball-screw, and the linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered, or tipped and tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Singh, Prashant (1) Suresh, K. G. (1) Varma, Manoj Raama (1) Venkateswara, Y. (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for ...

  4. 70005 MODULE AT-- U-X ASSY - Sh

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 MODULE AT-- U-X ASSY MODULE U-X ASS'Y 1:10 1 6 RSF RSF RSF 70005 21607 - 21607 - - - INITIAL ISSUE - - WEIGHT: 3081 LBS FRONT (UPSTREAM SIDE) Parts List ITEM NO. QTY...

  5. Experimental demonstration of a soft x-ray self-seeded free-electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Emma, P. 1 ; Fairley, D. 1 ; Feng, Y. 1 ; Field, C. 1 ; Flechsig, U. 2 ; ... J. 1 ; Walz, D. 1 ; Welch, J. 1 ; Wu, J. 1 less + Show Author Affiliations ...

  6. L2:VUQ.P2.03 Brian Adams SNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -a 1 VUQ: Achieving Credible, Science-Based Predictions Milestone VUQ.Y1.03 (Enable SAUQ Demonstrations in VERA) * Strategy: Integrate SNL's DAKOTA UQ Toolkit with Westinghouse's ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Huang, Jing (2) Yang, Yuting (2) Brunzelle, Joseph S (1) Chang, Howard Y. (1) Chen, Juan ... Yuting ; Protacio, Angeline ; Dou, Yali ; Chang, Howard Y. ; Lei, Ming ; HHMI) Ash2L is a ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    De Boer, G. (2) Argrow, B (1) Asaka, Y. (1) Bauer, S. E. (1) Bland, G (1) Crawford,C. (1) ... observations de Boer G. ; Vogelmann A. ; Bauer, S. E. ; Toto, T. ; Menon, S. June 2013 ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter by Author Park, Tuson (7) Bauer, Eric D (4) Ronning, Filip (4) Thompson, Joe D (4) Ronning, F. (3) Thompson, J. D. (3) Bauer, E. D. (2) Lu, Xin (2) Chen, G F (1) Chen, Y. (1) ...

  10. Nanoselective area growth and characterization of dislocation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Sundaram, S. ; El Gmili, Y. 1 ; Puybaret, R. ; Li, X. ; Bonanno, P. L. ; Voss, P. L. ; Ougazzaden, A., E-mail: abdallah.ougazzaden@georgiatech-metz.fr 1 ; School of ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Lam, Amy Y. (1) Lamothe, Betty (1) Lin, Su-Chang (1) Lo, Yu-Chih (1) Min, Tongpil (1) ... of the NF-B Inhibitor A20 Lin, Su-Chang ; Chung, Jee Y. ; Lamothe, Betty ; ...

  12. Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' .;-;< 14 ,I> ,,.. &.<,y---.--- * 1 .? 1 c ,-J ..1, j ' ii ,; :I : j' - * - v- e . . *' ' -y " Y. ;: -.-, yl-j ' " : -2 F*;f yTJ IEYii, , .- -.,ir:.l -. ( z;y;,y:' ...

  13. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prashant (1) Suresh, K. G. (1) Varma, Manoj Raama (1) Venkateswara, Y. (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have feedback or suggestions for a way...

  14. Extraordinary suppression of carrier scattering in large area...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Negishi, R., E-mail: negishi@ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp ; Kobayashi, Y. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, ...

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 032321 (2015

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... This scheme is remarkably simple for CW beams: one has the same resource state at all ... The cubic phase gate U(y) 1 + Iyx3 - y3x6|2 can be approximated by its Taylor expansion, ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Brandt, Nate (1) Chen, Hou-Tong (1) Grady, Nathaniel (1) Hwang, Harold Y. (1) Jia, Quanxi (1) Nelson, Keith A. (1) Perkins Jr., Bradford G. (1) Singh, Ranjan (1) Taylor, Antoinette ...

  17. Preparation of bulk superhard B-C-N nanocomposite compact

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yusheng; He, Duanwei

    2011-05-10

    Bulk, superhard, B--C--N nanocomposite compacts were prepared by ball milling a mixture of graphite and hexagonal boron nitride, encapsulating the ball-milled mixture at a pressure in a range of from about 15 GPa to about 25 GPa, and sintering the pressurized encapsulated ball-milled mixture at a temperature in a range of from about 1800-2500 K. The product bulk, superhard, nanocomposite compacts were well sintered compacts with nanocrystalline grains of at least one high-pressure phase of B--C--N surrounded by amorphous diamond-like carbon grain boundaries. The bulk compacts had a measured Vicker's hardness in a range of from about 41 GPa to about 68 GPa.

  18. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  19. Gage for micromachining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Donald M.

    1979-02-27

    A gage for measuring the contour of the surface of an element of a micromachining tool system and of a work piece machined by the micromachining tool system. The gage comprises a glass plate containing two electrical contacts and supporting a steel ball resting against the contacts. As the element or workpiece is moved against the steel ball, the very slight contact pressure causes an extremely small movement of the steel ball which breaks the electrical circuit between the two contacts. The contour information is supplied to a dedicated computer controlling the micromachining tool so that the computer knows the contour of the element and the work piece to an accuracy of .+-. 25 nm. The micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nanometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS.

  20. FLEXIBLE COUPLING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Babelay, E.F.

    1962-02-13

    A flexible shaft coupling for operation at speeds in excess of 14,000 rpm is designed which requires no lubrication. A driving sleeve member and a driven sleeve member are placed in concentric spaced relationship. A torque force is transmitted to the driven member from the driving member through a plurality of nylon balls symmetrically disposed between the spaced sleeves. The balls extend into races and recesses within the respective sleeve members. The sleeve members have a suitable clearance therebetween and the balls have a suitable radial clearance during operation of the coupling to provide a relatively loose coupling. These clearances accommodate for both parallel and/or angular misalignments and avoid metal-tometal contact between the sleeve members during operation. Thus, no lubrication is needed, and a minimum of vibrations is transmitted between the sleeve members. (AEC)

  1. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Bergren, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  2. Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

    1987-10-06

    An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

  3. REDUCTION OF THE MOMENTUM OF FALLING BODIES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kendall, J.W.; Morrison, I.H.

    1954-09-21

    A means for catching free falling bodies that may be damaged upon impact is given. Several layers of floating gas-filled rubber balls are contained within a partially compartmented tank of liquid. The compartment extends from beneath the surface of the liquid to that height necessary to contain the desired number of layers of the balls. The balls and the liquid itself break the force of the fall by absorbing the kinetic energy of falling body. The body may then be retrieved from the floor of the tank by a rake that extends from outside of the tank through the free surface area and underneath the compartment wall. This arrangement is particularly useful in collecting irradiated atomic fuel rods that are discharged from a reactor at considerable height without damaging the thin aluminum jacket of the rods.

  4. High temperature control rod assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollman, Russell E.

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature nuclear control rod assembly comprises a plurality of substantially cylindrical segments flexibly joined together in succession by ball joints. The segments are made of a high temperature graphite or carbon-carbon composite. The segment includes a hollow cylindrical sleeve which has an opening for receiving neutron-absorbing material in the form of pellets or compacted rings. The sleeve has a threaded sleeve bore and outer threaded surface. A cylindrical support post has a threaded shaft at one end which is threadably engaged with the sleeve bore to rigidly couple the support post to the sleeve. The other end of the post is formed with a ball portion. A hollow cylindrical collar has an inner threaded surface engageable with the outer threaded surface of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve. the collar also has a socket portion which cooperates with the ball portion to flexibly connect segments together to form a ball and socket-type joint. In another embodiment, the segment comprises a support member which has a threaded shaft portion and a ball surface portion. The threaded shaft portion is engageable with an inner threaded surface of a ring for rigidly coupling the support member to the ring. The ring in turn has an outer surface at one end which is threadably engageably with a hollow cylindrical sleeve. The other end of the sleeve is formed with a socket portion for engagement with a ball portion of the support member. In yet another embodiment, a secondary rod is slidably inserted in a hollow channel through the center of the segment to provide additional strength. A method for controlling a nuclear reactor utilizing the control rod assembly is also included.

  5. CONTROL TESTING OF THE UK NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY'S RADBALL TECHNOLOGY AT SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2009-11-23

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall (patent pending), which offers a means to locate and quantify radiation hazards and sources within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. To date, the RadBall has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the UK. The trials have demonstrated the successful ability of the RadBall technology to be deployed and retrieved from active areas. The positive results from these initial deployment trials and the anticipated future potential of RadBall have led to the NNL partnering with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to further underpin and strengthen the technical performance of the technology. RadBall consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. It has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach places. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly less transparent, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation maps provides information on the spatial distribution and strength of the sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. This study completed at SRNL addresses key aspects of the testing of the RadBall technology. The first set of tests was performed at Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL) using various gamma-ray sources and an x-ray machine with known radiological characteristics. The objective of these preliminary tests was to identify the optimal dose and collimator thickness. The second set of tests involved a highly contaminated hot cell. The objective of this part of the testing was to characterize a hot cell with unknown radiation sources. The RadBall calibration experiments and hot cell deployment completed at SRNL were successful in that for each trial, the technology was able to locate the radiation sources. The NNL believe that the ability of RadBall to be remotely deployed with no electrical supplies into difficult to access areas of plant and locate and quantify radiation hazards is a unique radiation mapping service. The NNL consider there to be significant business potential associated with this innovative technology.

  6. Efficient boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitney, R Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael W

    2015-03-24

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  7. Efficient boron nitride nanotube formation via combined laser-gas flow levitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitney, R. Roy; Jordan, Kevin; Smith, Michael

    2014-03-18

    A process for producing boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z. The process utilizes a combination of laser light and nitrogen gas flow to support a boron ball target during heating of the boron ball target and production of a boron vapor plume which reacts with nitrogen or nitrogen and carbon to produce boron nitride nanotubes and/or boron-carbon-nitrogen nanotubes of the general formula B.sub.xC.sub.yN.sub.z.

  8. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Barriers Hi. Is it possible to experimentally prove my following question AND my following analogous question? Does a particle really go through a wall or through a potential barrier, or is it possible that a) a particle hits the wall, and the energy is transferred (just like those balls on the double strings that tranfer energy to the last ball) until the other side of the wall emits it's own electron? Perhaps the tranfer of energy has identical velocity as the particle, or b) that

  9. Development of Readout Interconnections for the Si-W Calorimeter of SiD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, M.; Fields, R.G.; Holbrook, B.; Lander, R.L.; Moskaleva, A.; Neher, C.; Pasner, J.; Tripathi, M.; Brau, J.E.; Frey, R.E.; Strom, D.; Breidenbach, M.; Freytag, D.; Haller, G.; Herbst, R.; Nelson, T.; Schier, S.; Schumm, B.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2012-09-14

    The SiD collaboration is developing a Si-W sampling electromagnetic calorimeter, with anticipated application for the International Linear Collider. Assembling the modules for such a detector will involve special bonding technologies for the interconnections, especially for attaching a silicon detector wafer to a flex cable readout bus. We review the interconnect technologies involved, including oxidation removal processes, pad surface preparation, solder ball selection and placement, and bond quality assurance. Our results show that solder ball bonding is a promising technique for the Si-W ECAL, and unresolved issues are being addressed.

  10. Young Women's Conference cheers on girls interested in STEM | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Young Women's Conference cheers on girls interested in STEM By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 27, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL engineer Han Zhang shows off a plasma ball to a few of the 400 young women who attended PPPL's Young Women's Conference on March 21 at Princeton University. (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL engineer Han Zhang shows off a plasma ball to a few of the 400 young women who attended PPPL's Young Women's

  11. Young Women's Conference cheers on girls interested in STEM | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Young Women's Conference cheers on girls interested in STEM By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 28, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL engineer Han Zhang shows off a plasma ball to a few of the 400 young women who attended PPPL's Young Women's Conference on March 21. (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL engineer Han Zhang shows off a plasma ball to a few of the 400 young women who attended PPPL's Young Women's Conference on March 21.

  12. New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture New Computer Model Pinpoints Prime Materials for Carbon Capture July 17, 2012 NERSC Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 UC Berkeley Contact: Robert Sanders, rsanders@berkeley.edu zeolite350.jpg One of the 50 best zeolite structures for capturing carbon dioxide. Zeolite is a porous solid made of silicon dioxide, or quartz. In the model, the red balls are oxygen, the tan balls are silicon. The blue-green area is where

  13. F.S.V.B. Volleyball

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    22me assemblée des délégués de la Fédération Suisse de Volley Ball (F.S.V.B.), en présence entre autres de Claude Delay, représentant de la société fédérale de gymnastique et Hans Gauer, représentant de l'association suisse de gymnastique féminine. Annonce d'une démonstration d'un mini match de volley ball à Meyrin dans l'après-midi.

  14. Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Project Title: Program or Program Office:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    radiation mapping dosimeter will be placed in a shielded cell in 773-A E-wing Shielded Cell Operations (SCO) facility for in-cell exposure to ambient radiation. Either the RadBall or GrayQb technologies will be selected for deployment; details of these two radiation mapping technologies are discussed below. --The RadBall consists of an inner spherical core made of a radiation sensitive polymer and an outer tungsten based collimation sheath. --The GrayQb is a alternate type of radiation mapping

  15. Holder for rotating glass body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolleck, Floyd W.

    1978-04-04

    A device is provided for holding and centering a rotating glass body such as a rod or tube. The device includes a tubular tip holder which may be held in a lathe chuck. The device can utilize a variety of centering tips each adapted for a particular configuration, such as a glass O-ring joint or semi-ball joint.

  16. Index of /documents/public/root/material/1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] C++Examples/ 03-Jun-2012 22:34 - [ ] IntroductiontoROOT.pdf 03-Jun-2012 22:28 868K [ ] IntroductiontoROOTClasses.pdf 03-Jun-2012 22:30 511K [DIR] ROOTExamples/ 03-Jun-2012 22:39 - [ ] ROOTTarBall_1.tar 03-Jun-2012 22:41

  17. Index of /documents/public/root/material/2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] C++Examples/ 03-Jun-2012 22:34 - [ ] IntroductiontoROOT.pdf 03-Jun-2012 22:28 868K [ ] IntroductiontoROOTClasses.pdf 03-Jun-2012 22:30 511K [DIR] ROOTExamples/ 03-Jun-2012 22:39 - [ ] ROOTTarBall_1.tar 03-Jun-2012 22:42

  18. Index of /documents/public/root/material/3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [ ] IntrotoROOTDataStructures.pdf 15-Jul-2009 11:01 1.1M [DIR] ROOT_Data_Structures/ 12-Jul-2009 16:01 - [ ] TarBall_Data_Structure_Programs.tar 13-Jul-2009 17:19 4

  19. CX-011718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical District 2 to Saguaro #2 115 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Marker Ball Installation at Structure 26-10. CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/09/2014 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  20. CX-012074: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Canyon City West-Midway 230-Kilovolt Transmission Line Safety Marker Ball Installation CX(s) Applied: B.13 Date: 04/07/2014 Location(s): Colorado, Colorado, Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  1. Fast closing valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Clark L.

    1984-01-10

    A valve is provided for protecting the high vacuum of a particle accelera in the event of air leakage, wherein the valve provides an axially symmetrical passage to avoid disturbance of the partical beam during normal operation, and yet enables very rapid and tight closure of the beam-carrying pipe in the event of air leakage. The valve includes a ball member (30) which can rotate between a first position wherein a bore (32) in the member is aligned with the beam pipe, and a second position out of line with the pipe. A seal member (38) is flexibly sealed to the pipe, and has a seal end which can move tightly against the ball member after the bore has rotated out of line with the pipe, to thereby assure that the seal member does not retard rapid rotation of the ball valve member. The ball valve member can be rapidly rotated by a conductive arm (40) fixed to it and which is rotated by the discharge of a capacitor bank through coils (44, 45) located adjacent to the arm.

  2. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  3. REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-06-24

    Refractory coating for graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is described. The coating is an alumino-silicate refractory composition which may be used as a mold surface in solid form or as a coating applied to the graphite mold. The composition consists of a mixture of ball clay, kaolin, alumina cement, alumina, water, sodium silicate, and sodium carbonate.

  4. Rolling contact fatigue in high vacuum using ion plated nickel-copper-silver solid lubrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2011-01-15

    Ion plated, nickel-copper-silver coated steel ball bearings that were tested in rolling contact fatigue (RCF) experiments in high vacuum are presented in this article. ANSI T5 ball bearings were coated with approximately 10 nm of nickel-copper followed by 100 nm of silver using a dc ion plating process. The balls were then tested for RCF in vacuum in the 10{sup -7} Torr range at 130 Hz rotational speed and at 4.1 GPa Hertzian contact stress. The significance of this work is in the extension of RCF testing to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application using silver as a lubricant instead of oil. The effects of pressure and voltage on the ion plating process were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy and RCF life testing in UHV. Test results with a ball size of 5/16 in. in UHV show that deposition at voltages greater than 2.5 kV shortens the RCF life and introduces a unique failure mode. Voltage and pressure fluctuations during the deposition process result in significant thickness monitor measurement errors as well. A regulator control scheme that minimizes the process pressure overshoot is also simulated.

  5. Argonne Physics Division - ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ATLAS Program Advisory Committee (PAC) Current PAC Membership: Gordon Ball TRIUMF Dan Bardayan University of Notre Dame Peter Butler University of Liverpool Michael Carpenter Argonne National Laboratory Alexandra Gade Michigan State University Walter Loveland (Chair) Oregon State University Ingo Wiedenhoever Florida State University Alan Wuosmaa (UEC Chair) University of Connecticut

  6. CX-002281: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ball State University Ground Source Geothermal District Heating and Cooling SystemCX(s) Applied: B2.2, A9, B5.1Date: 05/12/2010Location(s): Muncie, IndianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  7. Jacking mechanism for upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Wineman, Arthur L. (Greensburg, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A jacking mechanism for raising the upper internals structure of a liquid metal nuclear reactor which jacking mechanism uses a system of gears and drive shafts to transmit force from a single motor to four mechanically synchronized ball jacks to raise and lower support columns which support the upper internals structure. The support columns have a pin structure which rides up and down in a slot in a housing fixed to the reactor head. The pin has two locking plates which can be rotated around the pin to bring bolt holes through the locking plates into alignment with a set of bolt holes in the housing, there being a set of such housing bolt holes corresponding to both a raised and a lowered position of the support column. When the locking plate is so aligned, a surface of the locking plate mates with a surface in the housing such that the support column is then supported by the locking plate and not by the ball jacks. Since the locking plates are to be installed and bolted to the housing during periods of reactor operation, the ball jacks need not be sized to react the large forces which occur or potentially could occur on the upper internals structure of the reactor during operation. The locking plates react these loads. The ball jacks, used only during refueling, can be smaller, which enable conventionally available equipment to fulfill the precision requirements for the task within available space.

  8. Valve for abrasive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, Harold S.

    1982-01-01

    A ball valve assembly for controlling the flow of abrasive particulates including an enlarged section at the bore inlet and an enlarged section at the bore outlet. A refractory ceramic annular deflector is positioned in each of the enlarged sections, substantially extending the useful life of the valve.

  9. CX-007164: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prescott-Pinnacle Peak & Pinnacle Peak-Rogers Aerial Marker Ball AdditionCX(s) Applied: B1.9Date: 01/07/2011Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  11. Senate Energy Committee Passes New Geothermal Legislation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Energy Committee moved the ball forward for geothermal energy by passing two important geothermal measures, S. 1142 and S. 1149, on December 15. "These two measures will support exploration drilling, expand geothermal research into heating uses, and expedite leasing and development," remarked GEA Executive Director Karl Gawell.

  12. Cosmology with hybrid expansion law: scalar field reconstruction of cosmic history and observational constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akarsu, zgr [Department of Physics, Ko University, 34450 Sariyer, ?stanbul (Turkey); Kumar, Suresh [Department of Mathematics, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, Rajasthan-333031 (India); Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M. [Centre of Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Xu, Lixin, E-mail: oakarsu@ku.edu.tr, E-mail: sukuyd@gmail.com, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com, E-mail: samijamia@gmail.com, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple form of expansion history of Universe referred to as the hybrid expansion law - a product of power-law and exponential type of functions. The ansatz by construction mimics the power-law and de Sitter cosmologies as special cases but also provides an elegant description of the transition from deceleration to cosmic acceleration. We point out the Brans-Dicke realization of the cosmic history under consideration. We construct potentials for quintessence, phantom and tachyon fields, which can give rise to the hybrid expansion law in general relativity. We investigate observational constraints on the model with hybrid expansion law applied to late time acceleration as well as to early Universe a la nucleosynthesis.

  13. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is also designed (1) to survive the extreme level of radiation ({approx}1 GGy in the nominal condition), (2) to resolve the shower from each bunch crossing (40 MHz in the nominal condition) and measure the bunch-by-bunch luminosities, and (3) to have four independent square shaped channels, each occupying a quadrant, making the detector sensitive to the crossing angle [1, 2]. During the proton operation in 2010, the beam energy was 3.5 TeV and the multiplicity did not exceed four. Because the counting mode is still effective in such a condition [5], the BRAN were operated in the counting mode in 2010. This paper presents operational results of the BRANs during the operation in 2010 (mainly the proton operation) and makes comparisons with measurements of the experiments. The luminosity optimization is discussed in detail in [6] and so this paper focuses on measurements during the normal operation.

  14. Online SAG Mill Pluse Measurement and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj Rajamani; Jose Delgadillo; Vishal Duriseti

    2007-06-30

    The grinding efficiency of semi autogenous milling or ball milling depends on the tumbling motion of the total charge within the mill. Utilization of this tumbling motion for efficient breakage of particles depends on the conditions inside the mill. However, any kind of monitoring device to measure the conditions inside the mill shell during operation is virtually impossible due to the severe environment presented by the tumbling charge. An instrumented grinding ball, which is capable of surviving a few hours and transmitting the impacts it experiences, is proposed here. The spectrum of impacts collected over 100 revolutions of the mills presents the signature of the grinding environment inside mill. This signature could be effectively used to optimize the milling performance by investigating this signature's relation to mill product size, mill throughput, make-up ball size, mill speed, liner profile and ball addition rates. At the same time, it can also be used to design balls and liner systems that can survive longer in the mill. The technological advances made in electronics and communication makes this leap in instrumentation certainly viable. Hence, the instrumented grinding ball offers the ability to qualitatively observe and optimize the milling environment. An instrumented load cell package that can measure the force of impacts inside the grinding chamber of a mill is developed here. The signal from the instrumented load cell package is interpreted in terms of a histogram termed as an impact spectrum which is a plot of the number of impacts at a specific energy level against the energy. It reflects on the average force regime of the mill. The instrumented load cell package was calibrated against the ultra fast load cell which has been unanimously accepted as a standard to measure single breakage events. The load cell package was successfully used to produce impact spectra in an 8.5 inch lab scale mill. The mill speed and the ball size were varied to study their effect on the impact spectra. A good correlation was found between the process variables and the impact spectra. The load cell package was then used in a 16 inch pilot scale mill. The mill speed, ball size, and mill filling were varied here and a consistent trend between these variables and impact spectra was observed. With a better understanding developed from the initial tests, the design of the load cell package was significantly changed to eliminate noise. With the new design, the impact spectra were re-determined in the 16 inch pilot mill varying the process variables - ball size, mill speed, and mill filling. Finally, it is successfully shown that a change in the operating variables of a mill can be seen in the impact spectra and that this concept can be successfully developed to monitor the grinding operation of industrial mills. To adapt it to industrial level it is mandatory to make the load cell package wireless. A design of a wireless circuit that is capable of transferring data at the required speed of 1000 kbps was also developed and tested at Cortez Gold Mines (CGM), Nevada.

  15. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Milestone: CASL.Y1.01 Port and Integrate Base-line WEC Codes into VERA/LIME Rod Schmidt Sandia National Laboratory with Chris Baker/John Turner, ORNL; Ross Bartlett, Noel Belcourt, Roger Pawlowski, SNL; David Paterline, Pete Hilton and Brian Coulter: WEC January 12, 2011 CASL-U-2010-0025-000-c Nuclear Energy CASL-U-2010-0025-000-c Level 1 Milestone: CASL.Y1.01 Port and Integrate Base-line WEC Codes into VERA/LIME VRI Physics Simulation Suite Project Presented by: Rod Schmidt, SNL with: Chris

  16. Device for identifying a circumferential position

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mikesell, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01

    A device is described which accurately and reproducibly identifies points on the circumference of a non-vertical pipe for use as reference marks for pipe inspections. The device comprises a light-permeable disk-shaped chamber having a plurality of pockets spaced about its circumference, a light source transmitting a beam of light through the chamber, and a light-activated switch positioned to detect the light beam. The chamber contains a freely moving ball sized to be retained by the pockets. The device is mounted to revolve about the axis of the pipe. As it revolves the ball moves from one pocket of the chamber to another, interrupting the beam of light and triggering the light-activated switch, thereby indicating that the device has passed to a pre-selected circumferential position on the non-vertical pipe.

  17. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=58 GPa, T=1400K2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  18. A New Type of Steady and Stable, Laminar, Premixed Flame in Ultra-Lean, Hydrogen-Air Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grcar, Joseph F; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Ultra-lean, hydrogen-air mixtures are found to support another kind of laminar flame that is steady and stable beside flat flames and flame balls. Direct numerical simulations are performed of flames that develop into steadily and stably propagating cells. These cells were the original meaning of the word"flamelet'' when they were observed in lean flammability studies conducted early in the development of combustion science. Several aspects of these two-dimensional flame cells are identified and are contrasted with the properties of one-dimensional flame balls and flat flames. Although lean hydrogen-air flames are subject to thermo-diffusive effects, in this case the result is to stabilize the flame rather than to render it unstable. The flame cells may be useful as basic components of engineering models for premixed combustion when the other types of idealized flames are inapplicable.

