National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for xylene btx asphalt

  1. Superfund innovative technology evaluation (site) program evaluation report for antox BTX water screen (BTX immunoassay)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerlach, R.W.; White, R.J.; O'Leary, N.F.; Van Emon, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    The results of a demonstration of a portable immunoassay for the detection of benzene, toluene, and xylene(s) (BTX) are described in the report. Seventy-nine field samples were obtained from monitoring wells at several sites with gasoline contaminated ground water. Sample splits were analyzed on-site by the BTX immunoassay and in the laboratory by gas chromatography (GC) using EPA Method 8020. The BTX immunoassay was rapid and simple to use. It performed well in identifying high level contamination and gasoline contaminated samples having BTX concentrations greater than 100 ppb. It did not fully meet the claims of the developer of identifying contamination levels down to 25 ppb BTX. Two field samples determined by GC to have between 25 and 100 ppb BTX failed to be classified correctly by the immunoassay. Results from quality assurance samples with BTX concentrations of 2.5, 25, and 100 ppb also showed that false negative results would be expected at higher than a 5 percent rate when BTX contamination levels were between 25 and 100 ppb. However, for samples with higher BTX levels, the immunoassay gave excellent results. Two field samples yielded false positive results compared to GC values, but these samples showed signs of low-level gasoline contamination.

  2. Integrated Analysis of Phenology, Traits, and QTL in the Drought Tolerant Sorghum Genotypes BTx642 and RTx7000 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weers, Brock D.

    2012-10-19

    ................................... 20 2.7 BTx642 and RTx7000 individual leaf dry weight ..................................... 21 2.8 BTx642 and RTx7000 total leaf area time course ...................................... 22 2.9 BTx642 and RTx7000 individual leaf area... lines grown in the field in 2009 and 2010 .................. 166 8.2 Analysis of variance across field conditions in 2009-2010 for root size parameters in the BTx642 x RTx7000 RIL population...

  3. Compositional evaluation of asphalt binder recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, Richard Charles

    1997-01-01

    new asphalt binder. The high temperature Superpave TM Performance Grade (PG) specifications for recycled asphalt binders were found to be highly dependent on the aged asphalt. In addition, as the amount of saturates in the aromatic recycling agent...

  4. BBR Asphalt mixture creep test BBR Asphalt mixture creep size effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    #12;Outline ØBBR Asphalt mixture creep test ØBBR Asphalt mixture creep size effect ØBBR Asphalt Point Bending Test Low temperature 3-point bending creep tests on specimens with three different sizes mixture strength test ØBBR Asphalt binder strength test #12;Asphalt Pavements ØRecent efforts under NCHRP

  5. Life Cycle Assessment of Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    such thing as "carbon neutral" · You Can't Quit ­We have to do something #12;Carbon Footprint Perspective · Asphalt Mixture ­60 g C02e/ kg #12;Carbon Footprint Perspective · Asphalt Mixture ­60 g C02e/ kg · Orange Juice ­1600 g C02e/ kg Jan Th. van der Zwan #12;Carbon Footprint Perspective · Asphalt Mixture ­60 g C02

  6. Enhancing P-xylene selectivity during m-xylene transformation using mildly pre-coked ZSM-5 catalyst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    -xylene theoretically obtainable from these aromatic compounds is very much limited by thermodynamics. Consequently [1]. It should be mentioned that toluene alkylation with methanol over ZSM-5 was the first test

  7. Materials characterization of asphalt and polymer modified asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramasivam, Mohan

    1992-01-01

    specimen mold made of aluminum ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? - 28 5. Strain sweep of Santa Maria AC10/AR4000 at 100 rad/sec --- 33 6. Strain sweep of Conoco AC10 at 10 rad/sec ------------- 34 7. Stress relaxation modulus of AAM grade asphalt at 25'C --- 37 8.... The verification of Cox-Merz rule for Santa Maria AC6/AR2000 at 40'C- 9. The master curve of Santa Maria AC6/Muehlstein LDPE shifted to 25'C showing the errors 10. Master curve (G') of Santa Maria AC6 shifted to 25'C ? ? ? ? ? 43 11. Master curve of Santa...

  8. Thermal hydrocracking of coal derived liquid from mild gasification (production of phenols, BTX and naphthalenes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Yoshiki; Kodera, Yoichi; Kamo, Tohru [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kameyama, Mitsuo; Tatsumoto, Katsunobu [Mitsui SRC Development Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Coolidge, D.W. [ENCOAL Corp., Gillette, WY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Coal derived liquid from mild gasification contains more than 40% of alkylphenols with alkylnaphthalenes and a small amount of benzofuran, naphthol and condensed aromatic derivatives. In this study, thermal hydrocracking of the coal derived liquid, and related model compounds have been investigated using a small atmospheric flow apparatus at temperatures of 700--770 C with residence time of 3--10 sec, and hydrogen-to-reactant molar ratio of about 3--10. In the experiments using m-cresol and 2,5-dimethylphenol, dealkylation and dehydroxylation proceeded concurrently with high selectivity in the presence of excess hydrogen. The rates of hydrocracking of m-cresol and 2,5-dimethylphenol were in accordance with first-order rate law with respect to reactant. This indicates that the same kinetic equation for the demethylation of alkylbenzenes can be applied. Rates of demethylation and dehydroxylation for cresols and dimethylphenols have been measured at 700 C by using toluene as an internal reference, and discussed in terms of chemical structure. Thermal hydrocracking of the coal derived liquid produced 20--40 wt% gases and 60--80 wt% liquids. Gaseous products mainly consisted of carbon monoxide and methane with small amounts of C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} hydrocarbon gases. Liquid products, obtained at 770 C, contained 24 wt% of BTX, 40 wt% of phenol and cresols, and 12 wt% of naphthalene and methylnaphthalenes. Yield of useful chemicals, having simple aromatic structure in the liquid product increased with temperature and residence time.

  9. A Study on the Durability of Flexible Pavement Materials: Asphalt Absorption and Oxidation Kinetics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Guanlan

    2015-08-10

    affecting pavement durability are the absorption of asphalt into porous aggregates and the hardening of asphalt due to oxidation. Asphalt absorption reduces the effective binder content in the pavement. Meanwhile, the oxidative hardening of asphalt...

  10. Microstructural viscoplastic continuum model for asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tashman, Laith

    2004-09-30

    deformation of Asphalt Concrete (AC) at high temperatures. These phenomena include strain rate dependency, confining pressure dependency, dilation, aggregate friction, anisotropy, and damage. The model is based on Perzyna's theory of viscoplasticity...

  11. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore »present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  12. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  13. Constant displacement rate experiments and constitutive modeling of asphalt mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hariharakumar, Pradeep

    2006-04-12

    The focus of this dissertation is on constant displacment rate experiments on asphalt concrete and on developing continuum models in a general thermo-mechanical setting which will corroborate with the experimental results. Modeling asphalt concrete...

  14. Moisture Diffusion in Asphalt Binders and Fine Aggregate Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasconcelos, Kamilla L.

    2011-08-08

    cost in highway maintenance and vehicle operations. One key mechanism of how moisture reaches the asphalt-aggregate interface is by its permeation or diffusion through the asphalt binder or mastic. Different techniques are available for diffusion...

  15. Study of properties of sand asphalt using a torsional rheometer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasula, Lavan Kumar Reddy

    2004-11-15

    The modeling of Sand Asphalt and experiments to measure their rheological properties are of vital concern to many industrial processes especially highway and roadway pavement construction industry. A variety of hot mix asphalt mixtures are used...

  16. Characterization of Fatigue Cracking and Healing of Asphalt Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xue

    2012-07-16

    Fatigue cracking is one of the most common distresses of asphalt pavements, whereas healing is a counter process to cracking which alleviates cracking damage and extends fatigue life of asphalt pavements. Most of existing ...

  17. Controlling Thermal Properties of Asphalt Concrete and its Multifunctional Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Xijun

    2014-08-10

    ) by controlling thermal properties of the construction materials. To change thermal properties of asphalt concrete, expanded polypropylene (EPP) pellet and graphite were selected as the additives and mixed into asphalt concrete. Experimental tests are classified...

  18. Damage analysis in asphalt concrete mixtures based on parameter relationships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Injun

    2004-11-15

    Asphalt pavements experience damage due to traffic loading under various environmental conditions. Damage can be caused by viscopl microcracks, fracture due to fatigue cracking, or fracture due to thermal cracking. Asphalt pavements have...

  19. Evaluation of Rexene polymers in hot mixed asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Mary Anne Reese

    1991-01-01

    flexibility and ductility at lower temperatures. The mixture study investigated the performance of asphalt concrete mixtures made with a control asphalt cement and mixtures made with the polymer modified asphalt cements. Susceptibility of the mixture..., indicating that the polymer modified mixtures are less susceptible to permanent deformation. Rexene APAO polymers will provide marketable products for modifying paving grade asphalts and can compete equitably with other commercially available polymers...

  20. The curing of asphalt with rubber and its effect on the physical and chemical properties of asphalt-rubber binders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun, Jay Sung

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a potentially useful asphalt-rubber binder using the curing process. For the curing process, six parameters, which altered the physical and chemical properties of the asphalt-rubber binder, were tested...

  1. The effects of asphalt binder oxidation on hot mix asphalt concrete mixture rheology and fatigue performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Sung Hoon

    2009-06-02

    Asphalt oxidation causes major changes to binder properties and is hypothesized to be a major contributor to age-related pavement failure such as fatigue cracking. Extensive laboratory aging research has been done to assess ...

  2. Prediction of Asphalt Mixture Compactability from Mixture, Asphalt, and Aggregate Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muras, Andrew J.

    2010-07-14

    The underlying purpose of any pavement is to provide a safe, smooth and reliable surface for the intended users. In the case of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements, this includes producing a surface that is resistant to the ...

  3. Identification of asphalt binder properties that affect cracking performance of hot mixed asphalt concrete pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Charles Patrick

    1997-01-01

    with the original mixture designs, compacted in the laboratory, and tested using the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) asphalt aggregate mixture analysis system (AAMAS) test protocols to assess relative resistance to fatigue cracking. Field cores...

  4. Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana David Hokanson ExxonMobil Research and Engineering May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA.... May 20-23, 2014 2Outline • Baytown Chemical Complex • Xylene Fractionation Overview • Dynamic Matrix Control • Results • Benefits/Wrap-Up ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20...

  5. Continuum-Based Constitutive Modeling of Coupled Oxidative Aging-Mechanical Response of Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmani, Eisa

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative aging is known to be one of the main contributors to reducing the service life of asphalt pavements. Asphalt concrete becomes stiffer and more brittle when it reacts with oxygen. The aged asphalt pavement is more susceptible to crack...

  6. Detection of Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl Benzene, and Xylenes (BTEX) Using Toluene Dioxygenase-Peroxidase Coupling Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Detection of Benzene, Toluene, Ethyl Benzene, and Xylenes (BTEX) Using Toluene Dioxygenase, whole-cell bioassay for the detection of bioavailable benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylenes (BTEX of the response obtained from the blank) of 10, 10, 20, and 50 µM was observed for benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene

  7. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    asphalt mixes made from recycled aggregates with the same orasphalt mixes made from recycled aggregates with the same orconsists mostly of recycled natural aggregate and cracked

  8. Blending of processed pitches for the production of roofing asphalts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.A.; Sawatzky, H.

    1987-01-01

    Asphalt is a natural constituent of crude oils and is presently produced from the distillation residues of refining feedstocks. The asphalt market is saturated at this time and it appears that in the near future refineries will upgrade bitumens/heavy oils and vacuum residues via technologies such as hydrocracking, H-Oil and LC-Fining to produce more transportation fuels. Therefore, there will be economic pressure for the utilization of the resulting processed residues as road and roofing asphalts rather than low grade fuels. In this work the use of processed residues for the production of roofing asphalts has been investigated. Results show that 28-30 wt% of processed residue can be blended with 150-200 penetration asphalt cement to produce Type I roofing asphalt. The physical properties of the roofing asphalts were examined in terms of the composition (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes) as well as average molecular weight of the maltenes and asphaltenes determined by gel permeation chromatography. The results are compared with two roofing asphalts obtained from petroleum refineries.

  9. Microstructural Characterization of Material Properties and Damage in Asphalt Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Khorasani, Sara

    2013-05-03

    Asphalt composites are used to construct 90% of roads in the United States. These composites consist of asphalt binder, which is a product of the refinery process of oil, aggregates, and air voids. Fatigue cracking is one of the most important...

  10. Xylenes Reactions and Diffusions in ZSM-5 Zeolite based Catalyst S. Al-Khattaf*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    a great challenge to both the academic field and petrochemical industry. However, the introduction of ZSM-5 for xylene transformation process by Mobil workers in the early 1970s represented a clear

  11. Settling of rubber particles in asphalt-rubber blends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wattanachai, Piyachat

    1998-01-01

    of the binders seemed to be deteriorated by these severe curing conditions. Air blowing was conducted with an expectation of improving high temperature properties while the added rubber benefited low temperature properties. Low molecular weight asphalt or low...

  12. Imparting Electrical Conductivity into Asphalt Composites Using Graphite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baranikumar, Aishwarya

    2013-07-09

    publications showed the potential of graphite in mitigating the sudden transition. The study presented herein investigates possibility of precisely controlling the electrical conductivity of asphalt concrete only by adding filler size graphite powder. Nine...

  13. Relationship between composition and performance of asphalt recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Gerald Dean

    1993-01-01

    This research was aimed at determining the effects of recycling agent composition on the performance of recycled asphalt with aging. To accomplish this, five experiments were performed, in which blends were produced with controlled compositions...

  14. Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael A.

    2010-10-12

    in experiments, and their model was limited to uniaxial loading. Chehab et al. (2003) developed a continuum viscoelastoplastic model for undamaged asphalt concrete, but its scope was also limited to uniaxial characterization. Uzan (2005) developed a damaged...

  15. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30

    (Member) (Head of Department) August 2003 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Evaluation of Moisture Damage within Asphalt Concrete Mixes. (August 2003) Brij D. Shah, B.E., Gujarat University Chair...

  16. Methodology for predicting asphalt concrete overlay life against reflection cracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayawickrama, Priyantha Warnasuriya

    1985-01-01

    METHODOLOGY FOR PREDICTING ASPHALT CONCRETE OVERLAY Lr 8 AGAINST REFLECTION CRACKING A Thesis by PRIYANTHA NARNASURIYA JAYAWICKRAMA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirements.... Experimental investigations carried out at Ohio State University ( 1, 2, 3) and Texas A8M University ( 4, 5, 6 ) have verified the applicability of fracture mechanics principles in predicting fatigue life of asphalt TIP OF THE CRACX /~ // N/i OVERLAY OLD...

  17. Use of VFDs on Asphalt Plant Induced Draft Fans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, G. R.; Case, P. L.; Lowery, J.

    2005-01-01

    by feeding aggregate into a mixing drum where a burner heats and dries the aggregate. Liquid asphalt cement is added to the aggregate before the hot mix is transferred from the drum to holding silos. Most plants use some recycled pavement which... is loaded, screened and fed to the drum mixer. With approximately 3,600 existing asphalt plants in operation across the United States, a large opportunity for retrofits exists. Working with manufacturers and owners, a new standard can be established...

  18. Relationship Between Surface Free Energy and Total Work of Fracture of Asphalt Binder and Asphalt Binder-Aggregate Interfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howson, Jonathan Embrey

    2012-10-19

    Performance of asphalt mixtures depends on the properties of its constituent materials, mixture volumetrics, and external factors such as load and environment. An important material property that influences the performance ...

  19. Asphalt Roofing Shingles Into Energy Project Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Rex, PE

    2008-04-28

    Based on a widely cited September, 1999 report by the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources, nearly 11 million tons of asphalt roofing shingle wastes are produced in the United States each year. Recent data suggests that the total is made up of about 9.4 million tons from roofing tear-offs and about 1.6 million tons from manufacturing scrap. Developing beneficial uses for these materials would conserve natural resources, promote protection of the environment and strengthen the economy. This project explored the feasibility of using chipped asphalt shingle materials in cement manufacturing kilns and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. A method of enhancing the value of chipped shingle materials for use as fuel by removing certain fractions for use as substitute raw materials for the manufacture of new shingles was also explored. Procedures were developed to prevent asbestos containing materials from being processed at the chipping facilities, and the frequency of the occurrence of asbestos in residential roofing tear-off materials was evaluated. The economic feasibility of each potential use was evaluated based on experience gained during the project and on a review of the well established use of shingle materials in hot mix asphalt. This project demonstrated that chipped asphalt shingle materials can be suitable for use as fuel in circulating fluidized boilers and cement kilns. More experience would be necessary to determine the full benefits that could be derived and to discover long term effects, but no technical barriers to full scale commercial use of chipped asphalt shingle materials in these applications were discovered. While the technical feasibility of various options was demonstrated, only the use of asphalt shingle materials in hot mix asphalt applications is currently viable economically.

  20. A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro Spinel, Silvia

    2011-02-22

    The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture ...

  1. Evaluation of the filler effects on fatique cracking and permanent deformation of asphalt concrete mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izzo, Richard P

    1997-01-01

    The addition of hydrated lime to asphalt has shown to be beneficial with an improvement in the Theological properties of the binder, as well as resistance to permanent deformation (rutting) and fatigue cracking of asphalt concrete mixtures...

  2. Methods for the synthesis and polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-p-xylenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferraris, John P. (Coppell, TX); Neef, Charles J. (Garland, TX)

    2002-07-30

    The present invention describes an improved method for the polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.-dihalo-p-xylene's such as the .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-xylene's. The procedure for synthesis is based on the specific order of addition of reagents and the use of an anionic initiator that allows control of the molecular weight of the polymer. The molecular weight control allows processability of the polymer which is important for its utility in applications including in light-emitting-diodes, field effect transistors and photovoltaic devices.

  3. Investigation of Asphalt Mixture Creep Behavior Using Thin Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zofka, Adam; Marasteanu, Mihai; Turos, Mugur

    2008-02-15

    The asphalt pavement layer consists of two or more lifts of compacted asphalt mixture; the top of the layer is also exposed to aging, a factor that significantly affects the mixture properties. The current testing specifications use rather thick specimens that cannot be used to investigate the gradual change in properties with pavement depth. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the 3-point bending test with thin asphalt mixture beams (127x12.7x6.35 mm) to determine the low-temperature creep compliance of the mixtures. Several theoretical and semi-empirical models, from the theory of composites, are reviewed and evaluated using numerical and experimental data. Preliminary results show that this method can be used for low-temperature mixture characterization but several crucial factors need further inspection and interpretation.

  4. Evaluation of products recovered from scrap tires for use as asphalt modifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, J.

    1992-05-01

    Western Research Institute performed rheological tests and water sensitivity tests on asphalt cements that had been modified with carbonous residues obtained from the pyrolysis of scrap tires and waste motor oil. These tests are part of an ongoing program at the University of Wyoming Chemical Engineering Department to evaluate, as asphalt additives, solid carbonous products recovered from the scrap tire and waste motor oil pyrolysis experiments conducted at the University. The tests showed that carbonous residues increased the viscosity and decreased the elasticity of AC-10 and AC-20 asphalts. The tests also indicatedthat asphalt cements modified with carbonous residues were less sensitive to water damage and age embrittlement than unmodified asphalt cements.

  5. Fiber reinforcement of asphalt concrete using cow manure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakar, Mohammed Abu

    1976-01-01

    FIBER REINFORCEMENT OF ASPHALT CONCRETE USING COW MANURE A Thesis by MOHAMMED ABU BAKAR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M Uaivers"ty in partial fulfill-ent of the recuirement for the degree of STER OF SCIENCE December I976... klajor Subject: Mechanical Engineering FIBER REINFORCKCENT OF ASPHALT CONCRETE USING COW MANURE A These. s by MOE&RM ABU BAKAR Approved as to style and content by: c -~WiH. rman ot Commrt ee ead or Departm ) (M ber) / ( rber) (Member) December...

  6. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pauli, Adam T. (Cheyenne, WY); Robertson, Raymond E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Chatham, IL); Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  7. An investigation of the use of tire rubber in asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Heamo Lee

    1996-01-01

    , and Exxon AC-5. With respect to rubber type, the Rouse rubber was determined to improve Theological properties of the asphalt-rubber binder more than the Tire-Gator rubber. The curing process was also shown to increase the breakdown of the rubber...