  19. The effects of high magnetic field on the morphology and microwave electromagnetic properties of MnO{sub 2} powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Zhang [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China); Duan Yuping, E-mail: duanyp@dlut.edu.c [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China); Li Shuqing, E-mail: lsq6668@126.co [Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, 1 Jun Zhuang east Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100024 (China); Li Xiaogang, E-mail: lixiaogang99@263.ne [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu Shunhua [Department of Materials Processing Engineering, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Ganjingzi District, Dalian 116085, Liaoning Province (China)

    2010-07-15

    MnO{sub 2} with a sea urchin-like ball chain shape was first synthesized in a high magnetic field via a simple chemical process, and a mechanism for the formation of this grain shape was discussed. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and vector network analysis. The dielectric constant and the loss tangent clearly decreased under a magnetic field. The magnetic loss tangent and the imaginary part of the magnetic permeability increased substantially. Furthermore, the theoretically calculated values of reflection loss showed that the absorption peaks shifted to a higher frequency with increases in the magnetic field strength. - Graphical abstract: MnO{sub 2} with a sea urchin-like ball chain shape is first synthesized in a high magnetic field via a simple hydrothermal route.

  20. Development of Centrifugal Contactor with High Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamura, Nobuo; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ogino, Hideki; Kase, Takeshi; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    2007-07-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), an innovative centrifugal contactor system has been developed for a future reprocessing plant. It was confirmed that it had a higher extraction capacity through the uranium test already. But it was necessary that it had the higher mechanical reliability to be applied in a reprocessing plant. In this study, two types of driving units that use a ball bearing or a magnetic bearing have been developed for it. It was confirmed that they had enough abilities trough endurance tests. The driving unit with ball bearing could be operated continuously for 5000 hours that was equal to a term of an annual operation. It was found that it could be operated for a year without maintenance. JAEA will continue to improve them and select more advantageous one on the basis of economy and lifetime in near future. (authors)

  1. Machine tool locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanlon, John A.; Gill, Timothy J.

    2001-01-01

    Machine tools can be accurately measured and positioned on manufacturing machines within very small tolerances by use of an autocollimator on a 3-axis mount on a manufacturing machine and positioned so as to focus on a reference tooling ball or a machine tool, a digital camera connected to the viewing end of the autocollimator, and a marker and measure generator for receiving digital images from the camera, then displaying or measuring distances between the projection reticle and the reference reticle on the monitoring screen, and relating the distances to the actual position of the autocollimator relative to the reference tooling ball. The images and measurements are used to set the position of the machine tool and to measure the size and shape of the machine tool tip, and examine cutting edge wear. patent

  2. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-01-10

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figures.

  3. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine wheel having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. The turbine blade has a root portion having a first groove and a second groove therein. The turbine wheel includes a plurality of openings in which the turbine blade is positioned. Each of the openings has a first groove and a second groove therein. The space or void formed between the first grooves and the second grooves has a plurality of spherical balls positioned therein. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  4. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1995-01-01

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade.

  5. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2005-09-06

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  6. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  7. Ceramic blade attachment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-07-11

    A turbine blade having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is attached to a turbine disc having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade and forms a turbine assembly. The turbine blade has a root portion defining a pair of sides having a pair of grooves therein. The turbine assembly includes a pair of flanges between which the turbine blades are positioned. Each of the pair of flanges has a plurality of grooves defined therein. The grooves within the pair of flanges are aligned with the grooves in the blades and have a space formed therebetween. A plurality of spherical balls are positioned within the space. The plurality of spherical balls has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being equal to the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine blade. 4 figs.

  8. Device for identifying a circumferential position

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mikesell, C.R.

    1982-06-29

    A device is described which accurately and reproducibly identifies points on the circumference of a non-vertical pipe for use as reference marks for pipe inspections. The device comprises a light-permeable disk-shaped chamber having a plurality of pockets spaced about its circumference, a light source transmitting a beam of light through the chamber, and a light-activated switch positioned to detect the light beam. The chamber contains a freely moving ball sized to be retained by the pockets. The device is mounted to revolve about the axis of the pipe. As it revolves the ball moves from one pocket of the chamber to another, interrupting the beam of light and triggering the light-activated switch, thereby indicating that the device has passed to a pre-selected circumferential position on the non-vertical pipe.

  9. Method of producing an oxide dispersion strengthened coating and micro-channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Bruce S; Chyu, Minking K; Alvin, Mary Anne; Gleeson, Brian M

    2013-12-17

    The disclosure provides a method for the production of composite particles utilizing a mechano chemical bonding process following by high energy ball milling on a powder mixture comprised of coating particles, first host particles, and second host particles. The composite particles formed have a grain size of less than one micron with grains generally characterized by a uniformly dispersed coating material and a mix of first material and second material intermetallics. The method disclosed is particularly useful for the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened coatings, for example using a powder mixture comprised of Y.sub.2O.sub.3, Cr, Ni, and Al. This particular powder mixture may be subjected to the MCB process for a period generally less than one hour following by high energy ball milling for a period as short as 2 hours. After application by cold spraying, the composite particles may be heat treated to generate an oxide-dispersion strengthened coating.

  10. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 12.5 Nuclear Ordnance 12.6 Weapons 13. Electronic & Communication Equipment - 8.7B 13.1 ... 348,725 260,890 38.9% 18.3% Y 0.3% Safari Books 172,556 506,544 439,334 65.9% 60.7% Y 1.0% ...

  11. DOE/NV/10327-19 DOE/NV/10327-19

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... - 020485 010684 - 020485 ELEVATIOW WT) WSE RATE 1983 AOJUSTED hramd) ANNUAL DOSE gg& (mmY) 0622 0.14 0.16 60 1984 ADJUSTED ANNUAL WSE (nrealY 1 60 5750 0.37 0.n 0.26 105 ...

  12. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wildfires may contribute more to global warming than previously predicted July 9, 2013 Particle analysis shows "tar ball" effect is significant LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 9, 2013-Wildfires produce a witch's brew of carbon- containing particles, as anyone downwind of a forest fire can attest. A range of fine carbonaceous particles rising high into the air significantly degrade air quality, damaging human and wildlife health, and interacting with sunlight to affect climate. But measurements

  14. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Interesting Insights

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DNA Interesting Insights Atom Neat Stuff a pre-Pong video game (Tennis for Two) [Video game] why dinosaurs are extinct [Alvarez] BuckyBall 'optical tweezers' [Chu] the molecule named Buckminsterfullerene (Buckyball) [Curl, Smalley] femtochemistry [Zewail] the structure of protein [Deisenhofer] the maser and the laser [Townes] Gaussian Code [Pople] biological computer modeling [Levitt] chemical computer modeling [Karplus] the Manhattan Project brings an end to World War II an anti-jet-lag diet

  15. 10 Ways to "See" the Electric Field | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 Ways to "See" the Electric Field 10 Ways to "See" the Electric Field Addthis Description How can you demonstrate the electric field if it's invisible? This video shows you 10 activities and experiments that help to teach about the electric field using various apparatuses, such as a plasma ball or a Van de Graaff generator. Duration 8:07 Credit James Lincoln, AAPT Films

  16. Mechanosynthesis, deposition and characterization of CZTS and CZTSe materials for solar cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shyju, T.S.; Anandhi, S.; Suriakarthick, R.; Gopalakrishnan, R.; Kuppusami, P.

    2015-07-15

    Mechanosynthesis of nanocrystalline powders of CZTS and CZTSe by ball milling technique and the physical properties of thermally evaporated CZTS and CZTSe thin films as a function of substrate temperature are investigated. Nanocrystalline Cu–Zn–Tin–Sulphide (CZTS) and Cu–Zn–Tin–Selenide (CZTSe) powders synthesized by ball milling at different milling time using the source materials of Cu, Zn, Sn, S (or) Se in the ratio 2:1:1:4 are investigated. The above synthesized powder was thermally evaporated on glass substrate kept at room temperature and 673 K under a vacuum of 10{sup −6} mbar to prepare quaternary compound semiconducting thin films in a single step process. The synthesized powder and deposited CZTS and CZTSe thin films belong to tetragonal crystal system. Raman spectra reveal that the synthesized nanocrystals are pure without any secondary phases. A gradual reduction in optical bandgap of films was observed with increasing substrate temperature due to increased crystallinity of the films. The changes in surface morphology of the films with respect to substrate temperature were studied by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Electrical studies indicate that the deposited films have p-type conductivity. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline powders of CZTS and CZTSe are synthesized by ball milling technique. • The ball milled powder was thermally evaporated on glass at room temperature and 673 K. • Raman spectroscopy reveals that the synthesized nanocrystals are pure without any secondary phases. • SEM and AFM micrographs illustrate the granular type of growth and the roughness and particle sizes obtained at the substrate temperature of 673 K are higher than those obtained in the room temperature. • Hall coefficient obtained for the film confirms the p-type conductivity. • A gradual reduction in optical bandgap was observed with increasing substrate temperature.

  17. Index of /documents/public/root/material/6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    root/material/6 [ICO] Name Last modified Size Description [DIR] Parent Directory - [DIR] C++Examples/ 03-Jun-2012 22:34 - [ ] CompPhysMethods.pdf 06-Jun-2012 09:11 8.0M [ ] IntroductiontoROOT.pdf 03-Jun-2012 22:28 868K [ ] IntroductiontoROOTClasses.pdf 03-Jun-2012 22:30 511K [DIR] ROOTExamples/ 03-Jun-2012 22:39 - [ ] ROOTTarBall_1.tar 05-Jun-2012 22:04 2.

  18. Insider looks at "Rhythm of the Night" | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches to Predicting the Gasoline Price at the Pump Christiane Baumeister, Bank of Canada Lutz Kilian, University of Michigan Thomas K. Lee, U.S. Energy Information Administration April 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of

  19. Historical Significance Dropping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Historical Significance Dropping the Ball NNSS is known for more than just nuclear past. NvE celebrates employees with picnics. U1a Facility, Icecap become testing grounds for unique physics experiments. See page 8. See page 4. NNSA Head Frank Klotz Visits NLV, NNSS Facilities On May 6, the National Nuclear Security Administration's new administrator Frank Klotz conducted an all-hands meeting with employees of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the National Nuclear Security

  20. Polyamorphous transition in amorphous fullerites C{sub 70}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisova, P. A.; Agafonov, S. S.; Glazkov, V. P.; D'yakonova, N. P.; Somenkov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    Samples of amorphous fullerites C{sub 70} have been obtained by mechanical activation (grinding in a ball mill). The structure of the samples has been investigated by neutron and X-ray diffraction. The high-temperature (up to 1200 Degree-Sign C) annealing of amorphous fullerites revealed a polyamorphous transition from molecular to atomic glass, which is accompanied by the disappearance of fullerene halos at small scattering angles. Possible structural versions of the high-temperature amorphous phase are discussed.

  1. Non-aqueous solution preparation of doped and undoped lixmnyoz

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Voigt, James A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for generation of phase-pure doped and undoped Li.sub.x Mn.sub.y O.sub.z precursors. The method of this invention uses organic solutions instead of aqueous solutions or nonsolution ball milling of dry powders to produce phase-pure precursors. These precursors can be used as cathodes for lithium-polymer electrolyte batteries. Dopants may be homogeneously incorporated to alter the characteristics of the powder.

  2. labnews04-15-16.qxp_la02_02-20-04

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    up disease-carrying mosquitoes RED MEANS A DISEASE is present to Sandia researchers Cameron Ball and Robert Meagher as they test their QUASR, quenching of unincorporated amplification signal reporters, a technique to detect the presence of malaria and viruses like West Nile. Simple enough for field labs and handheld devices, QUASR's positive signal is 10 times brighter than a negative signal. (Photo by Dino Vournas) M osquitoes are deadly efficient at spreading disease. Despite vaccines and

  3. November 12, 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cafés November 12, 2010 November 12, 2010 Print Friday, 12 November 2010 00:00 christine beavers Having a ball in the wild world of fullerenes Christine Beavers, Beamline 11.3.1 nils huse Nanoclimates: Watching electron clouds move Nils Huse, Chemical Sciences, Beamlines 6.0.1/6.0.2 stefano marchesini Stitching x rays Stefano Marchesini, Beamline 9.0

  4. 2012-2013 EAC Membership Roster

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    August 3, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012/2013 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Linda Blair ITC Holdings Corporation Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry

  5. Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Across the Pond Newsletter Issue 1 A Quarterly Update on Joint UK NDA/US DOE Activities and Initiatives Issue 1: Summer 2009. In this issue: The US Department of Energy (DOE) / UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) Bilateral Agreement Initial Topic Areas for Discussion US DOE Represented at NDA-Sponsored Pu Workshop DOE - NDA Implementation Plan (4th Standing Committee Meeting held in Phoenix ) SRNL and NNL Collaborate on RadBall Trials NDA Provides Support to EM in Prioritization of

  6. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 31, 2010-A Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon nanostructures-elixir or poison? March 31, 2010 Los Alamos researchers find a case where size really does matter LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 31, 2010-A Los Alamos National Laboratory toxicologist and a multidisciplinary team of researchers have documented potential cellular damage from "fullerenes"-soccer-ball-shaped, cage-like molecules composed of 60 carbon atoms. The team also noted that this particular type of damage might hold hope for treatment of Parkinson's disease,

  7. Optics learning through affordable kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P, Anusha N E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com Shaji, Chitra E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com Sharan, Alok E-mail: chitrashaji@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    An affordable kit which helps to understand some of the optical phenomena qualitatively and quantitatively is presented in this paper. It supplements optics taught in classes. The kit consists of equipments which are available in the market at nominal cost such as laser pointer, lenses, glass plates, razor blades, coins, ball bearing etc. Experiments which come under wave optics (interference and diffraction) and ray optics (reflection and refraction) are explained using this kit.

  8. Microsoft Word - NETL-TRS-5-2014_High-Temperature, High-Pressure Equation of State.20141003.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Temperature, High-Pressure Equation of State: Solidification of Hydrocarbons and Viscosity Measurement of Krytox Oil Using Rolling-Ball Viscometer 3 October 2014 Office of Fossil Energy NETL-TRS-5-2014 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility

  9. Chemically Bonded Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid as a High Performance Anode

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Sodium-Ion Batteries (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost, natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel graphene nanosheets-wrapped phosphorus composite as an anode for high performance sodium-ion batteries though a facile ball-milling of red phosphorus and graphene nanosheets. Not only can the graphene nanosheets significantly improve the electrical

  10. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond youtube Topic The Jordan Aha! Test for Visualizations by Sharon Jordan 24 Mar, 2010 in Technology It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words. Such is the justification and hope for visualizations. Examples of enlightening visualizations are structural models of molecules like the carbon-60 Bucky Ball used in OSTI's recent YouTube video. The model shows a carbon atom at each intersection of molecular bonds. Related Topics:

  11. Carbon nanostructures-elixir or poison?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon nanostructures-elixir or poison? Carbon nanostructures-elixir or poison? A LANL toxicologist and a team of researchers have documented potential cellular damage from "fullerenes"-soccer-ball-shaped, cage-like molecules composed of 60 carbon atoms. March 31, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

  12. EV-131

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    31 Removal of Gillman iiell, Unfwrsity of California, Ecrkeley, California from the Formerly Utflized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAPj S. Meyers, NE-30 This is in response to your memorandum of March 26, 1980, relative to the removal of Gillman Ball, Univcrs'lty of California, Berkeley, California from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. As we now undcr- stand the sittlation, SAN has indicated that the site in question is covered under an exfsting license and,

  13. Liquid-blocking check valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, J.T.

    1982-09-27

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  14. ORTEP-III: Oak Ridge Thermal Ellipsoid Plot Program for crystal structure illustrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, M.N.; Johnson, C.K.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes a computer program for drawing crystal structure illustrations. Ball-and-stick type illustrations of a quality suitable for publication are produced with either spheres or thermal-motion probability ellipsoids on the atomic sites. The program can also produce stereoscopic pairs of illustrations which aid in the visualization of complex packing arrangements of atoms and thermal motion patterns. Interatomic distances, bond angles, and principal axes of thermal motion are also calculated to aid the structural study.

  15. Preparation of supported electrocatalyst comprising multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-27

    A process for preparing a durable non-precious metal oxygen reduction electrocatalyst involves heat treatment of a ball-milled mixture of polyaniline and multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the presence of a Fe species. The catalyst is more durable than catalysts that use carbon black supports. Performance degradation was minimal or absent after 500 hours of operation at constant cell voltage of 0.40 V.

  16. HYDRAULIC SERVO

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiegand, D.E.

    1962-05-01

    A hydraulic servo is designed in which a small pressure difference produced at two orifices by an electrically operated flapper arm in a constantly flowing hydraulic loop is hydraulically amplified by two constant flow pumps, two additional orifices, and three unconnected ball pistons. Two of the pistons are of one size and operate against the additional orifices, and the third piston is of a different size and operates between and against the first two pistons. (AEC)

  17. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 5, 2012 Electricity Advisory Committee 2012 Membership Roster Richard Cowart Regulatory Assistance Project CHAIR Irwin Popowsky Pennsylvania Consumer Advocate VICE CHAIR William Ball Southern Company Guido Bartels IBM Rick Bowen Alcoa Merwin Brown California Institute for Energy and Environment Ralph Cavanagh Natural Resources Defense Council The Honorable Paul Centolella Public Utilities Commission of Ohio David Crane NRG Energy, Inc. The Honorable Robert Curry New York State Public

  18. X- And y-axis driver for rotating microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Berthold W.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for precise control of the motion and position of microspheres for examination of their interior and/or exterior. The apparatus includes an x- and y-axis driver mechanism controlled, for example, by a minicomputer for selectively rotating microspheres retained between a pair of manipulator arms having flat, smooth end surfaces. The driver mechanism includes an apertured plate and ball arrangement which provided for coupled equal and opposite movement of the manipulator arms in two perpendicular directions.

  19. Non-aqueous solution preparation of doped and undoped Li{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub z}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyle, T.J.; Voigt, J.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method is described for generation of phase-pure doped and undoped Li{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub z} precursors. The method of this invention uses organic solutions instead of aqueous solutions or nonsolution ball milling of dry powders to produce phase-pure precursors. These precursors can be used as cathodes for lithium-polymer electrolyte batteries. Dopants may be homogeneously incorporated to alter the characteristics of the powder. 1 fig.

  20. La Cueva High School team takes top award in 23rd New Mexico Supercomputing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge 23rd New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge La Cueva High School team takes top award in 23rd New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge The team, Ari Echt-Wilson, Eli Echt-Wilson, and Justin Sanchez also won the CHECS Teamwork and Cray High Performance Computing awards. April 23, 2013 Justin Sanchez of Albuquerque La Cueva High School during the finalist team judging at the New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge expo and awards ceremony at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The styrofoam balls

  1. Distillate Fuel Oil Days of Supply

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Randall Luthi, President www.noia.org National Ocean Industries Association The Future of OCS After Macondo 2011 EIA Conference Washington, DC April 26, 2011 NOIA represents the full spectrum of U.S. businesses that produce energy offshore Last year's view through the crystal ball was far different than today's * A year ago, the off shore oil and gas industry was poised to come out of the economic doldrums * Spurred by earlier deep water discoveries, the future looked promising * The Obama

  2. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground waste site. This site was an open field covered with cobbles, with no vegetation growing on the surface. The site received irradiated reactor parts that were removed during conversion of the 105-F Reactor from the Liquid 3X to the Ball 3X Project safety systems and received mostly vertical safety rod thimbles and step plugs.

  3. From the tiny atom to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From the tiny atom to the supernovae Atom-split it for nuclear energy Fermi-leader of the team that produced the first self-sustain- ing controlled nuclear chain reaction; contributed to ending WWII Calutron-invented by E. O. Lawrence; for maximum pro- ductivity, critical sensitive adjustments were provided by the 'Calutron Girls' Seaborg-Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission 1961-1971; discovered many elements Buckyball-Buckminsterfullerene; 60 carbon atoms in the shape of a soccer ball;

  4. Department of Defense Net Assessment Summer 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Randall Luthi, President www.noia.org National Ocean Industries Association The Future of OCS After Macondo 2011 EIA Conference Washington, DC April 26, 2011 NOIA represents the full spectrum of U.S. businesses that produce energy offshore Last year's view through the crystal ball was far different than today's * A year ago, the off shore oil and gas industry was poised to come out of the economic doldrums * Spurred by earlier deep water discoveries, the future looked promising * The Obama

  5. ACCELERATION RESPONSIVE SWITCH

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chabrek, A.F.; Maxwell, R.L.

    1963-07-01

    An acceleration-responsive device with dual channel capabilities whereby a first circuit is actuated upon attainment of a predetermined maximum acceleration level and when the acceleration drops to a predetermined minimum acceleriltion level another circuit is actuated is described. A fluid-damped sensing mass slidably mounted in a relatively frictionless manner on a shaft through the intermediation of a ball bushing and biased by an adjustable compression spring provides inertially operated means for actuating the circuits. (AEC)

  6. The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The role of polymer formation during vapor phase lubrication of silicon. The lubrication of silicon surfaces with alcohol vapors has recently been demonstrated. With a sufficient concentration of pentanol vapor present, sliding of a silica ball on an oxidized silicon wafer can proceed with no measurable wear. The initial results of time-of-flight

  7. Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Shock-Induced Chemistry in Energetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Shock-Induced Chemistry in Energetic Materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Shock-Induced Chemistry in Energetic Materials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Wixom, Ryan R. ; Knepper, Robert ; Tappan, Alexander S. ; Jilek, Brook Anton ; Zelenok, Matthew David ; Kay, Jeffrey J ; Farrow, Darcie ; Ball, James Patrick Publication Date: 2015-04-01 OSTI Identifier:

  8. Time-Resolved Optical Measurements of Shock-Induced Chemistry in Energetic Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Time Resolved Optical Measurements of Shock-Induced Chemistry in Energetic Materials Ryan Wixom, Robert Knepper, Alex Tappan, Jeffrey Kay, Brook Jilek, Darcie Farrow, David Damm, Pat Ball, Matt Zelenok, Explosives Technology Group Project Overview: Our ability to simulate initiation and growth to detonation in explosives is limited by the lack of high fidelity data for building and validating the models used to describe chemical reactions. Data is difficult to acquire due to the extremely small

  9. Liquid blocking check valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, John T.

    1984-01-01

    A liquid blocking check valve useful particularly in a pneumatic system utilizing a pressurized liquid fill chamber. The valve includes a floatable ball disposed within a housing defining a chamber. The housing is provided with an inlet aperture disposed in the top of said chamber, and an outlet aperture disposed in the bottom of said chamber in an offset relation to said inlet aperture and in communication with a cutaway side wall section of said housing.

  10. Influence of processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 14YWT

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoelzer, David T.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the investigation of the mechanical alloying (MA) conditions for producing the advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) 14YWT ferritic alloy led to significant improvements in balancing the strength, ductility and fracture toughness properties while still maintaining the salient microstructural features consisting of ultra-fine grains and high concentration of Y-, Ti- and O-enriched nanoclusters. The implemented changes to the processing conditions included reducing the contamination of the powder during ball milling, applying a pre-extrusion annealing treatment on the ball milled powder and exploring different extrusion temperatures at 850 °C (SM170 heat), 1000 °C (SM185) and 1150 °C (SM200). Themore » microstructural studies of the three 14YWT heats showed similarities in the dispersion of nanoclusters and sub-micron size grains, indicating the microstructure was insensitive to the different extrusion conditions. Compared to past 14YWT heats, the three new heats showed lower strength, but higher ductility levels between 25 and 800 °C and significantly higher fracture toughness values between 25 °C and 700 °C. The lower contamination levels of O, C and N achieved with improved ball milling conditions plus the slightly larger grain size were identified as important factors for improving the balance in mechanical properties of the three heats of 14YWT.« less

  11. Coordinate measuring machine test standard apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, Lothar F.

    1994-08-30

    A coordinate measuring machine test standard apparatus and method which iudes a rotary spindle having an upper phase plate and an axis of rotation, a kinematic ball mount attached to the phase plate concentric with the axis of rotation of the phase plate, a groove mounted at the circumference of the phase plate, and an arm assembly which rests in the groove. The arm assembly has a small sphere at one end and a large sphere at the other end. The small sphere may be a coordinate measuring machine probe tip and may have variable diameters. The large sphere is secured in the kinematic ball mount and the arm is held in the groove. The kinematic ball mount includes at least three mounting spheres and the groove is an angular locating groove including at least two locking spheres. The arm may have a hollow inner core and an outer layer. The rotary spindle may be a ratio reducer. The device is used to evaluate the measuring performance of a coordinate measuring machine for periodic recertification, including 2 and 3 dimensional accuracy, squareness, straightness, and angular accuracy.

  12. Coordinate measuring machine test standard apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bieg, L.F.

    1994-08-30

    A coordinate measuring machine test standard apparatus and method are disclosed which includes a rotary spindle having an upper phase plate and an axis of rotation, a kinematic ball mount attached to the phase plate concentric with the axis of rotation of the phase plate, a groove mounted at the circumference of the phase plate, and an arm assembly which rests in the groove. The arm assembly has a small sphere at one end and a large sphere at the other end. The small sphere may be a coordinate measuring machine probe tip and may have variable diameters. The large sphere is secured in the kinematic ball mount and the arm is held in the groove. The kinematic ball mount includes at least three mounting spheres and the groove is an angular locating groove including at least two locking spheres. The arm may have a hollow inner core and an outer layer. The rotary spindle may be a ratio reducer. The device is used to evaluate the measuring performance of a coordinate measuring machine for periodic recertification, including 2 and 3 dimensional accuracy, squareness, straightness, and angular accuracy. 5 figs.

  13. Finite Cosmology and a CMB Cold Spot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, R.J.; Bjorken, J.D.; Overduin, J.M.; /Stanford U., HEPL

    2006-03-20

    The standard cosmological model posits a spatially flat universe of infinite extent. However, no observation, even in principle, could verify that the matter extends to infinity. In this work we model the universe as a finite spherical ball of dust and dark energy, and obtain a lower limit estimate of its mass and present size: the mass is at least 5 x 10{sup 23}M{sub {circle_dot}} and the present radius is at least 50 Gly. If we are not too far from the dust-ball edge we might expect to see a cold spot in the cosmic microwave background, and there might be suppression of the low multipoles in the angular power spectrum. Thus the model may be testable, at least in principle. We also obtain and discuss the geometry exterior to the dust ball; it is Schwarzschild-de Sitter with a naked singularity, and provides an interesting picture of cosmogenesis. Finally we briefly sketch how radiation and inflation eras may be incorporated into the model.

  14. High temperature control rod assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vollman, R.E.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a control rod assembly for use in nuclear reactor control. It comprises segments, each the segment being made of a graphite composite material, each the segment having a chamber for containing neutron-absorbing material, wherein the chamber compromises a hollow cylindrical sleeve having a first end formed with an opening for receiving the neutron-absorbing material, and having a second end formed with a sleeve bore and an outer sleeve surface; a cylindrical weight-bearing support post positioned substantially centrally of the sleeve, the support post having a first end formed as a ball surface portion and a second end formed as a ball surface portion and a second end formed as a shaft, the shaft being engageable with the sleeve bore for rigidly coupling the support post axially within the hollow sleeve, a hollow cylindrical collar having a socket lip portion correspondingly shaped to receive the ball surface portion of an adjacent support post, and having an inner surface for engaging the outer sleeve surface on the second end of the sleeve to rigidly couple the collar to the sleeve.

  15. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  16. Effect of EGR contamination of diesel engine oil on wear.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Aldajah, S.; Goldblatt, I. L.; Energy Systems; United Arab Emirates Univ.; BP-Global Lubricants Technology

    2007-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is one of the effective means to reduce the NO{sub X} emission from diesel engines. Returning exhaust product to the diesel engine combustion chamber accelerated the degradation of the lubricant engine oil, primarily by increasing the total acid number (TAN) as well as the soot content and, consequently, the viscosity. These oil degradation mechanisms were observed in engine oil exposed to EGR during a standard Cummins M-l 1 diesel engine test. Four-ball wear tests with M-50 balls showed that, although the used oils slightly decrease the friction coefficients, they increased the ball wear by two orders of magnitude when compared to tests with clean oil. Wear occurred primarily by an abrasive mechanism, but in oil with the highest soot loading of 12%, scuffing and soot particle embedment were also observed. Laboratory wear tests showed a linear correlation with the TAN, while the crosshead wear during the engine test was proportional to the soot content.

  17. Frictional anisotropy under boundary lubrication: effect of surface texture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erck, R. A.; Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2009-06-15

    The friction coefficient was measured under boundary lubrication with a ball-on-flat contact configuration in unidirectional sliding. The ball was smooth and hardened 52100 steel. Discs were made from case-carburized and hardened 4620, annealed 1080, and 1018 steels with directionally ground surfaces. A synthetic lubricant of stock polyalphaolefin was used for testing. During testing with each material, a frictional spike was observed whenever the ball slid parallel to the grinding ridge on the disc surface. The average friction coefficient for all tests was about 0.1, which is typical for the boundary lubrication regime. The magnitude of the frictional spikes, which reached as high as a friction coefficient of 0.25, and their persistence depended on the hardness of the disc surface. On the basis of elastohydrodynamic theory, coupled with the observation of severe plastic deformation on the ridges parallel to the sliding direction, the frictional spike could be due to localized plastic deformation on the disc surface at locations of minimal thickness for the lubricant fluid film. This hypothesis was further supported by lack of frictional spikes in tests using discs coated with a thin film of diamond-like carbon, in which plastic deformation is minimal.

  18. Scientific/Technical Report Science Literacy Project Award number-DE-FG02-06ER64286

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasseh, Bizhan

    2011-02-28

    Ball State University (BSU) was the recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy award to develop educational games teaching science and math. The Science Media Program will merge Ball State Universitys nationally recognized capabilities in education, technology, and communication to develop new, interactive, game-based media for the teaching and learning of science and scientific principles for K-12 students. BSU established a team of educators, researchers, scientists, animators, designers, technology specialists, and hired a professional media developer company (Outside Source Design) from Indianapolis. After six months discussions and assessments the project team selected the following 8 games in Math, Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, 2 from each discipline. The assembled teams were innovative and unique. This new model of development and production included a process that integrated all needed knowledge and expertise for the development of high quality science and math games for K-12 students. This new model has potential to be used by others for the development of the educational games. The uniqueness of the model is to integrate domain experts knowledge with researchers/quality control group, and combine a professional development team from the game development company with the academic game development team from Computer Science and Art departments at Ball State University. The developed games went through feasibility tests with selected students for improvement before use in the research activities.

  19. Virtual sine arm kinematic mount system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Randall, K.J.

    1997-09-01

    A novel kinematic mount system for a vertical focusing mirror of the soft x-ray spectroscopy beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is described. The system contains three points in a horizontal plane. Each point consists of two horizontal linear precision stages, a spherical ball bearing, and a vertical precision stage. The horizontal linear stages are aligned orthogonally and are conjoined by a spherical ball bearing, supported by the vertical linear stage at each point. The position of each confined horizontal stage is controlled by a motorized micrometer head by spring-loading the flat tip of the micrometer head onto a tooling ball fixing on the carriage of the stage. A virtual sine arm is formed by tilting the upstream horizontal stage down and the two downstream horizontal stages up by a small angle. The fine pitch motion is achieved by adjusting the upstream stage. This supporting structure is extremely steady due to a relatively large span across the supporting points and yields extremely high resolution on the pitch motion. With a one degree tilt and a microstepping motor, the authors achieved a 0.4 nanoradian resolution on the mirror pitch motion.

  20. Studies of heavy-ion reactions and transuranic nuclei. Progress report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, W.U.

    1993-08-01

    This report contain papers on the following topics: The Cold-Fusion Saga; Decay Patterns of Dysprosium Nuclei Produced in {sup 32}S + {sup 118,124}Sn Fusion Reactions; Unexpected Features of Reactions Between Very Heavy Ions at Intermediate Bombarding Energies; Correlations Between Neutrons and Charged Products from the Dissipative Reaction {sup 197}Au+{sup 208}Pb at E/A = 29 MeV; Dissipative Dynamics of Projectile-Like Fragment Production in the Reaction {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe at E/A = 28.2 MeV; Dynamical Production of Intermediate-Mass Fragments in Peripheral {sup 209}Bi+{sup 136}Xe Collisions at E{sub lab}/A = 28.2 MeV; The Rochester 960-Liter Neutron Multiplicity Meter; A Simple Pulse Processing Concept for a Low-Cost Pulse-Shape-Based Particle Identification; A One-Transistor Preamplifier for PMT Anode Signals; A Five-Channel Multistop TDC/Event Handler for the SuperBall Neutron Multiplicity Meter; Construction of the SuperBall -- a 16,000-Liter Neutron Detector for Calorimetric Studies of Intermediate-Energy Heavy-Ion Reactions; A Computer Code for Light Detection Efficiency Calculations for Photo-multipliers of a Neutron Detector; Evaluation of Gd-Loaded Liquid Scintillators for the SuperBall Neutron Calorimeter; and Measurement of the Interaction of Cosmic-Ray {mu}{sup {minus}} with a Muon Telescope.

  1. Influence of processing on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 14YWT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoelzer, David T.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Byun, Thak Sang

    2015-12-15

    In this study, the investigation of the mechanical alloying (MA) conditions for producing the advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) 14YWT ferritic alloy led to significant improvements in balancing the strength, ductility and fracture toughness properties while still maintaining the salient microstructural features consisting of ultra-fine grains and high concentration of Y-, Ti- and O-enriched nanoclusters. The implemented changes to the processing conditions included reducing the contamination of the powder during ball milling, applying a pre-extrusion annealing treatment on the ball milled powder and exploring different extrusion temperatures at 850 °C (SM170 heat), 1000 °C (SM185) and 1150 °C (SM200). The microstructural studies of the three 14YWT heats showed similarities in the dispersion of nanoclusters and sub-micron size grains, indicating the microstructure was insensitive to the different extrusion conditions. Compared to past 14YWT heats, the three new heats showed lower strength, but higher ductility levels between 25 and 800 °C and significantly higher fracture toughness values between 25 °C and 700 °C. The lower contamination levels of O, C and N achieved with improved ball milling conditions plus the slightly larger grain size were identified as important factors for improving the balance in mechanical properties of the three heats of 14YWT.

  2. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  3. Mechanically induced self-propagating reaction and consequent consolidation for the production of fully dense nanocrystalline Ti{sub 55}C{sub 45} bulk material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherif El-Eskandarany, M. Al-Hazza, Abdulsalam

    2014-11-15

    We employed a high-energy ball mill for the synthesis of nanograined Ti{sub 55}C{sub 45} powders starting from elemental Ti and C powders. The mechanically induced self-propagating reaction that occurred between the reactant materials was monitored via a gas atmosphere gas-temperature-monitoring system. A single phase of NaCl-type TiC was obtained after 5 h of ball milling. To decrease the powder and grain sizes, the material was subjected to further ball milling time. The powders obtained after 200 h of milling possessed spherical-like morphology with average particle and grain sizes of 45 μm and 4.2 nm, respectively. The end-products obtained after 200 h of ball milling time, were then consolidated into full dense compacts, using hot pressing and spark plasma sintering at 1500 and 34.5 MPa, with heating rates of 20 °C/min and 500 °C/min, respectively. Whereas hot pressing of the powders led to severe grain growth (∼ 436 nm in diameter), the as-spark plasma sintered powders maintained their nanograined characteristics (∼ 28 nm in diameter). The as-synthesized and as-consolidated powders were characterized, using X-ray diffraction, high-resolution electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the consolidated samples obtained via the hot pressing and spark plasma sintering techniques were characterized, using Vickers microhardness and non-destructive testing techniques. The Vickers hardness, Young's modulus, shear modulus and fracture toughness of as-spark plasma sintered samples were 32 GPa, 358 GPa, 151 GPa and 6.4 MPa·m{sup 1/2}, respectively. The effects of the consolidation approach on the grain size and mechanical properties were investigated and are discussed. - Highlights: • Room-temperature synthesizing of NaCl-type TiC • Dependence on the grain size on the ball milling time • Fabrication of equiaxed nanocrystalline grains with a diameter of 4.2 nm • Fabrication of nanocrystalline bulk TiC material by SPS with minimal grain growth • Dependence of improved mechanical properties on the consolidation techniques.

  4. The National Carbon Capture Center

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Topical Report Budget Period Four Ja n u a r y 1, 2013 - D e c e m b e r 31, 2013 DOE C o o p e ra tiv e A g r e e m e n t DE-NT0000749 The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Developm ent Facility Topical Report Budget Period Four Ja n u a r y 1, 2013 - D e c e m b e r 31, 2013 DOE C o o p e ra tiv e A g r e e m e n t DE-NT0000749 P r e p a r e d by: S o u t h e r n C o m p a n y Services, Inc. P o w e r S

  5. NMMSS Newsletter, March 2009

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    R e p o rtin g M o n th T ra n s a c tio ns D u e In ve n to ry D u e Ja n ua ry 2 0 0 9 F e b ru a ry 1 0 F e b ru a ry 1 6 F e b ru a ry 2 0 09 M a rch 1 1 M a rch 1 6 M a rch 2 00 9 A p ril 1 0 A p ril 1 5 A p ril 2 0 09 M a y 1 2 M a y 1 5 M a y 2 0 0 9 Ju n e 1 0 Ju n e 1 5

  6. Application of Dye-Ligand Affinity Chromatography to Structural Genomics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Application of Dye-Ligand Affinity Chromatography to Structural Genomics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of Dye-Ligand Affinity Chromatography to Structural Genomics Authors: Kim, Chang Y. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-07-22 OSTI Identifier: 1088347 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-25609 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos

  7. Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two-color laser pulses in air (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused two-color laser pulses in air This content will become publicly available on March 23, 2017 Title: Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused two-color laser pulses in air Authors: Kuk, D. [1] ; Yoo, Y. J. [1] ; Rosenthal, E. W. [1] ; Jhajj, N. [1] ; Milchberg, H. M. [1] ; Kim, K. Y. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Institute for Research

  8. 2014_01 15 EEP Quarterly-post LF comments

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 , I S S U E 1 J A N U A R Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 4 Infrastructure Interdependencies Workshop Highlights Critical Partnerships to Improve Security and Resilience On December 2-3, 2013, DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), in coordination with the National Association for State Energy Officials (NASEO), conducted the Energy Assurance and Interdependency Workshop in Washington, DC. The objective of the workshop was to educate participants and increase aware- ness about

  9. Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Ofll s' :y 1: ,' :*,; / c- tii; 1 ;q' (/. 4 L Department of Energy Washington, D .C. 20545 Mr. Harold Snyder, Chief Discovery and Investigation Branch Hazardous Site Control Division Administration for Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 401 M Street Washington, D.C. 20460 Dear Mr. Snyder: The Department of Energy (DOE) radiological survey at the former Horizons, Inc. facility at 2909 East 79th Street in Cleveland, Ohio, performed in 1977, indicated that

  10. Event activity dependence of Y(nS) production in $$\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$$=5.02 TeV pPb and $$\\sqrt{s}$$=2.76 TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-04-15

    The production of Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) is investigated in pPb and pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies per nucleon pair of 5.02 TeV and 2.76 TeV, respectively. The datasets correspond to integrated luminosities of about 31 nb–1 (pPb) and 5.4 pb–1 (pp), collected in 2013 by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Upsilons that decay into muons are reconstructed within the rapidity interval (yCM) < 1.93 in the nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass frame. Their production is studied as a function of two measures of event activity, namely the charged-particle multiplicity measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η| < 2.4, and the sum ofmore » transverse energy deposited at forward pseudorapidity, 4.0 < |η|< 5.2. The Y cross sections normalized by their event activity integrated values, Y(nS)/, are found to rise with both measures of the event activity in pp and pPb. In both collision systems, the ratios of the excited to the ground state cross sections, Y(nS)/Y(1S), are found to decrease with the charged-particle multiplicity, while as a function of the transverse energy the variation is less pronounced. Lastly, the event activity integrated double ratios, [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pPb / [Y(nS)/Y(1S)]pp, are also measured and found to be 0.83 +/- 0.05 (stat.) +/- 0.05 (syst.) and 0.71 +/- 0.08 (stat.) +/- 0.09 (syst.) for Y(2S) and Y(3S), respectively.« less

  11. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 J U L Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OE Hosts National Energy Assurance Conference Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director Infrastructure Reliability ISER Stewart Cedres DOE Supports 2012 NATO Summit Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness OE and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) hosted

  12. EC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT .:'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2, j ,&+~ ,:. x&+,, ; wt. d.' :?.' . ' ~~j~,,~~ &?$;i?$$,i:i~-' _' ' .. EC RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT REPORT .:' :' :I :I:.- : . . ' _ -a. :. _. : . . 1 . . ' y:y ,. 1. . :<,*I t..; : !,,!' :.' ...> ,I 43 .r:. :&& i pq7.q 12 w ; ;::> x ,. _ ,.l 2.. r/' -T ."."--- ,' ,;. ;' , , _,' . 2 , ' .. LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of Government sponsored work. Neither the United States, nor the Commission, nor any person acting on behalf of the

  13. Application of PDSLin to the magnetic reconnection problem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Application of Dye-Ligand Affinity Chromatography to Structural Genomics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of Dye-Ligand Affinity Chromatography to Structural Genomics Authors: Kim, Chang Y. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-07-22 OSTI Identifier: 1088347 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-25609 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos

  14. Theoretical priors on modified growth parametrisations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yong-Seon; Hollenstein, Lukas; Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Koyama, Kazuya E-mail: Lukas.Hollenstein@unige.ch E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    Next generation surveys will observe the large-scale structure of the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. This will enable us to test the relationships between matter over-densities, the curvature perturbation and the Newtonian potential. Any large-distance modification of gravity or exotic nature of dark energy modifies these relationships as compared to those predicted in the standard smooth dark energy model based on General Relativity. In linear theory of structure growth such modifications are often parameterised by virtue of two functions of space and time that enter the relation of the curvature perturbation to, first, the matter over- density, and second, the Newtonian potential. We investigate the predictions for these functions in Brans-Dicke theory, clustering dark energy models and interacting dark energy models. We find that each theory has a distinct path in the parameter space of modified growth. Understanding these theoretical priors on the parameterisations of modified growth is essential to reveal the nature of cosmic acceleration with the help of upcoming observations of structure formation.

  15. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of a $q$-$\\bar q$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $\\Delta y$ falling within the window of $|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$, on account of the space-time-rapidity ordering of produced pions in a flux tube fragmentation. Therefore, the local conservation of momentum will lead to a suppression of azimuthal two-pion correlation $dN/(d\\Delta \\phi\\, d\\Delta y)$ on the near side at $(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $(\\Delta \\phi$$\\sim$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$\\sim$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$, but there is no such prohibition for $|\\Delta y| >1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.

  16. Signature of the Fragmentation of a Color Flux Tube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-10-07

    The production of quark-antiquark pairs along a color flux tube precedes the fragmentation of the tube. Because of the local conservation of momentum and charge, the production of amore » $q$-$$\\bar q$$ pair will lead to correlations of adjacently produced mesons (mostly pions). Adjacently produced pions however can be signalled by the their rapidity difference $$\\Delta y$$ falling within the window of $$|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$, on account of the space-time-rapidity ordering of produced pions in a flux tube fragmentation. Therefore, the local conservation of momentum will lead to a suppression of azimuthal two-pion correlation $$dN/(d\\Delta \\phi\\, d\\Delta y)$$ on the near side at $$(\\Delta \\phi, \\Delta y) \\sim 0$$, but an enhanced azimuthal correlation on the back-to-back, away side at $$(\\Delta \\phi$$$$\\sim$$$$ \\pi,\\Delta y$$$$\\sim$$0). Similarly, in a flux tube fragmentation, the local conservation of charge will forbid the production of like charge pions within $$|\\Delta y | < 1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$, but there is no such prohibition for $$|\\Delta y| >1/(dN_\\pi/dy)$$. These properties may be used as the signature for the fragmentation of a color flux tube.« less

  17. Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

  18. Solvent-free mechanochemical preparation of phosphonium salts, phosphorus ylides, and olefins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K; Balema, Viktor P; Wiench, Jerzy W; Pruski, Marek

    2006-09-12

    The present invention provides a method of preparing a phosphonium salt of the formula [R.sup.1R.sup.2R.sup.3P--CR.sup.4R.sup.5R.sup.6]X, comprising ball-milling a phosphine of the formula R.sup.1R.sup.2R.sup.3P with a compound of the formula XCR.sup.4R.sup.5R.sup.6; a method of preparing a phosphorus ylide of the formula R.sup.1R.sup.2R.sup.3P.dbd.CR.sup.4R.sup.5, comprising ball-milling a phosphonium salt of the formula [R.sup.1R.sup.2R.sup.3P--HCR.sup.4R.sup.5]X in the presence of a base; and a method of preparing an olefin of the formula R.sup.4R.sup.5C.dbd.CR.sup.7H or R.sup.4R.sup.5C.dbd.CR.sup.7R.sup.8, comprising ball-milling a phosphorus ylide of the formula R.sup.1R.sup.2R.sup.3P.dbd.CR.sup.4R.sup.5 with a compound of the formula R.sup.7C(O)H or R.sup.7C(O)R.sup.8. The inventive method produces phosphonium salts and phosphorus ylides by mechanical processing solid reagents under solvent-free conditions. The advantages of the present invention over conventional solution methods, include: (1) extremely high selectivity; (2) high yields; (3) low processing temperatures; (4) simple and scalable reactions using commercially available equipment; and (5) the complete elimination of solvents from the reaction.

  19. Solvent-free mechanochemical preparation of phosphonium salts, phosphorus ylides, and olefins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Balema, Viktor P.; Wiench, Jerzy W.; Pruski, Marek

    2004-05-04

    The present invention provides a method of preparing a phosphonium salt of the formula [R.sup.1 R.sup.2 R.sup.3 P--CR.sup.4 R.sup.5 R.sup.6 ]X, comprising ball-milling a phosphine of the formula R.sup.1 R.sup.2 R.sup.3 P with a compound of the formula XCR.sup.4 R.sup.5 R.sup.6 ; a method of preparing a phosphorus ylide of the formula R.sup.1 R.sup.2 R.sup.3 P.dbd.CR.sup.4 R.sup.5, comprising ball-milling a phosphonium salt of the formula [R.sup.1 R.sup.2 R.sup.3 P--HCR.sup.4 R.sup.5 ]X in the presence of a base; and a method of preparing an olefin of the formula R.sup.4 R.sup.5 C.dbd.CR.sup.7 H or R.sup.4 R.sup.5 C.dbd.CR.sup.7 R.sup.8, comprising ball-milling a phosphorus ylide of the formula R.sup.1 R.sup.2 R.sup.3 P.dbd.CR.sup.4 R.sup.5 with a compound of the formula R.sup.7 C(O)H or R.sup.7 C(O)R.sup.8. The inventive method produces phosphonium salts and phosphorus ylides by mechanical processing solid reagents under solvent-free conditions. The advantages of the present invention over conventional solution methods, include: (1) extremely high selectivity; (2) high yields; (3) low processing temperatures; (4) simple and scalable reactions using commercially available equipment; and (5) the complete elimination of solvents from the reaction.

  20. Danish sour-gas pipeline has subsea safety system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thygesen, J.E. )

    1990-06-04

    Dansk Olie og Gasproduktion A/S has gained valuable experience installing a subsea safety system on a 30-in., 215-km (134-mile) subsea sour-gas pipeline. The system is designed to reduce the risk of explosion or suffocation of personnel aboard a nearby platform. It consists of a subsea check valve and a fullbore ball valve. Experience from operation of the system has been gained in pigging through the check valve, scour around the installation, repairs, and function tests. This is the basis for recommendations for operators intending to install subsea safety systems of the same or similar type.

  1. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Process Development and Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Research Overhead photo a male standing next to a large circular piece of equipment. Work with Us Are you interested in collaborating with NREL scientists within the PDIL? Do you want to know more about its capabilities? We want to hear from you! To get the ball rolling, please apply by following steps 1 through 4 below. The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) has one-of-a-kind capabilities for fabricating and studying a wide range of solar cell technologies.

  2. Untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DYNES Instrument: A Description and Overview Jason Zurawski 1 , Robert Ball 2 , Artur Barczyk 3 , Mathew Binkley 4 , Jeff Boote 1 , Eric Boyd 1 , Aaron Brown 1 , Robert Brown 4 , Tom Lehman 5 , Shawn McKee 2 , Benjeman Meekhof 2 , Azher Mughal 3 , Harvey Newman 3 , Sandor Rozsa 3 , Paul Sheldon 4 , Alan Tackett 4 , Ramiro Voicu 3 , Stephen Wolff 1 , and Xi Yang 5 1 Internet2 2 University of Michigan 3 California Institute of Technology 4 Vanderbilt University 5 ISI East E-mail:

  3. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, Albert L.

    1985-01-01

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade.

  4. Erratum: Coulomb excitation of the proton-dripline nucleus {sup 20}Na

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    [Phys. Rev. C 80, 044325 (2009)] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Erratum: Coulomb excitation of the proton-dripline nucleus {sup 20}Na [Phys. Rev. C 80, 044325 (2009)] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Erratum: Coulomb excitation of the proton-dripline nucleus {sup 20}Na [Phys. Rev. C 80, 044325 (2009)] No abstract prepared. Authors: Schumaker, M. A. ; Cline, D. ; Hackman, G. ; Pearson, C. J. ; Svensson, C. E. ; Wu, C. Y. ; Andreyev, A. ; Austin, R. A. E. ; Ball, G. C. ;

  5. UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.M.K. Nefkens; J. Goetz; A. Lapik; M. Korolija; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin

    2011-05-18

    This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup #25;0}, 2{pi}{sup #25;}0, 3{pi}{sup #25;0}, {eta}#17;, {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4#25;. It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, Gâ??parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta}#17;,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta}#17; and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup #4;â??}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and nonâ??coherent #25;0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the #25;{pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2#25;{pi}{sup 0}.

  6. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  7. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Length of Particle Accelerators I have six questions. 1. How long is a particle accelerator? 2. Is it true that there are weapons 40 times stronger than the fatman and little boy atomic bombs used in World War II? 3. What does E=mc2 mean? 4. Does electricity in general move at the speed of light? How was fusion discovered? 5. Is it true that the sun is a ball of hydrogen that is in a fusion chain reaction? 6. How can you become a scientific worker at Fermilab? Dear Mr. Bond, I am glad you are

  8. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Craig M.; Zidan, Ragaiy A.