  8. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR ASPHALT PREPARATION OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR ASPHALT PREPARATION OPERATIONS IN THE LOWER FRASER BASIN DOE FRAP 1996-12 Prepared for: Environment Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution through its Fraser Pollution Abatement Office. Environment Canada is not responsible for the content

  9. Mechanistic Studies of Reactions of Peroxodiiron(III) Intermediates in T201 Variants of Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase Hydroxylase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippard, Stephen J.

    Site-directed mutagenesis studies of a strictly conserved T201 residue in the active site of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase (ToMOH) revealed that a single mutation can facilitate kinetic isolation of two ...

  10. An analysis of some properties of paving asphalts in Texas as they relate to pavement performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuBose, Emmett Haygood

    1980-01-01

    University Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. William B. Ledbetter This study exam1nes the possibility of the ex1stence of a better defined relationship between rheological asphalt binder properties and pavement performance of thin asphaltic concrete... Directed Interaction Graph of the Relationship Between Pavement Performance and Asphalt Binder Properties for 19 Texas Pavements 122 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND In recent years there has been a growing concern 1n the road construction industry...

  11. Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

    1982-01-01

    Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

  12. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    Wavelength (nm) In press at Solar Energy Materials & Solarcool asphalt shingles. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cellsof common colorants, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells

  13. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA)

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  14. Microstructural Characterization of the Chemo-mechanical Behavior of Asphalt in Terms of Aging and Fatigue Performance Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Robert Grover

    2013-03-27

    The study of asphalt chemo-mechanics requires a basic understanding of the physical properties and chemical composition of asphalt and how these properties are linked to changes in performance induced by chemical modifications. ...

  15. A unified method for the analysis of nonlinear viscoelasticity and fatigue cracking of asphalt mixtures using the dynamic mechanical analyzer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelo Branco, Veronica Teixeira Franco

    2009-05-15

    Fatigue cracking is one of the primary modes of distress in asphalt pavements that has an important economic impact. Fatigue resistance characterization of an asphalt mixture is a complex issue due to: (i) composite ...

  16. Isomerization of xylene and methylation of toluene on zeolite H-ZSM-5 compound kinetics and selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beschmann, K; Riekert, L. (Institute fuer Chemische Verfahrenstechnik der Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany))

    1993-06-01

    The alkylation of toluene with methanol and the isomerization of xylene were investigated separately and in detail on zeolite H-ZSM-5 as catalyst. The influence of crystal size alone on rates and product distributions was studied for two Si/Al ratios in the zeolite at 573 and 723 K in a gradientless batch-reactor. The isomer distribution in the xylene resulting from toluene methylation is constant from zero up to at least 50% conversion of the methanol in a stoichiometric mixture, H-ZSM-5 being always para-selective. para-Xylene prevails increasingly in the products when either crystal size, temperature, or Al content in the zeolite increase; essentially pure p-xylene can be obtained in the limit with unmodified H-ZSM-5 as catalyst. The rate of isomerization of xylene alone to an equilibrium mixture of isomers was found to be roughly proportional to the extent of the (external) surface of the zeolite crystals, the ratios of the rates of different reactions in the triangular scheme of isomerization being nearly independent of crystal size. The observations can be understood as resulting from the interaction of reaction an diffusion in the volume of the crystals. 34 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Studies of asphalt air blowing and development of a new short-term aging technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassiliev, Nicolai

    2001-01-01

    In this work asphalt air blowing has been studied from two perspectives. First, the process itself was investigated in terms of the effect of air-blowing conditions on the properties of the asphalt materials obtained. It was found that according...

  18. Project Information Form Project Title Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Information Form Project Title Evaluation of the Combined Effect of Recycled Asphalt(s) and Amounts Provided (by each agency or organization) Caltrans $90,315 Total Project Cost $90,315 Agency ID Description of Research Project As virgin material sources become increasingly scarce, and the volume

  19. MODELING OF ASPHALT DURABILITY AND SELF-HEALING WITH DISCRETE PARTICLES METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    of asphalt and the mechanics of the bitumen layer between the particles are only partly involved in this kind Asphalt mixtures are composite materials that consist of solid particles, viscous binder/fluid (bitumen changes: starting from the initially loose material, the particle in the skeleton move close to each other

  20. Remedial investigation/feasibility study analysis asphalt storage area, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    This report is focused on an abandoned material storage area located on Elmendorf Air Force Base (EAFB), Alaska. The site is located approximately 2000 feet from the east end of the east/west runway and includes approximately 25 acres. The site was used for asphalt storage and preparation activities during the 1940s and 1950s. Approximately 4,500 drums of asphalt and 29 drums of unknown materials have been abandoned at the site. The drums are located in 32 areas throughout the 25-acre site. Following several decades of exposure to the elements, many of the drums have corroded and leaked to the ground surface. Several acres of soil are inundated with liquid asphalt that has leaked from the drums. Depths of the asphalt range from 6 to 10 inches in areas where surface anomalies have created depressions, and thus a collection point for the asphalt. A 14-x 18-x 4 foot wood frame pit used to support previous asphalt operations is located at the north end of the site. The pit contains approximately 2300 gallons of asphalt. There are also locations where the soil appears to be contaminated by petroleum products other than asphalt.

  1. Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology data and status report - FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.; Zacher, A.H.

    1994-09-01

    The asphalt layer within the Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier (HPIB) is an important component of the overall design. This layer provides a RCRA equivalent backup to the overlying earthen layers in the unlikely event that these layers are not able to reduce the infiltration rate to less than 0.05 cm/yr. There is only limited amount of information on using asphalt for a moisture infiltration barrier over the long times required by the HPIB. Therefore, a number of activities are under way, as part of the Barrier Development Program, to obtain data on the performance of asphalt as a moisture barrier in a buried environment over a 1000-year period. These activities include (1) determining RCRA equivalency, (2) measurement of physical properties, (3) measurement of aging characteristics, and (4) relationship to ancient asphalt analogs. During FY 1994 progress was made on all of these activities. Studies were conducted both in the laboratory and on the prototype barrier constructed over the 216-B-57 crib in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Site. This report presents results obtained from the asphalt technology tasks during FY 1994. Also included are updates to planned activities for asphalt analogs and monitoring the asphalt test pad near the prototype barrier. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity on the HMAC portion of the prototype barrier show that the asphalt layers easily meet the RCRA standard of 1 {times} 10{sup -7} cm/s. In-place measurements using a new field falling head technique show an average of 3.66 {times} 10{sup -8} cm/s, while cores taken from the north end of the prototype and measured in a laboratory setup averaged 1.29 {times} 10{sup -9} cm/s. Measurements made on the fluid applied asphalt membrane (polymer-modified asphalt) show an extremely low permeability of less than 1 {times} 10{sup -11} cm/s.

  2. The effect of asphalt deposition on recovery of oil by a pentane slug 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhagia, Nanik S

    1965-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF ASPHALT DEPOSITION ON RECOVERY OF OIL BY A PENTANE SLUG NANIK S. BHAGIA THE EFFECT OF ASPHALT DEPOSITION ON RECOVERY OF OIL BY A PENTANE SLUG A Thesis By NANIK S. BHAGIA Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas Ak...M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, I 965 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECT OF ASPHALT DEPOSITION ON RECOVERY OF OIL BY A PENTANE SLUG A Thesis By NANIK S. BHAGIA Approved...

  3. Genotoxicity and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster exposed to benzene, toluene and xylene: Attenuation by quercetin and curcumin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Mahendra P.; Mishra, M.; Sharma, A.; Shukla, A.K.; Mudiam, M.K.R.; Patel, D.K.; Ram, K. Ravi; Chowdhuri, D. Kar

    2011-05-15

    Monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) such as benzene, toluene and xylene are being extensively used for various industrial and household purposes. Exposure to these hydrocarbons, occupationally or non-occupationally, is harmful to organisms including human. Several studies tested for toxicity of benzene, toluene and xylene, and interestingly, only a few studies looked into the attenuation. We used Drosophila model to test the genotoxic and apoptotic potential of these compounds and subsequently evaluated the efficiency of two phytochemicals, namely, quercetin and curcumin in attenuating test chemical induced toxicity. We exposed third instar larvae of wild type Drosophila melanogaster (Oregon R{sup +}) to 1.0-100.0 mM benzene, toluene or xylene, individually, for 12, 24 and 48 h and examined their apoptotic and genotoxic potential. We observed significantly (P < 0.001) increased apoptotic markers and genotoxicity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in organisms exposed to benzene, toluene or xylene. We also observed significantly (P < 0.001) increased cytochrome P450 activity in larvae exposed to test chemicals and this was significantly reduced in the presence of 3',4'-dimethoxyflavone, a known Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) blocker. Interestingly, we observed a significant reduction in cytochrome P450 activity, GST levels, oxidative stress parameters, genotoxic and apoptotic endpoints when organisms were exposed simultaneously to test chemical along with quercetin or curcumin. The study further suggests the suitability of D. melanogaster as an alternate animal model for toxicological studies involving benzene, toluene and xylene and its potential in studying the protective role(s) of phytochemicals.

  4. Influence of coarse aggregate size, shape and surface texture on rutting of hot mix asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeggoni, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1 ) Evaluate the influence of coarse aggregate shape and surface texture on deformation characteristics of asphalt concrete, 2) Characterize aggregate elongation, shape and texture using fractal dimensional...

  5. A Continuum Coupled Moisture-mechanical Constitutive Model for Asphalt Concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shakiba, Maryam

    2013-12-09

    The presence and flow of moisture degrade engineering properties of asphalt concrete as part of thermodynamic, chemical, physical, and mechanical processes. This detrimental effect is referred to as moisture damage. The aim of this dissertation...

  6. Structural Characterization of Micromechanical Properties in Asphalt Using Atomic Force Microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Robert Grover

    2012-02-14

    of the study was based on nano-indentation experiments performed within a micro-grid of asphalt phases in order to determine micromechanical properties such as stiffness, adhesion and elastic/plastic behavior. The change in microstructure...

  7. Development of a long-term durability specification for polymer modified asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woo, Won Jun

    2009-06-02

    In recent years an increased use of polymers has occurred to modify asphalt binders, mainly to decrease pavement rutting but also to improve binder failure strain in direct tension. Whereas all of these effects positively ...

  8. The morphology of polymer modified asphalt and its relationship to rheology and durability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraus, Zachary Rothman

    2008-10-10

    Polymers are added to asphalt binders primarily to stiffen the binder at higher temperatures and thus to protect the pavement against rutting at summertime temperatures early in the pavement's life. Also, it has been ...

  9. Analytical-Numerical Methodology to Measure Undamaged, Fracture and Healing Properties of Asphalt Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koohi, Yasser 1980-

    2012-08-29

    Unlike in laboratory compacted asphalt mixtures, the distribution of viscoelastic properties in field layers is not uniform because of nonuniform air void distribution and aging. Therefore, characterization of field specimens ...

  10. Evaluation of healing in asphalt binders using dynamic shear rheometer and molecular modeling techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bommavaram, Ramamohan Reddy

    2009-05-15

    A self-healing material has the inherent ability to partially reverse damage such as crack formation that might have occurred during its service. Significant evidence exists in the literature to indicate that asphalt binder ...

  11. Development of a Prediction Model for Skid Resistance of Asphalt Pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezaei, Arash

    2012-02-14

    The skid resistance of asphalt pavement is a major characteristic that determines the driving safety on a road, especially under wet surface conditions. Skid resistance is primarily a function of the microtexture and ...

  12. The effect of air blowing on the properties of rubber-modified asphalt binder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Shauna Erin

    1997-01-01

    Recently, crumb rubber modifier or CRM has become prevalent in the construction of flexible pavements. This work addresses the phase separation that is commonly encountered with asphalt-rubber binders subjected to prolonged ...

  13. The effect of aging techniques on asphalt low-temperature properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knorr, Daniel Brainard

    2001-01-01

    This study includes three phases wherein the effects of various aging techniques on asphalt low-temperature properties were investigated. In addition, two other studies were conducted: air-blowing was investigated as a possible long-term aging test...

  14. Laboratory evaluation of crumb rubber asphalt concrete mixtures using the concepts of SMA mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebala, Somasekhar Reddy

    1994-01-01

    the potential to significantly improve the resistance to fatigue and thermal cracking characteristics of asphalt concrete mixtures. The wet method appears to yield better performance regardless of the rubber particle size. Fine rubber would improve the fatigue...

  15. Automated Protocol for the Analysis of Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer Date from Fine Aggregate Asphalt Mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti De Sousa, Pedro

    2010-10-12

    Fatigue cracking and moisture damage are two important modes of distresses in asphalt pavements. Recently, the Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) was used to characterize fatigue cracking and evaluate the effects of moisture damage on the Fine...

  16. Investigation of Rheological and Nano-Rheological Properties of Asphalt Binders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabir, Pooyan

    2014-08-04

    to the asphalt microstructure and nano-rheology. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the application of dynamic shear rheometer for macro scale and the application of atomic force microscopy imaging for nano-scale. Extraction of nano-scale engineering properties...

  17. Effect of airblowing on the durability of asphalt paving cements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolson, Ronald Geoffrey

    1962-01-01

    Investigated 90 Penetration Asphalts Sam le Mo. ASTN Penetration 77 F ? 100 s/5 secs. Original Viscosity Megapoi~es (S (7 F 5 x 10 sec 1-3 (SR)* 1-4 (AB)* 1-6 (B)* 87 88 87 0. 95 0. 98 0. 91 6-3 (SR) 6-4 (AB) 6-6 (B) 89 92 95 0. 71 0. 85.... 0 16. 0 20. 5 6-3 (SR) 6-4 (AB) 6-6 (8) 2. 0 2. 0 4. 0 3, 5 7. 5 5, 5 3. 5 5. 0 11-3 (SR) 11 4 (AB) 11-6 (B) 2. 0 2. 0 2. 0 6. 0 7. 0 6. 5 11. 0 10. 5 8. 5 9. 5 10. 0 9. 5 g, V P 1 ;ih, e& 7 1, ~a 4 / ~y&, ri 4...

  18. The Effects of Using Alkali-Silica Reaction Affected Recycled Concrete Aggregate in Hot Mix Asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, Brian James

    2011-10-21

    through the Airfield Asphalt Pavement Technology Program. Finally, thanks to my mother and father for their encouragement and to my fianc?e for her patience and love. vii NOMENCLATURE AFB - Air Force Base AASHTO - American Association of State... RCA - RCA from Edwards AFB EDL - Electrical Double Layer EDS - Elemental Dispersive Spectroscopy ESEM - Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope HL RCA - RCA from Holloman AFB HMA - Hot Mix Asphalt K - Potassium KOH - Potassium Hydroxide Li...

  19. Multiple Roles of Component Proteins in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases: Phenol Hydroxylase and Toluene/o-Xylene Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. OX1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinberg, Christine E.

    Phenol hydroxylase (PH) and toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 require three or four protein components to activate dioxygen for the oxidation of aromatic substrates at a carboxylate-bridged ...

  20. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    growth on natural asphalts and heavy oil compounds. A majorand the origin of heavy oil. Nature, 426, 344-352. HEITKAMP,mainly of asphalts and heavy oils, which have saturated into

  1. Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedi, Harpreet

    2001-01-01

    Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

  2. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    and the origin of heavy oil. Nature, 426, 344-352. HEITKAMP,natural asphalts and heavy oil compounds. A major questionmainly of asphalts and heavy oils, which have saturated into

  3. Porous Asphalt Pavement for Stormwater Management The UNH Stormwater Center Web: www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porous Asphalt Pavement for Stormwater Management The UNH Stormwater Center Web: www.unh.edu/erg/cstev/ Benefits and Uses Porous Asphalt can be used in replace of traditional stormwater management measures given Quality Treatment 3. Recharges Groundwater to Underlying Aquifers 4. Allows for Reduction of Stormwater

  4. Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

  5. Asphalt and Asphaltic Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, A. R.

    1914-05-01

    of Materials in Curb 36 Proportions Determined by Weight 52 Propo sal 16 Proposal, Plans & Specifications, part of Contract 71 Protection from Sun 37 Protection of Base 44 Protection of New Work 21 Protection of Public 21 Provision for Traffic... bonds at the option of the Mayor and Board of Com- missioners. 29. In performing the work done under any contract, of which these specifications may be a part, the con- tractor will be governed by the laws of the State of Kansas, and the ordinances...

  6. The effects of lime and amines on the aging of asphalts and recycling agents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisneski, Mary Luvola

    1995-01-01

    , and AAF-F3. The experiments were designed and performed to study the oxidation rates, the hardening rates, the hardening susceptibilities, and if possible, the prediction of the critical times for pavement failure due to the hardening of the asphalt...

  7. 1 INTRODUCTION Asphalt mixtures are composite materials that consist of solid particles, viscous binder/fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    binder/fluid (bitumen) and pores filled with air. When considering asphalt we should distinguish in the skeleton move close to each other and air in the voids is squeezed out. The fluid in the mixture (that can of the bitumen layer between the particles are only partly involved in this kind of approach. The discrete

  8. Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Creep Compliance Analysis Technique for the Flattened Indirect Tension Test of Asphalt Concrete: ­ Cored Sample (Cylindrical) Indirect tensile testing (IDT) (Strength/Creep) ­ AASHTO T-322 Damage under and Flattened IDT · 1000-sec creep tests on three replicates · 0, -10, and -20 deg. C · Displacement

  9. Mirzahosseini et. al. ANN-Based Prediction Model for Rutting Propensity of Asphalt Mixtures1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    in a repeated load permanent deformation test.21 Dynamic creep test is one of the best tools for assessing of load cycles is the most23 important output of the dynamic creep test. This curve includes primary based on volumetric proportioning of the asphalt mixture. This method does16 not include any direct test

  10. A comparison of the fracture properties of conventional and polymer-modified two-layer asphalt concrete overlay systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Praveena Gutha

    1996-01-01

    The problem of reflection cracking through the conventional asphalt concrete overlays has increased the need to find new materials which could resist cracking or fracture more effectively. It is for this reason that polymers (Styrelo are added...

  11. Fatigue resistance of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures using the calibrated mechanistic with surface energy (CMSE) measurements approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofori-Abebresse, Edward Kwame

    2006-10-30

    Fatigue cracking is one of the fundamental distresses that occur in the life of a Hot Mix Asphalt Concrete (HMAC) pavement. This load induced distress leads to structural collapse of the entire pavement ultimately and can ...

  12. Contributions to an Improved Oxygen and Thermal Transport Model and Development of Fatigue Analysis Software for Asphalt Pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xin

    2012-02-14

    Fatigue cracking is one primary distress in asphalt pavements, dominant especially in later years of service. Prediction of mixture fatigue resistance is critical for various applications, e.g., pavement design and ...

  13. A Model for the Nonlinear Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Binders and its Application in Prediction of Rutting Susceptibility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasa Parthasarathy, Atul

    2013-04-30

    The mechanical behavior of asphalt binders is nonlinear. The binders exhibit shear thinning/thickening behavior in steady shear tests and non-proportational behavior in other standard viscoelastic tests such as creep-recovery ...

  14. A study of substitution solvents in asphalt fume extraction and the effects of heating duration and temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Noel Thomas

    1981-01-01

    may be used as substitute solvents for the solvent extraction analytical method for asphalt furres proposed by NlnSH and currently in use by OSHA. Benzene is known to orovide IC0% effic- 1 iency in asphalt fume extraction. The results..., rather than the solvents' effic- iency loss, was responsible for the differences. The importance of the data lies in the fact that the other two test solvents exhibited a consiatency equal to that of benzene. 'Ahile the exact coefficient of any...

  15. Primary and Secondary Glyoxal Formation from Aromatics: Experimental Evidence for the Bicycloalkyl-Radical Pathway from Benzene, Toluene, and p-Xylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Radical Pathway from Benzene, Toluene, and p-Xylene R. Volkamer,*, U. Platt, and K. Wirtz Centro de Estudios Form: May 16, 2001 A new approach is presented to study the ring-cleavage process of benzene, toluene for the troposphere. The yield of glyoxal was determined to be 35% ( 10% for benzene and about 5% higher for toluene

  16. Liquid phase oxidation of p-xylene to terephthalic acid at medium-high temperatures: multiple benefits of CO2-expanded liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Xiaobin; Niu, Fenghui; Snavely, Kirk William; Subramaniam, Bala; Busch, Daryle H.