    2002-01-01

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  9. CX-005512: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5512: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiation Mapping Dosimeter Exposure in Shielded Cell in 773-A: RadBall and GrayQb technologies CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office A radiation mapping dosimeter will be placed in a shielded cell in 773-A E-wing Shielded Cell Operations (SCO) facility for in-cell exposure to ambient radiation. Either the

  10. Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later Our view: Vaccinate now, prevent flu later Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are predicting that this winter's flu season is most likely to peak in February across much of the United States. The scientists can say this because of the model they have constructed. December 24, 2015 Man sneezing Model suggests still time to get your flu shot and be protected. "There's no crystal ball when it comes to predicting disease outbreaks," said

  11. PPPL Offers Twice-Monthly Public Tours | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL Offers Twice-Monthly Public Tours By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 6, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Physicist Andrew Zwicker, head of Science Education, gives a tour at PPPL. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) Physicist Andrew Zwicker, head of Science Education, gives a tour at PPPL. Gallery: A young woman lights up a fluorescent tube using a plasma ball during a tour of PPPL. (Photo by Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) A young

  12. PPPL Offers Twice-Monthly Public Tours | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL Offers Twice-Monthly Public Tours By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe October 6, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook PPPL physicist Andrew Zwicker, head of Science Education, leads a tour of PPPL. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL physicist Andrew Zwicker, head of Science Education, leads a tour of PPPL. Gallery: A young woman makes a fluorescent tube light up with a plasma ball during a PPPL tour. (Photo by Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications)

  13. 10 Ways to Save Money and Energy in the New Year | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Ways to "See" the Electric Field 10 Ways to "See" the Electric Field Addthis Description How can you demonstrate the electric field if it's invisible? This video shows you 10 activities and experiments that help to teach about the electric field using various apparatuses, such as a plasma ball or a Van de Graaff generator. Duration 8:07 Credit James Lincoln, AAPT Films

    Ways to Save Money and Energy in the New Year 10 Ways to Save Money and Energy in the New Year January

  14. Differential cross sections of the charge-exchange reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}n in the momentum range from 103 to 178 MeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekterovic, D.; Supek, I.; Abaev, V.; Bekrenev, V.; Kozlenko, N.; Kulbardis, A.; Kruglov, S.; Lopatin, I.; Bircher, C.; Isenhover, D.; Jerkins, M.; Joy, M.; Sadler, M. E.; Watson, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Shafi, A.; Strakovsky, I.; Cadman, R. V.; Spinka, H.; Clajus, M.

    2009-11-15

    Measured values of the differential cross sections for pion-nucleon charge exchange, {pi}{sup -}p{yields}{pi}{sup 0}n, are presented for {pi}{sup -} momenta of 103,112,120,130,139,152, and 178 MeV/c. Complete angular distributions were obtained by using the Crystal Ball detector at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Statistical uncertainties of the differential cross sections vary from 3 to 6% in the backward angle region and from 6 to about 20% in the forward region with the exception of the two most forward angles. The systematic uncertainties are estimated to be about 3% for all momenta.

  15. Production of reactive sintered nickel aluminide. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, February 22, 1993--May 22, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.M.

    1993-06-01

    Effort over the past 3 months was directed at increasing manufacturing capacity (ball milling) and improving product quality. Orders for the powder have increased, mainly for plasma spray powders. NiAl is an excellent coat between a metal and a ceramic, and its use instead of cobalt should extending operating range for carbide tools. The feather phase in the sintered Ni{sub 3}Al was identified to be a Ni-rich phase nucleated on the grain boundaries with 10 wt % Al composition. The ductile to brittle temperature of powder extruded NiAl was found to be between 500 and 600 C, and shows a 50% elongation at 600 C.

  16. Production of reactive sintered nickel aluminide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Effort over the past 3 months was directed at increasing manufacturing capacity (ball milling) and improving product quality. Orders for the powder have increased, mainly for plasma spray powders. NiAl is an excellent coat between a metal and a ceramic, and its use instead of cobalt should extending operating range for carbide tools. The feather phase in the sintered Ni[sub 3]Al was identified to be a Ni-rich phase nucleated on the grain boundaries with 10 wt % Al composition. The ductile to brittle temperature of powder extruded NiAl was found to be between 500 and 600 C, and shows a 50% elongation at 600 C.

  17. Means for positively seating a piezoceramic element in a piezoelectric valve during inlet gas injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Kenneth E.

    1994-01-01

    A piezoelectric valve in a gas delivery system includes a piezoceramic element bonded to a valve seal and disposed over a valve seat, and retained in position by an O-ring and a retainer; an insulating ball normally biased by a preload spring against the piezoceramic element; an inlet gas port positioned such that upon admission of inlet gas into the valve, the piezoceramic element is positively seated. The inlet gas port is located only on the side of the piezoceramic element opposite the seal.

  18. Means for positively seating a piezoceramic element in a piezoelectric valve during inlet gas injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, K.E.

    1994-08-23

    A piezoelectric valve in a gas delivery system includes a piezoceramic element bonded to a valve seal and disposed over a valve seat, and retained in position by an O-ring and a retainer; an insulating ball normally biased by a preload spring against the piezoceramic element; an inlet gas port positioned such that upon admission of inlet gas into the valve, the piezoceramic element is positively seated. The inlet gas port is located only on the side of the piezoceramic element opposite the seal. 3 figs.

  19. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, R.J. Jr.

    1986-02-25

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame. 7 figs.

  20. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, A.L.

    1985-11-19

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts is disclosed. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade. 2 figs.

  1. Apparatus and method for measuring viscosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Jr., Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for measuring the viscosity of a fluid. This apparatus and method is particularly useful for the measurement of the viscosity of a liquid in a harsh environment characterized by high temperature and the presence of corrosive or deleterious gases and vapors which adversely affect conventional ball or roller bearings. The apparatus and method of the present invention employ one or more flexural or torsional bearings to suspend a bob capable of limited angular motion within a rotatable sleeve suspended from a stationary frame.

  2. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, B.E.; May, C.P.; Rossabi, J.

    1997-06-24

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere. 7 figs.

  3. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pemberton, Bradley E. (Aiken, SC); May, Christopher P. (Fairfax, VA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC)

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which passively removes contaminated gases from a subsurface. The apparatus includes a riser pipe extending into a subsurface which has an exterior end in fluid communication with a valve. When well pressure is greater than atmospheric pressure, the valve opens to release contaminants into the atmosphere, and when well pressure is less than atmospheric pressure, the valve closes to prevent flow of air into the well. The valve assembly of the invention comprises a lightweight ball which is lifted from its valve seat with a slight pressure drop between the well and the atmosphere.

  4. Incorporating Technetium in Minerals and Other Solids: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luksic, Steven A.; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2015-08-29

    Technetium (Tc) can be incorporated into a number of different solids including spinel, sodalite, rutile, tin dioxide, pyrochlore, perovskite, goethite, layered double hydroxides, cements, and alloys. Synthetic routes are possible for each of these phases, ranging from high temperature ceramic sintering to ball-milling of constituent oxides. However, in practice, Tc has only been incorporated into solid materials by a limited number of the possible syntheses. Reviewing the diverse ways in which Tc-immobilizing materials can be made shows the range of options available.

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cotton-Ball Clouds Contained Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, WI Gustafson, EI Kassianov, and D Liping. 2013. "Evaluation of a modified scheme for shallow convection: Implementation of CuP and case studies." Monthly Weather Review, 141, doi:10.1175/MWR-D-12-00136.1. Cumulus Potential (CuP) parameterization leads to improved forecasts of

  6. HIGH TEMPERATURE REFRACTORY COATING FOR GRAPHITE MOLDS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.

    1958-10-21

    An improved foundry mold coating for use with graphite molds used in the casting of uranium is presented. The refractory mold coating serves to keep the molten uranium from contact with graphite of the mold and thus prevents carbon pickup by the molten metal. The refractory coating is made by dry mixing certain specific amounts of aluminum oxide, bentonite, Tennessee ball clay, and a soluble silicate salt. Water is then added to the mixture and the suspension thus formed is applied by spraying onto the mold.

  7. SOME RECENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENTS FROM THE UK'S NATIONAL NUCLEAR LABORATORY TO ENABLE HAZARD CHARACTERISATION FOR NUCLEAR DECOMMISSIONING APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Foley, T.

    2010-02-11

    Under its programme of self investment Internal Research and Development (IR&D), the UK's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) is addressing the requirement for development in technology to enable hazard characterisation for nuclear decommissioning applications. Three such examples are described here: (1) RadBall developed by the NNL (patent pending) is a deployable baseball-sized radiation mapping device which can, from a single location, locate and quantify radiation hazards. RadBall offers a means to collect information regarding the magnitude and distribution of radiation in a given cell, glovebox or room to support the development of a safe, cost effective decontamination strategy. RadBall requires no electrical supplies and is relatively small, making it easy to be deployed and used to map radiation hazards in hard to reach areas. Recent work conducted in partnership with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is presented. (2) HiRAD (patent pending) has been developed by the NNL in partnership with Tracerco Ltd (UK). HiRAD is a real-time, remotely deployed, radiation detection device designed to operate in elevated levels of radiation (i.e. thousands and tens of thousands of Gray) as seen in parts of the nuclear industry. Like the RadBall technology, the HiRAD system does not require any electrical components, the small dimensions and flexibility of the device allow it to be positioned in difficult to access areas (such as pipe work). HiRAD can be deployed as a single detector, a chain, or as an array giving the ability to monitor large process areas. Results during the development and deployment of the technology are presented. (3) Wireless Sensor Network is a NNL supported development project led by the University of Manchester (UK) in partnership with Oxford University (UK). The project is concerned with the development of wireless sensor network technology to enable the underwater deployment and communication of miniaturised probes allowing pond monitoring and mapping. The potential uses, within the nuclear sector alone, are both numerous and significant in terms of the proceeding effort to clean up the UK's nuclear waste legacy.

  8. Searches for signals from microscopic black holes in processes of proton collisions at {radical} s = 7 TeV in the CMS experiment at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savina, M. V.

    2013-09-15

    If the fundamental scale of multidimensional gravity is about one or several TeV units, microscopic black holes or objects referred to as string balls may be produced at the LHC. The most recent results obtained by the CMS Collaboration at the LHC from searches for such signals at the c.m. protoninteraction energy of 7 TeV and for an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb{sup -1}. Lower limits on the masses of objects of strongly acting gravity were set in the parameter region accessible to tests at the present time. Prospects for further research in this field are discussed.

  9. HEADQUARTERS, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HEADQUARTERS, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HQ F 3335.1 (3-85) REQUEST FOR MERIT PROMOTION CONSIDERATION (To be filed by applicant and attached to SF-171) Instructions to Applicants: Complete Items 1 through 6 below and submit together with all other required materials to the address listed on the vacancy announcement. Title of Position Applied for 3. Grade 4. Announcement No. 2. Date Submitted 1. 5. Name 6. Address (Please type, or print clearly with ball point pen) REPORT ON CONSIDERATION (to be

  10. Variable loading roller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Daniel M.

    1989-01-01

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves on the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first.

  11. Half-heusler alloys with enhanced figure of merit and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng; Yan, Xiao; Joshi, Giri; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Gang; Poudel, Bed; Caylor, James Christopher

    2015-06-02

    Thermoelectric materials and methods of making thermoelectric materials having a nanometer mean grain size less than 1 micron. The method includes combining and arc melting constituent elements of the thermoelectric material to form a liquid alloy of the thermoelectric material and casting the liquid alloy of the thermoelectric material to form a solid casting of the thermoelectric material. The method also includes ball milling the solid casting of the thermoelectric material into nanometer mean size particles and sintering the nanometer size particles to form the thermoelectric material having nanometer scale mean grain size.

  12. Radiative J/psi decays and the pseudoscalar puzzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wermes, N.

    1985-07-01

    Recent results on radiative decays of the J/PSI, obtained by the SPEAR detectors Mark III and Crystal Ball and the DCI detector DM2 at Orsay, are presented. The status of the glueball candidates theta(1690), iota(1460), and xi(220), and the decays J/PHI ..-->.. ..gamma.. Vector Vector are reviewed. A coupled channel analysis of iota(1460) decays to K anti K..pi.., rho rho, ..omega omega.., and ..gamma..rho is presented which may help to understand the pseudoscalar sector in radiative J/PHI decays. 42 refs., 16 figs.

  13. Ultrasonic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven C.; Kraft, Nancy C.

    2007-03-13

    An ultrasonic transducer having an effective center frequency of about 42 MHz; a bandwidth of greater than 85% at 6 dB; a spherical focus of at least 0.5 inches in water; an F4 lens; a resolution sufficient to be able to detect and separate a 0.005 inch flat-bottomed hole at 0.005 inches below surface; and a beam size of approximately 0.006–0.008 inches measured off a 11/2 mm ball in water at the transducer's focal point.

  14. Microsoft Word - Clouds of Changing Times Lesson- print!.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Changing Times Grade Levels: 2-4 Objective: To learn about the history of rainfall, snowfall, ice melt, and seasons in the area by conducting interviews with family and local elders. Materials: * One piece of poster board or butcher paper (approximately 2ft. x 3 ft.) in a color other than white * Glue and/or tape * Markers, crayons, colored pencils * 8 ½" x 11" plain white paper (about 5 sheets) * 11" x 14" plain white paper (1 sheet) * Scissors * Cotton balls, glitter

  15. Magnetic particle detection in unshielded environment using orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elrefai, Ahmed L. Sasada, Ichiro

    2015-05-07

    A new detection system for magnetic particles, which can operate in an unshielded environment, is developed using a fundamental mode orthogonal fluxgate gradiometer. The proposed detection system offers the advantages of cost, size, and weight reduction as compared to contamination detection systems using superconducting quantum interference device sensor. The detection system can be used to detect metallic contamination in foods or lithium ion battery production lines. The system has been investigated numerically to optimize various design parameters of the system. Experimental setup has been developed to evaluate some of the numerically predicted results. Steel balls were successfully detected down to the diameter of 50 ?m.

  16. Ultrasonic transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Steven C.; Kraft, Nancy C.

    2007-03-13

    An ultrasonic transducer having an effective center frequency of about 42 MHz; a bandwidth of greater than 85% at 6 dB; a spherical focus of at least 0.5 inches in water; an F4 lens; a resolution sufficient to be able to detect and separate a 0.005 inch flat-bottomed hole at 0.005 inches below surface; and a beam size of approximately 0.0060.008 inches measured off a 11/2 mm ball in water at the transducer's focal point.

  17. Variable loading roller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, D.M.

    1988-01-21

    An automatic loading roller for transmitting torque in traction drive devices in manipulator arm joints includes a two-part camming device having a first cam portion rotatable in place on a shaft by an input torque and a second cam portion coaxially rotatable and translatable having a rotating drive surface thereon for engaging the driven surface of an output roller with a resultant force proportional to the torque transmitted. Complementary helical grooves in the respective cam portions interconnected through ball bearings interacting with those grooves effect the rotation and translation of the second cam portion in response to rotation of the first. 14 figs.

  18. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  19. Effect of samarium doping on the dielectric behavior of barium zircomium titanate ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badapanda, T.; Sarangi, S.; Behera, B.; Anwar, S.; Sinha, T. P.

    2014-04-24

    Samarium doped Barium Zirconium Titanate ceramic with general formula Ba{sub 1?x}Sm{sub 2x/3}Zr{sub 0.05}Ti{sub 0.95}O{sub 3} [x=0.0,0.01,0.02,0.03,0.04] has been prepared by high energy ball milling. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed that these ceramics have a single phase with perovskite-type upto x?0.03 and a small secondary phase exist at x=0.04. The temperature dependent dielectric study shows a ferroelectric phase transition and transition temperature decreases with an increase in the Samarium content.

  20. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-26:14, 116-F-5 Influent Pipelines, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-029

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2008-02-29

    The 100-F-26:14 waste site includes underground pipelines associated with the 116-F-5 Ball Washer Crib and remnants of process pipelines on the west side of the 105-F Building. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  1. The behavior, quantity, and location of undissolved gas in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewster, M.E.; Gallagher, N.B.; Hudson, J.D.; Stewart, C.W.

    1995-10-01

    Mitigation of episodic flammable gas releases from Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101 was accomplished in July 1993 with the installation of a mixer pump that prevents gas retention. But is has not been possible until recently to measure the effects of mixing on the waste or how much gas remains and where it is located. Direct measurements of the void fraction and rheology of the mixed waste by the void fraction instrument (VFI) and ball rheometer along with previous data provide estimates of the location, quantity, and behavior of undissolved gas in the tank. This report documents the compilation and integration of the information that enables this understanding.

  2. GPS+ on the Nanometer Scale | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GPS+ on the Nanometer Scale A new technique makes it possible to track not only the location of moving particles to within 10 nanometers, but also their rotation and orientation. This is like watching a football game from the ionosphere and knowing where the football is at anytime within 1.5 inches, how the ball is spinning, and what direction it is moving. This is made possible by inserting an additional arm into the optical path of the specialized instrument known as a differential

  3. Test NIMROD Pictures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The NIMROD multi detector a new 4pi array of detectors build at Texas A&M to study reactions mechanisms in heavy ion reactions. The charged particle detectors are composed of Ionization Chambers, silicon telescopes and CsI(Tl) scintillators covering angles between 3 and 170 degrees. These charged particle detectors are placed in a cavity inside the revamped TAMU neutron ball. The charged particle detector setup is composed of: 168 CsI(Tl) 6 rings of 12 detectors between 3 and 35 degrees. 2

  4. The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directory: Facilities Services Name Title Office Email Phone Number Jordan Anderson 167 Metals Development ja762@iastate.edu 515-294-5428 Teresa Ball Custodian I 241C Metals Development tdball@iastate.edu 515-294-4360 Brian Bergman Facil Mechanic III Maintenance Shop bbergman@ameslab.gov 515-294-4346 Ronald Berrett Sys Control Tech Maintenance Shop rberrett@ameslab.gov 515-294-1746 Alexander Burgher Facil Mechanic III 158B Metals Development burghera@ameslab.gov 515-294-3756 Steven Carter Engr

  5. The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    XCL-2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2 Authors: Scott, Kathleen M [1] ; Sievert, Stefan M [2] ; Abril, Fereniki N [1] ; Ball, Lois A [1] ; Barrett, Chantell J [1] ; Blake, Rodrigo A [1] ; Boller, Amanda J [1] ; Chain, Patrick S [3] ; Clark, Justin A [1] ; Davis, Carisa R [1] ; Detter, J C [4] ; Do, Kimberly F [1] ; Dobrinski, Kimberly P

  6. RADBALL TECHNOLOGY TESTING IN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HEALTH PHYSICS INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a radiation-mapping device that can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. The device, known as RadBall{trademark}, consists of a colander-like outer collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The collimator has over two hundred small holes; thus, specific areas of the polymer sphere are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. The RadBallTM technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This paper summarizes the tests completed at SRNL Health Physics Instrument Calibration Laboratory (HPICL).

  7. Tool holder for preparation and inspection of a radiused edge cutting tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asmanes, Charles

    1979-01-01

    A tool holding fixture is provided for removably holding a radiused edge cutting tool in a tool edge lapping apparatus. The fixture allows the operator to preset the lapping radius and angle before the tool holder is placed in the fixture and the holder may be removed from the lapping apparatus to inspect the tool and simply replaced in the fixture to continue lapping in accordance with a precise alignment without realignment of the tool relative to the lap. The tool holder includes a pair of self aligning bearings in the form of precision formed steel balls connected together by a rigid shaft. The tool is held by an arm extending from the shaft and the balls set in fixed position bearing cups and the holder is oscillated back and forth about a fixed axis of rotation to lap the tool radius by means of a reversibly driven belt-pulley arrangement coupled to the shaft between the bearings. To temporarily remove the holder, the drive belt is slipped over the rearward end of the holder and the holder is lifted out of the bearing cups.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride powder by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Xiaoliang Wang Sheng; Yang Hua; Duan Xinglong; Dong Xuebin

    2008-09-15

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) powder was fabricated prepared by the spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The effects of nitrided temperature on the phases, morphology and particle size distribution of hBN powder, were investigated. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. UV-vis spectrum revealed that the product had one obvious band gap (4.7 eV) and PL spectrum showed that it had a visible emission at 457 nm ({lambda}{sub ex}=230 nm). FESEM image indicated that the particle size of the synthesized hBN was mainly in the range of 0.5-1.5 {mu}m in diameter, and 50-150 nm in thickness. The high-energy ball-milling process following 900 deg. C calcining process was very helpful to obtain fully crystallized hBN at lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: hBN powder was fabricated prepared by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The results indicated that spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology assisted with high-energy ball-milling process following calcined process was a hopeful way to manufacture hBN powder with high crystallinity in industrial scale.

  9. Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoseinpur, Arman; Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ? Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ? By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ? XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ? TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

  10. Solid state consolidation nanocrystalline copper-tungsten using cold spray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; Sarobol, Pylin; Argibay, Nicolas; Clark, Blythe; Diantonio, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that nanostructured metals can exhibit significantly improved properties compared to metals with conventional grain size. Unfortunately, nanocrystalline metals typically are not thermodynamically stable and exhibit rapid grain growth at moderate temperatures. This severely limits their processing and use, making them impractical for most engineering applications. Recent work has shown that a number of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metal alloys exist. These alloys have been prepared as powders using severe plastic deformation (e.g. ball milling) processes. Consolidation of these powders without compromise of their nanocrystalline microstructure is a critical step to enabling their use as engineering materials. We demonstrate solid-state consolidation of ball milled copper-tantalum nanocrystalline metal powder using cold spray. Unfortunately, the nanocrystalline copper-tantalum powder that was consolidated did not contain the thermodynamically stable copper-tantalum nanostructure. Nevertheless, this does this demonstrates a pathway to preparation of bulk thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Furthermore, it demonstrates a pathway to additive manufacturing (3D printing) of nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Additive manufacturing of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metals is attractive because it enables maximum flexibility and efficiency in the use of these unique materials.

  11. Wear behavior of the surface alloyed AISI 1020 steel with Fe-Nb-B by TIG welding technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilinc, B. Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.

    2015-03-30

    Weld overlay coatings also known as hardfacing is a method which involves melting of the alloys and solidification for applied coatings. Recently hardfacing by welding has become a commonly used technique for improvement of material performance in extreme (high temperature, impact/abrasion, erosion, etc.) conditions.In the present study, the coatings were produced from a mixture of ferrous niobium, ferrous boron and iron powders in the ranges of -45m particle size with different ratio. Fe{sub 12}Nb{sub 5}B{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}NbBalloys were coated on the AISI 1020 steel surface by TIG welding. The phases formed in the coated layer are Fe{sub 2}B, NbB{sub 2}, NbFeB and Fe0,2 Nb{sub 0,8} phases. The hardness of the presence phases are changing between 168985 HV{sub 0.01}, and 1817 HV{sub 0.1}. Microstructural examinations were realized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The wear and friction behaviors of Fe{sub 12}Nb{sub 5}B{sub 3} and Fe2NbB realized on the AISI 1020 steel were investigated by the technique of TIG welding by using ball-on-disk arrangement against alumina ball.

  12. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durmaz, M. Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.; Kilinc, B.

    2015-03-30

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1?m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575C for 8?h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000C for 2?h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr{sub 2}N. The depth of the layer was 8.15?m. The average hardness of the layer was 216015 HV{sub 0.025}. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  13. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, P.R.

    1985-06-21

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and radius by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  14. Tube wall thickness measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagasse, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the thickness of a tube's wall for the tube's entire length and circumference by determining the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the known thickness of a selected standard item. The apparatus comprises a base and a first support member having first and second ends. The first end is connected to the base and the second end is connected to a spherical element. A second support member is connected to the base and spaced apart from the first support member. A positioning element is connected to and movable relative to the second support member. An indicator is connected to the positioning element and is movable to a location proximate the spherical element. The indicator includes a contact ball for first contacting the selected standard item and holding it against the spherical element. The contact ball then contacts the tube when the tube is disposed about the spherical element. The indicator includes a dial having a rotatable needle for indicating the deviation of the tube wall thickness from the thickness of the selected standard item.

  15. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  16. Miniature Laser Tracker

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles S.

    2003-09-09

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  17. Preparation of powders suitable for conversion to useful .beta.-aluminas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Peter E. D.

    1982-01-01

    A process for forming a precursor powder which, when suitably pressed and sintered forms highly pure, densified .beta.- or .beta."-alumina, comprising the steps of: (1) forming a suspension (or slurry) of Bayer-derived Al(OH).sub.3 in a water-miscible solvent; (2) adding an aqueous solution of a Mg compound, a Li compound, a Na compound or mixtures thereof to the Bayer-derived Al(OH).sub.3 suspension while agitating the mixture formed thereby, to produce a gel; (3) drying the gel at a temperature above the normal boiling point of water to produce a powder material; (4) lightly ball milling and sieving said powder material; and (5) heating the ball-milled and sieved powder material at a temperature of between 350.degree. to 900.degree. C. to form the .beta.- or .beta."-alumina precursor powder. The precursor powder, thus formed, may be subsequently isopressed at a high pressure and sintered at an elevated temperature to produce .beta.- or .beta."-alumina. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

  18. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J. (Los Alamos, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  19. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  20. Fabrication of stable electrode/diffusion barrier layers for thermoelectric filled skutterudite devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jie, Qing; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed are methods for the manufacture of n-type and p-type filled skutterudite thermoelectric legs of an electrical contact. A first material of CoSi.sub.2 and a dopant are ball-milled to form a first powder which is thermo-mechanically processed with a second powder of n-type skutterudite to form a n-type skutterudite layer disposed between a first layer and a third layer of the doped-CoSi.sub.2. In addition, a plurality of components such as iron, and nickel, and at least one of cobalt or chromium are ball-milled form a first powder that is thermo-mechanically processed with a p-type skutterudite layer to form a p-type skutterudite layer "second layer" disposed between a first and a third layer of the first powder. The specific contact resistance between the first layer and the skutterudite layer for both the n-type and the p-type skutterudites subsequent to hot-pressing is less than about 10.0 .mu..OMEGA.cm.sup.2.

  1. A nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvester for various mechanical motions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Kangqi; Chang, Jianwei; Liu, Zhaohui; Zhu, Yingmin; Pedrycz, Witold

    2015-06-01

    This study presents a nonlinear piezoelectric energy harvester with intent to scavenge energy from diverse mechanical motions. The harvester consists of four piezoelectric cantilever beams, a cylindrical track, and a ferromagnetic ball, with magnets integrated to introduce the magnetic coupling between the ball and the beams. The experimental results demonstrate that the harvester is able to collect energy from various directions of vibrations. For the vibrations perpendicular to the ground, the maximum peak voltage is increased by 3.2 V and the bandwidth of the voltage above 4 V is increased by more than 4 Hz compared to the results obtained when using a conventional design. For the vibrations along the horizontal direction, the frequency up-conversion is realized through the magnetic coupling. Moreover, the proposed design can harvest energy from the sway motion around different directions on the horizontal plane. Harvesting energy from the rotation motion is also achieved with an operating bandwidth of approximately 6 Hz.

  2. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantly random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.

  3. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    2002-01-01

    A locator with a part support is used to hold a part onto the kinematic mount of a tooling machine so that the part can be held in or replaced in exactly the same position relative to the cutting tool for machining different surfaces of the part or for performing different machining operations on the same or different surfaces of the part. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls placed at equidistant positions around the planar surface of the locator and the kinematic mount has a plurality of magnets which alternate with grooves which accommodate the portions of the steel balls projecting from the locator. The part support holds the part to be machined securely in place in the locator. The locator can be easily detached from the kinematic mount, turned over, and replaced onto the same kinematic mount or another kinematic mount on another tooling machine without removing the part to be machined from the locator so that there is no need to touch or reposition the part within the locator, thereby assuring exact replication of the position of the part in relation to the cutting tool on the tooling machine for each machining operation on the part.

  4. Grain boundary character distribution in nanocrystalline metals produced by different processing routes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bober, David B.; Kumar, Mukal; Rupert, Timothy J.; Khalajhedayati, Amirhossein

    2015-12-28

    Nanocrystalline materials are defined by their fine grain size, but details of the grain boundary character distribution should also be important. Grain boundary character distributions are reported for ball-milled, sputter-deposited, and electrodeposited Ni and Ni-based alloys, all with average grain sizes of ~20 nm, to study the influence of processing route. The two deposited materials had nearly identical grain boundary character distributions, both marked by a Σ3 length percentage of 23 to 25 pct. In contrast, the ball-milled material had only 3 pct Σ3-type grain boundaries and a large fraction of low-angle boundaries (16 pct), with the remainder being predominantlymore » random high angle (73 pct). Furthermore, these grain boundary character measurements are connected to the physical events that control their respective processing routes. Consequences for material properties are also discussed with a focus on nanocrystalline corrosion. As a whole, the results presented here show that grain boundary character distribution, which has often been overlooked in nanocrystalline metals, can vary significantly and influence material properties in profound ways.« less

  5. REACTOR CONTROL MECHANISM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, J.A.; Engberg, R.E.; Welch, J.M.

    1959-05-12

    A quick-releasing mechanism is described which may be used to rapidiy drop a device supported from beneath during normal use, such as a safety rod in a nuclear reactor. In accordance with this invention an electrical control signal, such as may be provided by radiation detection or other alarm condition sensing devices, is delivered to an electromagnetic solenoid, the armature of which is coupled to an actuating mechanism. The solenoid is energized when the mechanism is in its upper or cocked position. In such position, the mechanism engages a plurality of retaining balls, forcing them outward into engagement with a shoulder or recess in a corresponding section of a tubular extension on the upheld device. When the control signal to the solenoid suddenly ceases, the armature drops out, allowing the actuating mechanism to move slightly but rapidly under the force of a compressed spring. The weight of the device will urge the balls inward against a beveled portion of the actuating mechanism and away from the engaging section on the tubular extension, thus allowing the upheld device to fall freely under the influence of gravity.

  6. Cost comparison modeling between current solder sphere attachment technology and solder jetting technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, R.N.

    1996-10-01

    By predicting the total life-cycle cost of owning and operating production equipment, it becomes possible for processors to make accurate and intelligent decisions regarding major capitol equipment investments as well as determining the most cost effective manufacturing processes and environments. Cost of Ownership (COO) is a decision making technique based on inputting the total costs of acquiring, operating and maintaining production equipment. All quantitative economic and production data can be modeled and processed using COO software programs such as the Cost of Ownership Luminator program TWO COOL{trademark}. This report investigated the Cost of Ownership differences between the current state-of-the-art solder ball attachment process and a prototype solder jetting process developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The prototype jetting process is a novel and unique approach to address the anticipated high rate ball grid array (BGA) production requirements currently forecasted for the next decade. The jetting process, which is both economically and environmentally attractive eliminates the solder sphere fabrication step, the solder flux application step as well as the furnace reflow and post cleaning operations.

  7. Apparatus And Method Of Using Flexible Printed Circuit Board In Optical Transceiver Device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2005-03-15

    This invention relates to a flexible printed circuit board that is used in connection with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. In one embodiment, the flexible printed circuit board has flexible metal layers in between flexible insulating layers, and the circuit board comprises: (1) a main body region orientated in a first direction having at least one electrical or optoelectronic device; (2) a plurality of electrical contact pads integrated into the main body region, where the electrical contact pads function to connect the flexible printed circuit board to an external environment; (3) a buckle region extending from one end of the main body region; and (4) a head region extending from one end of the buckle region, and where the head region is orientated so that it is at an angle relative to the direction of the main body region. The electrical contact pads may be ball grid arrays, solder balls or land-grid arrays, and they function to connect the circuit board to an external environment. A driver or amplifier chip may be adapted to the head region of the flexible printed circuit board. In another embodiment, a heat spreader passes along a surface of the head region of the flexible printed circuit board, and a window is formed in the head region of the flexible printed circuit board. Optoelectronic devices are adapted to the head spreader in such a manner that they are accessible through the window in the flexible printed circuit board.

  8. Investigation of helium ion production in constricted direct current plasma ion source with layered-glows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Park, Yeong-Shin; Hwang, Y. S.; Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744

    2014-02-15

    Generation of helium ions is experimentally investigated with a constricted direct current (DC) plasma ion source operated at layered-glow mode, in which electrons could be accelerated through multiple potential structures so as to generate helium ions including He{sup 2+} by successive ionization collisions in front of an extraction aperture. The helium discharge is sustained with the formation of a couple of stable layers and the plasma ball with high density is created near the extraction aperture at the operational pressure down to 0.6 Torr with concave cathodes. The ion beam current extracted with an extraction voltage of 5 kV is observed to be proportional to the discharge current and inversely proportional to the operating pressure, showing high current density of 130 mA/cm{sup 2} and power density of 0.52 mA/cm{sup 2}/W. He{sup 2+} ions, which were predicted to be able to exist due to multiple-layer potential structure, are not observed. Simple calculation on production of He{sup 2+} ions inside the plasma ball reveals that reduced operating pressure and increased cathode area will help to generate He{sup 2+} ions with the layered-glow DC discharge.

  9. Facilely preparation and microwave absorption properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guiqin, E-mail: wanggq@dlut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China); Chang, Yongfeng; Wang, Lifang; Liu, Lidong; Liu, Chao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116085 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? A bran-new method is firstly used to fabricate Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. ? The detailed analysis of formation mechanism is discussed. ? The electromagnetic absorption properties are defined. ? The effect of nanometer-sized is considered for the excellent microwave absorption. - Abstract: The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared by a novel wet-chemical method which shows its highly synthesizing efficiency and controllability. A possible formation mechanism was also proposed to explain the synthesizing process. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed and yielded an examination of an average diameter of 77 nm of the as-synthesized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with face-centered cubic structure. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer were employed to measure the magnetic property and electromagnetic parameters of the nanoparticles, then reflection losses (RL (dB)) were calculated in the frequency range of 218 GHz. A large saturation magnetization (72.36 emu/g) and high coercivity (95 Oe) were determined and indicated that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles own strong magnetic performance. Following simulation results showed that the lowest reflection loss of the sample was ?21.2 dB at 5.6 GHz with layer thickness of 6 mm. Effect of nanometer-sized further provided an explanation for the excellent microwave absorption behavior shown by the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  10. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  11. Group-III nitride based high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with barrier/spacer layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chavarkar, Prashant; Smorchkova, Ioulia P.; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Wu, Yifeng

    2005-02-01

    A Group III nitride based high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) is disclosed that provides improved high frequency performance. One embodiment of the HEMT comprises a GaN buffer layer, with an Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N (y=1 or y 1) layer on the GaN buffer layer. An Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5) barrier layer on to the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer, opposite the GaN buffer layer, Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer having a higher Al concentration than that of the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. A preferred Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer has y=1 or y.about.1 and a preferred Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer has 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.0.5. A 2DEG forms at the interface between the GaN buffer layer and the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer. Respective source, drain and gate contacts are formed on the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N barrier layer. The HEMT can also comprising a substrate adjacent to the buffer layer, opposite the Al.sub.y Ga.sub.1-y N layer and a nucleation layer between the Al.sub.x Ga.sub.1-x N buffer layer and the substrate.

  12. Interplay of octahedral tilts and polar order in BiFeO3 films (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Interplay of octahedral tilts and polar order in BiFeO3 films Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interplay of octahedral tilts and polar order in BiFeO3 films Authors: Kim, Young Min [1] ; Kumar, Amit [1] ; Hatt, Alison J [2] ; Morozovska, A. N. [3] ; Tselev, Alexander [1] ; Biegalski, Michael D [1] ; Ivanov, Ilia N [1] ; Eliseev, E. A. [3] ; Pennycook, Stephen J [1] ; Rondinelli, James [4] ; Kalinin, Sergei V [1] ; Borisevich, Albina Y [1] + Show Author

  13. Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale selective area growth of thick, dense, uniform, In-rich, InGaN nanostructure arrays on GaN/sapphire template Authors: Sundaram, S. [1] ; Puybaret, R. [2] ; El Gmili, Y. [1] ; Li, X. [2] ; Bonanno, P. L. [1] ; Pantzas, K. [3] Search SciTech

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Switch to Detail View for this search SciTech Connect Search Results Page 1 of 1 Search for: All records Creators/Authors contains: "Liou, Kuo-Nan" × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Next » Everything2 Electronic Full Text2 Citations0 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject environmental sciences (1) geosciences (1) mathematics and computing (1) Filter by Author Liou, Kuo-Nan (2) Gu, Y. (1)

  15. Genealogy of periodic trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Adguiar, M.A.M.; Maldta, C.P.; de Passos, E.J.V.

    1986-05-20

    The periodic solutions of non-integrable classical Hamiltonian systems with two degrees of freedom are numerically investigated. Curves of periodic families are given in plots of energy vs. period. Results are presented for this Hamiltonian: H = 1/2(p/sub x//sup 2/ + p/sub y//sup 2/) + 1/2 x/sup 2/ + 3/2 y/sup 2/ - x/sup 2/y + 1/12 x/sup 4/. Properties of the families of curves are pointed out. (LEW)

  16. Implementation of Double-Waist Chicane Optics in SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.; Cornacchia, M.; Dao, T.; Dell'Orco, D.; Rafael, F.; Harrington, D.; Hettel, R.; Huang, X.; Nosochkov, Y.; Rabedeau, T.; Rarback, H.; Ringwall, A.; Safranek, J.; Scott, B.; Sebek, J.; Tanabe, J.; Terebilo, A.; Wermelskirchen, C.; Widmeyer, M.; Yoon, Moohyun; /POSTECH

    2006-08-16

    The SPEAR3 accelerator upgrade opened up two 7.6m racetrack straights in the magnet lattice. In one of these straights, we recently added a magnetic chicane to separate two insertion device (ID) beam lines by 10mrad. A quadrupole triplet in the center creates a ''double focus'' optics with {beta}y = 1.6m at the middle of each ID, hence the term ''double-waist chicane''. The new optics also reduced {beta}y in the four matching straights adjacent to the racetrack straights to 2.5m. In this paper, we outline design features of the optics and physical implementation of the lattice.

  17. Electrode With Porous Three-Dimensional Support

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Patrick; Dauchier, Jean-Michel; Simonneau, Olivier

    1999-07-27

    Electrode including a paste containing particles of electrochemically active material and a conductive support consisting of a three-dimensional porous material comprising strands delimiting contiguous pores communicating via passages, characterized in that the average width L in .mu.m of said passages is related to the average diameter .O slashed. in .mu.m of said particles by the following equation, in which W and Y are dimensionless coefficients: wherein W=0.16 Y=1.69 X=202.4 .mu.m and Z=80 .mu.m

  18. Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians 10 Y Energy, Environmental, and Economic Development Platform

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians - TMBCI 10Y Energy, Environmental and Economic Development Platform DOE Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Forum Series Indian Pueblo Cultural Center - Albuquerque, NM July 27, 2015 10Y Governance, Financial and Environmental Impacts TMBCI Current Annual Energy Spend: $6.5 Million est. Daily Demand: 18MW est. 0 50 100 150 200 10Y1 10Y2 10Y3 10Y4 10Y5 10Y6 10Y7 10Y8 10Y9 10Y10 10Y Growth Projection Non-tribal Utility Hydrocarbons TMBCI Efficiency and

  19. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse May 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 From Steve'S DeSk 3 experimentS hint that the atomic nucleuS Still holDS Some SurpriSeS 4 Spin anD orbital orDering in Y 1-x la x vo 3 5 probing manganite FilmS chemical uniFor- mitY with polarizeD neutronS 6 heaDS up! By Diana Del Mauro ADEPS Communications As joint Accelerator Operations and Technology (AOT) deputy division

  20. A PROCEDURAL GUIDE FOR THE ACQUISITION OF REAL PROPERTY BY GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROCEDURAL GUIDE FOR THE ACQUISITION OF REAL PROPERTY BY GOVERNMENTAL AGENCIES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LAND AND NATURAL RESOURCES D I V I S I O N 1972 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Foreword . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i v I n t r o d u c t o r y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I . I n i t i a l Steps t o be taken by t h e a c q u i r i n g agency p r i o r t o a c q u i s i t i o n o f t h e l a n d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A . I

  1. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and amore » putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of either anthropogenic or natural origin, but little is known of the defense mechanisms they have evolved. Using a microorganism that generates RCS internally as part of its respiratory process allowed us to uncover a novel defense mechanism based on RCS scavenging by reductive reaction with a sacrificial methionine-rich peptide and redox recycling through a methionine sulfoxide reductase. As a result, this system is conserved in a broad diversity of organisms, including some of clinical importance, invoking a possible important role in innate immune system evasion.« less

  2. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen; Xu, Wu

    2008-01-01

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  3. Electrolytic orthoborate salts for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angell, Charles Austen [Mesa, AZ; Xu, Wu [Tempe, AZ

    2009-05-05

    Orthoborate salts suitable for use as electrolytes in lithium batteries and methods for making the electrolyte salts are provided. The electrolytic salts have one of the formulae (I). In this formula anionic orthoborate groups are capped with two bidentate chelating groups, Y1 and Y2. Certain preferred chelating groups are dibasic acid residues, most preferably oxalyl, malonyl and succinyl, disulfonic acid residues, sulfoacetic acid residues and halo-substituted alkylenes. The salts are soluble in non-aqueous solvents and polymeric gels and are useful components of lithium batteries in electrochemical devices.

  4. ETATP12rev0.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E T T A A - - T T P P 0 0 1 1 2 2 R R e e v v i i s s i i o o n n 0 0 E E f f f f e e c c t t i i v v e e J J u u l l y y 1 1 , , 1 1 9 9 9 9 7 7 E E v v a a l l u u a a t t i i o ...

  5. Oxygen-vacancy-induced polar behavior in (LaFeO3)2/(SrFeO3) superlattices

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Oxygen-vacancy-induced polar behavior in (LaFeO3)2/(SrFeO3) superlattices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Oxygen-vacancy-induced polar behavior in (LaFeO3)2/(SrFeO3) superlattices Authors: Mishra, Rohan [1] ; Kim, Young-Min [1] ; Salafranca Laforga, Juan I [1] ; Kim, Seong Keun [2] ; Chang, Seohyoung [2] ; Bhattacharya, Anand [2] ; Fong, Dillon [2] ; Pennycook, Stephen J [1] ; Pantelides, Sokrates T [1] ; Borisevich, Albina Y [1] + Show Author

  6. Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two-color laser pulses in air (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused two-color laser pulses in air Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 23, 2017 Title: Generation of scalable terahertz radiation from cylindrically focused two-color laser pulses in air Authors: Kuk, D. [1] ; Yoo, Y. J. [1] ; Rosenthal, E. W. [1] ; Jhajj, N. [1] ; Milchberg, H. M. [1] ; Kim, K. Y. [1] + Show

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Port and Integrate Base- line WEC Codes into VERA/LIME - VRI Physics Simulation Suite Project Rod Schmidt Sandia National Laboratory January 12, 2011 CASL-U-2010-0018-000 Nuclear Energy CASL-U-2010-0018-000 Level 1 Milestone: CASL.Y1.01 Port and Integrate Base-line WEC Codes into VERA/LIME VRI Physics Simulation Suite Project Presented by: Rod Schmidt, SNL with: Chris Baker and John Turner: ORNL Ross Bartlett, Noel Belcourt, Roger Pawlowski: SNL David Paterline, Pete Hilton and Brian Coulter:

  8. Novel mechanism for scavenging of hypochlorite involving a periplasmic methionine-rich peptide and methionine sulfoxide reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melnyk, Ryan A.; Youngblut, Matthew D.; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Lavarone, Anthony T.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Coates, John D.

    2015-05-12

    Reactive chlorine species (RCS) defense mechanisms are important for bacterial fitness in diverse environments. In addition to the anthropogenic use of RCS in the form of bleach, these compounds are also produced naturally through photochemical reactions of natural organic matter and in vivo by the mammalian immune system in response to invading microorganisms. To gain insight into bacterial RCS defense mechanisms, we investigated Azospira suillum strain PS, which produces periplasmic RCS as an intermediate of perchlorate respiration. Our studies identified an RCS response involving an RCS stress-sensing sigma/anti-sigma factor system (SigF/NrsF), a soluble hypochlorite-scavenging methionine-rich periplasmic protein (MrpX), and a putative periplasmic methionine sulfoxide reductase (YedY1). We investigated the underlying mechanism by phenotypic characterization of appropriate gene deletions, chemogenomic profiling of barcoded transposon pools, transcriptome sequencing, and biochemical assessment of methionine oxidation. Our results demonstrated that SigF was specifically activated by RCS and initiated the transcription of a small regulon centering around yedY1 and mrpX. A yedY1 paralog (yedY2) was found to have a similar fitness to yedY1 despite not being regulated by SigF. Markerless deletions of yedY2 confirmed its synergy with the SigF regulon. MrpX was strongly induced and rapidly oxidized by RCS, especially hypochlorite. Our results suggest a mechanism involving hypochlorite scavenging by sacrificial oxidation of the MrpX in the periplasm. Reduced MrpX is regenerated by the YedY methionine sulfoxide reductase activity. The phylogenomic distribution of this system revealed conservation in several Proteobacteria of clinical importance, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Brucella spp., implying a putative role in immune response evasion in vivo. In addition, bacteria are often stressed in the environment by reactive chlorine species (RCS) of either anthropogenic or natural origin, but little is known of the defense mechanisms they have evolved. Using a microorganism that generates RCS internally as part of its respiratory process allowed us to uncover a novel defense mechanism based on RCS scavenging by reductive reaction with a sacrificial methionine-rich peptide and redox recycling through a methionine sulfoxide reductase. As a result, this system is conserved in a broad diversity of organisms, including some of clinical importance, invoking a possible important role in innate immune system evasion.

  9. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 J A N U A R Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Released in November 2011, The National Preparedness System is an integrated set of guidance, programs, and processes that will enable the Nation to meet the National Preparedness Goal. The National Preparedness System is the second deliverable mandated by Presidential Policy Directive 8: National Preparedness (PPD-8), which the President signed in March 2011. PPD-8 describes the Nation's approach to preparing for the threats and hazards

  10. Energy Emergency Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Preparedness Quarterly

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 J A N U A R Y 1 5 , 2 0 1 3 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Superstorm Sandy: DOE's Efforts to Help the Nation Recover Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Deputy Assistant Secretary ISER William N. Bryan Director, Preparedness and Response ISER Stewart Cedres Visit us at: http://energy.gov/oe/services/energy-assurance/emergency-preparedness November 30 marked the end of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season-another busy season

  11. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    y y y 1 1 1 4 4 4 , , , 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 4 4 6 p.m., DOE Information Center 1 Science.gov Way Oak Ridge, Tennessee The mission of the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) is to provide informed advice and recommendations concerning site specific issues related to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation. In order to provide unbiased evaluation and recommendations on the cleanup efforts related to the Oak Ridge site, the

  12. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board Monthly Meeting W W W

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a a a n n n u u u a a a r r r y y y 1 1 1 3 3 3 , , , 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 p.m., DOE Information Center 1 Science.gov Way Oak Ridge, Tennessee The mission of the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) is to provide informed advice and recommendations concerning site specific issues related to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Reservation. In order to provide unbiased evaluation and recommendations on the cleanup efforts

  13. Y(nS) Polarizations Versus Particle Multiplicity in pp Collisions at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    $\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Y(nS) Polarizations Versus Particle Multiplicity in pp Collisions at $$\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Y(nS) Polarizations Versus Particle Multiplicity in pp Collisions at $$\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV The polarizations of the Y(1S), Y(2S), and Y(3S) mesons are measured as a function of the charged particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The measurements are performed with a dimuon data

  14. Visual inspections of N Reactor horizontal control rod channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, E.M.

    1990-07-01

    This document describes the examination of thirteen horizontal control rod channels during the N Reactor Surveillance Program campaigns of 1987 and 1988. Traverses with miniature video cameras recorded the condition and relative positions of graphite blocks that form channel walls. The major conclusion confirms that no conditions exist that would prevent rod insertion. Where encroachment of broken filler block keys into the channel indicated a potential for rod motion impairment their removal by displacement into gaps between blocks was performed as preventive maintenance. In some locations a chisel was used in clearing keys lodged in gaps between tube blocks. Other observations include counts of safety balls observed in channels, breaks in tube blocks and Tee-bars and separations at Tee-bar junctions that results from axial graphite contraction. 15 refs., 18 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Use of H2S to Probe the Active Sites in FeNC Catalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) in Acidic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Deepika; Mamtani, Kuldeep; Bruening, Christopher R.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Ozkan, Umit S.

    2014-10-01

    H2S has been used as a probe molecule both in an “in situ” poisoning experiment and in intermediate-temperature heat-treatment steps during and after the preparation of FeNC catalysts in an attempt to analyze its effect on their ORR activity. The heat treatments were employed either on the ball-milled precursor of FeNC or after the Ar-NH3 high temperature heat treatments. ORR activity of the H2S-treated catalysts was seen to be significantly lower than the sulfur-free catalysts, whether the sulfur exposure was during a half-cell testing, or as an intermediate-temperature exposure to H2S. The incorporation of sulfur species and interaction of Fe with sulfur were confirmed by characterization using XPS, EXAFS, TPO, and TPD. This study provides crucial evidence regarding differences in active sites in FeNC versus nitrogen-containing carbon nanostructured (CNx) catalysts.

  16. How NIF Works

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility, located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is the world's largest laser system... 192 huge laser beams in a massive building, all focused down at the last moment at a 2 millimeter ball containing frozen hydrogen gas. The goal is to achieve fusion... getting more energy out than was used to create it. It's never been done before under controlled conditions, just in nuclear weapons and in stars. We expect to do it within the next 2-3 years. The purpose is threefold: to create an almost limitless supply of safe, carbon-free, proliferation-free electricity; examine new regimes of astrophysics as well as basic science; and study the inner-workings of the U.S. stockpile of nuclear weapons to ensure they remain safe, secure and reliable without the need for underground testing. More information about NIF can be found at:

  17. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Fred J.

    1996-01-01

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  18. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Fred J.

    1994-01-01

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2 /g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  19. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Weaver, Fred J.

    1995-01-01

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  20. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.; Kollie, T.G.; Weaver, F.J.

    1996-01-02

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm{sup 3} and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m{sup 2}/g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraalkyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders. 2 figs.

  1. Technical Information to Support Double Shell Tank (DST) Emergency Annulus Pumping [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2000-09-14

    This document provides the design calculations for the DST Annulus Emergency Pumping Project. This document also contains essential information relative to DST annulus emergency pumping that may not be found in other documents. This information consists of the following: Index drawing for annulus pumping; References to the Acceptance Test Report, DST Emergency Pumping Guide, Time Deployment study, etc.; Statements of work; and Reference CEIS and RMIS numbers. A Vendor Information document, VI-50121, is not included in this document, but a copy can be obtained by contacting Document Control Services. This document contains various information regarding the Hydrostar pumps, such as the air motor, cylinder size, pump installation and operation manual. It also contains information regarding the Flygt BS2060 submersible pump, such as parts list, pump handling, preventative maintenance, overhaul and repair. In addition, this document also has information on 3-way PM ball valves, electrical skid components and the alternate Gurman-Rupp stainless steel submersible pump.

  2. Inspection system for a turbine blade region of a turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smed, Jan P.; Lemieux, Dennis H.; Williams, James P.

    2007-06-19

    An inspection system formed at least from a viewing tube for inspecting aspects of a turbine engine during operation of the turbine engine. An outer housing of the viewing tube may be positioned within a turbine engine using at least one bearing configured to fit into an indentation of a support housing to form a ball and socket joint enabling the viewing tube to move during operation as a result of vibrations and other movements. The viewing tube may also include one or more lenses positioned within the viewing tube for viewing the turbine components. The lenses may be kept free of contamination by maintaining a higher pressure in the viewing tube than a pressure outside of the viewing tube and enabling gases to pass through an aperture in a cap at a viewing end of the viewing tube.

  3. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of aLiBH4/CaH2Destabilized System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a destabilizedLiBH4/CaH2system ball-milled withTiCl3,TiF3, andTiO2additives have been investigated. It is found that the system withTiCl3additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount ofTiCl3is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of theLiBH4/CaH2system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation. The activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25?mol% ofTiCl3are 141, 126, and 110?kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts ofTiCl3are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures.