    2010-02-01

    The Co/Mn/Br catalyzed oxidation of p-xylene to terephthalic acid (TPA) is demonstrated in CO2-expanded solvents at temperatures lower than those of the traditional Mid-Century (MC) process. As compared with the traditional air (N2/O2) oxidation...

  17. A utility evaluation of nondestructive testing devices used on asphalt concrete pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffels, Shelley Marie

    1986-01-01

    defined . Weighting factors are developed using the Churchman-Ackoff technique. The analysis is performed under uncertainty using a beta probability distribution. The calculations are performed using a computer program. The results are expressed... in terms of an expected value and a 95f confidence interval. Fifteen nondestructive testing devices are evaluated for use for both project-level design and network-level planning on asphalt concrete pavements. These devices are described in detail...

  18. Chip Seals for Asphalt Concrete Pavements: A Proposed Emulsion Residue Specification and Existing Pavement Texture Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyt, Denise

    2012-07-16

    of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Amy Epps Martin Committee Members, Robert L. Lytton Charles Glover Head of Department, John...&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Amy Epps Martin Chip seals are a pavement surface treatment used for maintaining asphalt concrete pavements. National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Project 14-17 was performed to produce a...

  19. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petit, Christophe; Canestrari, Francesco; Pannunzio, Valter; Virgili, Amadeo

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  20. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Petit; Anne Millien; Francesco Canestrari; Valter Pannunzio; Amadeo Virgili

    2012-03-13

    Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used to manufacture Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA), which is a modified asphalt concrete produced, applied and compacted at temperatures below those typically required. This feature leads to environmental benefits, such as reduced energy consumption, gas and fume emissions, as well as to economic/operational advantages, such as lower production costs and greater hauling distances for extended construction seasons with tighter schedules. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax with a traditional Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) specimen, in terms of shear fatigue response and both complex and stiffness moduli. The experimental results and related modeling work demonstrate that adding synthetic wax into the WMA composition does not hinder either the destructive or non-destructive performance of an HMA, and this finding is corroborated by respectively measuring fatigue life and stiffness.

  1. HAZARDOUS WASTE & HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Volume 13, Number 2, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    bioremediation systems in Brazil. INTRODUCTION Groundwater contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons contamination by the toxic and water soluble components such as benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX promise as a cost-effective approach to hydrocarbon plume management. This technique requires thorough

  2. BTX Holdings Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuels Brasil Jump to: navigation,BROAD

  3. Reconstruction of fault slip of the September 21st, 1999, Taiwan earthquake in the asphalted surface of a car park,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jian-Cheng

    surface of a car park, and co-seismic slip partitioning Jacques Angeliera,*, Jian-Cheng Leeb , Hao Received 27 May 2001; accepted 5 March 2002 Abstract The deformation in the asphalted surface of a car park), the surface traces of the June 21st, 2000, earthquake (Mw 6.4) in southern Iceland, were analysed in a car

  4. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauul J. Tikalsky

    2004-10-31

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  5. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J. Tikalsky, Hussain U. Bahia, An Deng and Thomas Snyder

    2004-10-15

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  6. Comparison of fatigue analysis approaches for predicting fatigue lives of hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walubita, Lubinda F.

    2006-08-16

    -1 COMPARISON OF FATIGUE ANALYSIS APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING FATIGUE LIVES OF HOT-MIX ASPHALT CONCRETE (HMAC) MIXTURES A Dissertation by LUBINDA F. WALUBITA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Dissertation by LUBINDA F. WALUBITA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Amy Epps Martin...

  7. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) for the determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in foundry molding sand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dungan, R.S. [USDA ARS, Beltsville, MD (United States). Environmental Management & Byproducts Utilization Laboratory

    2005-07-01

    The use of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) to determine benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) in foundry molding sand, specifically a 'green sand' (clay-bonded sand) was investigated. The BTEX extraction was conducted using a 75 {mu} M carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber, which was suspended above 10 g of sample. The SPME fiber was desorbed in a gas chromatograph injector port (280{sup o}C for 1 min) and the analytes were characterized by mass spectrometry. The effects of extraction time and temperature, water content, and clay and bituminous coal percentage on HS-SPME of BTEX were investigated. Because green sands contain bentonite clay and carbonaceous material such as crushed bituminous coal, a matrix effect was observed. The detection limits for BTEX were determined to be {lt}= 0.18 ng g{sup -1} of green sand.

  8. Establishment of a laboratory mix-design method for open-graded friction courses using sulfur-extended asphalt (SEA) binders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Kee-Kwong

    1981-01-01

    indicated that mixtures of sand, asphalt and sulfur exhibited somewhat h1gher Marshall stabil1ties, with a slightly greater water sensitiv1ty, than convent1onal asphalt1c concrete mixtures. 23 Develo ment of SEA-DGFC A review of the literature... temperature of sulfur (i. e. , 240'F (116'C)1. It was also suggested that further study should examine the reasons for the improved permeab1lity in the SEA-OGFC systems. Future work should also include the verificat1on of the proposed mix-des1gn procedure...

  9. Experimental Study on Geocell-Reinforced Flexible Pavements with Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) Bases under Cyclic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acharya, B. S.

    2011-12-31

    and Characteristics 27 3.3 Asphalt Concrete and Characteristics 29 3.4 Geocell 29 3.5 Geotextile 31 3.6 Test Devices and Instrumentation 32 3.6.1 Earth Pressure Cells 33 3.6.2 Strain Gauge 34 3.6.3 Displacement Transducer and Tell Tales 36 3.6.4 Data....5 The bundled NPA Geocell used in this research 30 Figure 3.6 Non-woven geotextile used in this research 32 Figure 3.7 Earth pressure cell on the top of the subgrade 34 Figure 3.8 Strain gauge affixed on Geocell...

  10. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul; Wood, Kurt; Skilton, Wayne; Petersheim, Jerry

    2009-11-20

    The widespread use of solar-reflective roofing materials can save energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming by cooling the roughly 20% of the urban surface that is roofed. In this study we created prototype solar-reflective nonwhite concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing materials using a two-layer spray coating process intended to maximize both solar reflectance and factory-line throughput. Each layer is a thin, quick-drying, pigmented latex paint based on either acrylic or a poly(vinylidene fluoride)/acrylic blend. The first layer is a titanium dioxide rutile white basecoat that increases the solar reflectance of a gray-cement concrete tile from 0.18 to 0.79, and that of a shingle surfaced with bare granules from 0.06 to 0.62. The second layer is a 'cool' color topcoat with weak near-infrared (NIR) absorption and/or strong NIR backscattering. Each layer dries within seconds, potentially allowing a factory line to pass first under the white spray, then under the color spray. We combined a white basecoat with monocolor topcoats in various shades of red, brown, green and blue to prepare 24 cool color prototype tiles and 24 cool color prototypes shingles. The solar reflectances of the tiles ranged from 0.26 (dark brown; CIELAB lightness value L* = 29) to 0.57 (light green; L* = 76); those of the shingles ranged from 0.18 (dark brown; L* = 26) to 0.34 (light green; L* = 68). Over half of the tiles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.40, and over half of the shingles had a solar reflectance of at least 0.25.

  11. Asphalt overlay design methods for rigid pavements considering rutting, reflection cracking, and fatigue cracking. Research report September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y.H.; Liu, C.; Dossey, T.; McCullough, B.F.

    1998-10-01

    An asphalt concrete pavement (ACP) overlay over a rigid pavement represents a viable rehabilitation strategy. It can provide good serviceability at an initial construction cost that is substantially less than that of a rigid overlay rehabilitation. In addition, ACP overlays require less construction time, which can reduce user costs during construction. However, it may not be the most economical solution for long-term rehabilitation. Because of their relatively short service life, ACP overlays may require maintenance sooner than rigid overlays. And one of the more critical distresses that effectively determine the life span of the structure is reflection cracking. This report investigates alternative strategies that seek to prevent reflection cracking on ACP overlays.

  12. Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan; Danda, Swapna

    2011-02-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.

  13. The importance of the glass transition temperature in relation to the low-temperature fracture resistance of asphalt and sulphlex pavement binders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Douglas Lee

    1985-01-01

    dilatometer was fabricated for use in the determination of the glass trans1ti on temperature of asphalt and plasticized sulfur (Sulphlex) pavement binders. A total of 11 materials were examined including seven Sul phlex binders, a blend of two Sulphlex.... Ouartz Tube Dilatometer . Df fferential Scanning Calorimetry . IV EXPERIMENTAL PRDCEOURE. Materials Selection . . Di 1atometri c Measurements V RESULTS Vi scoel asti c Justi f i cat i on. Experimental Results. Statistical Analysis. VI CONCLUSIONS...

  14. Two- and Three-Dimensional Microstructural Modeling of Asphalt Particulate Composite Materials using a Unified Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic-Viscodamage Constitutive Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Taesun

    2013-08-13

    -viscoplastic, and thermo-viscodamaged materials, while the aggregate is considered to be a linear, isotropic elastic material. The 2D RVEs were used to study the effects of variation in aggregate shape, distribution, volume fraction, ITZ strength, strain rate... Page Figure IV-19. Damage density distribution of asphalt concrete models with tensile strain rates (50% aggregate volume fraction and T=20 ?C): (a) 10-6/second, (b) 10-5/second, (c) 10-4/second, and (d) 10...

  15. SOLAR HEATING OF TANK BOTTOMS Application of Solar Heating to Asphaltic and Parrafinic Oils Reducing Fuel Costs and Greenhouse Gases Due to Use of Natural Gas and Propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eugene A. Fritzler

    2005-09-01

    The sale of crude oil requires that the crude meet product specifications for BS&W, temperature, pour point and API gravity. The physical characteristics of the crude such as pour point and viscosity effect the efficient loading, transport, and unloading of the crude oil. In many cases, the crude oil has either a very high paraffin content or asphalt content which will require either hot oiling or the addition of diluents to the crude oil to reduce the viscosity and the pour point of the oil allowing the crude oil to be readily loaded on to the transport. Marginal wells are significantly impacted by the cost of preheating the oil to an appropriate temperature to allow for ease of transport. Highly paraffinic and asphaltic oils exist throughout the D-J basin and generally require pretreatment during cold months prior to sales. The current study addresses the use of solar energy to heat tank bottoms and improves the overall efficiency and operational reliability of stripper wells.

  16. Hematoxyliin & Eosin Staining 1. Xylene 3 min

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OH up & down 5. 95% EtOH up & down 6. 80% EtOH up & down 7. 70% EtOH up & down 8. Running tap wather 2

  17. Variability of hot mix asphalt produced with reclaimed asphalt pavement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Guiqin

    1999-01-01

    Pavement recycling operations have been used in the United States from the early 1900s to date. These recycling operations have been used for a variety of reasons including solid waste disposal problems, reduction of initial cost, and conservation...

  18. Influence of vehide traffic reduction in a town centre on BTX polhition Isabelle ZDANEVITCH a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    et Pollution de l'Air", Avignon : France (2000)" #12;1. Objectives It seems obvious that with limited centres. According to that scheine, WERIS, m association wifh the local Air Qualily Moniforing Nefwork A1 clearly indicates traffic äs the main source of atmospheric pollution. Measured benzene levels over the 3

  19. Experiment 6. QUANTINTATIVE ANALYSIS OF XYLENES USING IR SPECTROSCOPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    with a syringe full of the solvent. Dry the cell. 2. Refill the clean, dry sample cell with solution #1 and run syringe for loading sealed infrared cells. 4. A 0.1 mm sealed IR cell. These cells are kept version of the baseline technique to the unknown and standards. II Sealed Cells. The sealed cells used

  20. Make aromatics from LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doolan, P.C. ); Pujado, P.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

  1. Multiscale approach for modeling hot mix asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Samer Hassan

    2005-08-29

    presents the development of elastic and visco-plastic models that account for important aspects of the microstructure distribution in modeling the macroscopic behavior of HMA. In the first part of this study, an approach is developed to introduce a length...

  2. ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Rheological characterization of asphalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    compared favorably with those obtained using conventional parallel-plate torsional flow in a commercial and are aggregates of polar aromatic compounds (Maruska and Rao 1987). Maltenes are nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbons time (Anderson and Marasteanu 1999). Because of their codification, the conventional tests

  3. Asphalt Oxidation Kinetics and Pavement Oxidation Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Xin

    2012-07-16

    by XIN JIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Charles J. Glover Committee Members, Amy Epps... I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Charles J. Glover, and my committee members, Dr. Amy Epps Martin, Dr. Victor M. Ugaz, Dr. M. Sam Mannan, for their guidance and support throughout the course of this research. Thanks also go to my...

  4. Anisotropic Characterization of Asphalt Mixtures in Compression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuqing 1983-

    2012-10-08

    and physically related to anisotropic modulus ratio. The anisotropic viscoelasticity was represented by complex moduli and Poisson's ratios in separate orthogonal directions that were determined by an efficient testing protocol. Master curve models were proposed...

  5. Cool Asphalt Shingles | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment of Energy3-1DepartmentCooking UpCool

  6. Effect of viscosity of asphalt on stress strain and volume change characteristics of asphaltic mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Poduru Mohandas Karamchand

    1966-01-01

    help given by the Texas Transportation Instituce for the auchor s graduate study i. s sincerely appreciated, The author is very grateful to Nsp students Messrs. Dou Russell and John cohagan uho helped cha author in tha experimental murk. Thanks ara... dua Mrs. Rddie Raye andrews for her excellent aud patient typing of this thesis. Finally, the author is deeply indebted to his uife for her conCinuous help and encouragamant. iv I INTRODUCTION II REVIEW OP LITERATBRE Rheological Properties...

  7. Performance of Drained and Undrained Flexible Pavement Structures Under Wet Conditions Test Data From Accelerated Pavement Test Section 543-Drained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    or through very permeable asphalt concrete and carry it outAsphalt Concrete Asphalt Treated Permeable Base AggregateAsphalt Concrete Asphalt Treated Permeable Base Aggregate

  8. Quantifying Pollutant Emissions from Office Equipment Phase I Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Hodgson, A.T.; McKone, T.E.; Perino, C.

    2006-01-01

    toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, formaldehyde andtoluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, styrene, formaldehyde andBicyclic aromatics Toluene Styrene Xylenes 2-Ethylhexanol n-

  9. Activated carbon cleanup of the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harruff, L.G.; Bushkuhl, S.J. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the details of a recently developed novel process using activated carbon to remove hydrocarbon contaminants from the acid gas feed to Claus sulfur recovery units. Heavy hydrocarbons, particularly benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) have been linked to coke formation and catalyst deactivation in Claus converters. This deactivation results in reduced sulfur recovery and increased sulfur emissions from these plants. This effect is especially evident in split flow Claus plants which bypass some of the acid gas feed stream around the initial combustion step because of a low hydrogen sulfide concentration. This new clean-up process was proven to be capable of removing 95% of the BTX and other C{sub 6}{sup +} hydrocarbons from acid gas over a wide range of actual plant conditions. Following the adsorption step, the activated carbon was easily regenerated using low pressure steam. A post regeneration drying step using plant fuel gas also proved beneficial. This technology was extensively pilot tested in Saudi Aramco`s facilities in Saudi Arabia. Full scale commercial units are planned for two plants in the near future with the first coming on-line in 1997. The process described here represents the first application of activated carbon in this service, and a patent has been applied for. The paper will discuss the pilot plant results and the issues involved in scale-up to commercial size.

  10. The atmospheric release of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene from contaminated soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Ronald Roland

    1993-01-01

    Chemicals may enter the environment in a number of ways accidents, spills during transport, leakage from waste disposal or storage sites, or discharge from industrial facilities. Hydrocarbons usually enter the environment through accidental spills...

  11. Understanding orchestrated chemical reactions in toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from pseudomonas sporium OX1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Woon Ju

    2011-01-01

    Chapter 1. Geometric and Functional Versatility of Carboxylate-Bridged Nonheme- Diiron Motifs: sMMO and ToMO. Several metalloenzymes utilize a carboxylate-bridged non-heme diiron motif for dioxygen activation. Despite their ...

  12. www.rsc.org/analyst The airliquid interface of benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYST FULLPAPER THE www.rsc.org/analyst The air­liquid interface of benzene, toluene, m as an Advance Article on the web 10th April 2003 The air­liquid interface and the liquid-phase of benzene-zero hyperpolarizabilities of benzene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene. The orientation of the aromatic rings of these compounds

  13. The influence of initial soil moisture content on the fate of xylene applies to soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aurelius, Marcus William

    1985-01-01

    based on past research. The existing data base concerning the fate of organic chemicals in soil environments deals -1 chiefly with the fate of pesticides present in the mg kg concen- tration range (Spencer et al. , 1973) . Since leaks and spills often.... , Montana State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. K. W, Brown Organic chemicals are often spilled on soil either accidentally or intentionally and are often found in subsurface environments, hence posing long term threats to human health...

  14. Evaluation of Laboratory Conditioning Protocols for Warm-Mix Asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Fan 1990-

    2012-10-26

    ) and off-site Plant Mixed Laboratory Compacted (PMLC) specimens were selected, and their effects on mixture properties were evaluated. Mixture stiffness evaluated in a dry condition using the Resilient Modulus (MR) test (ASTM D-7369) was the main parameter...

  15. Analyses of sulfur-asphalt field trials in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcomb, David Edward

    1979-01-01

    I I wr r I OI OI OI OI OI OI OI OI OI CL dl OJ OI OI OI OI Ol Crl OOCJCCJ: JJ av v o o o v o a IU fd RI fd fd IU fd fd fU IO 4 4 4 4 IO 4 4 IO C L I \\ I 1 III VI Vl III Vl f/I IU IU IU IU O Cl dl U CLCLCCCLU CL'IZ:LL a n. o. IU lll dl... IO Ol IO I/I (U Crl O ' dl E IOmr mOIOmL/IIO IO P) M CO P) Iff fO fO IO CU Of O Gl O O v O dl dl dl v C O C Cl fd fd fd 5 I- O U-U U I- IU df dl IJ IJ O O O fd fd fd L- LI U Lf E C fd fd O O. ' IU V/I Lf CCI fd UJ O O...

  16. A thermodynamic approach for compaction of asphaltic composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koneru, Saradhi

    2009-05-15

    Binder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 C. Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1. Field Compaction Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 a. Static Steel Wheel Rollers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 b. Pneumatic Tire... the desired density level and meet the specifications ? To provide the roadway with a smooth surface. The compaction equipment can be divided into three general categories; static steel wheel rollers, pneumatic tire rollers, and vibratory steel wheel rollers...

  17. Measurements of moisture suction in hot mix asphalt mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman

    2006-10-30

    . Peltier Effect...........................................................................................................14 Fig. 6. Stainless Steel Screen Thermocouple Psychrometer..............................................16 Fig. 7. Cover Materials.... The first one is called wet loop and the second one is called Peltier psychrometer. Both of them measure the relative humidity based on the temperature difference between two surfaces, the nonevaporating surface (dry bulb) and the evaporating surface (wet...

  18. Asphalt landscape after all : residual suburban surface as public infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Joseph Michael, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The thesis proposes a hybridized commercial retail strip inserted into a residual suburban condition as a manner of investigating the latent potential of suburban logic, both its constituent elements and its formal rules ...

  19. Complex Modulus Prediction of Asphalt Concrete Pavement Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Meng

    2013-12-02

    . For field cores complex modulus measuring methods, except some expensive pavement field testers, empirical and semiempirical models are widely used, but an accurate mechanical test method is more desired. In this research, Arizona, Yellowstone National Park...

  20. Recycling asphaltic concrete with sulphur as a supplemental binder 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Robert William

    1976-01-01

    ) (275'F) Ring and Ball Softening Point Specific Gravity 0. 2 mm 1. 2 mm Too Hard 14. 7 cSt 15S'F 1. 04 D 5 [53] D 5 [53] D 2170 [54] D 2170 [54] D 36 [55] D 70 [56] a Extraction ? ASTM Designation: D 2172 [57] TABLE 2--Physical... properties of the recovered aggregate. Property Fine Aggregate a b Coarse Aggregate Specific Gravity Bu11% SSD 2. 59 2. 60 Specific Gravity Apparent Absorption 2. 65 1. 4X 2. 66 1. 2X Percent Passing No. 200 Sieve S. OX ASTM Designation: C 128...