  4. Correlating mechanical properties and anti-wear performance of tribofilms formed by ionic liquids, ZDDP and their combinations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Landauer, Alexander K.; Barnhill, William C.; Qu, Jun

    2016-03-10

    Here we examine the elasticity, hardness, and resistance-to-plastic-deformation (P/S2) measured via nanoindentation of several tribofilms and correlates these properties to friction and wear behavior. The tribofilms were generated by ball-on-plate reciprocating sliding lubricated by a base oil containing an ionic liquid, phosphonium-organophosphate or ammonium-organophosphate, zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP), or combination of IL and ZDDP. Nanoindentation was conducted at room and elevated temperatures. While there seems little correlation between the tribofilm hardness and tribological behavior, a higher modulus generally leads to better friction and wear performance. Interestingly, a lower P/S2 ratio tends to reduce friction and improve wear protection, which is inmore » an opposite trend as reported for bulk materials. Ultimately, this is likely attributable to the dynamic, self-healing characteristics of tribofilms.« less

  5. Threshold ?0 Photoproduction on Transverse Polarised Protons at MAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, S.

    2015-09-14

    Polarisation-dependent differential cross sections ?T associated with the target asymmetry T have been measured for the reaction ? p-? p ?0 with transverse target polarisation from ?0 threshold up to photon energies of 190 MeV. Additionally, the data were obtained using a frozen-spin butanol target with the Crystal Ball / TAPS detector set-up and the Glasgow photon tagging system at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. Our results for ?T have been used in combination with our previous measurements of the unpolarised cross section ?0 and the beam asymmetry ? for a model-independent determination of S and P wave multipoles in the ?0 threshold region, which includes for the first time a direct determination of the imaginary part of the E0+ multipole.

  6. (U) Feynman-Y calculations using PARTISN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2015-08-31

    A prescription for computing the Feynman Y as a function of coincidence gate width using a deterministic multigroup neutron transport code has been published and the results compared favorably with measurements of the BeRP ball. In this paper, we report on our project to implement the method and reproduce the results. There are several clarifications and corrections of the published prescription. We show results using two multigroup cross section libraries compared with measurements and with Monte Carlo results. Deterministic simulations of the mean count rates compare very favorably with previously published Monte Carlo results, and deterministic simulations of the Feynman Y asymptote compare somewhat favorably. In Feynman beta plots, the deterministic simulations reached the asymptotic value much sooner than did a fit to the measured data.

  7. High strain in polycrystalline Ni{sub 48.8}Mn{sub 31.4}Ga{sub 19.8} Heusler alloys under overlapped static and oscillating magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanher, D. Z.; Pereira, J. R. D.; Cótica, L. F.; Santos, I. A.; Gotardo, R. A. M.; Viana, D. S. F.; Garcia, D.; Eiras, J. A.

    2014-09-21

    Martensitic polycrystalline Ni{sub 48.8}Mn{sub 31.4}Ga{sub 19.8} Heusler alloys, with a stacking period of 14 atomic planes at room temperature, were innovatively processed by combining high-energy ball milling and powder metallurgy. Bulk samples were mechanically coupled to a piezoelectric material in a parallel configuration, and the mechanical deformation of the studied system due to the twin's variant motion was investigated under overlapped static and oscillating magnetic fields. A reversible and high mechanical deformation is observed when the frequency of the oscillating magnetic field is tuned with the natural vibration frequency of this system. In this condition, a linear deformation as a function of the static magnetic field amplitude occurs in the ±4 kOe range, and a mechanical deformation of 2% at 10 kOe is observed.

  8. Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project: Phase 2 soils program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McArthur, R.D.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    To help estimate population doses of radiation from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site, soil samples were collected throughout the western United States. Each sample was prepared by drying and ball-milling, then analyzed by gamma-spectrometry to determine the amount of {sup 137}Cs it contained. Most samples were also analyzed by chemical separation and alpha-spectrometry to determine {sup 239 + 240}Pu and by isotope mass spectroscopy to determine the ratios of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu to {sup 239}Pu. The total inventories of cesium and plutonium at 171 sites were computed from the results. This report describes the sample collection, processing, and analysis, presents the analytical results, and assesses the quality of the data. 10 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of actinide nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaques, Brian; Butt, Darryl P.; Marx, Brian M.; Hamdy, A.S.; Osterberg, Daniel; Balfour, Gordon

    2007-07-01

    A carbothermic reduction of the metal oxides in a hydrogen/nitrogen mixed gas stream prior to nitriding in a nitrogen gas stream was used to synthesize uranium nitride at 1500 deg. C, cerium nitride at 1400 deg. C, and dysprosium nitride at 1500 deg. C. Cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride were also synthesized via hydriding and nitriding the metal shavings at 900 deg. C and 1500 deg. C, respectively. Also, a novel ball-milling synthesis route was used to produce cerium nitride and dysprosium nitride from the metal shavings at room temperature. Dysprosium nitride was also produced by reacting the metal shavings in a high purity nitrogen gas stream at 1300 deg. C. All materials were characterized by phase analysis via X-ray diffraction. Only the high purity materials were further analyzed via chemical analysis to characterize the trace oxygen concentration. (authors)

  10. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1982-08-10

    Much of the research in laser fusion has been done using simple ball on-stalk targets filled with a deuterium-tritium mixture. The targets operated in the exploding pusher mode in which the laser energy was delivered in a very short time (approx. 100 ps or less) and was absorbed by the glass wall of the target. The high energy density in the glass literally exploded the shell with the inward moving glass compressing the DT fuel to high temperatures and moderate densities. Temperatures achieved were high enough to produce DT reactions and accompanying thermonuclear neutrons and alpha particles. The primary criteria imposed on the target builders were: (1) wall thickness, (2) sphere diameter, and (3) fuel in the sphere.

  11. Composition and Technical Basis for K Basin Settler Sludge Simulant for Inspection, Retrieval, and Pump Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-06-25

    This report provides the formulation and technical basis for a K Basin Settler Tank Sludge simulant that will be used by the K Basin Closure Project (KBC) to test and develop equipment/approaches for Settler Tank sludge level measurement and retrieval in a mock-up test system of the actual Settler Tanks. The sludge simulant may also be used to demonstrate that the TOYO high pressure positive displacement pump design (reversing valves and hollow balls) is suitable for transfer of Settler Tank sludge from the K West (KW) Basin to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) (~500 ft). As requested the by the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project (STP) the simulant is comprised of non-radioactive (and non-uranium) constituents.

  12. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  13. Rotatable seal assembly. [Patent application; rotating targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.; Garibaldi, J.L.

    1980-11-12

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  14. Rotatable seal assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M.; Garibaldi, Jack L.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an O-ring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers.

  15. Search for low-scale gravity signatures in multi-jet final states with the ATLAS detector at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. 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F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-07-01

    A search for evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model in final states with multiple high-transverse-momentum jets is performed using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. No significant excess of events beyond Standard Model expectations is observed, and upper limits on the visible cross sections for non-Standard Model production of multi-jet final states are set. A wide variety of models for black hole and string ball production and decay are considered, and the upper limit on the cross section times acceptance is as low as 0.16 fb at the 95% confidence level. For these models, excluded regions are also given as function of the main model parameters.

  16. Threshold π0 Photoproduction on Transverse Polarised Protons at MAMI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schumann, S.

    2015-09-14

    Polarisation-dependent differential cross sections σT associated with the target asymmetry T have been measured for the reaction γ p-→ p π0 with transverse target polarisation from π0 threshold up to photon energies of 190 MeV. Additionally, the data were obtained using a frozen-spin butanol target with the Crystal Ball / TAPS detector set-up and the Glasgow photon tagging system at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. Our results for σT have been used in combination with our previous measurements of the unpolarised cross section σ0 and the beam asymmetry Σ for a model-independent determination of S and P wave multipoles in themore » π0 threshold region, which includes for the first time a direct determination of the imaginary part of the E0+ multipole.« less

  17. High-Energy Composite Permanent Magnets: High-Energy Permanent Magnets for Hybrid Vehicles and Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing permanent magnets that contain less rare earth material and produce twice the energy of the strongest rare earth magnets currently available. The University of Delaware is creating these magnets by mixing existing permanent magnet materials with those that are more abundant, like iron. Both materials are first prepared in the form of nanoparticles via techniques ranging from wet chemistry to ball milling. After that, the nanoparticles must be assembled in a 3-D array and consolidated at low temperatures to form a magnet. With small size particles and good contact between these two materials, the best qualities of each allow for the development of exceptionally strong composite magnets.

  18. High temperature low friction surface coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Bharat

    1980-01-01

    A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

  19. A simple, low-cost, data logging pendulum built from a computer mouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hubler, Alfred

    2009-01-01

    Lessons and homework problems involving a pendulum are often a big part of introductory physics classes and laboratory courses from high school to undergraduate levels. Although laboratory equipment for pendulum experiments is commercially available, it is often expensive and may not be affordable for teachers on fixed budgets, particularly in developing countries. We present a low-cost, easy-to-build rotary sensor pendulum using the existing hardware in a ball-type computer mouse. We demonstrate how this apparatus may be used to measure both the frequency and coefficient of damping of a simple physical pendulum. This easily constructed laboratory equipment makes it possible for all students to have hands-on experience with one of the most important simple physical systems.

  20. Investigation of room temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Gd5Si4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadimani, R. L.; Gupta, S.; Harstad, S. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-07-06

    Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds undergo first-order phase transitions close to room temperature when x ~ = 0.5, which are accompanied by extreme changes of properties. We report the fabrication of the nanoparticles of one of the parent compounds-Gd5Si4-using high-energy ball milling. Crystal structure, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been investigated. Particles agglomerate at long milling times, and the particles that are milled >20 min lose crystallinity and no longer undergo magnetic phase transition close to 340 K, which is present in a bulk material. The samples milled for >20 min exhibit a slightly increased coercivity. As a result, magnetization at a high temperature of 275K decreases with the increase in the milling time.

  1. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  2. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  3. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  4. On-Line Measurement of Lubricant Film Thickness Using Ultrasonic Reflection Coefficients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drinkwater, B.W.; Dwyer-Joyce, R.S.; Harper, P.

    2004-02-26

    The ultrasonic reflectivity of a lubricant layer between two solid bodies depends on the ultrasonic frequency, the acoustic properties of the liquid and solid, and the layer thickness. In this paper, ultrasonic reflectivity measurements are used as a method for determining the thickness of lubricating films in bearing systems. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned on the outside of a bearing shell such that the wave is focused on the lubricant film layer. For a particular lubricant film the reflected pulse is processed to give a reflection coefficient spectrum. The lubricant film thickness is then obtained from either the layer stiffness or the resonant frequency. The method has been validated using static fluid wedges and the elastohydrodynamic film formed between a ball sliding on a flat. Film thickness values in the range 50-500 nm were recorded which agreed well with theoretical film formation predictions.

  5. Nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bilibin, Konstantin

    1988-01-01

    A temperature responsive, self-actuated nuclear reactor shutdown control rod assembly 10. The upper end 18 of a lower drive line 17 fits within the lower end of an upper drive line 12. The lower end (not shown) of the lower drive line 17 is connected to a neutron absorber. During normal temperature conditions the lower drive line 17 is supported by detent means 22,26. When an overtemperature condition occurs thermal actuation means 34 urges ring 26 upwardly sufficiently to allow balls 22 to move radially outwardly thereby allowing lower drive line 17 to move downwardly toward the core of the nuclear reactor resulting in automatic reduction of the reactor powder.

  6. A portable power system using PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, E.

    1997-12-31

    Ball has developed a proof-of-concept, small, lightweight, portable power system. The power system uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack, stored hydrogen, and atmospheric oxygen as the oxidant to generate electrical power. Electronics monitor the system performance to control cooling air and oxidant flow, and automatically do corrective measures to maintain performance. With the controller monitoring the system health, the system can operate in an ambient environment from 0 C to +50 C. The paper describes system testing, including load testing, thermal and humidity testing, vibration and shock testing, field testing, destructive testing of high-pressure gas tanks, and test results on the fuel cell power system, metal hydride hydrogen storage, high-pressure hydrogen gas storage, and chemical hydride hydrogen storage.

  7. Preparation and electrochemical properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes-nickel oxide porous composite for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yanzhen; Zhang Milin . E-mail: dhyzyz@yahoo.com.cn; Gao Peng

    2007-09-04

    Porous nickel oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NiO/MWNTs) composite material was synthesized using sodium dodecyl phenyl sulfate as a soft template and urea as hydrolysis-controlling agent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that the as-prepared nickel oxide nanoflakes aggregate to form a submicron ball shape with a porous structure, and the MWNTs with entangled and cross-linked morphology are well dispersed in the porous nickel oxide. The composite shows an excellent cycle performance at a high current of 2 A g{sup -1} and keeps a capacitance retention of about 89% over 200 charge/discharge cycles. A specific capacitance approximate to 206 F g{sup -1} has been achieved with NiO/MWNTs (10 wt.%) in 2 M KOH electrolyte. The electrical conductivity and the active sites for redox reaction of nickel oxide are significantly improved due to the connection of nickel nanoflakes by the long entangled MWNTs.

  8. Transformations in Lighting: The Fifth Annual Solid-State Lighting R&D Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    More than 300 SSL technology leaders from industry, research organizations, universities, and national laboratories gathered in Atlanta, GA, along with representatives from efficiency programs, utilities, and the lighting design community to participate in the DOE SSL R&D Workshop on January 29-31, 2008. DOE SSL Program Manager James Brodrick kicked off the workshop by highlighting recent signs of the progress and pace of SSL advances: the New Year's Eve debut of the new Times Square Ball, lit with Philips Luxeon LEDs; the first DOE Gateway demonstration of Beta LED streetlights in Oakland, CA; and the LR6 downlight from LED Lighting Fixtures, Inc., Grand Prize Winner in the 2007 Lighting for Tomorrow competition.

  9. Production of ultra-thin nano-scaled graphene platelets from meso-carbon micro-beads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-11-11

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets (NGPs) having an average thickness no greater than 50 nm, typically less than 2 nm, and, in many cases, no greater than 1 nm. The method comprises (a) intercalating a supply of meso-carbon microbeads (MCMBs) to produce intercalated MCMBs; and (b) exfoliating the intercalated MCMBs at a temperature and a pressure for a sufficient period of time to produce the desired NGPs. Optionally, the exfoliated product may be subjected to a mechanical shearing treatment, such as air milling, air jet milling, ball milling, pressurized fluid milling, rotating-blade grinding, or ultrasonicating. The NGPs are excellent reinforcement fillers for a range of matrix materials to produce nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  10. inet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-03-10

    INET's was developed in the 80's when the Internet was in it's infancy and various vendors were attempting to get into the ball game with half baked code that indicated a lack of understanding about basic IP standards in the area of IP and ICMP. Various test applications were written to test conformance to the early Internet RFC's especially ICMP. The INET program allows the user to exercise various minor internet services provided by amore » specified service host. See the DDN Protocol Handbook, Volume Two, Section 8 for a detailed description of various minor applications which one might attempt to exercise. The unix network daemon "inetd" was the inspiration for the name "inet". A simple C library generated at the time was recently used to build a program called 'dp' shich GROK uses to transfer BAG session information to some backend data collector such as DISARM (LA-CC number 05-D47)« less

  11. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of a L i B H 4 / C a H 2 Destabilized System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Tmore » he hydrogen storage properties of a destabilized LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system ball-milled with TiCl 3 , TiF 3 , and TiO 2 additives have been investigated. It is found that the system with TiCl 3 additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount of TiCl 3 is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of the LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation.he activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25 mol% of TiCl 3 are 141, 126, and 110 kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts of TiCl 3 are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures.« less

  12. GAS COOLED NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Long, E.; Rodwell, W.

    1958-06-10

    A gas-cooled nuclear reactor consisting of a graphite reacting core and reflector structure supported in a containing vessel is described. A gas sealing means is included for sealing between the walls of the graphite structure and containing vessel to prevent the gas coolant by-passing the reacting core. The reacting core is a multi-sided right prismatic structure having a pair of parallel slots around its periphery. The containing vessel is cylindrical and has a rib on its internal surface which supports two continuous ring shaped flexible web members with their radially innermost ends in sealing engagement within the radially outermost portion of the slots. The core structure is supported on ball bearings. This design permits thermal expansion of the core stracture and vessel while maintainirg a peripheral seal between the tvo elements.

  13. Investigation of room temperature ferromagnetic nanoparticles of Gd5Si4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hadimani, R. L.; Gupta, S.; Harstad, S. M.; Pecharsky, V. K.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-07-06

    Gd5(SixGe1-x)4 compounds undergo first-order phase transitions close to room temperature when x ~ = 0.5, which are accompanied by extreme changes of properties. We report the fabrication of the nanoparticles of one of the parent compounds-Gd5Si4-using high-energy ball milling. Crystal structure, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been investigated. Particles agglomerate at long milling times, and the particles that are milled >20 min lose crystallinity and no longer undergo magnetic phase transition close to 340 K, which is present in a bulk material. The samples milled for >20 min exhibit a slightly increased coercivity. As a result, magnetization at a highmore » temperature of 275K decreases with the increase in the milling time.« less

  14. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  15. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Kiesel, Richard F.; Englund, David J; Hendrickson, Dave

    2012-12-18

    A method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets may include providing multiple layers of agglomerates, such as briquettes, balls and extrusions, of a reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and of a reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) on a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material) and providing a coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material over at least some of the agglomerates. Heating the agglomerates of reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  16. Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume III. Geothermal fracture fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    A detailed study of all available and experimental frac fluid systems is presented. They have been examined and tested for physical properties that are important in the stimulation of hot water geothermal wells. These fluids consist of water-based systems containing high molecular weight polymers in the uncrosslinked and crosslinked state. The results of fluid testing for many systems are summarized specifically at geothermal conditions or until breakdown occurs. Some of the standard tests are ambient viscosity, static aging, high temperature viscosity, fluid-loss testing, and falling ball viscosity at elevated temperatures and pressures. Results of these tests show that unalterable breakdown of the polymer solutions begins above 300/sup 0/F. This continues at higher temperatures with time even if stabilizers or other high temperature additives are included.

  17. Gold-based electrical interconnections for microelectronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Garrett, Stephen E.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Watson, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    A method of making an electrical interconnection from a microelectronic device to a package, comprising ball or wedge compression bonding a gold-based conductor directly to a silicon surface, such as a polysilicon bonding pad in a MEMS or IMEMS device, without using layers of aluminum or titanium disposed in-between the conductor and the silicon surface. After compression bonding, optional heating of the bond above 363 C. allows formation of a liquid gold-silicon eutectic phase containing approximately 3% (by weight) silicon, which significantly improves the bond strength by reforming and enhancing the initial compression bond. The same process can be used for improving the bond strength of Au--Ge bonds by forming a liquid Au-12Ge eutectic phase.

  18. Sludge sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, R.C.

    1981-06-25

    The disclosure relates to a sludge sampler comprising an elongated generally cylindrical housing containing a baffle containing an aperture. Connected to the aperture is a flexible tubing having a valve for maintaining and releasing pressure in the lower end of the housing and exiting the upper end of the housing. The lower end of the housing contains a ball check valve maintained in closed position by pressure. When the lower end of the device contacts the sludge bed, the pressure valve is opened, enabling sludge to enter the lower end of the housing. After the sample is collected the valve is closed. An upsetting pin opens the valve to empty a sludge sample after the sample is removed from the fluid.

  19. Sludge sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Ralph C.

    1983-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a sludge sampler comprising an elongated generally cylindrical housing containing a baffle containing an aperture. Connected to the aperture is a flexible tubing having a valve for maintaining and releasing pressure in the lower end of the housing and exiting the upper end of the housing. The lower end of the housing contains a ball check valve maintained in closed position by pressure. When the lower end of the device contacts the sludge bed, the pressure valve is opened, enabling sludge to enter the lower end of the housing. After the sample is collected the valve is closed. An upsetting pin opens the valve to empty a sludge sample after the sample is removed from the fluid.

  20. Power line detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latorre, V.R.; Watwood, D.B.

    1994-09-27

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard. 4 figs.

  1. Power line detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Latorre, Victor R.; Watwood, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard.

  2. Chemically Bonded Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid as a High Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail; Hu, Shilin; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost, natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel graphene nanosheets-wrapped phosphorus composite as an anode for high performance sodium-ion batteries though a facile ball-milling of red phosphorus and graphene nanosheets. Not only can the graphene nanosheets significantly improve the electrical conductivity, but they also serve as a buffer layer to accommodate the large volume change of phosphorus in the charge-discharge process. As a result, the graphene wrapped phosphorus composite anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially extend to other electrode materials with unstable solid electrolyte interphases in sodium-ion batteries.

  3. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeNure, Charles R. (Pocatello, ID)

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  4. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a "best" spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere.

  5. Sphericity determination using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, R.D.; Migliori, A.; Visscher, W.M.

    1994-10-18

    A method is provided for grading production quantities of spherical objects, such as roller balls for bearings. A resonant ultrasound spectrum (RUS) is generated for each spherical object and a set of degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies is identified. From the degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and known relationships between degenerate sphere-resonance frequencies and Poisson's ratio, a Poisson's ratio can be determined, along with a 'best' spherical diameter, to form spherical parameters for the sphere. From the RUS, fine-structure resonant frequency spectra are identified for each degenerate sphere-resonance frequency previously selected. From each fine-structure spectrum and associated sphere parameter values an asphericity value is determined. The asphericity value can then be compared with predetermined values to provide a measure for accepting or rejecting the sphere. 14 figs.

  6. Impacts of the Minamata Conventionon on Mercury Emissions and Global Deposition from Coal-Fired Power Generation in Asia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giang, Amanda; Stokes, Leah C.; Streets, David G.; Corbitt, Elizabeth S.; Selin, Noelle E.

    2015-05-05

    We explore implications of the United Nations Minamata Convention on Mercury for emissions from Asian coal-fired power generation, and resulting changes to deposition worldwide by 2050. We use engineering analysis, document analysis, and interviews to construct plausible technology scenarios consistent with the Convention. We translate these scenarios into emissions projections for 2050, and use the GEOS-Chem model to calculate global mercury deposition. Where technology requirements in the Convention are flexibly defined, under a global energy and development scenario that relies heavily on coal, we project similar to 90 and 150 Mg.y(-1) of avoided power sector emissions for China and India, respectively, in 2050, compared to a scenario in which only current technologies are used. Benefits of this avoided emissions growth are primarily captured regionally, with projected changes in annual average gross deposition over China and India similar to 2 and 13 mu g.m(-2) lower, respectively, than the current technology case. Stricter, but technologically feasible, mercury control requirements in both countries could lead to a combined additional 170 Mg.y(-1) avoided emissions. Assuming only current technologies but a global transition away from coal avoids 6% and 36% more emissions than this strict technology scenario under heavy coal use for China and India, respectively.

  7. Measurement of J / ψ and ψ ( 2 S ) Prompt Double-Differential Cross Sections in p p Collisions at s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; et al

    2015-05-14

    The double-differential cross sections of promptly produced J/ψ and ψ(2S) mesons are measured in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV, as a function of transverse momentum pT and absolute rapidity |y|. The analysis uses J/ψ and ψ(2S) dimuon samples collected by the CMS experiment, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.55 and 4.90 fb⁻¹, respectively. The results are based on a two-dimensional analysis of the dimuon invariant mass and decay length, and extend to pT=120 and 100 GeV for the J/ψ and ψ(2S), respectively, when integrated over the interval |y|<1.2. The ratio of the ψ(2S) to J/ψ cross sections is also reportedmore » for |y|<1.2, over the range 10T<100 GeV. These are the highest pT values for which the cross sections and ratio have been measured.« less

  8. Structure and Electrochemistry of LiNi1/3Co1/3-yMyMn1/3O2 (M=Ti, Al, Fe) Positive Electrode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, James; Patoux, Sebastien; Doeff, Marca

    2009-01-14

    A series of materials based on the LiNi1/3Co1/3-yMyMn1/3O2 (M = Ti,Al,Fe) system has been synthesized and examined structurally and electrochemically. It is found that the changes in electrochemical performance depend highly on the nature of the substituting atom and its effect on the crystal structure. Substitution with small amounts of Ti4+ (y = 1/12) leads to the formation of a high-capacity and high-rate positive electrode material. Iron substituted materials suffer from an increased antisite defect concentration and exhibit lower capacities and poor rate capabilities. Single-phase materials are found for LiNi1/3Co1/3-yAlyMn1/3O2 when y<_ 1/4 and all exhibit decreased capacities when cycled to 4.3 V. However, an increase in rate performance and cycle stability upon aluminum substitution is correlated with an improved lamellar structure.

  9. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: A Technology of Low Coal Rate and High Productivity of RHF Ironmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei-Kao Lu

    2002-09-15

    An economical and environment-friendly ironmaking process based on heating the chemiexecy self-sufficient green balls of iron ore and coal in a hearth furnace is being developed with financial support from AISI members and DOE. DRI, which is hot (1400 C), dense (3.2 g/cm) and of high degree of metallization (95%), has been produced in laboratory and in a pilot plant in Genoa, Italy. Products of such quality have been made from American and Brazilian ores, BOF sludge, EAF dust/BOF sludge mixtures and millscale. The removal of zinc and lead from green balls by this process is essentially complete. In comparison with typical blast furnace operation, the new technology with a melter would have a lower total coal rate by 200kg.THM. The elimination of cokemaking and high temperature agglomeration steps, and a simpler gas handling system would lead to lower capital and operating costs. In comparison with commercial RHF practice it is different in atmosphere (fully oxidized at 1600 to 1650 C), in bed height (120 mm instead of 20-25 mm) and in pellet composition (much less coal but of higher VM). The combined effect leads to three times higher furnace productivity, lower coal consumption and superior DRI quality. The risk of re-oxidation (slag formation) and dusty operation are practiexecy eliminated. The process is stable, tolerant and independent of the size, shape and movement of the hearth. However, materials handling (e.g., discharge of hot DRI) and the exact energy savings have to be established in a larger furnace, straight or rotary, and in a continuous mode of operation.