  1. Prediction of Reflection Cracking in Hot Mix Asphalt Overlays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Fang-Ling

    2011-02-22

    Distribution ??????????????????????????????? 64 3.4.5 Number of Axle Types per Vehicle ???????????????????????????????????? 65 3.5 Tire Patch Length and Cumulative Axle Load Distribution ???????????????? 70 3.5.1 Tire Patch Length... ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 70 3.5.2 Determination of Cumulative Axle Load Distribution on Tire Length ???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 71 3.5.3 Modeling of Cumulative Axle Load Distribution (CALD) ????????? 76 3.6 Determination of Hourly Number...

  2. Fatigue Resistance of Asphalt Mixtures Affected by Water Vapor Movement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Yunwei

    2013-11-08

    This dissertation has two key objectives: the first objective is to develop a method of predicting and quantifying the amount of water that can enter into a pavement system by vapor transport; the second objective is to ...

  3. Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Stone and Asphalt Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moray, S.; Throop, N.; Seryak, J.; Schmidt, C.; Fisher, C.; D'Antonio, M.

    2006-01-01

    of locations use underground mines. Mining methods involve removing the overburden to extract the underlying rock deposits. Tricone rotary drills, long-hole percussion drills, and churn drills are used to create the blast holes in the rocks. Blasting... Energy & Resource Solutions, Inc. Haverhill, MA Abstract The highly energy-intensive stone mining and crushing industry, grouped with other mining industries, has been one of the focal sectors of the US Department of Energy’s Industries...

  4. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    content). Small cold milling machines (e.g. , Wirtgen W35 orbe excavated with a cold milling machine to ensure thattest pits using a cold milling machine, the target grading

  5. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    cement, lime) and/or inert (fly ash, mineral fines) fillershydrated lime, Class-C fly ash, and cement kiln dust.lime), semi-active (e.g. , fly-ash and kiln dust), and inert

  6. Evaluation of Moisture Susceptibility of Warm Mix Asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Cucalon, Maria Lorena

    2013-05-03

    Economic, environmental and engineering benefits promote the rapid implementation of WMA technologies. However, concerns remain based on changes in the production process that may lead to moisture susceptibility in the ...

  7. Toward an Improved Model of Asphalt Binder Oxidation in Pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prapaitrakul, Nikornpon

    2011-02-22

    nd Coring of the Study ................................. 20 Table II-3. Properties of the Abilene L1 and L2 Cores ......................................... 30 Table II-4. Properties of the Abilene R1 and R2 Cores... Coring 2 nd Coring Ce11 1 5.9 Ce11 3 6.3 AC 120/150 (Un) 1992 Ce11 33 4.04 58-28 (Un) Ce11 34 3.92 58-34 (SBS) Ce11 35 I 94 3.96 58-40 (SBS) 1999 11/2004 07/2006 The accessible or interconnected air voids of core samples from the Mn...

  8. PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF POROUS ASPHALT FOR STORMWATER TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1.4 Study Area Durability, Life Cycle, and Cost....................................... 21 2.3 Surface Infiltration Capacity

  9. Full-Depth Pavement Reclamation with Foamed Asphalt: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, David; Fu, P.; Harvey, John T; Halles, F.

    2008-01-01

    Standard Method of Test for Determining the Creep ComplianceStandard Method of Test for Determining the Creep ComplianceLTPP P07 (Test Method for Determining the Creep Compliance,

  10. Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected paving asphalts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Carlos Luis

    1993-01-01

    Table XIII. Gas Analysis Results for Material ACT-2 Using Method 1 . . . 46 Table XIV. Approximate Yield (liter/kg) of NOx from Materials AC-10A, AC-10B, AC-10C, AR4%-B, AR10%-B and AR18%-B 48 Table XV. Approximate Yield (liter/kg) of SO2 from... 53 LIST OF TABLES (Continued) Table XIX. Smoke Mass Results for Material AC-5B . . . Table XX. Smoke Mass Results for Material AR10%-B . . Table XXI. Coefficient of Variation for Materials AC-10A, AC-10B, AC-10C, AC-5B and AR10%-B. Table XXII...

  11. New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIXConcentratingInstitutionalEnergyNew CleanNew Cool Roof

  12. A SPRAY REACTOR CONCEPT FOR CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF P-XYLENE TO PRODUCE HIGH-PURITY TEREPHTHALIC ACID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Meng

    2013-08-31

    Terephthalic acid (TPA), with current annual world capacity of exceeding 50 million metric tons, is a commercially important chemical used primarily in the manufacture of polyesters. A spray reactor in which the liquid phase, containing dissolved p...

  13. Dioxygen activation and substrate hydroxylation by the hydroxylase component of toluene/O-xylene monooxygenase from pseudomonas sporium OX1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Leslie Justin

    2007-01-01

    Non-heme carboxylate-bridged diiron centers in the hydroxylase components of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases activate dioxygen at structurally homologous active sites. Catalysis requires the management of four ...

  14. Cobalt Catalyst Heterogenized on SBA-15 for p-Xylene Oxidation David Raju Burri, Ki-Won Jun,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    was filtered and dried at 353 K in a vacuum oven overnight. The product was then slurried in ethanol under reflux condition, filtered, washed with ethanol and dried at 393 K in an oven. The washing resulted materials.1 Cobalt based homogeneous catalytic systems are widely used for this reaction.2 However

  15. The efficacy of marker-assisted-selection for grain mold resistance in sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franks, Cleve Douglas

    2004-09-30

    Five breeding populations were created by crossing elite U.S. sorghum parental lines (RTx430, RTx436, BTx631, BTx635, and Tx2903) with 'Sureño', a dual purpose grain mold resistant sorghum cultivar. Molecular markers ...

  16. Volatile Organic Emissions from Carpets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, A.T.

    2008-01-01

    Field-study Carpet o o Styrene 4-Phenylcyclohexene o o o o om-,p-Xylene· Styrene o-Xylene 4-Phenylcyclohexene 4-m-,p-Xylene· Styrene o-Xylene 4- Phenylcyclohexene 4-

  17. Improvements to a Transport Model of Asphalt Binder Oxidation in Pavements: Pavement Temperature Modeling, Oxygen Diffusivity in Asphalt Binders and Mastics, and Pavement Air Void Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Rongbin

    2012-07-16

    ) and image processing techniques. From these imaging techniques, three pavement air void properties, radius of each air void (r), number of air voids (N), and average shell distance between two air voids (rNFB) were obtained to use as model inputs...

  18. A study of the effects of limestone rock asphalt screenings on the structural properties of hot-mix asphaltic concrete made with siliceous materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albritton, Oscar Willard

    1958-01-01

    . Z Total yo a 28 9o Bin No. 3 Total 9o oo Igloo Bin No. 4 Total 9o ot Combined Analysis fo 1. 6 30. 8 58. 2 4 ? 10 38 Z0. 5 19 5. 3 25. 8 10 ? 40 43 12. I 14. 3 40 ? 80 36 10. 0 11. 7 21. 7 80 ? 200 0. 6 4. 3 4, 9 Pass 200 0, 9 0. 9.... 6 40 ? 80 36 2. 9 65 11. 7 19 3. 8 18 4 80 ? ZOO Pass ZOO 0. 2 24 0. 9 l. 8 l. 2 6. 3 2. 1 Total 100@a 54. 0/o 100'fo 8, 0'fo 1009'o 18. 0'fo 100/a 20. Ofo 100fo Bin No, I - Allen Farm Pea Gravel . Bin No. 2 - Gifford-Hill Concrete Sand...

  19. Caltrans Partnered Pavement Research Program (PPRC) Summary Report: Four Year Period: 2000–2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Monismith, Carl L.; Nokes, William; Coetzee, N. F

    2006-01-01

    in the asphalt concrete layer will reduce its permeability.asphalt concrete layer. Reducing the permeability and the

  20. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    energy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warmingenergy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warmingcommunities: strategies for heat islands mitigation and smog

  1. Impact of aging on asphalt pavement performance, ductility and DSR measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Azri, Nasser Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    was also established from the perspective of the viscoelastic rheological properties, G' and []'. Data points were plotted on G' vs. G'/[]' map. Both field and lab-aged binder followed the same trend on that map as aging progressed. The study of hardening...

  2. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01

    25. Admixtures used (lime, liquid anti- strip, etc. ) Mixuse of anti-strip additive (lime or liquid), and pavementeffectiveness of both hydrated lime and liquid anti-strip

  3. Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing

    2005-01-01

    effectiveness of both hydrated lime and liquid antistripping25. Admixtures used (lime, liquid anti- strip, etc. ) Mixeffectiveness of both hydrated lime and liquid antistripping

  4. Compaction Effects on Uniformity, Moisture Diffusion, and Mechanical Properties of Asphalt Pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassem, Emad Abdel-Rahman Ahmed

    2011-08-08

    of Core 4 from FW-01 Section ............147 9-1 (a) Seebeck Effect, (b) Peltier Effect (Fredlund and Rahardjo 1993) .................150 9-2 Calibration Curve of Thermocouple Psychrometer ............................................152 9...

  5. Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Chun Lok

    1991-01-01

    , The signature of the pulse emerging from the antenna looks different from the transmitter signal. Records of these signals are shown in Fig 2. 4. 1a-c. Fig 2. 4. 1a The transmitter pulse Fig 2. 4. 1b The mathematical differentiation of Fig2. 4. 1a Fig 2. 4... the metal plate is recorded and then the file consists of the adverse effects of the GPR system is subtracted from this record. The result is shown below in Fig 2. 4. 2a-c. Fig 2. 4. 2a Metal plate reflection toaveform before processing 22 Fig 2. 4. 2b...

  6. Whole House Thermal Performance of Asphalt Shingles Exploiting Special Infrared Reflective Pigments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, L.; Miller, W.; Desjarlais, A.; Jacobs, J.; Youngquist, A.

    2006-01-01

    Industrial Mineral Products St. Paul, Minnesota Adam Youngquist Graduate Student Mechanical Engineering University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee ABSTRACT New “cool pigmented” colors that appear as dark colors in the visible spectrum... of background foliage in the visible and NIR spectra. The chlorophyll in plants strongly absorbs in the non-green parts of the visible spectrum, giving the leaf a dark green color with high reflectance elsewhere in the solar spectrum 1 (Kipling 1970...

  7. Influence of fundamental material properties and air void structure on moisture damage of asphalt mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arambula Mercado, Edith

    2009-05-15

    Members, Robert L. Lytton Hamn-Ching Chen David S. Schechter Head of Department, David V. Rosowsky May 2007 Major Subject: Civil Engineering iii ABSTRACT Influence of Fundamental Material Properties and Air Void Structure... I dedicate this work to my beloved parents, Mart?n Lilia Raquel and to my dear sisters, Ivette Lizette Anette vi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I extend my sincere appreciation to the co-chairs of my committee Dr. Eyad Masad, E.B. Snead I associate...

  8. Laboratory Evaluation of Hot-Mix Asphalt Concrete Fatigue Cracking Resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamison, Brandon Parker

    2012-02-14

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Amy Epps Martin Committee Members, Robert L. Lytton Karl T. Hartwig Head of Department, John Niedzwecki December 2010... appreciation and due gratitude to my advisor and study leader, Dr. Amy Epps Martin (E.B. Snead II Associate Professor), for the academic guidance, mentorship, and technical advice rendered during the course of this thesis. This thesis would not have been...

  9. Analysis of aggregate imaging system (AIMS) measurements and their relationship to asphalt pavement skid resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luce, Anthony David

    2009-05-15

    and to propose a new method for the classification of aggregates based on their shape characteristics. This new method of classification is for use in the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) wet weather accident reduction program (WWARP). The use of AIMS...

  10. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    Akbari and Paul Berdahl Heat Island Group, Lawrence Berkeleyenergy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warmingenergy, mitigate urban heat islands and slow global warming

  11. An evaluation of permanent deformation properties of crumb rubber modified (CRM) asphalt concrete mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makunike, Danai Ellarin

    1995-01-01

    The disposal of waste car and truck tires in the U.S. is becoming increasingly problematic, as is true for all forms of non-biodegradable solid waste. Over 200 million tires are discarded annually, of which only 34 percent are recycled in various...

  12. Characterization of aggregate resistance to degradation in stone matrix asphalt mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatchalian, Dennis

    2006-04-12

    of aggregates to degradation in SMA was evaluated through the analysis of aggregate gradation before and after compaction using conventional mechanical sieve analysis and nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (CT). The findings of this study led...

  13. Surface roughness effects on the solar reflectance of cool asphalt shingles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Roofing Materials,” Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells,measurements,” Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells, 89(4):common colorants,” Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells, 89(

  14. A novel technique for the production of cool colored concrete tile and asphalt shingle roofing products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    nm) In press at Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cellsasphalt shingles. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 92 (common colorants, Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 89,

  15. Experimental Study on Geocell-Reinforced Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) Bases under Static and Cyclic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thakur, Jitendra Kumar

    2011-01-13

    .1.2 Standard Proctor compaction curve of subgrade 94 Figure 5.1.3 CBR versus moisture content curve of subgrade 95 Figure 5.2.1 Schematic diagram for the set up of cyclic plate load test 96 Figure 5.2.2 Cyclic loading wave 97 Figure 5.2.3 Geotextile... and coastal protection, airfields, railroads, subgrade improvement, and reinforcement to base courses of road sections etc. since the 1970s. Today, there are many types of geosynthetic products (e.g., geogrid, geotextile, geocell, geomembrane, geonet...

  16. Study of the asphalt pavement damage through nondestructive testing on overweight truck routes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramos-Aparicio, Sonia Ines

    2004-09-30

    Many highway facilities experience deterioration due to high traffic volumes and a service life that has been extended beyond facility design life. The 75th and 76th Texas Legislatures passed bills allowing trucks of gross ...

  17. Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Assessment of Using Recycled Materials for Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2003-01-01

    million metric tons of recycled aggregates are generated instate to state in the U.S. Recycled aggregates are, however,consumption of recycled aggregates from crushed concrete

  18. Taphonomy and paleoecology of asphaltic Pleistocene vertebrate deposits of the western Neotropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Emily Leigh

    2013-01-01

    paleontology,  geology,  and  paleoecology:  Mammoth  Site  taphonomy  and   paleoecology:  University  of  Chicago  Gregory.  (2005).  Paleoecology  of  extinct  xenarthrans  

  19. The use of sulfer modified bottom ash (SMBA) as an aggregate in asphaltic mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chimakurthy, Harshavardhan

    1998-01-01

    Of the 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag generated annually in the United States less than 40 percent is used. The eastern half of Texas is served by 18 coal burning electric power generating plants which produce approximately 3...

  20. Life-Cycle Environmental and Economic Assessment of Using Recycled Materials for Asphalt Pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2003-01-01

    1993] MOEE. Spent Foundry Sand - Alternative Uses Study.Flue Gas Scrubber Material Foundry Sands Kiln Dusts Mineralin highway construction is foundry sand. Silica sand coated

  1. Investigation of Noise and Durability Performance Trends for Asphaltic Pavement Surface Types: Three-Year Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Qing; Kohler, Erwin R.; Harvey, John T; Ongel, Aybike

    2009-01-01

    retain its permeability longer. Old concrete surfaces withretain its permeability longer. Old concrete surfaces withconcrete, decibel (dB), noise, absorption, macrotexture, microtexture, open-graded, gap-graded, dense- graded, onboard sound intensity, permeability,

  2. The effect of construction variables on the dynamic modulus of asphalt treated base courses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, William Ernest

    1970-01-01

    were taken the confining pressure was raised to 20 psi and the procedure repeated. The same sequence was repeated for a confining prossnre of 40 psi. 37 Unconfined Comcression Test The unconfined compression test has long been used in the testing... the recorder load versus time plot. No other instrumentation was utilized in this test. The Texas High?ay Department procedure for unconfined compression testing of bituminous mixtures specifies a specimen temperature of 140 F and a rate of loading...

  3. A program to design asphalt concrete overlays to mitigate reflection cracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satyanarayana Rao, Sindhu

    2002-01-01

    . Various engineering reinforcing grids have been used in recent years to mitigate the occurrence and propagation of reflection cracking. Reinforcing grids made of fiberglass or polypropylene has been used for this purpose. The main objectives...

  4. The application of triaxial compression tests to the design of sand-asphalt paving mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, Leo J

    1940-01-01

    of Changes in Sand. Orading upon the JLngle of Internal Friction III. Effect of the Initial Void Ratio upon ths ' ingle of Internal friction (Pine Sand. ) . . . . . . . Page 31 35 IV. Xffect oi Dust on the Angle of Internal Jriction in Sand Nixes... after Failure . . , 24 S. Nffsct of Changes in Sand. Grading on the Angle of Internal Friction . . . . . . '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Relation between ths Angle of Internal Friction ank Initial Yolk Ratio (Fine Sank...

  5. Taphonomy and paleoecology of asphaltic Pleistocene vertebrate deposits of the western Neotropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Emily Leigh

    2013-01-01

    Taphonomy  and  sedimentology  of  Arikaree  (lower  Gary.  (2009).  Sedimentology  and  stratigraphy:  Wiley.  using  megafauna,  sedimentology,  radiocarbon,  and  

  6. Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Storm-Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy in a Cold Climate Robert M. Roseen, Ph.D., P.E., D.WRE, M.ASCE1 ; Thomas P. Ballestero, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE2 ; James J. Houle3 ; Joshua F. Briggs4 ; and Kristopher M. Houle5 Abstract: This study-impact development designs. Peak flows were reduced by 90% to 0:58 m3 =s=km2 Æ 0:74 in comparison with standard

  7. New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSites KDFNationalNavy 1 GeothermalNew BondEnergy New Cool

  8. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with recycled asphalt | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentatabout Who Works for NIF &Y-12 wastes not and

  9. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport forRetirementAdministrationWayne| National

  10. Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini

    2011-01-01

    Terpenes Benzene p-Xylene Styrene Toluene TMPD-DIB TMPD-MIBpentadecane Hexadecane Styrene Benzene Toluene m/p-xylene o-pentadecane hexadecane styrene benzene toluene m/p-xylene o-

  11. Draft Closure Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    asphalt pad, the materials associated with the asphalt pad (e.g., concrete ringwall, sumps, liner) and a minimum of six inches of the base course and soil underlying the asphalt...

  12. The neutron spectrum from Li7 + H2 and energy levels of Be8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trail, Carroll Clark

    1956-01-01

    for asphalt absorption measurement, using a density gradient column, was developed to measure asphalt absorption in single aggregate particles at a higher precision level. Experimental results showed that asphalt absorption correlated very well with the void...

  13. Development of Energy Balances for the State of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

    2005-01-01

    to obtain, the consumption of lubricants and asphalt andto the reported consumption of lubricants, asphalt, roadlubricants, asphalt, and road oil. Data Sources and Data Issues Data for petroleum product consumption

  14. Asphalt Pavement Aging and Temperature Dependent Properties through a Functionally Graded Viscoelastic Model, Part-II: Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    products obtained through fractional distillation of crude oil or petroleum. Due to its organic nature - Mirza and Witczak [5] refers to them as short term hardening, which occurs during the mix production by the "Global Aging Model" used

  15. Probabilistic analysis of air void structure and its relationship to permeability and moisture damage of hot mix asphalt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castelblanco Torres, Adhara

    2006-04-12

    ............................24 Probabilistic Analysis of Air Void Size and Permeability..........................29 Summary .....................................................................................................50 IV THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AIR VOID... ..............................................................................................................................106 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Schematic of the X-ray CT scanner. .....................................................................16 2 X-ray CT images of an LKC specimen: (a) grey scale image...