  10. Sharp transition between two regimes of operation of dc discharge with two anodes and thermionic emission from cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustafaev, A. S.; Grabovskiy, A.; Demidov, V. I.; St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 199034; University ITMO, Kronverkskiy pr. 49, St. Petersburg 197101 ; Kaganovich, I. D.; Koepke, M. E.

    2014-05-15

    In a dc discharge plasma with two anodes and thermionic emission from cathode, the two anodes are used for plasma control. The main anode is placed between the cathode and the other auxiliary anode has a circular opening for passing electron current from the cathode to the second anode. It is experimentally demonstrated that a plasma may exhibit a sudden transition between two quasi-stable conditions as one increases the cathode-electron current collected by the auxiliary anode through an aperture, i.e., hole, in the main anode. In one regime, a bright glowing “ball-shaped double layer” appears on the plasma side having a potential drop of 10–15 eV and concomitant ionization in the neighboring region attached to the opening. The second regime is characterized by a uniform potential profile in plasma and an absence of the ball-shaped double layer. The transition between these regimes is accompanied by a significant change in plasma properties, such as the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). Controlling the EEDF is a valuable capability in technological applications. Increasing the gas pressure leads to the elimination of the first regime for sufficiently high gas pressure, the threshold being a few Torr. The disappearance of a regime transition can be explained by invoking an EEDF transition, from being nonlocal at low pressure to becoming local at high pressure. Local EEDF is determined by local values of electric field. Nonlocal EEDF is determined by electric field values elsewhere, and the electron can travel without energy loss over a path much longer than the discharge dimension.

  11. Exploratory Characterization of a Perfluoropolyether Oil as a Possible Viscosity Standard at Deepwater Production Conditions of 533 K and 241 MPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baled, Hseen O.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Morreale, Bryan D.; Soong, Yee; Gamwo, Isaac; Krukonis, Val; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; Wu, Yue; McHugh, Mark A.; Burgess, Ward A.; M Enick, Robert M.

    2013-10-01

    DuPonts perfluoropolyether oil Krytox GPL 102 is a promising candidate for the high-temperature, high-pressure Deepwater viscosity standard (DVS). The preferred DVS is a thermally stable liquid that exhibits a viscosity of roughly 20 mPa?s at 533 K and 241 MPa; a viscosity value representative of light oils found in ultra-deep formations beneath the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico. A windowed rolling-ball viscometer designed by our team is used to determine the Krytox GPL 102 viscosity at pressures to 245 MPa and temperatures of 311 K, 372 K, and 533 K. At 533 K and 243 MPa, the Krytox GPL 102 viscosity is (27.21.3)mPa?s . The rolling-ball viscometer viscosity results for Krytox GPL 102 are correlated with an empirical 10-parameter surface fitting function that yields an MAPD of 3.9 %. A Couette rheometer is also used to measure the Krytox GPL 102 viscosity, yielding a value of (26.21)mPa?s at 533 K and 241 MPa. The results of this exploratory study suggest that Krytox GPL 102 is a promising candidate for the DVS, primarily because this fluoroether oil is thermally stable and exhibits a viscosity closer to the targeted value of 20 mPa ? s at 533 K and 241 MPa than any other fluid reported to date. Nonetheless, further studies must be conducted by other researcher groups using various types of viscometers and rheometers on samples of Krytox GPL 102 from the same lot to further establish the properties of Krytox GPL 102.

  12. Photovoltaic generator with a spherical imaging lens for use with a paraboloidal solar reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, Roger P

    2013-01-08

    The invention is a generator for photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight into electricity. A generator according to the invention incorporates a plurality of photovoltaic cells and is intended for operation near the focus of a large paraboloidal reflector pointed at the sun. Within the generator, the entering concentrated light is relayed by secondary optics to the cells arranged in a compact, concave array. The light is delivered to the cells at high concentration, consistent with high photovoltaic conversion efficiency and low cell cost per unit power output. Light enters the generator, preferably first through a sealing window, and passes through a field lens, preferably in the form of a full sphere or ball lens centered on the paraboloid focus. This lens forms a concentric, concave and wide-angle image of the primary reflector, where the intensity of the concentrated light is stabilized against changes in the position of concentrated light entering the generator. Receiving the stabilized light are flat photovoltaic cells made in different shapes and sizes and configured in a concave array corresponding to the concave image of a given primary reflector. Photovoltaic cells in a generator are also sized and interconnected so as to provide a single electrical output that remains high and stable, despite aberrations in the light delivered to the generator caused by, for example, mispointing or bending of the primary reflector. In some embodiments, the cells are set back from the image formed by the ball lens, and part of the light is reflected onto each cell small secondary reflectors in the form of mirrors set around its perimeter.

  13. Fabrication of Sr- and Co-doped lanthanum chromite interconnectors for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setz, L.F.G. [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos - DEMa/UFSCar (Brazil) [Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos - DEMa/UFSCar (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN (Brazil); Santacruz, I. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)] [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Colomer, M.T., E-mail: tcolomer@icv.csic.es [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, ICV (CSIC), 28049 Madrid (Spain); Mello-Castanho, S.R.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN (Brazil)] [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN (Brazil); Moreno, R. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, ICV (CSIC), 28049 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, ICV (CSIC), 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Graphical abstract: FESEM micrographs of the fresh fracture surfaces for the La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} sintered specimens cast from optimised suspensions with 13.5, 15 and 17.5 vol.% solids loading. Aqueous suspensions were prepared using ammonium polyacrylate (PAA) as dispersant and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to assure a basic pH and providing stabilization. Sintering of the green discs was performed in air at 1600 {sup o}C for 4 h. Highlights: {yields} Optimum casting slips were achieved with 3 wt.% of ammonium polyacrylate and 1 wt.% of tetramethylammonium hydroxide. -- Abstract: Many studies have been performed dealing with the processing conditions of electrodes and electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). However, the processing of the interconnector material has received less attention. Lanthanum chromite (LaCrO{sub 3}) is probably the most studied material as SOFCs interconnector. This paper deals with the rheology and casting behaviour of lanthanum chromite based materials to produce interconnectors for SOFCs. A powder with the composition La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}Cr{sub 0.92}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} was obtained by combustion synthesis. Aqueous suspensions were prepared to solids loading ranging from 8 to 17.5 vol.%, using ammonium polyacrylate (PAA) as dispersant and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) to assure a basic pH and providing stabilization. The influence of the additives concentrations and suspension ball milling time were studied. Suspensions prepared with 24 h ball milling, with 3 wt.% and 1 wt.% of PAA and TMAH, respectively, yielded the best conditions for successful slip casting. Sintering of the green discs was performed in air at 1600 {sup o}C for 4 h leading to relatively dense materials.

  14. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  15. Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thackeray, Michael M. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Christopher S. (Naperville, IL); Li, Naichao (Croton on Hudson, NY)

    2007-12-04

    An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor of a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0y<1 in which the Li.sub.2MnO.sub.3 and LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 components have layered and spinel-type structures, respectively, and in which M is one or more metal cations. The electrode is activated by removing lithia, or lithium and lithia, from the precursor. A cell and battery are also disclosed incorporating the disclosed positive electrode.

  16. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeJonghe, L.C.; Visco, S.J.; Mailhe, C.C.; Armand, M.B.

    1988-03-31

    A novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200/degree/C or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S)/sub y/)n wherein y = 1 to 6; n = 2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprises one or more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon. 4 figs.

  17. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dejonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; Armand, Michel B.

    1989-01-01

    An novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200.degree. C. or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S).sub.y).sub.n wherein y=1 to 6; n=2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprisises one of more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associtated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

  18. ___________________ BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ___________________ BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY I B ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITlEa INC. Upton, Long Island, N ew York 11973 ( 5 1 6 )2 8 2 \ 3416 Biology D eportm ent FTS 666 ^ « ^ C t L U t / u T o P T H C I I ^ J a n u a r y 1 4 , 1983 ^ D r. D avid A. S m itli H e a l th E f f e c t s R e s e a rc h O f f ic e o f H e a l th and E n v iro n m e n ta l R e s e a rc h Room F -2 0 9 , E R -72, GTN D e p a rtm e n t o f E n erg y W a sh in g to n , D. C. 20545 D ear D ave: E n c lo s e d i s a copy

  19. Atmospheric benzenoid emissions from plants rival those from fossil fuels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Misztal, P. K.; Hewitt, C. N.; Wildt, J.; Blande, J. D.; Eller, A. S.D.; Fares, S.; Gentner, D. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Graus, M.; Greenberg, J.; et al

    2015-07-13

    Despite the known biochemical production of a range of aromatic compounds by plants and the presence of benzenoids in floral scents, the emissions of only a few benzenoid compounds have been reported from the biosphere to the atmosphere. Here, using evidence from measurements at aircraft, ecosystem, tree, branch and leaf scales, with complementary isotopic labeling experiments, we show that vegetation (leaves, flowers, and phytoplankton) emits a wide variety of benzenoid compounds to the atmosphere at substantial rates. Controlled environment experiments show that plants are able to alter their metabolism to produce and release many benzenoids under stress conditions. The functionsmore » of these compounds remain unclear but may be related to chemical communication and protection against stress. We estimate the total global secondary organic aerosol potential from biogenic benzenoids to be similar to that from anthropogenic benzenoids (~10 Tg y-1), pointing to the importance of these natural emissions in atmospheric physics and chemistry.« less

  20. Manganese oxide composite electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Christopher S.; Kang, Sun-Ho; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2009-12-22

    An activated electrode for a non-aqueous electrochemical cell is disclosed with a precursor thereof a lithium metal oxide with the formula xLi.sub.2MnO.sub.3.(1-x)LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 for 0.5y<1 in which the Li.sub.2MnO.sub.3 and LiMn.sub.2-yM.sub.yO.sub.4 components have layered and spinel-type structures, respectively, and in which M is one or more metal cations. The electrode is activated by removing lithia, or lithium and lithia, from the precursor. A cell and battery are also disclosed incorporating the disclosed positive electrode.

  1. IL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :; / 2. ' b-:-"y .",...4 * .-.a 2 IL !< :. 34 --' -, ' ' < I ,-. g Tvo"l r . . .-i- :- " .1-. . . . . NC0 /L ' J,, ' ;.' , -_I( + ? CENTRAL FILES c -&' { ' c;$y ;;j*' E ,J): ' i' Z, 1; p -^ r-raL-r.nuzT".Fn., , ,..-y - -' -ie .". iJ.&:~e!ct.;;' sf ' ;;i_is ,trip ' JG,' go f-Jj;~ey~ 2123 -:s<j .-&;.z ;y1y rrc&ed recr!p!~-,da.a .b ,&.j.,& .:*3;.. F-Y ' __ ,,,.x+; PC l;ealti: :.2,.i CCI ;et y. tirlr.&g t;1c oy-er at ion c.f sei;a~xl

  2. Lithium/organosulfur redox cell having protective solid electrolyte barrier formed on anode and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.; Liu, Meilin; Mailhe, Catherine C.

    1990-01-01

    A lithium/organosulfur redox cell is disclosed which comprises a solid lium anode, a liquid organosulfur cathode, and a barrier layer formed adjacent a surface of the solid lithium anode facing the liquid organosulfur cathode consisting of a reaction product of the lithium anode with the organosulfur cathode. The organosulfur cathode comprises a material having the formula (R(S).sub.y).sub.N where y=1 to 6, n=2 to 20 and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the linear chain may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

  3. Preconditioning first and second kind integral formulations of the capacitance problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tausch, J.; White, J.

    1996-12-31

    Engineering programs which compute electrostatic capacitances for complicated arrangements of conductors commonly set up the electrostatic potential u as a superposition of surface carges {sigma} u(x) = {integral}{sub s}G(x, y){sigma}(y) dS(y). Where G(x, y) = {1/4}{pi}{vert_bar}x - y{vert_bar} is the Green`s function for the Laplacian in the three-space. For a specified potential on the conductor surface(s) S, this approach leads to an integral equation of the first kind on S for the charge density {sigma}. The capacitance is the net-charge on the conductors and is given by the surface integral of {sigma}.

  4. Y.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' .;-;< 14 ,I> ,,.. ~&.<,y---.--- * 1 .?_ _ 1 c ,-J ..^1, j ' ii ,; ! :I : j' / - \* !- v- e . . *' ' -y " Y. ;: -.-, yl-j ' " : -2 F*;f yTJ IEYi~i~~, , .- -.~,ir:.~l -. ( z;y;,y:' y:i;?; p;l,r.LI :JC p2lOs;ilCT:i ItIC, . I i<,;;j:e;f:I;:l::, lj,yf, *t .. -77 ,.I .Y- ,P ' ?,u ,. P' r' -' I i F1.2.9: -__ ;!,IY?.879 (a> s :-;A ' c:; :; ,;r,t cc "q q?J r>ci ' I SV. ($! . f ._- . ' 1 -.<- J&q-I-/ /I r -r.s.~a,.&~z~---..- CT -3 im ILJ J ' Y.2 ?I!-,- r;7

  5. Re

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Re s pons e of a CSRM t o V arying M agnit ude s of Sh ort w av e M ont e Carl o Radiat iv e Trans f e r Nois e Jas on Col e 1 H ow ard Bark e r 2 M arat K h airout dinov 3 Dav id Randal l 3 1 Univ e rs it y of Brit is h Col um bia 2 M e t e orol ogical Se rv ice of Canada 3 Col orado St at e Univ e rs it y 1. I nt roduct ion 4. Re s ul t s (TO GA/ COARE) 2. Expe rim e nt Se t up CSRM Sys t e m f or At m os ph e ric M ode l l ing v e rs ion 6.5 (SAM v 6.5) 2D w it h axis orie nt e d w e s t -e

  6. Insulating and metallic spin glass in Ni-doped KxFe2-ySe? single crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ryu, Hyejin; Abeykoon, Milinda; Wang, Kefeng; Lei, Hechang; Lazarevic, N.; Warren, J. B.; Bozin, E. S.; Popovic, Z. V.; Petrovic, C.

    2015-05-04

    We report electron doping effects by Ni in KxFe2-?-yNiySe? (0.06 ? y ? 1.44) single crystal alloys. A rich ground state phase diagram is observed. A small amount of Ni (~ 4%) suppressed superconductivity below 1.8 K, inducing insulating spin glass magnetic ground state for higher Ni content. With further Ni substitution, metallic resistivity is restored. For high Ni concentration in the lattice the unit cell symmetry is high symmetry I4/mmm with no phase separation whereas both I4/m + I4/mmm space groups were detected in the phase separated crystals when concentration of Ni morewith the absence of crystalline Fe vacancy order.less

  7. Multiband semiconductor compositions for photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man; Wu, Junqiao

    2010-05-04

    The highly mismatched alloy Zn.sub.1-yMn.sub.yO.sub.xTe.sub.1-x, 0.ltoreq.y<1 and 0

  8. Multiband semiconductor compositions for photovoltaic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw; Yu, Kin Man; Wu, Junqiao

    2012-03-06

    The highly mismatched alloy Zn.sub.1-yMn.sub.yO.sub.xTe.sub.1-x, 0.ltoreq.y<1 and 0

  9. Mixed conducting membranes for syngas production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Paul Nigel; Carolan, Michael Francis; Butt, Darryl; Van Doorn, Rene Hendrick Elias; Cutler, Raymond Ashton

    2002-01-01

    This invention presents a new class of multicomponent metallic oxides which are particularly suited toward use in fabricating components used in processes for producing syngas. The non-stoichiometric, A-site rich compositions of the present invention are represented by the formula (Ln.sub.x Ca.sub.1-x).sub.y FeO.sub.3-.delta. wherein Ln is La or a mixture of lanthanides comprising La, and wherein 1.0>x>0.5, 1.1.gtoreq.y>1.0 and .delta. is a number which renders the composition of matter charge neutral. Solid-state membranes formed from these compositions provide a favorable balance of oxygen permeance and resistance to degradation when employed in processes for producing syngas. This invention also presents a process for making syngas which utilizes such membranes.

  10. V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . 1.1 I . COO-30.72-25 11 t 1 Hadronic Form Factors in Asymptotically Free Field Theories David J. Gross and S.B. Treiman Joseph Henry Labor atorie s of Physics -NOTICE- Pri nce ton Uni ver sit y 1 1 This repor t was prep ared as an acco unt of work 1 Pri nce ton , New Jer sey 1 spons ored by the Unite d State s Gove rnme nt. Neith er 1 1 the Un ited Sta tes nor the Un ited Sta tes Ato mic Ene rgy I 08 54 0 1 j Comm issi on, nor any of thei r empl oyee s, nor any of I the ir con trac tors , sub

  11. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8222, jDOE/OR/20722-205 11.06 - 126 Form e rl y Uti t i ze'O Sites,'fl e rn e d ial- {gti ol I tP I'^T^ { FU€ RAP ) POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE GEORGE HERBERT J!)NES OHEM|OALLABORAToRY4TTHE UN|VERS|TYoFcH|GAGoS|TE ,C,hic?go, Nl,linois January 1989 i. ,Ss&r$71 :Bechtel National, Inc. DOE/OR/ 207 22-205 POST-REMEDIAL ACTION REPORT FOR THE GEORGE HERBERT JONES CHEMICAI, LABORATORY AT THE T'NIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SITE C H I C A G O , I L L I N O I S J A N U A R Y 1 9 8 9 P r e P a r e d

  12. AIIEJIIDIENTOF IOLICITA~TIOit OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AIIEJIIDIENTOF IOLICITA~TIOit OF CONTRACT 2. IIMENIIMENTMlDIFICA'I10H NO. 3. EfFECINE Do\TE 2'10 See Block 16C S.IS&UEDBY CODE 05008 NNSA/Oakridge Site Office U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Y-1?. Site Office P.O. Box 2050 Building 9'104-2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 a NAME AND MlORIESS 01' CONl'RACTOR.-. _...,.. --*c-.. BA8C A OCK 4 WILCOX TECHNICAL ttn: WILLIE J. WILSON PO BOX 2009 SERVICES Y-12, LLC r* -*-' IDCOIIE I PAGE OF NOES 1 I 1 4. REOIJIII110NIIIUR REQ. NO. ri'ROJECTNO (II~ 7.~8Y(Il.,._ . .

  13. M186

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    . S . Department of E n m National NucIear Security A d ~ t i o n P.O. Box M50 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 PAGE ! of 3 PAGES Ahf~NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODWJCATZON OF CONTaACT --- I - I 8. NAMEAND ADDRESS OF CONTMCn,R (Uo., me#, &my, Zm We) I 9 k AMENDMENT OF SOLKITATION NO. 1. CONTRACT I D CODE A C 2. kMENDMENTMODFICATION NO. MI86 B a h d & W ~ X T a d Y - 1 2 , LLC P.0, Box 2009 MS 8014 Oak Ridge, 'JX 37?33143014 3. EFlBIWE DATE Sct Block l k . Offasmust~~h&edgtroaeiptdthis t prior to Ihc

  14. Order-disorder transition in Nd{sub 2-y}Gd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} pyrochlore solid solution: An X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, B.P.; Banerji, Ankita; Sathe, Vasant; Deb, S.K.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2007-10-15

    Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic study of order-disorder-phase transition with increase in the content of Gd in Nd{sub 2-y}Gd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} solid solution is being reported. It has been observed from Rietveld analysis that with increase in concentration of Gd in Nd{sub 2-y}Gd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the value of the x parameter of the 48f oxygen changes from 0.332(1) to 0.343(1) with a sudden change in the slope for y=1.8, which indicates that the structure is transforming from ordered pyrochlore to disordered pyrochlore. In addition to that a sudden and drastic change in the Raman spectra including changes in the position and width of several Raman modes beyond y{>=}1.8 has also been observed which has been correlated with increasing disorder. Based on these studies, it is suggested that there is a discontinuous order-disorder transition from 'perfect pyrochlore' to 'defect pyrochlore' phase in Nd{sub 2-y}Gd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} solid solution. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectra of Nd{sub 2-y}Gd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} with increasing proportion of Gd in Nd{sub 2-y}Gd{sub y}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} series. A transition from ordered pyrochlore to disordered pyrochlore can be seen at y{approx}1.8.

  15. The Phoenix stream: A cold stream in the southern hemisphere

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balbinot, E.

    2016-03-17

    In this study, we report the discovery of a stellar stream in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Year 1 (Y1A1) data. The discovery was made through simple color-magnitude filters and visual inspection of the Y1A1 data. We refer to this new object as the Phoenix stream, after its resident constellation. After subtraction of the background stellar population we detect a clear signal of a simple stellar population. By fitting the ridge line of the stream in color-magnitude space, we find that a stellar population with agemore » $$\\tau=11.5\\pm0.5$$ Gyr and $[Fe/H]<-1.6$ located 17.5$$\\pm$$0.9 kpc from the Sun gives an adequate description of the stream stellar population. The stream is detected over an extension of 8$$^{\\circ}.$$1 (2.5 kpc) and has a width of $$\\sim$$54 pc assuming a Gaussian profile, indicating that a globular cluster is a probable progenitor. There is no known globular cluster within 5 kpc compatible with being the progenitor of the stream, assuming that the stream traces its orbit. We examined overdensities along the stream, however no obvious counterpart bound stellar system is visible in the coadded images. We also find overdensities along the stream that appear to be symmetrically distributed - consistent with the epicyclic overdensity scenario for the formation of cold streams - as well as a misalignment between the Northern and Southern part of stream. Despite the close proximity we find no evidence that this stream and the halo cluster NGC 1261 have a common accretion origin linked to the recently found EriPhe overdensity (Li et al. 2016).« less

  16. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-07-28

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7, 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.

  17. Needle age and season influence photosynthetic temperature response and total annual carbon uptake in mature Picea mariana trees

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, Anna M.; Warren, Jeffrey; Hanson, Paul J.; Childs, Joanne; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-01-01

    Using seasonal- and cohort-specific photosynthetic temperature response functions, we quantified the physiological significance of maintaining multiple foliar cohorts in mature (~40-45 year old) Picea mariana trees in an ombrotrophic Sphagnum-bog, northern Minnesota, USA. We measured photosynthetic capacity, foliar respiration (Rd), biochemistry and morphology to estimate annual carbon (C) uptake by cohort, season and canopy position. Temperature response of key photosynthetic parameters at 25 C (i.e., light-saturated rate of CO2 assimilation (Asat), light-saturated rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax), light-saturated electron transport rate (Jmax)) were clearly dependent on season and were generally less responsive in younger needles. Temperature optimums range between 18.7-23.7,more » 31.3-38.3 and 28.7-36.7 C for Asat, Vcmax and Jmax respectively. Current-year (Y0) foliage had lower photosynthetic capacities compared to one-year-old (Y1) and two-year-old (Y2) foliage. As Y0 needles matured, values of Asat, Vcmax, Jmax, foliar LMA and nitrogen increased. Values of Vcmax, Jmax and Rd were related to foliar nitrogen but only in the youngest (Y0) cohort. Foliar ontogeny affected photosynthetic capacity more than growth temperature. Morphological and physiological cohort differences were reflected by their annual contribution to modeled C uptake, with a ~36% lower estimated annual C uptake by Y0 needles (LAI 0.52 m2m-2) compared to Y1&2 cohorts (LAI 0.67 m2m-2). Collectively, these results illustrate the physiological and ecological significance of characterizing multiple foliar cohorts during bud break and throughout the growth season, and for cumulative C uptake model estimates.« less

  18. Scattering and; Delay, Scale, and Sum Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, S K

    2011-07-06

    How do we see? What is the mechanism? Consider standing in an open field on a clear sunny day. In the field are a yellow dog and a blue ball. From a wave-based remote sensing point of view the sun is a source of radiation. It is a broadband electromagnetic source which, for the purposes of this introduction, only the visible spectrum is considered (approximately 390 to 750 nanometers or 400 to 769 TeraHertz). The source emits an incident field into the known background environment which, for this example, is free space. The incident field propagates until it strikes an object or target, either the yellow dog or the blue ball. The interaction of the incident field with an object results in a scattered field. The scattered field arises from a mis-match between the background refractive index, considered to be unity, and the scattering object refractive index ('yellow' for the case of the dog, and 'blue' for the ball). This is also known as an impedance mis-match. The scattering objects are referred to as secondary sources of radiation, that radiation being the scattered field which propagates until it is measured by the two receivers known as 'eyes'. The eyes focus the measured scattered field to form images which are processed by the 'wetware' of the brain for detection, identification, and localization. When time series representations of the measured scattered field are available, the image forming focusing process can be mathematically modeled by delayed, scaled, and summed migration. This concept of optical propagation, scattering, and focusing have one-to-one equivalents in the acoustic realm. This document is intended to present the basic concepts of scalar scattering and migration used in wide band wave-based remote sensing and imaging. The terms beamforming and (delayed, scaled, and summed) migration are used interchangeably but are to be distinguished from the narrow band (frequency domain) beamforming to determine the direction of arrival of a signal, and seismic migration in which wide band time series are shifted but not to form images per se. Section 3 presents a mostly graphically-based motivation and summary of delay, scale, and sum beamforming. The model for incident field propagation in free space is derived in Section 4 under specific assumptions. General object scattering is derived in Section 5 and simplified under the Born approximation in Section 6. The model of this section serves as the basis in the derivation of time-domain migration. The Foldy-Lax, full point scatterer scattering, method is derived in Section 7. With the previous forward models in hand, delay, scale, and sum beamforming is derived in Section 8. Finally, proof-of-principle experiments are present in Section 9.

  19. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The transport of foam in porous media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the impacts of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in porous media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).