  16. Experimental Study on Shear Fatigue Behavior and Stiffness Performance of Warm Mix Asphalt by adding Synthetic Wax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by adding Synthetic Wax C. Petita , A. Milliena , F. Canestrarib , V. Pannunziob , A. Virgilib a Université.petit@unilim.fr , Phone : +33555934519 Abstract Synthetic waxes produced by standard and registered processes may be used. The present article serves to compare the mechanical performance of a WMA produced by adding synthetic wax

  17. Geocell-Reinforced Unpaved and Paved Roads with Recycled Asphalt Pavement (RAP) Bases: Experimental Study and Damage Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thakur, Jitendra Kumar

    2013-08-31

    …………………………………….. 146 LWD test results…………………………………………………………. 148 Properties of cored HMA samples…………………………………….. 152 5.4.2 Recorded surface deformation…………………………………………. 153 5.4.3 Surface permanent deformation………………………………………... 154 5...………………………………. Fig. 5.3.2 Paved road test sections………………………………………… 138 Fig. 5.3.3 Light Weight Deflectometer (LWD) test on subgrade…………. 140 Fig. 5.3.4 Tell-tale measurements...

  18. Modeling Hot Mix Asphalt Compaction Using a Thermodynamics Based Compressible Viscoelastic Model within the Framework of Multiple Natural Configurations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koneru, Saradhi

    2011-10-21

    description of HMA. This framework has a reasonably general structure within which a host of dissipative processes can be de- scribed. This framework, to model HMA, recognizes the change in the microstructure of the material through the changes...

  19. A study of sand-asphalt mixtures: a constitutive model based on a thermomechanical framework and experimental corroboration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Parag

    2009-06-02

    TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B. Focus of Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 C. Outline... the reference and current configurations. The motion assigns a one-to-one mapping between points X ? ?R and points x ? ?c(t), at each t, i.e., x = ??R(X,t). (2.1) The motion is assumed to have sufficient smoothness to enable all operations defined subsequently...

  20. Electrochemical assessment and service-life prediction of mechanically stabilized earth walls backfilled with crushed concrete and recycled asphalt pavement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esfeller, Michael Watts, Jr.

    2009-06-02

    A Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) wall is a vertical grade separation that uses earth reinforcement extending laterally from the wall to take advantage of earth pressure to reduce the required design strength of the ...

  1. Application of Direct Tension Testing to Laboratory Samples to Investigate the Effects of Hot Mix Asphalt Aging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padigala, Meghana 1989-

    2012-12-07

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Amy Epps Martin Committee Members, Charles Glover Robert Lytton Head of Department, John Niedzwecki December 2012 Major Subject: Civil Engineering... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Epps Martin for her constant encouragement, support and invaluable input in this study. This study would not have been possible without her leadership and enthusiasm. I am thankful to Dr. Glover...

  2. Assistant Professor in Residence Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandy, John A.

    Polymer-Modified Asphalts Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide Implementation Plan, sponsored Transportation Consortium Recycling Asphalt Pavements Containing Modified Binders, sponsored by New England

  3. Microsoft Word - Attachment G2A.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    possible microbial degradation in asphalt elements is mitigated with addition 11 of lime. For these reasons, it is thought that design characteristics of asphalt components...

  4. Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate Building America Technology Solutions Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a...

  5. Caltrans Partnered Pavement Research Program (PPRC) Summary Report: Four Year Period: 2000–2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Monismith, Carl L.; Nokes, William; Coetzee, N. F

    2006-01-01

    5 tests as well as a recycled aggregate base (RAB) used inof Recycled Asphalt Concrete Materials as Aggregate Base.of Recycled Asphalt Concrete Materials as Aggregate Base.

  6. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willem, Henry

    2010-01-01

    aromatic hydrocarbons (xylene, naphthalene, 4-phenylcyclohexene), terpenes (?-pinene, limonene), alcohol (Texanol, methanol,

  7. 480 THE CANADIAN JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING VOLUME 84, AUGUST 2006 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.

    . (2001) modified asphalt binder using recycled polymers like polyethylenes, polypropylenes, polyetherpoly. Many investigations were performed on polymer modified asphalt (PMA), where asphalt binder is modified by different types of polymers. Goodrich (1988) related asphalt binder and PMA performance to the performance

  8. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    Lubricants Asphalt Waxes Special Naphtha Petrochem feedstocks Other Petro Prods Coal Net reconciliation error Total Consumption

  9. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

    2011-04-30

    This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

  10. Process Biochemistry 36 (2001) 765772 Benzene degradation in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    and plastics, as well as being components of aviation and automotive fuels. Since they are suspected as being treatment of BTX using microorganisms has been extensively ex- plored as an alternative to physical

  11. Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    1-pentene 2-methylpentane ethane n-pentane 1-butene o-xylenethe ratios of ethene/ethane and m,p-xylene/ethylbenzene wereaverage value of ethene/ethane and m,p-xylene/ethylbenzene

  12. A Pilot Study of the Effectiveness of Indoor Plants for Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air in a Seven-Story Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    chloride o-xylene Phenol Styrene Tetrachloroethylene LOQ cnonanal o-xylene phenol styrene Toluene a TXIB a 2,2,4-points, although styrene concentrations  increased by 

  13. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    and characterization of long-chain-alkane degrading Bacillus thermoleovorans from deep subterranean petroleum reservoirs.characterization of microbial assemblages associated with high- temperature petroleum reservoirs.

  14. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: Theof petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water: The

  15. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water:Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated ground water:dioxide and water (Heitzer and Sayler, 1993). Bioremediation

  16. A Methodology of Quantifying Precipitation Exposure for Wet-Weather Collisions and Evaluating Effectiveness of Open-Grade Asphalt Concrete as a Countermeasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Ching-Yao; Jin, Eui-Jae; Oh, Soon Mi; Ragland, David R

    2010-01-01

    of a road accident in rainy weather. Accident Analysis andseverity and recorded weather. J. Safety Research. Vol. 29,of rainfall and other weather variables with road traffic

  17. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    been converted to natural gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil,been converted to natural gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil,

  18. Application of Metagenomics for Identification of Novel Petroleum Hydrocarbon Degrading Enzymes in Natural Asphalts from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baquiran, Jean-Paul Mendoza

    2010-01-01

    WITH BIODEGRADATION OF CRUDE-OIL IN THE OUACHITA MOUNTAINS,A SPHALTS AND H EAVY O IL Crude oil is an extremely complexto natural gas, liquid crude oil, shale oil, tars and

  19. Contribution of Building Materials to Urban Wet-Weather Pollutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    . · Stabilizing additives include cellulose fiber, rock wool fiber, and/or polymers. · Road runoff has been shown. Asphalt · Khandal et al. (1995) investigated incorporation recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) into new

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A RAPID TEST TO DETERMINE MOISTURE SENSTIVITY OF HMA (SUPERPAVE) MIXTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiwakoti, Harihar

    2007-12-14

    Exiting test methods to determine moisture sensitivity in hot mix asphalt are time consuming and inconsistent. This research focused on wheel tracking devices to develop a rapid test method to evaluate moisture sensitivity. The Asphalt Pavement...

  1. Technical Report Documentation Page Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    revenues from the State of Texas. Project title: Micro Crack Growth in Recycled Asphalt Mixtures 16, while it excludes aggregate-asphalt binder interactions. Furthermore, this research also investigated

  2. Surface performance grading and grade selection process for surface treatment binders 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barcena Mendoza, Roberto

    2001-01-01

    ) or performance-graded (PG) asphalt binder specification was developed in the 1990's to measure binder properties directly related to hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) performance and included material characterization at low, intermediate, and high temperatures...

  3. Cool Roofs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    overlapping panels made from a variety of materials such as fiberglass asphalt, wood, polymers, or metals. How they can be made cool: Buy cool asphalt shingles, which use specially...

  4. World War I: A past that will not pass away 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joffe, Josef

    2013-09-19

    ) by controlling thermal properties of the construction materials. To change thermal properties of asphalt concrete, expanded polypropylene (EPP) pellet and graphite were selected as the additives and mixed into asphalt concrete. Experimental tests are classified...

  5. Evaluation of I-10 Pomona (07-181304) Long-Life Pavement Rehabilitation Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, John T; Santero, Nicholas J; G, Mary Fermo

    2005-01-01

    Treated Permeable Base Asphalt Concrete (Type B) PlacePermeable Base, Retrofit Dowels, Tie Bars, Concrete Spall

  6. Characterization and heritability studies on factors which affect milling properties of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadan, Hamis Mohamed

    1983-01-01

    ~ickness score- SC0283C 77CS2 79T70 ADN55 Corneous Corneous Corneous Corneous Combine shallu CS3541 BTx615 BTx3197 Corneous Intermediate Intermediate (waxy) Intermediate RTx09 Soft NSA740 Floury 1/ Endosperm texture score; 1=Completely... polyhedral surfaces that often have indentations where protein bodies were located in the kernel. Cultivars like SC0283C, 77CS2, Combine shallu and 79T70 are corneous and have a dense network of closely packed starch granules surrounded by protein matrix...

  7. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    during ARCTAS-B (H. Singh, 1,3-Butadiene m+p-Xylene personal2-Butene trans-2-Butene 1,3-Butadiene Methacrolein Methyl

  8. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    such as benzene, toluene, styrene, xylene, ethyl benzene,and ethyl benzene and styrene (used for polystyrene2 Vinylchloride 3 Ethylbenzene 1 Styrene 1 Formaldehyde 2

  9. Building America Case Study: Field Testing an Unvented Roof with Asphalt Shingles in a Cold Climate, Boilingbrook, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels ResearchofDerivativeCold Climate FoundationTotal Heating andTesting

  10. Microsoft Word - Attachment G2B.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to heal if deformed. Shielded from ultraviolet radiation and mixed with hydrated lime to 25 inhibit microbial degradation, the longevity of the asphalt will be great....

  11. Life Cycle Assessment of Pavements: A Critical Review of Existing Literature and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santero, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    pavements still consume more energy, although only 0.3 toalternatives generally consume more energy, albeit only withfeedstock energy included, the asphalt designs consume two

  12. Permeable Pavements, Green Roofs, and Cisterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    , and water harvesting through them, such as asphalt and con- systems or cisterns. This new fact sheet crete storage of rainwater. Permeable pavements are least expensive a

  13. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01

    Recycled asphalt is a better aggregate than virgin aggregaterecycled at the end of a road’s life by undergoing crushing and use as an aggregate.

  14. Development and HVS Validation of Design Tables for Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui; Jones, David; Wu, Rongzong; Harvey, John T

    2014-01-01

    porous asphalt, pervious concrete and permeable interlockingasphalt, pervious concrete, and permeable concrete slabs toasphalt, pervious concrete and permeable cast concrete slab

  15. Techniques and Technologies for Field Detection of Asbestos Containing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asbestos has been used in numerous applications at DOE sites including sprayed-on fireproofing, asphalt and vinyl floor tile, and asbestos-cement(transite) siding.

  16. Development and HVS Validation of Design Tables for Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui; Jones, David; Wu, Rongzong; Harvey, John T

    2014-01-01

    permeability of the porous asphalt and pervious concrete ispermeability was measured according to ASTM C1701 (Standard Test Method for Infiltration Rate of In Place Pervious Concrete,

  17. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe Railyard Park & Plaza * Permeable asphalt blends into gravel tree wells in highly pedestrian areas * Permeable strips are alternated with impermeable surfaces * Extensive...

  18. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 14891502, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/1489/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    propane toluene i-butane ethylbenzne n-butane m,p-xylene i-pentane o-xylene n-pentane Alkenes n-2001 Code for indoor environmental pollution control of civil building engineering 5 g/L -- 2002.01.01 #12-comparisons of (a) propane, (b) propene, (c) i-pentane, (d) benzene, and (e) toluene measurements among online GC

  19. Comprehensive Compaction Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of New Asphalt Pavement Do Road-User Charges Make Sense for Texas? More States Are Exploring Alternatives to the Motor Fuels Tax TTI Researchers Contribute to the 2014 TRB Annual Meeting Researcher TEXAS of New Asphalt Pavement 12 Do Road-User Charges Make Sense for Texas? More States Are Exploring

  20. 10 Water Resources and the Urban Environment Tide-induced Air Pressure Fluctuation in Coastal Unsaturated Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    such as asphalt pavement of extremely low permeability, soil structures of the reclamation area, and rainfall soil near the coast may also fluctuate in response to sea tides. If the soil is well capped by low-permeability materials such as concrete or asphalt, which is common in the extensively urbanized coastal areas

  1. Co-Sponsored by: Environmental Research Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015 Spring Seminar Series April 21, 2015 Gregg 320, 12:30 ­ 2:00 Sustainability in Beauty binders and aggregates is essential to the performance of asphalt mixtures. We used the modified Atomic-modified AFM probes differentiated the performance of different asphalt binders. Results also suggested

  2. Technical Report Documentation Page Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    authorized 1. Report No. SWUTC/13/600451-00062-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4 additives in the asphalt binder or by foaming the asphalt binder using small percentages of water. The use using four different rates of surface formation and at several different temperatures within the range

  3. WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WINTER PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PERMEABLE PAVEMENTS A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POROUS ASPHALT, PERVIOUS CONCRETE, AND CONVENTIONAL ASPHALT IN A NORTHERN CLIMATE BY KRISTOPHER M. HOULE BS, Worcester the University of New Hampshire, the Northern New England Concrete Promotion Association (NNECPA), the Northeast

  4. OKLAHOMA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PAVEMENT AND BRIDGE DECK SMOOTHNESS REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is defined. The specification applies to PFC (permeable friction course), OGFC (open graded friction course), HMA (hot mix asphalt), PCCP (P.C. concrete pavement) and Bridge Decks. Areas where 1/8 to 1/2 inch per apply to all types of Portland cement and asphalt concrete pavements as well as bridge decks. ODOT

  5. Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenland Meadows LID Case Study: Economics Utilizing an LID approach that featured porous asphalt and supporting designs. This case study shows how a combination of porous asphalt and standard pavement design natural underlying soils are mainly clay in composition, which is very prohibitive towards infiltration

  6. Structural investigations of hydroxylase proteins and complexes in bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormick, Michael S. (Michael Scott)

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial multicomponent monooxgenases (BMMs) such as toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO), phenol hydroxylase (PH), and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) catalyze hydrocarbon oxidation reactions at a carboxylatebridged ...

  7. Concurrent observations of air pollutants at two sites in the Pearl River Delta and the implication of regional transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    xylene to ethylbenzene (b) i-butane to propane at TC and WQSxylene to ethylbenzene (b) i-butane to propane at TC and WQSxylene to ethylbenzene (b) i-butane to propane at TC and WQS

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Nanoporous Materials and Their Films with Controlled Microstructure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In Ho

    2011-10-21

    .0 ?m), as well as to manipulate the density and structure of grain boundaries. Microstructural effects of silicalite-1 membranes on the gas separation are investigated by measuring the permeation and separation for xylene isomers. In the second section...

  9. 4-Chlorocrotonaldehyde as a unique chlorine-containing compound from the reaction of atomic chlorine with 1,3-butadiene in air at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Weihong; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2000-01-01

    J.N. Galloway, Evidence 1,3-butadiene concentration data,Evaporative emissions of 1,3-butadiene from petrol-fuelledtoluene, xylenes and 1,3-butadiene B. J. Finlayson-Pitts, W.

  10. Attenuation of dilute aromatic hydrocarbon transport by a block copolymer in a compacted vertisol 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, James Browning

    2001-01-01

    supplies. The study was performed to determine if the modification of a compacted soil liner with a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer could successfully sequester benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and meet the United States Environmental...

  11. Global comparison of VOC and CO observations in urban areas Erika von Schneidemesser a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sources, such as industry and LPG-related sources in non- Annex I countries. Yearly benzene to ethyne of air quality. Certain VOCs are very reactive in the atmosphere (e.g., xylenes and benzene compounds

  12. molt.Stud.(19'77)43,1-rl. i 5 Arib .;*?i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, Helene

    ,Queensland,481I, Australia. (Receivedl0 December1975) INTRODUCTION :iThemost remarkablemodificationof the radular in ethanol, cleared in xylene and vacuum embedded i" p"l".rr., i].ij sectlonswere cut at 5-'/ym. Two complete

  13. 1356 20 JUNE 2014 VOL 344 ISSUE 6190 sciencemag.org SCIENCE PHOTOS:(TOPTOBOTTOM)DENNISKUNKELMICROSCOPY,INC/VISUALSUNLIMTED,INC.;MAXALTAMOR/ALAMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ho-Young

    --similar in many ways to those happening today--had dramatic effects on the vegeta- tion of Indonesia over the past ethanol produced from plants, but PTA is made by oxidizing p-xylene, a petroleum derivative. Pachero

  14. Nanoparticles in Flow Assurance in Hydrocarbon Energy Production Abbas Firoozabadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    friendly alternative We have discovered that the addition of small amounts of methanol improves practice is using aromatic solvents such as xylene to prevent aspahltene precipitation Our work shows great

  15. RPSEA REPORT PROCEDURES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    version 7). http:webbook.nist.govchemistry Wu, Y., Bamgbade, B. A., Baled, H., Enick, R. M., Burgess, W. A., Tapriyal, D., McHugh, M. A., "Liquid Densities of Xylene...

  16. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS – FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, Randy L.

    2008-01-01

    of four chemicals (styrene, tetradecane, pentadecane and theTwo of the compounds (styrene and acetaldehyde) had similarToluene Ethylbenzene p-Xylene Styrene Propyl-benzene 1,3,5-

  17. Baytown Energy Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, J.

    2006-01-01

    Mobil's Baytown Chemical Plant, the Baytown Energy Project (BEP) utilized this planning strategy to redeploy assets by changing the fractionation configuration of the plant. In the aromatics recovery plant, aromatics (benzene, toluene and xylenes... prefractionator followed by a set of integrated towers to separate the ternary product mixture of benzene toluene and xylenes from a toluene disproportionation unit. The towers also fractionated a concentrated benzene and toluene sidestream from the primary...

  18. Model reaction for the in situ characterization of the hydrogenating and acid properties of industrial hydrocracking catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guisnet, M.; Thomazeau, C.; Lemberton, J.L. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, Poitiers (France)] [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, Poitiers (France); Mignard, S. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-01-01

    A kinetic study of o-xylene transformation was carried out on a sulfided NiMo on Y zeolite catalyst during the hydrocracking of a model compound (n-heptane) under the following conditions of the process: high hydrogen pressure (5.7 MPa), presence of nitrogen and sulfur-containing compounds. o-Xylene inhibits n-heptane transformation, which can be explained by a competition for the adsorption on the acid sites between o-xylene and the olefinic intermediates of hydrocracking. The products of o-xylene transformation are the following: p- and m-xylenes (isomerization), toluene and trimethylbenzenes (disproportionation), and saturated C{sub 8} naphthenes (dimethylcyclohexane and trimethylcyclopentanes). It is shown that 1,3- and 1,4-dimethylcyclohexanes (and trimethylcyclopentanes) result from the isomerization of m- and p-xylenes. Therefore, the hydrogenating activity of hydrocracking catalysts can be characterized by the formation of dimethylyclohexanes and trimethylcyclopentanes. Furthermore, the isomerization of xylenes, which occurs through an acid mechanism, can be used for characterizing the acid activity of hydrocracking catalysts. This is not the case for disproportion whose rate depends on hydrogen pressure. The validity of o-xylene transformation for characterizing the acid and hydrogenating activities of bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts was confirmed by the use of a series of catalysts having either the same content of NiMo and different contents of zeolite or the same content of zeolite and different contents of NiMo. While the isomerization activity is strictly proportional to the zeolite content and independent of the NiMo content, and the hydrogenating activity is proportional to the NiMo content and independent of the zeolite content. 27 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Theoretical Study of Chain Transfer to Solvent Reactions of Alkyl Nazanin Moghadam,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    to the oxygen atom in n-butanol, from the methylene group in MEK, and from a methyl group in p-xylene by a live(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) is investigated. Among n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert- butanol, tert of chain transfer to n-butanol reactions compared to those of chain transfer to MEK and p-xylene reactions

  20. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 20572071, 2007 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/2057/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    -xylene, hexamethylbenzene, phenol, m-cresol and aniline R. Koch1,2, R. Knispel1, M. Elend1, M. Siese1,2, and C. Zetzsch1,2 1-xylene, hexamethylbenzene, phenol, m-cresol and aniline by observing decays of OH at temperatures where the thermal back work on their degradation mechanism (Jenkin et al., 2003; Bloss et al., 2004). This paper summarises

  1. Development of a technique to screen for resistance to Cercospora sorghi in sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, George Clayton

    1983-01-01

    3338 79HW188 TX2775 Tpl-24-2 R3318 IS3956C IS2930 x IS3922 (SC326-6xSC110-9)x(SC599-6xSC134-6) TP4 selection (SC599-6xSC134-6) (Wx x Gbllg)xSC748-5 (TX2536x72CS794-1)-5-76-2-1-1-1 TAN2566(BTX3197xSC170-6)-20-8- TP1 selection (Wx x Gbllg...) NR4(4606) 79HW207 R1880 IS4884C (BTAN618x(BTX378xSC110-9))xSC599-6 TAN2566(BTX3197xSC170-6)-7-2-1-5-Bk. (TX2536x72CS794-1)-5-78-1-1-2-6 SC599-6xSC134-6 Rox. (SC244) 19 Table 2. Sorghum accessions with resistance to grey leaf spot...

  2. The Practice of Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald C.

    2006-01-01

    for churches and parking lots that replaced buildings onceThe full cost of the parking lot is incurred to serve a fewbuilt have supersize parking lots that are asphalt eyesores,

  3. Rutting and drainage design methodology for a concrete block pavement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poduska, Daryl Jason

    1998-01-01

    Concrete block pavements (CBP) have historically been hics. used in low trafficked applications as an alternative to asphalt and concrete pavement because of their aesthetic quality. However, concrete block pavements have not been used for high...

  4. November, 2014 Beyond Pipes to Watersheds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetland Surface WetlandStormwater Wetland Constructed WetlandPorous AsphaltPervious Concrete Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavers Permeable Interlocking

  5. Thermo-Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic-Viscodamage-Healing Modeling of Bituminous Materials: Theory and Computation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darabi Konartakhteh, Masoud

    2012-10-19

    for bituminous materials and asphalt mixes. The developed thermodynamic-based framework is general and can be applied for constitutive modeling of different materials such as bituminous materials, soft materials, polymers, and biomaterials. This framework...

  6. Economically and Environmentally Informed Policies for Road Resurfacing: Tradeoffs between Costs and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reger, Darren Peter

    2015-01-01

    of a U.S. economic input-output life-cycle assessment model.International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 12(6), 365-input–output life cycle assessment of warm mix asphalt

  7. The effect of carbonation after demolition on the life cycle assessment of pavements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossick, Katelyn M

    2014-01-01

    The high contribution of CO? emissions associated with pavements has driven research to assess the life cycle of concrete versus asphalt structures and to develop a strategy to reduce the carbon footprint. The life cycle ...

  8. Factors affecting binder properties between production and construction and their impact on quality assurance programs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arambula Mercado, Edith

    2002-01-01

    . In Texas, QA testing is done immediately after binder production, regardless of the fact that the material undergoes several storage and transfer processes before it reaches the construction site or hot mix asphalt (HMA) plant. Storage at elevated...

  9. Bioadhesive Alliance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioadhesive Alliance Inc. is a developer and manufacturer of “PiGrid”, bio-based adhesive that is green, low cost, and durable and can be utilized as a substitute to petroleum-based asphalt binder.

  10. A framework for a coarse aggregate classification system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peapully, Srikrishna

    1994-01-01

    Coarse aggregates are the major constituents of concrete or asphalt mixtures and are widely used in various construction purposes. A classification system for these aggregates would provide a systematic means of aggregate identification which could...

  11. Using the Multi-Depth Deflectometer to study pavement response 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, Jamshed Iqbal

    1989-01-01

    GILT NGV IIAN SIAT NIL T NON 101 ~ PATE OP NEASUGEO OEPLECTION 1000 Figure 23. Comparison of measured and calculated surface deflections (40) 44 bottom of an asphalt pavement is justified, provided that the moduli values used is corrected...

  12. Stormwater Management for UMore Park Molly McClung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    from brake dust, oils on asphalt, and pesticides and fertilizer from landscaping. These compounds ground water sources on site. To support the current goals of creating a sustainable, regenerative

  13. Effects of superpave aggregate gradation on permanent deformation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Cerro Grau, Jose

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance, durability, and safety of United States roads, the Strategic Highway Research Program (SHRP) was established by Congress in 1987 as a five year research program. SUPERPAVE[] (Superior Performing Asphalt Pavements...

  14. Advanced Tools For Characterizing HMA Fatigue Resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James Jefferies

    2011-02-22

    Accurately and efficiently characterizing the material properties of hot mix asphalt (HMA) is critical to the design and development of pavements that can experience repeated loading for long periods of time and resist ...

  15. Electronics Lab 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Moisture damage in asphalt mixes refers to the loss of serviceability due to the presence of moisture. The extent of moisture damage, also called moisture susceptibility, depends on internal and external factors. The ...

  16. New Braunfels HTC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The performance of hot mix asphalt, Portland cement concrete, unbound base, and subbase layers in a pavement are significantly affected by aggregate shape characteristics. Classification of coarse and fine aggregate shape ...

  17. Development of methods to quantify bitumen-aggregate adhesion and loss of adhesion due to water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhasin, Amit

    2007-09-17

    reasons. The objective of this research is to develop experimental and analytical tools to characterize important material properties that influence the moisture sensitivity of asphalt mixes. Quality of adhesion between the aggregate and bitumen binder...

  18. IMPROVING MIX DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PERMEABLE FRICTION COURSE MIXTURES 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez Lugo, Allex Eduardo

    2012-02-14

    Permeable friction course (PFC), or new generation open-graded friction course (OGFC) mixtures, are hot mix asphalt (HMA) characterized by high total air voids (AV) content (minimum 18 %) as compared to the most commonly ...

  19. The development of correlations between HMA pavement performance and aggregate shape properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGahan, Jeremy

    2006-04-12

    The physical characteristics of aggregates (form, angularity, and texture) are known to affect the performance of hot mix asphalt (HMA) pavements. Efforts to develop relationships between these aggregate characteristics ...

  20. Evaluation of an alternative bituminous material as a soil stabilizer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong-Rak

    1999-01-01

    . Consequently, development of a new stabilization material, which is environmentally safe and non-flammable, is desired for replacing cutback asphalts. In this study a petroleum-resin-based (PRB) material was tested to investigate its physical and mechanical...

  1. Agents of seed dispersal : animal--zoochary / Wind--anemonochory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lysakowski, Lukasz Kamil, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Agents of seed dispersal is a project designed to address the increase of environmental degradation, which occurs as a result of the perpetual spread of the asphalt and concrete of the contemporary urban situation. Agents ...

  2. 2030 Transportation and Mobility Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi-State Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2006-08-11

    The skid resistance of asphalt pavement is a major characteristic that determines the driving safety on a road, especially under wet surface conditions. Skid resistance is primarily a function of the microtexture and ...

  3. Application of Direct Tension Testing to Field Samples to Investigate the Effects of HMA Aging 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, James 1973-

    2012-08-27

    There are many factors which contribute to fatigue failure in HMA. While studies have been made with respect to binder aging, little has been done to investigate the effect of aging on the fatigue failure of asphalt mixtures. The lack...

  4. DOE Tour of Zero: The School Street Homes by StreetScape Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of 17 The wall moisture control system consists of an asphalt-based, vapor-permeable coating that is painted directly onto the OSB sheathing to provide a weather-resistant...

  5. University of Washington Faculty Council on University Facilities and Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    costs will escalate, driven by rising oil prices and its effect on asphalt · deferred maintenance · loss for the separate trim out space. The lighting upgrade in the Triangle Garage is an ESCO project funded by energy

  6. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aggregates were coated with fine-grained polyethylene, carpet co-product, or cement + styrene butadiene-product, or cement + styrene butadiene rubber latex and used to prepare hot mix asphalt concrete specimens. Only

  7. Effects of aggregate gradation and angularity on VMA and rutting resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Dae-Wook

    2000-01-01

    Specific Gravity of Fine Aggregates. 20 5 FAA Values of Fine Aggregates. 21 6 Design Asphalt Content and VMA Value. . 7 Asphalt Pavement Analyzer (APA) Results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Analysis of Variance ( = 0. 05) for Average... Maximum Size. . . . . 10 2 FAA versus Rut Depth. . 27 3 Mineral Filler Content versus VMA. . 4 VMA During Superpave Volumetric Mix Design Process. . . . . 5 FAA versus VMA at 4 Percent Air Voids. . . . . . . . 39 40 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION GENERAL...

  8. Safety considerations for the use of sulfur in sulfur-modified pavement materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Carolyn Yuriko

    1980-01-01

    Liquid Sulfur Page v111 ix 33 33 35 IV Symptoms of Poisoning . First Aid SULFUR IN THE PAVING INDUSTRY General Sand-Asphalt-Sulfur Pavements (SAS) ', , Sulfur-Extended Asphalt Pavements (SEA) Sulfur Concrete EVALUATION OF RISKS AND SAFETY... RECOMMENDATIONS General Stationary Sources Mobile Sources Maintenance 40 41 43 43 44 45 46 Hot-Mix Recycling VI EMISSIONS MONITORING METHODS General Area Monitoring - Continuous Samplina Short Term Sampling (" Grab" Sampling) Personnel Monitoring...

  9. Doctrina cristiana en lengua misteca 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferná ndez, Benito, 16th cent.

    2010-10-16

    -1 AUTOMATED PROTOCOL FOR ANALYSIS OF DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYZER DATA FROM FINE AGGREGATE ASPHALT MIXES A Thesis by PEDRO CAVALCANTI DE SOUSA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ii AUTOMATED PROTOCOL FOR ANALYSIS OF DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYZER DATA FROM FINE AGGREGATE ASPHALT MIXES A Thesis by PEDRO CAVALCANTI DE...

  10. Economic aspects of black bases in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoen, Wayne Ayron

    1976-01-01

    such that an optimal asphalt content for each aggregate type could be determined. Test method Tex-126-E requires that the 6-inches in diameter by 8-inches in height samples be failed in unconfined compression and from these results an optimum asphalt content... procedure and two would not. The purpose of the vacuum saturation procedure was to determine the effect of water on the black base mixtures. At present, an acceptable national standard vacuum saturation procedure does not exist. Therefore, a test...

  11. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01

    . Lime was added in the pugmill of the batch plant, on the cold feed belt, and through the fines feeder of the drum mix plant. The asphalt and aggregates used were characterized in the laboratory. Asphalt concrete mixture tests included laboratory... Maria Road 14 3 Laboratory Test Program for All Mixtures 17 Process by which Lime Slurry was Added to the Individual Aggregates on the Cold Feed Belt Overall Average Air Void Content of Laboratory Mixed and Compacted Samples 19 27 Resilient...

  12. Site-specific variability in BTEX biodegradation under denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.M. [Geophex, Ltd., Raleigh, NC (United States); Borden, R.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1997-03-01

    Laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and o-xylene (BTEX) biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. Nine different sources of inocula, including contaminated and uncontaminated soil cores from four different sites and activated sludge, were used to establish microcosms. BTEX was not degraded under denitrifying conditions in microcosms inoculated with aquifer material from Rocky Point and Traverse City. However, rapid depletion of glucose under denitrifying conditions was observed in microcosms containing Rocky Point aquifer material. TEX degradation was observed in microcosms containing Rocky Point aquifer material. TEX degradation was observed in microcosms containing aquifer material from Fort Bragg and Sleeping Bear Dunes and sewage sludge. Benzene was recalcitrant in all microcosms tested. The degradation of o-xylene ceased after toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene were depleted in the Fort Bragg and sludge microcosms, but o-xylene continued to degrade in microcosms with contaminated Sleeping Bear Dunes soil. The most probable number (MPN) of denitrifiers in these nine different inocula were measured using a microtiter technique. There was no correlation between the MPN of denitrifiers and the TEX degradation rate under denitrifying conditions. Experimental results indicate that the degradation sequence and TEX degradation rate under denitrifying conditions may differ among sites. Results also indicate that denitrification alone may not be a suitable bioremediation technology for gasoline-contaminated aquifers because of the inability of denitrifiers to degrade benzene.

  13. Flash hydropyrolysis of coal. Quarterly report No. 11, October 1-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.; Bhatt, B.L.

    1980-02-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from this work: (1) when the caking bituminous coals are used with diluents, only 20% Pittsburgh No. 8 coal can be added to the diluent swhile 40% Illinois No. 6 could be added due to the higher free swelling index of the Pittsburgh No. 8; (2) When limestone is used as a diluent, considerably more sulfur is retained in the char than when using sand; (3) when the char from an experiment using limestone is recycled as the diluent for another experiment, the char continually retains additional sulfur through at least three recycles; (4) decomposition of the limestone and reduction is indicated by the high concentrations of CO observed at 900/sup 0/C; (5) increasing the coal feed rate by a factor of 4 from 2.4 to 10.7 lb/hr at low H/sub 2//Coal ratios (approx. = 0.6) results in no appreciable change in gaseous HC yields (approx. = 27%) or concentration (approx. = 45%) but higher BTX yields (1.1% vs. 5.4%); (6) although only one experiment was conducted, it appears that hydrogasification of untreated New Mexico sub-bituminous coal at 950/sup 0/C does not give an increase in yield over hydrogasification at 900/sup 0/C; (7) the hydrogasification of Wyodak lignite gives approximately the same gaseous HC yields as that obtained from North Dakota lignite but higher BTX yields particularly at 900/sup 0/C and 1000 psi (9% vs. 2%); (8) treating New Mexico sub-bituminous coal with NaCO/sub 3/ does not increase its hydrogasification qualities between 600/sup 0/C and 900/sup 0/C at 1000 psi but does decrease the BTX yield.

  14. Factors affecting the porridge quality of sorghum and pearl millet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kante, Assa

    1987-01-01

    kernels were Dorado, SC303, and SC283 with a hardness index of 92. 0X, 91. 3X, and 91. 0X, respectively; the softest cultivar was SC90 (58. 7X). Den- sity was significantly correlated with grain hardness (r=0. 61, Table Bl). Endosperm texture ranged... Presence of Teste Endosperm Textureb Density (gm/cc)c Hardness Indexc Hilling Yieldc 083541 Tx430 CSH63e CSH63d 0265-14 SC170 083541 TAH428 80265 80283 80296 80253 80261 SC90 ATx623 e BTx623 SSS610 ATx623 80605 80303 Dorado...

  15. 2>K SSOOOJ3L RiS-M-267I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in fresh water with 5% TIOA/ xylene extraction for decontamination. E. Holm et al.* deter- mined technetium Extraction at Controlled Valence Qingjiang Chen, A. Aarkrog, Helle Dick, Karen Mandrup Risø National IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION AT CONTROLLED VALENCE Qingjiang Chen, A. aarkrog, Helle Dick, Karen

  16. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlin, DA; Bertolani, SJ; Siegel, JB

    2015-01-01

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  17. Ebeam Resist Processes at ISNCEbeam Resist Processes at ISNC This file includes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    . Integrated Systems Nanofabrication Cleanroom (ISNC), CNSI, UCLA V2.0 Oct.2013 Prepared by: Yuwei Fan #12 Systems Nanofabrication Cleanroom (ISNC), CNSI, UCLA V2.0 Oct.2013 Prepared by: Yuwei Fan #12;PositiveXylene (ZEDWN), 40 secs; IPA rinse, 30secs; N2 blow dry Integrated Systems Nanofabrication Cleanroom (ISNC

  18. PROOF COPY [023113] 008209QEE [023113]008209QEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    facilitate the migration of pre-existing contamination. MTBE 25 mg/L influent was not degraded keywords: Anaerobic processes; Ground water; Oxygenation; Biodegradation. Introduction Monoaromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, toluene, ethylben- zene, and the three isomers of xylene BTEX are ubiquitous

  19. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Dec. 2008, p. 73137320 Vol. 74, No. 23 0099-2240/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.01695-08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Jin-Woo

    of their high solubility in water relative to that of other petroleum hydrocarbons, these compounds account-, and p-xylene (BTEX) compounds, was isolated by plating gasoline-contaminated sediment from a gasoline that strain BD-a59 has the potential to assist in BTEX biodegradation at contaminated sites. A considerable

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER J. Fang M. J. Barcelona P. J. J. Alvarez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    , and xylenes (BTEX) are common envi- ronmental contaminants that represent a serious threat to ground water resources and to public health (Turs- man and Cork 1992). ``Bioremediation'' is the overall term applied processes. Engineered bioremediation and monitored natural attenuation hold great promise as an approach

  1. Supporting Information Direct measurements of electric fields in weak OH hydrogen bonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    ). Methanol-d4 (99.6%) was ordered from Acros Organics (Geel, Belgium). Dry phenol was dissolved under nitrogen atmosphere in different substituted anhydrous liquid benzene derivatives to form phenol/aromatic as electron-donating groups were toluene, para- xylene and mesitylene. To form weaker phenol/aromatic

  2. Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Vapors in Biotrickling Filters. 1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    byproducts in either the gas or the liquid phase. They also exhibited a very high specific degradation and leaking pipe- lines. In the past few years, several studies have been conducted to determine if natural, ethyl benzene, and xylene (BTEX) plumes, with in most cases no clear signs of natural attenuation (2

  3. The Fecal Microbiome in Cats with Diarrhea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suchodolski, Jan S.; Foster, Mary L.; Sohail, Muhammad U.; Leutenegger, Christian; Queen, Erica V.; Steiner, Jö rg M.; Marks, Stanley L.

    2015-05-19

    = 0.034), gly- cerolipid metabolism (p = 0.013), biodegradation of xenobiotics (p = 0.044), caprolactam deg- radation (p = 0.025), dioxin degradation (p = 0.008), and xylene degradation (p = 0.006). In contrast, decreased in diarrhea were genes for RNA...

  4. Unusual Function of Modified Polyolefins for Manipulating Magnetic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    (CO)5 or Co2(CO)8] in the presence of PP-g-MA in solvent xylene. By simply changing the backbone length. Among many developed approaches (high-temperature reduction, evapo- ration­condensation, melting-dependent physicochemical properties. The morphology (size and shape) control of magnetic NPs by many small molecular

  5. ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH AND SAFETY ACRONYMS AFRD Accelerator and Fusion Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    of Energy Lab Accreditation Program DOT Department of Transportation (Federal Agency) DSC Department benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene CAA Clean Air Act CARB California Air Resources Board CCCSD Advisory Commission CEQA California Environmental Quality Act of 1970 CERCLA Comprehensive Environmental

  6. Vol. 57, No. 10APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 1991, p. 2981-2985 0099-2240/91/102981-05$02.00/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    an oil refinery settling pond was inhibited by phenol, a more easily degradable substrate (15). In other the degradation of monosubstituted phenols by a mixed microbial community from a mesotrophic reservoir (18-Xylene during Microbial Degradation by Pure Cultures and Mixed Culture Aquifer Slurries PEDRO J. J. ALVAREZ

  7. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-2240/98/$04.00 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    oxidizes toluene and o-xylene, was examined for its ability to degrade the environmental pollutants, phenol, 2,4-dichlo- rophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and 2,3,4,5,6-pentachloro- phenol. Escherichia coli JM109 that expressed ToMO from genes on plasmid p

  8. QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 QUANTIFYING NON-POINT SOURCES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN STORMWATER FROM A PARKING LOT (VOCs) in stormwater from an asphalt parking lot without obvious point sources (e.g. gasoline stations). The parking lot surface and atmosphere are important non-point sources of VOCs, with each being important

  9. Energy sources for a secure (?) and clean (?) energy future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    -energy: ­ Pesticides ­ Plastics ­ Cosmetics ­ Asphalt Source: IEA, Key World Energy Statistics, 2006 #12;Oil production;Other issues · Changes in the oil market: ­ Heavy-sour crude replacing light-sweet crude ­ Exploration Dalhousie University http://lh.ece.dal.ca/enen #12;Why all the fuss over oil? Oil 34.3% Coal 25.1% Natural

  10. Revision 5/05/15 YES NO NO NO NO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    for the purpose of subsequent transfer to another solid waste management facility. Are Lab Results for TCLP1 Above" and unadultered wood, asphalt pavement, brick, concrete, masonary waste, soil or rocks. Waste Management Flowchart&D Landfill: Can accept and dispose of only C&D waste Can accept and dispose of C&D and other solid wastes

  11. COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, William F.

    ABSTRACT COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect of porous concrete (PC), two types of permeable interlocking concrete pavers (PICP) with gravel fill significantly lower outflow volumes than #12;asphalt and the other permeable pavement sections evaluated (p

  12. Characterization of a combined release of LNAPLs and DNAPLs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, W. )

    1993-10-01

    The subject of this investigation concerns a large quantity, subsurface release of an asphalt paint. The asphalt paint consisted of a mixture of asphalt (cut-back) and a commercial solvent that is 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) based. The TCA appeared in the aquifer as a dense, nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), and the balance of the material in the asphalt paint mixture appeared as light, nonaqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs). The site is located within a manufacturing facility which has been in operation since the late 1900s. There has been extensive development at the site, with attendant renovations and demolition of prior structures and placement of fill material, which has changed the natural surface soil conditions and complicated the local ground-water flow patterns. The complexity of the geology and hydrogeology of the site as well as the extent of the contaminant plume migration further complicated the site investigation. The investigation consisted of several elements: (A) Soil/Gas/Vapor Survey; (B) Surface-Water Sampling; (C) Deep and Shallow Cluster Drilling, Ground-Water Monitoring Well Installation, and Sampling; and (D) Ground-Water Flow and Transport Modeling.