  20. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-09-22

    The work described in this grant report was focused mainly on the properties of novel magnetic intermetallics. In the first project, we synthesized several 2:17 intermetallic compounds, namely Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Si{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}Al{sub 2}, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiAl and Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 15}SiMn, as well as several 1:12 intermetallic compounds, such as NdFe{sub 10}Si{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}Al{sub 2}, NdFe{sub 10}SiAl and NdFe{sub 10}MnAl. In the second project, seven compositions of Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 100-x-y}B{sub y} ribbons were prepared by a melt spinning method with Nd and B content increasing from 7.3 and 3.6 to 11 and 6, respectively. The alloys were annealed under optimized conditions to obtain a composite material consisting of the hard magnetic Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and soft magnetic {alpha}-Fe phases, typical of a spring magnet structure. In the third project, intermetallic compounds of the type Zr{sub 1}Cr{sub 1}Fe{sub 1}T{sub 0.8} with T = Al, Co and Fe were subjected to hydrogenation. In the fourth project, we performed three crucial experiments. In the first experiment, we subjected a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation by high-energy ball milling, for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 14 hours. In the second experiment, we ball-milled Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}:Co{sup 2+} (x = 0.1) for time intervals between 2.5 and 17.5 hours. Finally, we exposed a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Co (80-20 wt %) to mechanochemical activation for time periods ranging from 0.5 to 10 hours. In all cases, the structural and magnetic properties of the systems involved were elucidated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy and hysteresis loop measurements. The four projects resulted in four papers, which were published in Intermetallics, IEEE Transactions on Magnetics, Journal of Materials Science Letters and Materials Chemistry and Physics. The contributions reveal for the first time in literature the effect of substitutions on the hyperfine magnetic field of neodymium-based intermetallics, the correlation between structure and magnetic properties in spring magnets, the unique effects induced by hydrogenation on the hyperfine parameters of iron-rich intermetallics and the characteristics of the ball milling process in systems containing magnetite.

  1. Scale Resistant Heat Exchanger for Low Temperature Geothermal Binary Cycle Power Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, Lance G.

    2014-11-18

    Phase 1 of the investigation of improvements to low temperature geothermal power systems was completed. The improvements considered were reduction of scaling in heat exchangers and a hermetic turbine generator (eliminating seals, seal system, gearbox, and lube oil system). A scaling test system with several experiments was designed and operated at Coso geothermal resource with brine having a high scaling potential. Several methods were investigated at the brine temperature of 235 ºF. One method, circulation of abradable balls through the brine passages, was found to substantially reduce scale deposits. The test heat exchanger was operated with brine outlet temperatures as low as 125 ºF, which enables increased heat input available to power conversion systems. For advanced low temperature cycles, such as the Variable Phase Cycle (VPC) or Kalina Cycle, the lower brine temperature will result in a 20-30% increase in power production from low temperature resources. A preliminary design of an abradable ball system (ABS) was done for the heat exchanger of the 1 megawatt VPC system at Coso resource. The ABS will be installed and demonstrated in Phase 2 of this project, increasing the power production above that possible with the present 175 ºF brine outlet limit. A hermetic turbine generator (TGH) was designed and manufacturing drawings produced. This unit will use the working fluid (R134a) to lubricate the bearings and cool the generator. The 200 kW turbine directly drives the generator, eliminating a gearbox and lube oil system. Elimination of external seals eliminates the potential of leakage of the refrigerant or hydrocarbon working fluids, resulting in environmental improvement. A similar design has been demonstrated by Energent in an ORC waste heat recovery system. The existing VPC power plant at Coso was modified to enable the “piggyback” demonstration of the TGH. The existing heat exchanger, pumps, and condenser will be operated to provide the required process conditions for the TGH demonstration. Operation of the TGH with and without the ABS system will demonstrate an increase in geothermal resource productivity for the VPC from 1 MW/(million lb) of brine to 1.75 MW/(million lb) of brine, a 75% increase.

  2. Single-Step Ironmaking from Ore to Improve Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.K. Kawatra; B. Anamerie; T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    The pig iron nugget process was developed as an alternative to the traditional blast furnace process by Kobe Steel. The process aimed to produce pig iron nuggets, which have similar chemical and physical properties to blast furnace pig iron, in a single step. The pig iron nugget process utilizes coal instead of coke and self reducing and fluxing dried green balls instead of pellets and sinters. In this process the environmental emissions caused by coke and sinter production, and energy lost between pellet induration (heat hardening) and transportation to the blast furnace can be eliminated. The objectives of this research were to (1) produce pig iron nuggets in the laboratory, (2) characterize the pig iron nugget produced and compare them with blast furnace pig iron, (3) investigate the furnace temperature and residence time effects on the pig iron nugget production, and (4) optimize the operational furnace temperatures and residence times. The experiments involved heat treatment of self reducing and fluxing dried green balls at various furnace temperatures and residence times. Three chemically and physically different products were produced after the compete reduction of iron oxides to iron depending on the operational furnace temperatures and/or residence times. These products were direct reduced iron (DRI), transition direct reduced iron (TDRI), and pig iron nuggets. The increase in the carbon content of the system as a function of furnace temperature and/or residence time dictated the formation of these products. The direct reduced iron, transition direct reduced iron, and pig iron nuggets produced were analyzed for their chemical composition, degree of metallization, apparent density, microstructure and microhardness. In addition, the change in the carbon content of the system with the changing furnace temperature and/or residence time was detected by optical microscopy and Microhardness measurements. The sufficient carbon dissolution required for the production of pig iron nuggets was determined. It was determined that pig iron nuggets produced had a high apparent density (6.7-7.2 gr/cm3), highly metallized, slag free structure, high iron content (95-97%), high microhardness values (> 325 HVN) and microstructure similar to white cast iron. These properties made them a competitive alternative to blast furnace pig iron.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of Bi-doped Mg{sub 2}Si thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiameni, S.; Battiston, S.; Boldrini, S.; Famengo, A.; Agresti, F.; Barison, S.; Fabrizio, M.

    2012-09-15

    The Mg{sub 2}Si-based alloys are promising candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion for the middle high range of temperature. They are very attractive as they could replace lead-based compounds due to their low cost and non toxicity. They could also result in thermoelectric generator weight reduction (a key feature for the automotive application field). The high value of thermal conductivity of the silicide-based materials could be reduced by increasing the phonon scattering in the presence of nanosized crystalline grains without heavily interfering with the electrical conductivity of the thermoelectric material. Nanostructured materials were obtained under inert atmosphere through ball milling, thermal treatment and spark plasma sintering processes. In particular, the role of several bismuth doping amounts in Mg{sub 2}Si were investigated (Mg{sub 2}Si:Bi=1:x for x=0.01, 0.02 and 0.04 M ratio). The morphology, the composition and the structure of the samples were characterized by FE-SEM, EDS and XRD analyses after each process step. Moreover, the Seebeck coefficient analyses at high temperature and the electrical and thermal conductivity of the samples are presented in this work. The nanostructuring processes were affect by the MgO amount increase which influenced the thermoelectric properties of the samples mainly by reducing the electrical conductivity. With the aim of further increasing the scattering phenomena by interface or boundary effect, carbon nanostructures named Single Wall Carbon Nanohorns were added to the Mg{sub 2}Si in order to produce a nanocomposite material. The influence of the nanostructured filler on the thermoelectric material properties is also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Figure of merit (ZT) of Bi-doped samples and undoped Mg{sub 2}Si. A maximum ZT value of 0.39 at 600 Degree-Sign C was obtained for the nanocomposite material obtained adding Single Wall Carbon Nanohorns to the Bi 0.02 at% doped silicide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of Bi doping amounts in Mg{sub 2}Si and thermoelectric characterization up to 600 Degree-Sign C Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocomposite materials synthesized by ball milling and Spark Plasma Sintering Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect on scattering phenomena of Single Wall Carbon Nanohorns added to Mg{sub 2}Si Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Importance of oxidation phenomena in nanostructured materials.

  4. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-01: Automation of the Winston-Lutz Test for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litzenberg, D; Irrer, J; Kessler, M; Lam, K; Keranen, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize clinical efficiency and shorten patient wait time by minimizing the time and effort required to perform the Winston-Lutz test before stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) through automation of the delivery, analysis, and documentation of results. Methods: The radiation fields of the Winston-Lutz (WL) test were created in a machine-QA patient saved in ARIA for use before SRS cases. Images of the BRW target ball placed at mechanical isocenter are captured with the portal imager for each of four, 2cm2cm, MLC-shaped beams. When the WL plan is delivered and closed, this event is detected by in-house software called EventNet which automates subsequent processes with the aid of the ARIA web services. Images are automatically retrieved from the ARIA database and analyzed to determine the offset of the target ball from radiation isocenter. The results are posted to a website and a composite summary image of the results is pushed back into ImageBrowser for review and authenticated documentation. Results: The total time to perform the test was reduced from 20-25 minutes to less than 4 minutes. The results were found to be more accurate and consistent than the previous method which used radiochromic film. The images were also analyzed with DoseLab for comparison. The difference between the film and automated WL results in the X and Y direction and the radius were (?0.17 +/? 0.28) mm, (0.21 +/? 0.20) mm and (?0.14 +/? 0.27) mm, respectively. The difference between the DoseLab and automated WL results were (?0.05 +/? 0.06) mm, (?0.01 +/? 0.02) mm and (0.01 +/? 0.07) mm, respectively. Conclusions: This process reduced patient wait times by 1520 minutes making the treatment machine available to treat another patient. Accuracy and consistency of results were improved over the previous method and were comparable to other commercial solutions. Access to the ARIA web services is made possible through an Eclipse co-development agreement with Varian Medical Systems.

  5. Technical Review Report for the Model 9977 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging Addendum 1 Justification for DNDO Contents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, M H

    2008-12-17

    The Model 9977 Package is currently certified for Content Envelope C.1, {sup 238}Pu Heat Sources, either in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), or in Food-Pack Can configurations, under Certificate of Compliance (CoC) Certificate Number 9977 and Package Identification Number USA/9977/B(M)F-96 (DOE). Addendum 1, Justification for DNDO Contents,--the Submittal--supplements Revision 2 of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging for the Model 9977 Package. The Submittal adds five new contents to the Model 9977 Package, Content Envelopes, AC.1 through AC.5. The Content Envelopes are neptunium metal, the beryllium-reflected plutonium ball (BeRP Ball), plutonium/uranium metal, plutonium/uranium metal with enhanced wt% {sup 240}Pu (to 50 wt%), and uranium metal. The last three Content Envelopes are stabilized to DOE-STD-3013. These Content Envelopes will be shipped to the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), where they will reside, and, hence, to off-site locations in support of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The new certificate will apply to a limited number of Model 9977 Packages. At the same time, the Submittal requests an extension of the periodic maintenance requirements from one (1) year to up to five (5) years using Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID) temperature-monitoring systems to measure the ambient storage temperature in order to ensure that the temperature of the Viton{reg_sign} O-rings for the 6-inch Containment Vessel (6CV) remain less than 200 F. The RFIDs have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. An on-going surveillance program at the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility at the Savannah River Site, and an on-going examination of Viton{reg_sign} O-rings from mock Primary Containment Vessels (PCVs) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide the technical justification for the extension of the periodic maintenance interval. Where extended periodic maintenance is desired, the decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package is limited to 15 watts.

  6. EXCITATION OF STRUCTURAL RESONANCE DUE TO A BEARING FAILURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R; David Stefanko, D

    2007-04-30

    Vibration due to a bearing failure in a pump created significant vibrations in a fifteen foot by fifteen foot by eight feet tall mounting platform due to excitation of resonant frequencies. In this particular application, an 18,000 pound pump was mounted to a structural steel platform. When bearing damage commenced, the platform vibrated with sufficient magnitude that conversations could not be heard within forty feet of the pump. Vibration analysis determined that the frequency of the bearing was coincident to one of the natural frequencies of the pump, which was, in turn, coincident to one of the natural frequencies of the mounting platform. This coincidence of frequencies defines resonance. Resonance creates excessive vibrations when the natural frequency of a structure is coincident to an excitation frequency. In this well documented case, the excitation frequency was related to ball bearing failures. The pump is a forty foot long vertical pump used to mix nuclear waste in 1,300,000 gallon tanks. A 300 horsepower drive motor is mounted to a structural steel platform on top of the tank. The pump hangs down into the tank from above to mix the waste and is inaccessible after installation. Initial awareness of the problem was due to increased noise from the pump. Initial vibration analysis indicated that the vibration levels of the bearing were within the expected range for this type of bearing, and the resonant condition was not obvious. Further analysis consisted of disassembly of the motor to inspect the bearings and extensive vibration monitoring. Vibration data for the bearings was obtained from the manufacturer and compared to measured vibration plots for the pump and mounting platform. Vibration data measured along the length of the pump was available from full scale testing, and vibrations were also measured at the installed pump. One of the axial frequencies of the pump, the platform frequency in the vertical direction, and the ball spin frequency for the bearing were multiples of each other. This resonant condition was detected before other damage occurred, and further damage due to the resonant condition was prevented through vibration analysis.

  7. Abrasion and erosion testing of materials used in power production from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tylczak, Joseph H.; Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.

    2003-09-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of studying abrasive wear, related to mineral testing, handling, and processing. The center has also been instrumental in the design and development of wear test procedures and equipment. Research capabilities at ARC include Pin-on-Drum, Pin-on-Disk, and Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel abrasion tests, Jaw Crusher gouging test, Ball-on-Ball Impact test, and Jet erosion tests. Abrasive and erosive wear studies have been used to develop both new alloys and improved heat treatments of commercial alloys. As part of ARC’s newest iteration on wear testing to evaluate materials for use in new and existing pulverized coal combustion and gasifier power systems, the ARC has designed and constructed a new High Temperature Hostile Atmosphere Erosion Wear Test (HAET). This new piece of test apparatus is designed for erosive particle velocities of 10-40 m/sec and temperatures from room temperature (23°C) to 800+°C, with special control over the gas atmosphere. A variable speed whirling arm design is used to vary the impact energy of the gravity fed erosive particles. The specimens are mounted at the edge of a disk and allow a full range of impingement angles to be selected. An electric furnace heats the specimens in an enclosed retort to the selected temperature. Tests include both oxidizing conditions and reducing conditions. A range of gases, including CO, CO2, CH4, H2, H2S, HCl, N2, O2, and SO2 can be mixed and delivered to the retort. During the erosion testing a stream of abrasive powder is delivered in front of the specimens. This apparatus is designed to use low abrasive fluxes, which simulate real operating conditions in commercial power plants. Currently ~270 μm SiO2 particles are being used to simulate the abrasive impurities typically found in coal. Since operators are always striving for longer lifetimes and higher operating temperatures, this apparatus can help elucidate mechanisms of wastage and identify superior materials. This talk will present some initial results from this new environmentally controllable erosion test apparatus.

  8. Fabrication of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20 vol.% Al nanocomposite powders using high energy milling and their sinterability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawrah, M.F.; Abdel-kader, H.; Elbaly, N.E.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al nanocomposite powders were prepared via high energy ball milling. After 20 h milling, the size of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20 vol.% Al nanocomposite particles was in the range of 23-29 nm. A uniform distribution of nanosized Al reinforcement throughout the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix, coating the particles was successfully obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There was no any sign of phase changes during the milling. A competition between the cold welding mechanism and the fracturing mechanism were found during milling and finally the above two mechanisms reached an equilibrium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest value of relative density was obtained for the sintered bodies at 1500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The harness of the sintered composite was decreased while the fracture toughness was improved after addition Al into alumina. -- Abstract: In this study, alumina-based matrix nanocomposite powders reinforced with Al particles were fabricated and investigated. The sinterability of the prepared nanocomposite powder at different firing temperature was also conducted. Their mechanical properties in terms of hardness and toughness were tested. Alumina and aluminum powder mixtures were milled in a planetary ball mill for various times up to 30 h in order to produce Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-20% Al nanocomposite. The phase composition, morphological and microstructural changes during mechanical milling of the nanocomposite particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques, respectively. The crystallite size and internal strain were evaluated by XRD patterns using Scherrer methods. A uniform distribution of the Al reinforcement in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix was successfully obtained after milling the powders. The results revealed that there was no any sign of phase changes during the milling. The crystal size decreased with the prolongation of milling times, while the internal strain increased. A simple model is presented to illustrate the mechanical alloying of a ductile-brittle component system. A competition between the cold welding mechanism and the fracturing mechanism were found during powder milling and finally the above two mechanisms reached an equilibrium. The maximum relative density was obtained at 1500 Degree-Sign C. The harness of the sintered composite was decreased while the fracture toughness was improved after addition Al into alumina.

  9. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  10. Omega-X micromachining system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Donald M.

    1978-01-01

    A micromachining tool system with X- and omega-axes is used to machine spherical, aspherical, and irregular surfaces with a maximum contour error of 100 nonometers (nm) and surface waviness of no more than 0.8 nm RMS. The omega axis, named for the angular measurement of the rotation of an eccentric mechanism supporting one end of a tool bar, enables the pulse increments of the tool toward the workpiece to be as little as 0 to 4.4 nm. A dedicated computer coordinates motion in the two axes to produce the workpiece contour. Inertia is reduced by reducing the mass pulsed toward the workpiece to about one-fifth of its former value. The tool system includes calibration instruments to calibrate the micromachining tool system. Backlash is reduced and flexing decreased by using a rotary table and servomotor to pulse the tool in the omega-axis instead of a ball screw mechanism. A thermally-stabilized spindle rotates the workpiece and is driven by a motor not mounted on the micromachining tool base through a torque-smoothing pulley and vibrationless rotary coupling. Abbe offset errors are almost eliminated by tool setting and calibration at spindle center height. Tool contour and workpiece contour are gaged on the machine; this enables the source of machining errors to be determined more readily, because the workpiece is gaged before its shape can be changed by removal from the machine.

  11. Microminiature optical waveguide structure and method for fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strand, Oliver T. (Castro Valley, CA); Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method for manufacturing low-cost, nearly circular cross section waveguides comprises starting with a substrate material that a molten waveguide material can not wet or coat. A thin layer is deposited of an opposite material that the molten waveguide material will wet and is patterned to describe the desired surface-contact path pedestals for a waveguide. A waveguide material, e.g., polymer or doped silica, is deposited. A resist material is deposited and unwanted excess is removed to form pattern masks. The waveguide material is etched away to form waveguide precursors and the masks are removed. Heat is applied to reflow the waveguide precursors into near-circular cross-section waveguides that sit atop the pedestals. The waveguide material naturally forms nearly circular cross sections due to the surface tension effects. After cooling, the waveguides will maintain the round shape. If the width and length are the same, then spherical ball lenses are formed. Alternatively, the pedestals can be patterned to taper along their lengths on the surface of the substrate. This will cause the waveguides to assume a conical taper after reflowing by heat.

  12. Development of ceramic matrix composites for application in the ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project. Final report, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, H.; Solidum, E.; Karasek, K.; Stranford, G.; Yuhas, D.; Schienle, J.; Bradley, S.

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this effort (Phase II of a multi-phase program) was to maximize the toughness of a high-temperature Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GN-10) by the near-net-shape fabrication technology established previously (Phase I). Acid-etched American Matrix SiC whiskers were selected as the reinforcement. Extensive green forming and densification process optimizations were conducted. The results showed that whisker addition increased the toughness slightly, but decreased the strength of the material. It has been recommended to discontinue the whisker reinforcement approach, and to instead pursue the in-situ grown-whisker reinforcement approach. To address future needs for the composite technology, two supplemental efforts were conducted using monolithic GN-10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These were nanometer deposition of sintering aids and ultrasonic characterization of drying. Spray drying, polymerization, basic precipitation, and evaporation yielded more uniform sintering aid distributions than conventional ball milling. Spray drying was selected for scale-up study. Improved mechanical properties were demonstrated. The results of the ultrasonic study showed that variations in ultrasonic compressional velocity in slip-cast components are more complex than anticipated. Specifically, it was found that the sonic velocity, as a function of moisture content, was double-valued. This behavior, together with the problems associated with maintaining uniform couplant, precludes the use of ultrasonics as a routine means of monitoring moisture content.

  13. Development of ceramic matrix composites for application in the ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, H.; Solidum, E.; Karasek, K.; Stranford, G.; Yuhas, D.; Schienle, J.; Bradley, S. . Garrett Ceramic Components Div.)

    1992-04-01

    The objective of this effort (Phase II of a multi-phase program) was to maximize the toughness of a high-temperature Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (GN-10) by the near-net-shape fabrication technology established previously (Phase I). Acid-etched American Matrix SiC whiskers were selected as the reinforcement. Extensive green forming and densification process optimizations were conducted. The results showed that whisker addition increased the toughness slightly, but decreased the strength of the material. It has been recommended to discontinue the whisker reinforcement approach, and to instead pursue the in-situ grown-whisker reinforcement approach. To address future needs for the composite technology, two supplemental efforts were conducted using monolithic GN-10 Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. These were nanometer deposition of sintering aids and ultrasonic characterization of drying. Spray drying, polymerization, basic precipitation, and evaporation yielded more uniform sintering aid distributions than conventional ball milling. Spray drying was selected for scale-up study. Improved mechanical properties were demonstrated. The results of the ultrasonic study showed that variations in ultrasonic compressional velocity in slip-cast components are more complex than anticipated. Specifically, it was found that the sonic velocity, as a function of moisture content, was double-valued. This behavior, together with the problems associated with maintaining uniform couplant, precludes the use of ultrasonics as a routine means of monitoring moisture content.

  14. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ -Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Arnold, C. W.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Mosby, S. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2015-05-28

    The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity) have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. Themore » detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ) and 113Cd(n, γ) reactions.« less

  15. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G. Liu, Y. F.

    2014-08-25

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  16. Sequestration: isolating the issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankinship, S.

    2007-06-15

    A question and answer session between Steve Blankinship and David Ball, Battelle program manager and Neeraj Gupta, research leader at Battelle digs deep into one of USA's largest CO{sub 2} sequestration research programs. Under the US Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Ohio-based Battelle, has assessed the technical, economic and social feasibility of carbon sequestration in the region. In the second phase, small-scale field tests of sequestration opportunities will be conducted. Theoretically, North America, and the region in particular, which has many coal-fired power plants has the potential to store centuries worth of CO{sub 2} from anthropogenic CO{sub 2} point sources. The additional cost of sequestration to coal-fired power generation could be 10-40% with main part of the costs relating to the energy needed to capture CO{sub 2} and compress it to pipeline pressures. 3 photos.

  17. Elastic emission polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  18. Temperature Dependence of Aliovalent-vanadium Doping in LiFePO4 Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Katharine L; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Manthiram, Arumugam; Goodenough, J. B.; Segre, C; Katsoudas, John; Maroni, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    Vanadium-doped olivine LiFePO4 cathode materials have been synthesized by a novel low-temperature microwave-assisted solvothermal (MW-ST) method at 300 oC. Based on chemical and powder neutron/X-ray diffraction analysis, the compositions of the synthesized materials were found to be LiFe1-3x/2Vx x/2PO4 (0 x 0.2) with the presence of a small number of lithium vacancies charge-compensated by V4+, not Fe3+, leading to an average oxidation state of ~ 3.2+ for vanadium. Heating the pristine 15 % V-doped sample in inert or reducing atmospheres led to a loss of vanadium from the olivine lattice with the concomitant formation of a Li3V2(PO4)3 impurity phase; after phase segregation, a partially V-doped olivine phase remained. For comparison, V-doped samples were also synthesized by conventional ball milling and heating, but only ~ 10 % V could be accommodated in the olivine lattice in agreement with previous studies. The higher degree of doping realized with the MW-ST samples demonstrates the temperature dependence of the aliovalent-vanadium doping in LiFePO4.

  19. Study the effect of mechanical alloying parameters on synthesis of Cr{sub 2}NbAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shayesteh, Payam Mirdamadi, Shamseddin; Razavi, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Cr{sub 2}NbAl{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite synthesized through MA. Effect of BPR, rotating speed, milling time and PCA concentration investigated. After annealing at 1100 C crystalline phase were appeared. WilliamsonHall analysis was used in order to study the grain size of nano composite. - Abstract: In this study, Cr{sub 2}Nb20 vol.% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite was prepared successfully by mechanochemical reaction between Al, Nb and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders. Amorphization of powder occurred during mechanical alloying because of high energy collisions between powders and steel balls in milling container which transfer high degree of energy to powders. Therefore, annealing was needed to form crystalline phases. The influence of different mechanical alloying parameters such as BPR, rotating speed, milling time and PCA concentration on synthesis of composite material were investigated. After mechanical alloying, the powder was encapsulated in quartz and then annealed at 1100 C for 3 h. After annealing, 3 different phases were appeared (Cr{sub 2}Nb (cubic), Cr{sub 2}Nb (hexagonal) and ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The structural changes of powder particles during mechanical alloying were studied by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  20. Dynamic in-situ X-ray Diffraction of Catalyzed Alanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, K.J.; Sandrock, G.; Thomas, G.J.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery that hydrogen can be reversible absorbed and desorbed from NaAlH{sub 4} by the addition of catalysts has created an entirely new prospect for lightweight hydrogen storage. NaAlH{sub 4} releases hydrogen through the following set of decomposition reactions: NaAlH{sub 4} {r_arrow} 1/3({alpha}-Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6}) + 2/3Al + H{sub 2} {r_arrow} NaH + Al + 3/2H{sub 2}. These decomposition reactions as well as the reverse recombination reactions were directly observed using time-resolved in-situ x-ray powder diffraction. These measurements were performed under conditions similar to those found in PEM fuel cell operations (hydrogen absorption: 50--70 C, 10--15 bar Hz, hydrogen resorption: 80--110 C, 5--100 mbar H{sub 2}). Catalyst doping was found to dramatically improve kinetics under these conditions. In this study, the alanate was doped with a catalyst by dry ball-milling NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mol.% solid TiCl{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction clearly showed that TiCl{sub 3} reacts with NaAlH{sub 4} to form NaCl during the doping process. Partial desorption of NaAlH{sub 4} was even observed to occur during the catalyst doping process.