  13. Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Asphalt Pavements through Developing a Predictive Model with Fundamental Material Properties August 2009 6 Drucker-Prager yield surface and plastic potential that is modified to capture the distinction between Model with Fundamental Material Properties by Rashid K. Abu Al-Rub Zachry Department of Civil

  14. ROOFING PROJECT ODORS How Can EHS Help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    ROOFING PROJECT ODORS How Can EHS Help? We can work with occupants to act as a liaison with Facili- ties Management and the contractor to identify ways to reduce odors. Contact us at 491­ 6745. Roof work is a necessary part of building preservation. Roofing odors are generated during these projects when hot asphalt

  15. Wet-Weather Pollution from Commonly-Used Building Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    .4) 100 (1.1) 99 (2.6) Freeways (185 events) 1.4 (0.5) 60 (1.2) 78 (1.5) Industrial (518 events) 1.6 (0 · Membrane/rubberized roofing · Cedar shingles · Faux slate shingles (made from recycled materials Distillate PenetrexTM (penetrating oil) · Silver Dollar Fibered Aluminum Roof Coating Aluminum Flakes Asphalt

  16. Long-term Water Balance Monitoring of Engineered Covers for Waste Containment Robert C. Reedy1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlon, Bridget R.

    was excavated to a depth of approximately 3.5 m and sequentially backfilled in nominal 0.15-m lifts with soil. The two designs are separated at the ground surface by a drainage ridgeline and in the subsurface components of the water balance include precipitation, surface runoff, lateral drainage from the asphalt

  17. Society for Range Management and Weed Science Society of America, "Working landscapes providing for the future", February 711 2010, Denver, Colorado. p80.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    , and Balbach H Dispersal of plant propagules by vehicles. Secondary dispersal of plant propagules by vehicles is generally perceived to be important in the spread of invasive species, though with only to vehicles will depend on a number of factors including type of ground surface (asphalt, gravel, or unpaved

  18. Montana Weed Control Association Annual Meeting. January 11th 2011, Great Falls, MT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Seed movement by vehicles: how many, how far, and under what conditions? Movement of seeds by vehicles is generally thought to increase the spread of invasive plant species, but few studies have vehicles when driven a range of distances on different surfaces (asphalt, unpaved and offroad) under wet

  19. Conservation of Heat Energy at Hot Petroleum Products Terminals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, J. C.; Graham, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Exxon operates several terminals which store asphalt and heavy fuel oil. Due to the rising cost of fuels, Exxon initiated a study to identify economic investments which would reduce the fuel needed to heat these products. First, fuel usage at four...

  20. TTCC/NCC Fall Meeting October 6-8, 2009 St. Louis, MO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2; cement is #8 of major contributors · Needed infrastructural renewal, cost of asphalt (5b-Poppoff) · Canadian GHG legislation previously mandated a 18% reduction in CO2 emissions final limit requirement...based on a clinker or cement baseline (MT/MT or BTU/MT). · Process CO2

  1. Lake Worth Inlet Palm Beach Harbor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    and Environmental Impact Statement (FR/EIS). The Battelle IEPR panel reviewed the Draft FR/EIS, as well. Clarification of the materials categorized as cement and cement materials was added to Sections 4.2, 4.2.2, 4 and recent rates was added to Section 4.2.3. Clarification on the grouping of asphalt, fuel oil

  2. Worldwide refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, M.

    1994-12-19

    The paper consists of several tables compiling data on refinery capacities by country, by state, and by company. The capacity data are given by process as well as by final product. Processes include vacuum distillation, thermal operations, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, catalytic hydrocracking, catalytic hydrorefining, and catalytic hydrotreating. Products include alkylates, polymers, and dimers; aromatics and isomers; oxygenates; hydrogen; asphalts; and coke.

  3. 1996 worldwide refining survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-23

    Data are presented on the capacity of refineries for the following processes: vacuum distillation, coking, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, catalytic hydrocracking, catalytic hydrorefining, and catalytic hydrotreating. Production capacities are also noted for alkylation, polymerization/dimerization, aromatics, isomerization, lubricants, oxygenates, hydrogen, coke, sulfur, and asphalts. Country totals are given, as well as the data for individual companies within each country, state, or province.

  4. Worldwide refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-18

    Data are presented on refining capacity by country and by company within each country. Capacity data are divided into the following processes: vacuum distillation, thermal operations, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, catalytic hydrocracking, catalytic hydrorefining, and catalytic hydrotreating. Production capacity is divided into: alkylation/polymerization/dimerization; aromatics/isomerization; lubricants; oxygenates; hydrogen; petroleum coke; and asphalts.

  5. Lignite pellets and methods of agglomerating or pelletizing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Albert F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Blaustein, Eric W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Deurbrouck, Albert W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Garvin, John P. (Pittsburgh, PA); McKeever, Robert E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01

    The specification discloses lignite pellets which are relatively hard, dust resistant, of generally uniform size and free from spontaneous ignition and general degradation. Also disclosed are methods for making such pellets which involve crushing as mined lignite, mixing said lignite with a binder such as asphalt, forming the lignite binder mixture into pellets, and drying the pellets.

  6. COARSE AGGREGATE FOR COMPOSITE PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT Effective: January 30, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specifications: "(g) Recycled Coarse Aggregate (RCA). If recycled coarse aggregate is specified for use in a concrete mix design, the recycled coarse aggregate will be generated from a Tollway approved source of existing concrete or asphalt pavement. The recycled coarse aggregate may be processed from a non

  7. Multiscale Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Flows in Inelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Peter

    in porous media (e.g. soil), Elasticity equations in heterogeneous media (concrete, asphalt), etc permeability K = 0.0045 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0025 0.0000 0.0000 0.0000 0.0043 #12;- p. 8/42 Nonlinear

  8. CX-012380: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Establishment of a MOX Laydown Yard in an Existing Asphalt Parking Lot South of Building 782-3A CX(s) Applied: B1.15 Date: 05/22/2014 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  9. 1. Report No. SWUTC/13/600451-00019-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1. Report No. SWUTC/13/600451-00019-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle FATIGUE RESISTANCE OF ASPHALT MIXTURES AFFECTED BY WATER VAPOR MOVEMENT 5. Report of predicting and quantifying the amount of water that can enter into a pavement system by vapor transport

  10. Short Elliott Hendrickson Inc., 3535 Vadnais Center Drive, St. Paul, MN 55110-5196 SEH is an equal opportunity employer | www.sehinc.com | 651.490.2000 | 800.325.2055 | 651.490.2150 fax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    , 2009 UMore Air Quality Impact Study Projected Air Quality Impacts from Concrete and Asphalt Plants an Air Quality Impact Study to assess the air quality impacts associated with the project. The Air for the project and identified issues and alternatives to be examined in depth in the EIS. Air quality impacts

  11. Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on The application of permeable pavement with emphasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Project Information Form Project Title White Paper on The application of permeable pavement Project Depending on the type of surface pavement, permeable pavement can be termed as porous asphalt, pervious concrete, or interlocking concrete pavers. Because of their ability to reduce runoff volume

  12. Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea-sured and modeled data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequency dependent elastic properties and attenuation in heavy-oil sands: comparison between mea) properties of heavy-oil sands over a range of frequencies (2 - 2000Hz) covering the seismic bandwidth and at ultrasonic frequencies (0.8MHz). The measurements were carried on heavy-oil sand sample from Asphalt Ridge

  13. Evaluation of infiltration in layered pavements using surface GPR reflection techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Evaluation of infiltration in layered pavements using surface GPR reflection techniques K. Grotea and guiding pavement maintenance, is greatly influenced by soil water content. In this study, ground content in sub-asphalt aggregate layers during an extended infiltration experiment. Water was injected

  14. Supplementary material: The role of vegetation in the CO2 flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Norford1 1 Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), Center for Environmental Sensing or asphalt. Figure S2. Cumulative probability density distribution of height of trees and buildings within height of trees and buildings. 80% of the trees and buildings have heights below 9.8 and 12.8 m

  15. Eshan V. Dave,1 Andrew F. Braham,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    . KEYWORDS: indirect tensile test, creep test, tensile strength test, viscoelasticity, finite element creep and strength properties of asphalt con- crete mixtures [2,3] in indirect tension. The test in AASHTO T322. Both properties are measured on the same sample, with the non-destructive creep test run

  16. 1 INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION The Indirect Tension Test is frequently used in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Highway Research Program (SHRP), in the mid-1990's, a test protocol was developed for evaluating creep on the same sample, with the non-destructive creep test run before the destructive strength test Tension Test (IDT) is frequently used for evaluation of asphalt material viscoelas- tic creep properties

  17. Automated speed enforcement study finds public support in Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    -temperature cracking than current methods that examine creep and strength properties. After using the DCT test professor Mihai Marasteanu has been working to develop new testing methods and specification criteria, the research team developed a new test for asphalt mixtures based on fracture mechanics principles. The test

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Other Petroleum Products Consumption Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The other petroleum product consumption module of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) model is designed to provide U.S. consumption forecasts for 6 petroleum product categories: asphalt and road oil, petrochemical feedstocks, petroleum coke, refinery still gas, unfinished oils, and other miscvellaneous products

  19. Variations in the structure of aromatic solvents under the influence of microadditives of the C{sub 60} fullerene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, B. M. Tuichiev, Sh.

    2007-02-15

    The structural ordering of aromatic solvents is investigated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the degree of structural ordering of aromatic solvents at room temperature decreases in the following sequence: benzene, toluene, and n-xylene. The introduction of the C{sub 60} fullerene ({approx}0.001%) into these solvents leads to an increase in the degree of their ordering. Upon introduction of the fullerene, the degree of structural ordering increases significantly in n-xylene and only slightly in toluene and remains virtually unchanged in benzene. An analysis of the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of C{sub 60} fullerene solutions in benzene likewise demonstrates that the introduction of the fullerene into benzene leads to an insignificant change in the degree of structural ordering of this solvent. The specific features of the structure and behavior of benzene upon interaction with C{sub 60} fullerene additives are discussed.

  20. Ecological Interactions Between Metals and Microbes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopka, Allan E.

    2004-06-01

    Analyses of chromium resistant microbes. Culturable xylene-degrading and chromate-resistant microbes were obtained from chronically cocontaminated soil using a microcosm enrichment technique, and shown to correlate to dominant soil populations using culture independent techniques. The soil microbial community proved able to mount a respiratory response to addition of xylene in the presence of chromate. The majority of isolates belonged to the ubiquitous but poorly studied high %G+C Gram positive genus Arthrobacter, and exhibited considerable genotypic and phenotypic variability. Phenotypic assays uncovered a wide variation in the levels of chromate resistance, even between very closely related strains. Primers designed against conserved motifs in the known chrA chromate efflux gene failed to detect similar sequences among the chromate resistant Arthrobacter isolates obtained through enrichment.

  1. Process for hydrocracking carbonaceous material to provide fuels or chemical feed stock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Dennis A. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A process is disclosed for hydrocracking coal or other carbonaceous material to produce various aromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, toluene, xylene, ethylbenzene, phenol and cresols in variable relative concentrations while maintaining a near constant maximum temperature. Variations in relative aromatic concentrations are achieved by changing the kinetic severity of the hydrocracking reaction by altering the temperature profile up to and quenching from the final hydrocracking temperature. The relative concentration of benzene to the alkyl and hydroxyl aromatics is increased by imposing increased kinetic severity above that corresponding to constant heating rate followed by immediate quenching at about the same rate to below the temperature at which dehydroxylation and dealkylation reactions appreciably occur. Similarly phenols, cresols and xylenes are produced in enhanced concentrations by adjusting the temperature profile to provide a reduced kinetic severity relative to that employed when high benzene concentrations are desired. These variations in concentrations can be used to produce desired materials for chemical feed stocks or for fuels.

  2. Sorption of selected volatile organic constituents of jet fuels and solvents on natural sorbents from gas and solutions phases. Final report, April 1985-September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, P.S.; Rhue, R.D.; Johnson, C.T.; Oguada, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    Sorption of selected volatile organic constituents (VOC) of jet fuels and solvents on several natural sorbents from the gas and aqueous phases was investigated. The sorbates studied were: trans-1,2-dichloroethylene; 1,2-dichloroethane; trichloroethylene; 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane; toluene; ethylbenzene; p-xylene; o-xylene; and cyclohexane. The sorbents used included clays (kaolin, montmorillonite, SAz-1), soils (Webster and Oldsmar), and aquifer materials (Borden and Lula). Sorption from the vapor phase was studied using three techniques; the headspace analysis method, dynamic-flow method, and a gas chromatographic method. Sorption of VOC on anhydrous sorbents and sorbents in equilibrium with water at different relative humidities was examined. The energetics of sorption were characterized by measuring VOC sorption at several temperatures.

  3. Fate and Transport of Polymeric Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Jonathan Edward

    2015-08-11

    to contaminants which have high vapor pressure and low water solubility. Similarly to bioremediation, these systems can also take years to achieve endpoint goals 37. 2.2.4. Sorption Media Sorption media are typically employed in either a pump and treat system... in the pore water velocity of m-xylene(aq) and MSCKs .... 51 ix LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Common ENP size distribution ………………………...……….. 4 2 Particle transport models ……………………………..…………. 21 3 Properties of Texas Gold sand…………………………………… 22 4...

  4. Aromatics Extraction Plant Design Using Synthesis Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R. J.; Nedwick, R.

    1987-01-01

    and condenser duties and temperatures and estimating the traffic and number of trays in each column to estimate its capital cost. APPUCATION TO THE SPECIFIC DESIGN A new plant was designed to produce benzene, toluene, and xylene by extraction... to extract an aromatics stream from a C 6 -C o heart cut of hydrogenated pyrolysis gasoline, leaving a raffinate containing paraffins and naphthenes. The Distillation Section distills the aromatics stream into high purity benzene, toluene, and Co...

  5. Crosslinked Polybenzimidazole Membrane For Gas Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Young, Jennifer S. (Los Alamos, NM); Espinoza, Brent F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-09-20

    A cross-linked, supported polybenzimidazole membrane for gas separation is prepared by layering a solution of polybenzimidazole (PBI) and a,a'dibromo-p-xylene onto a porous support and evaporating solvent. A supported membrane of cross-linked poly-2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole unexpectedly exhibits an enhanced gas permeability compared to the non-cross linked analog at temperatures over 265° C.

  6. Regional Multiple Pathology Scores Are Associated with Cognitive Decline in Lewy Body Dementias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlett, David R.; Whitfield, David; Johnson, Mary; Attems, Johannes; O’Brien, John T.; Aarsland, Dag; Lai, Mitchell K. P.; Lee, Jasinda H.; Chen, Christopher; Ballard, Clive; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Francis, Paul T.

    2014-10-30

    of neuropathology was undertaken by standard protocols. Briefly, sections were dewaxed and rehydrated through xylene and descending concentrations of alcohol into water. For A? and phosphotau, antigen retrieval was carried out by either immersion in 98% formic acid... , Hansen LA, Jeste DV, Galasko D, Hofstetter CR, Ho GJ et al (2003) Influence of Alzheimer pathology on clinical diagnostic accuracy in dementia with Lewy bodies. Neurology 60:1586–1590. 37. Mirra SS, Hart MN, Terry RD (1993) Making the diagnosis...

  7. Studies of thin films and surfaces with optical harmonic generation and electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilk, D.E.

    1996-01-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum frequency generation (SFG) were used to study C{sup 60} thin solid films (low energy ED forbidden electronic excitations), and electron spectroscopy was used to study organic overlayers (xylenes) on Pt(111). Theory of SHG from a thin film is described in terms of surface and bulk contributions as well as local and nonlocal contributions to the optical nonlinearities. (1)In situ SHG data on C{sub 60} films during UHV film growth can be described in terms of only nonlocal contributions to both surface and bulk nonlinear susceptibilities. Microscopic origin of SHG response is discussed in terms of electric quadrupole and ED transitions of C{sub 60}. (2)Adsorption and thermal decomposition of ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111) is studied using HREELS, LEED, AES, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. We have observed preferential decomposition of the methyl groups which leads to distinct decomposition pathways for ortho- and para-xylene on Pt(111).

  8. Design, construction, and service behavior of selected pavements in district 17 of the Texas Highway Department 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Robert Eugene

    1962-01-01

    The' ~c aches%emoter value fcr the ~~ns tsetse one 74o the apphalt. r~ meed 43uw3ng. ccnstrnctkont Asphalt content cas" gram hi5 4 5+C ~sni. by' ~t sn6 4hc percent' of ~ahs retained, cn Thc si33L&cae ns5nre cf hhe ~ats pins the relativelp 1 asphalt...::rASM-TO~ NAEK@, gN- Hf-' ~MES--AMD ~4', CQUETXES=-=. -'-'-- . , ' A~, Gesijn of, Fern to~bet FQ8 fn Bnrgesen sad &1@An . '. Q, s~ "censtreeQ. on Metes sn6 'JotI Gon'tro3, Tesg~ en'Fete-. '55 te;VMke@ C~' 'Serrfes Mxjirfer of. Fern tm-Merit 5GS...

  9. Grounding electrode and method of reducing the electrical resistance of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koehmstedt, Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    1980-01-01

    A first solution of an electrolyte is injected underground into a volume of soil having negative surface charges on its particles. A cationic surfactant suspended in this solution neutralizes these surface charges of the soil particles within the volume. Following the first solution, a cationic asphalt emulsion suspended in a second solution is injected into the volume. The asphalt emulsion diffuses through the volume and electrostatically bonds with additional soil surrounding the volume such that an electrically conductive water repellant shell enclosing the volume is formed. This shell prevents the leaching of electrolyte from the volume into the additional soil. The second solution also contains a dissolved deliquescent salt which draws water into the volume prior to the formation of the shell. When electrically connected to an electrical installation such as a power line tower, the volume constitutes a grounding electrode for the tower.

  10. Geothermal Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachman, Gary

    2015-07-28

    The Cleary University Geothermal Energy Retrofit project involved: 1. A thermal conductivity test; 2. Assessment of alternative horizontal and vertical ground heat exchanger options; 3. System design; 4. Asphalt was stripped from adjacent parking areas and a vertical geothermal ground heat exchanger system installed; 5. the ground heat exchanger was connected to building; 6. a system including 18 heat pumps, control systems, a manifold and pumps, piping for fluid transfer and ductwork for conditioned air were installed throughout the building.

  11. Evaluation of tire pressure, tire construction, axle configuration, and axle load on flexible pavement performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamy, Ahmad Najeeb

    1991-01-01

    as to style and content by: obe L. Lytton (Ch ' of Committee) mm el G. Fernando (Member) 01 a J Pendleton (Member) J es T. P. Yao (Head of Department) August 1991 ABSTRACT Evaluation of Tire Pressure, Tire Construction, Axle Configuration, and Axle...=triple) Tire = number of tires ( 1=single, 2=dual) Es = subgrade modulus (psi) asphalt concrete thickness (inches) tire inflation pressure (psi) MODEL SELECTION NETHOD Multiple regression analysis was done on SAS. The maximum R' (squared 24...

  12. Worldwide refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, L.

    1993-12-20

    The paper presents compiled data on operating refineries worldwide by country and by company within these countries. Data are presented on charge capacity for the following processes: vacuum distillation, thermal operations, catalytic cracking, catalytic reforming, cat-hydrocracking, cat hydrorefining, and cat hydrotreating. Data are also presented on the production capacity for the following products: alkylates and polymers, aromatics and isomers, lubricating oils, asphalt, hydrogen, and coke.

  13. TEX-A-SYST: Reducing the Risk of Ground Water Contamination by Improving Petroleum Product Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bill L.; Hoffman, D.; Mazac Jr., F. J.; Kantor, A. S.

    1997-08-29

    and cathodically protected. Monitoring Tanks Regulations for new underground tanks require that they have a method of detecting leaks. Select the tank location carefully to ensure that installation is easy and leak detec- tion methods reliable. Test the tank.../corrosion with cathodic corro- 15 years old, coated or more years old. or more years old. protection sion protection. with paint or asphalt. Bare steel tank less than 15 years old. Spill and tank over- Impermeable catch Impermeable catch Impermeable catch No protection...

  14. Utilization of ash from municipal solid waste combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, C.; Hahn, J.; Magee, B.; Yuen, N.; Sandefur, K.; Tom, J.; Yap, C.

    1999-09-01

    This ash study investigated the beneficial use of municipal waste combustion combined ash from the H-POWER facility in Oahu. These uses were grouped into intermediate cover for final closure of the Waipahu landfill, daily cover at the Waimanalo Gulch Landfill, and partial replacement for aggregate in asphalt for road paving. All proposed uses examine combined fly and bottom ash from a modern waste-to-energy facility that meets requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments for Maximum Achievable Control Technology.

  15. Cost of radon-barrier systems for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    This report deals specifically with the cost of three types of radon barrier systems, earthen covers, asphalt emulsion covers, and multilayer covers, which could meet standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency to stabilize uranium mill tailings located primarily in the western US. In addition, the report includes a sensitivity analysis of various factors which significantly effect the overall cost of the three systems. These analyses were based on a generic disposal site. Four different 3m thick earthen covers were tested and cost an average of $27/m/sup 2/. The least expensive earthen cover cost was about $21/m/sup 2/. The asphalt cover system (6 to 7 cm of asphalt topped with 0.6m of overburden) cost about $28/m/sup 2/. The four multilayer covers averaged $57/m/sup 2/, but materials handling problems encountered during the test inflated this cost above what was anticipated and significant cost reductions should be possible. The least expensive multilayer cover cost $43/m/sup 2/. Based on the results of the Grand Junction field test we estimated the cost of covering the tailings from three high priority sites, Durango, Shiprock, and Salt Lake City (Vitro). The cost of a 3m earthen cover ranged from $18 to 33/m/sup 2/ for the seven disposal sites (two or three at each location) studied. The cost of asphalt cover systems were $23 to 28/m/sup 2/ and the multilayer cover costs were between $31 to 36/m/sup 2/. The earthen cover costs are less than the Grand Junction field test cost primarily because cover material is available at or near most of the disposal sites selected. Earthen material was imported from 6 to 10 miles for the field test. Assuming more efficienct utilization of materials significantly reduced the cost of the multilayer covers.

  16. Editorial Manager(tm) for Journal of Environmental Engineering Manuscript Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development designs. Peak flows were reduced by 90% to 0.58 m3/sec/km2 +/- 0.74 in comparison with standard 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 1 Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Stormwater Treatment Strategy in a Cold Climate Robert M. Roseen M.ASCE 1 , Thomas P

  17. -A Science Service Feature 7 VHYTHEI'rrEATHER 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    apart from the ice storm. Just as warm rain f a l l i n g on a sidewalk may leave its surface dry, so, too, chilled rain may f a l l 011 brick or asphalt without wetting it, evaporates the raindrops converted i n t o i c e . In the one case the hot surface In the other, rain,cooled be- Some snowstorms

  18. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  19. The Effects of Infrared-Blocking Pigments and Deck Venting on Stone-Coated Metal Residential Roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Field data show that stone-coated metal shakes and S-mission tile, which exploit the use of infraredblocking color pigments (IrBCPs), along with underside venting reduce the heat flow penetrating the conditioned space of a residence by 70% compared with the amount of heat flow penetrating roofs with conventional asphalt shingles. Stone-coated metal roof products are typically placed on battens and counter-battens and nailed through the battens to the roof deck. The design provides venting on the underside of the metal roof that reduces the heat flow penetrating a home. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) and its affiliate members installed stone-coated metal roofs with shake and S-mission tile profiles and a painted metal shake roof on a fully instrumented attic test assembly at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Measurements of roof, deck, attic, and ceiling temperatures; heat flows; solar reflectance; thermal emittance; and ambient weather were recorded for each of the test roofs and also for an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and direct nailed asphalt shingle roof. All attic assemblies had ridge and soffit venting; the ridge was open to the underside of the stone-coated metal roofs. A control assembly with a conventional asphalt shingle roof was used for comparing deck and ceiling heat transfer rates.

  20. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikowski, L.; Mauro, G.; Bird, M.; Karten, B.; Asaoka, S.; Wu, Q.; Cook, A. R.; Miller, J.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  1. Effect of oxygen compounds addition on the hydrocracking of coal derived liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Yoshiki; Kodera, Yoichi; Kamo, Tohru; Kushiyama, Satoshi [National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Hydrocarbon Research Lab.

    1998-12-31

    Coal derived liquid from liquefaction, coking and low temperature pyrolysis contains considerable amounts of alkylphenols with alkylbenzenes and alkylnaphthalenes. To produce and purify useful chemicals from coal-derived liquid, hydrocracking and hydrotreating of alkylphenol mixture is a very important process. In this study the effects of oxygen compounds such as dimethylcarbonate (DMC) addition on the hydrocracking of alkylphenols and coal-derived liquid were investigated to decrease hydrogen consumption due to the production of water from the removal of OH group. From the hydrocracking of 3,5-dimethylphenol (3,5-DMP) without DMC at 700 C, residence time of 3--10 sec under hydrogen-to-reactant molar ratio of more than 10 using atmospheric flow apparatus with quartz reactor, m-xylene and m-cresol were produced with the production ratio of 1:1.8. However the dehydroxylation to produce m-xylene was decreased by the addition of 10% DMC with the 50% increased production ratio of 1:2.7. These are considered due to the strong interaction between OH group and DMC. Similar reaction behavior was observed in the hydrocracking of 2,5-DMP and the production ratio of (o-cresol + m-cresol)/p-xylene slightly increased from 3.0 to 3.5 by the addition of DMC. On the other hand, the products distribution did not change with and without DMC in the case of 2,6-DMP. This indicates the interaction is hindered by steric effect by the neighboring CH{sub 3} group. The effect of other oxygen compounds on the hydrocracking and the products distribution from the hydrocracking of coal-derived liquids is also discussed.

  2. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore »large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  3. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  4. Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poa, D.S.

    1984-02-16

    A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

  5. Characterizing a fast-response, low-afterglow liquid scintillator for neutron time-of-flight diagnostics in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, Y. Hosoda, H.; Arikawa, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Iwasa, Y.; Iwano, K.; Yamanoi, K.; Fujioka, S.; Nakai, M.; Sarukura, N.; Shiraga, H.; Norimatsu, T.; Azechi, H.

    2014-11-15

    The characteristics of oxygen-enriched liquid scintillators with very low afterglow are investigated and optimized for application to a single-hit neutron spectrometer for fast ignition experiments. It is found that 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene has better characteristics as a liquid scintillator solvent than the conventional solvent, p-xylene. In addition, a benzophenon-doped BBQ liquid scintillator is shown to demonstrate very rapid time response, and therefore has potential for further use in neutron diagnostics with fast time resolution.

  6. Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poa, David S. (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1985-01-01

    A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

  7. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C.; Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    2012-10-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  8. Selective hydrocracking of raffinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shipikin, V.V.; Georgievskii, V.Yu.

    1987-05-01

    The most acceptable method for processing raffinates to improve their antiknock properties is selective hydrocracking. As a result of selective cracking of the straight-chain paraffinic hydrocarbons present in raffinates, an octane number gain of 15-20 may be achieved. The authors list certain process indexes for selective hydrocracking of 62-105/sup 0/C cut (benzene-toluene) and 105-140/sup 0/C cut (xylene). It is shown that the improvement of the antiknock properties of raffinates by selective hydrocracking may change the structure of automotive gasoline production quite substantially.

  9. Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

  10. Manufacture of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal hydrogenation products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.S. Maloletnev; M.A. Gyul'malieva [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    The manufacture of aromatic hydrocarbons from coal distillates was experimentally studied. A flow chart for the production of benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes was designed, which comprised the hydrogen treatment of the total wide-cut (or preliminarily dephenolized) fraction with FBP 425{sup o}C; fractional distillation of the hydrotreated products into IBP-60, 60-180, 180-300, and 300-425{sup o}C fractions; the hydro-cracking of middle fractions for increasing the yield of gasoline fractions whenever necessary; the catalytic reform of the fractions with bp up to 180{sup o}C; and the extraction of aromatic hydrocarbons.

  11. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  12. Characterization of polyxylylenes with solid state {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D.A.; Loy, D.A.; Assink, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Polyxylylenes are an important class of thermoplastics that are readily prepared by thermolysis of [2.2]paracyclophane or xylene precursors to afford xylylene monomers that condense and polymerize on solid surfaces to give polymer films. As most polyxylylenes are insoluble due to a high degree of crystallinity, characterization by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques is necessary. In this paper we describe the preparation of polyxylylene, poly-2-ethylxylylene, poly-2-chloroxylylene, poly-2, 3-dichloroxylylene, and poly({alpha}, {alpha}, {alpha}{prime}, {alpha}{prime}-tetrafluoroxylylene) and their characterization using solid state {sup 13}C Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP MAS NMR) spectroscopy.

  13. Long period grating refractive-index sensor: optimal design for single wavelength interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Amita; Sharma, Enakshi K.

    2009-11-01

    We report the design criteria for the use of long period gratings (LPGs) as refractive-index sensors with output power at a single interrogating wavelength as the measurement parameter. The design gives maximum sensitivity in a given refractive-index range when the interrogating wavelength is fixed. Use of the design criteria is illustrated by the design of refractive-index sensors for specific application to refractive-index variation of a sugar solution with a concentration and detection of mole fraction of xylene in heptane (paraffin).

  14. Tertiary recycling of PVC-containing plastic waste by copyrolysis with cattle manure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duangchan, Apinya [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kasetsart University, 50 Paholyotin Road, Ladyao Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: fengapd@ku.ac.th; Samart, Chanatip [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kasetsart University, 50 Paholyotin Road, Ladyao Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2008-11-15

    The corrosion from pyrolysis of PVC in plastic waste was reduced by copyrolysis of PVC with cattle manure. The optimization of pyrolysis conditions between PVC and cattle manure was studied via a statistical method, the Box-Behnken model. The pyrolysis reaction was operated in a tubular reactor. Heating rate, reaction temperature and the PVC:cattle manure ratio were optimized in the range of 1-5 deg. C/min, 250-450 deg. C and the ratio of 1:1-1:5, respectively. The suitable conditions which provided the highest HCl reduction efficiency were the lowest heating rate of 1 deg. C/min, the highest reaction temperature of 450 deg. C, and the PVC:cattle manure ratio of 1:5, with reliability of more than 90%. The copyrolysis of the mixture of PVC-containing plastic and cattle manure was operated at optimized conditions and the synergistic effect was studied on product yields. The presence of manure decreased the oil yield by about 17%. The distillation fractions of oil at various boiling points from both the presence and absence of manure were comparable. The BTX concentration decreased rapidly when manure was present and the chlorinated hydrocarbon was reduced by 45%. However, the octane number of the gasoline fraction was not affected by manure and was in the range of 99-100.

  15. Chemi-microbial processing of waste tire rubber: A project overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romine, R.A.; Snowden-Swan, L.

    1993-12-01

    PNL is developing a method to use thiophillic microorganisms to devulcanize (biodesulfurize) the surface of ground rubber particles, which will improve the bonding and adhesion of the ground tire rubber into the virgin tire rubber matrix. The Chemi-microbial processing approach, introduced in this paper, is targeted at alleviating the waste tire problem in an environmentally conscious manner; it may also be applied to improve asphaltic materials and rubber and polymeric wastes to facilite their recycling. This paper outlines the logic and technical methods that will be used.

  16. Extension and replacement of aspalt cement with sulphur 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickett, Daniel Ernest

    1977-01-01

    LLI V) O 0 I- LIJ IO UI O O Lo IO' 300 400 TEMPERATURE ('F) FIG. I--Viscosity-temperature curve for liquid sulphur. 13 Sul hur-As halt Mixtures An excellent source of information about sulphur-asphalt applications is an annotated... and provides a mechanical inter- locking effect (3, 7, 61). The sul'phur serves as a filler of the voids between the aggregate particles. As the molten sulphur cools below the melting point of about 245 F (118 C) it solidifies and creates the 20...

  17. Measurements of pavement condition and estimation of maintenance and rehabilitation costs using statistical sampling techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templeton, Connie Jill

    1983-01-01

    of the beta distribution . 26 Table 7. Table 8. Maximum difference between Sn(X) and F*(X) and K 99 ~, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Mean Error in predicting percentage of roads below a Pavement Score of 40. . 27 30 Table 9. True mean cost per square yard..., from which one was selected were as follows: l. Seal coat, or fog seal, or extensive patching plus seal ($0. 36/ sq. yd. ). 2. One inch asphaltic concrete pavement (ACP) overlay or seal plus level-up ($1. 58/sq. yd. ). 3. Two and one-half inch ACP...

  18. Petroleum refining for the nontechnical person

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leffler, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The second edition of this book remains a straightforward and uncomplicated text setting forth the many technical procedures involved in refining. The author has added a new chapter on simple and complex refineries and a revised chapter on gasoline blending, including current information on alcohol blending components. Contents include: Crude oil characteristics; Distilling; Flashing; The chemistry of petroleum; Catalytic cracking; Refining gas plants; Alkylation; Catalytic reforming; Residue reduction; Hydrocracking; Gasoline blending; Distillate fuels; Asphalt and residual fuel; Hydrogen, hydrotreating, and sulfur plants; Isomerization; Solvent recovery of aromatics; Ethylene plants; Simple and complex refineries; Crude oil, condensate, and natural gas liquids; Fuel values - heating values.

  19. XANES Identification of Plutonium Speciation in RFETS Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LoPresti, V.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.

    2009-06-03

    Using primarily X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) with standards run in tandem with samples, probable plutonium speciation was determined for 13 samples from contaminated soil, acid-splash or fire-deposition building interior surfaces, or asphalt pads from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Save for extreme oxidizing situations, all other samples were found to be of Pu(IV) speciation, supporting the supposition that such contamination is less likely to show mobility off site. EXAFS analysis conducted on two of the 13 samples supported the validity of the XANES features employed as determinants of the plutonium valence.

  20. Recycling of pavement materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, Randy Jim

    1976-01-01

    roadway which was to be recycle 1 was a lightly reinforced Portland cement concrete pa remcnt an asphalt c&ncrete overlay. Thc mater ial was broken wjth ld a headache ball and the reinforcing steel cut with cutting torches. After hauling to a central... which was an 18 foot wide concrete pavement of cI-6-9 design. The reinforcing steel in the thickened edge pavement consisted of two 1/2-inch bars along each side with 1/2-inch by $- foot bars acting as tie bars between lanes. Dowels were placed...

  1. Stochastic Modeling of Future Highway Maintenance Costs for Flexible Type Highway Pavement Construction Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yoo Hyun

    2012-07-16

    OF TABLES Page Table 1. Categorized climate region used in California (Caltrans 2007) ................. 6 Table 2. Total lane-mile of Texas highways in 2005 (Mikhail et al. 2006) ............ 15 Table 3. Maintenance categories defined in Maintenance... are as shown in Table 2. Table 2. Total lane-mile of Texas highways in 2005 (Mikhail et al. 2006) Highway type Asphalt Concrete Pavement(ACP) Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement (CRCP) Jointed Concrete Pavement(JCP) Total IH 4,745 1,346 244 6...

  2. War against water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitz-Hugh, S.

    1982-01-01

    It is stressed that waterproofing should be the most important concern in an earth-sheltered home, starting with the design and continuing throughout the construction. Damage which may be caused by water leakage is discussed. Proper site selection is most important and the need for outside professionals and consultants is emphasized. The ideal waterproofing system is discussed and illustrated. Waterproofing agents are discussed in detail. They are: (1) sodium bentonite; (2) elastomers, such as isobutylene isoprene (butyl rubber), EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer), and liquid elastomers (polyurethanes); and (3) rubberized asphalt. Availability, sheet sizes and application of these waterproofing agents are discussed. (MJJ)

  3. Technology meets aggregate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.; Swan, C.

    2007-07-01

    New technology carried out at Tufts University and the University of Massachusetts on synthetic lightweight aggregate has created material from various qualities of fly ash from coal-fired power plants for use in different engineered applications. In pilot scale manufacturing tests an 'SLA' containing 80% fly ash and 20% mixed plastic waste from packaging was produced by 'dry blending' mixed plastic with high carbon fly ash. A trial run was completed to produce concrete masonry unit (CMU) blocks at a full-scale facility. It has been shown that SLA can be used as a partial substitution of a traditional stone aggregate in hot asphalt mix. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  4. Design of a Sustainable House for Residents of a Colonia in South Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenemann, T. J.; Haberl, J. S.; Hill, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    ) and covering parking lots with porous paving rather than asphalt. ?The habitat roof is a third of what a normal drainage site might cost with gutters, down spouts and underground pipes," stated Tim O'Brien, vice- president of real estate for Ford Motor Land...Cabe?s findings, but this is considered a fairly primitive testing procedure. In 1996, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) constructed a bale wall that was stuccoed on the cold side and covered with gypsum drywall on the warm side. This test found the R...

  5. Degradative capacities and bioaugmentation potential of an anaerobic benzene-degrading bacterium strain DN11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuki Kasai; Yumiko Kodama; Yoh Takahata; Toshihiro Hoaki; Kazuya Watanabe

    2007-09-15

    Azoarcus sp. strain DN11 is a denitrifying bacterium capable of benzene degradation under anaerobic conditions. The present study evaluated strain DN11 for its application to bioaugmentation of benzene-contaminated underground aquifers. Strain DN11 could grow on benzene, toluene, m-xylene, and benzoate as the sole carbon and energy sources under nitrate-reducing conditions, although o- and p-xylenes were transformed in the presence of toluene. Phenol was not utilized under anaerobic conditions. Kinetic analysis of anaerobic benzene degradation estimated its apparent affinity and inhibition constants to be 0.82 and 11 {mu}M, respectively. Benzene-contaminated groundwater taken from a former coal-distillation plant site in Aichi, Japan was anaerobically incubated in laboratory bottles and supplemented with either inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and nitrate) alone, or the nutrients plus strain DN11, showing that benzene was significantly degraded only when DN11 was introduced. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments, and quantitative PCR revealed that DN11 decreased after benzene was degraded. Following the decrease in DN11 16S rRNA gene fragments corresponding to bacteria related to Owenweeksia hongkongensis and Pelotomaculum isophthalicum, appeared as strong bands, suggesting possible metabolic interactions in anaerobic benzene degradation. Results suggest that DN11 is potentially useful for degrading benzene that contaminates underground aquifers at relatively low concentrations. 50 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Summary of the issues with regard to the carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and exposure of polycyclic organic matter (POM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    Polycyclic organic matter (POM) is emitted from a variety of sources in the environment. Evidence of the carcinogenicity of emissions from coke production, motor vehicles (includes tire wear), asphalt roofing, paving, and air blowing, catalytic cracking residential coal combustion, industrial/utility coal combustion, carbon black, and iron and steel processes is presented. The contribution of the POM fraction to the carcinogenicity of the mixture is evaluated for gasoline engine exhaust condensate and coal combustion effluent and appears to contribute the majority of the carcinogenic potential for those mixtures. Evidence of the mutagenicity of emissions from coke production, motor vehicles (including tire wear), industrial/utility coal combustion, carbon black, iron and steel processes, forest fires and open burning, residential solid fuel (wood) combustion, commercial and other incineration, commercial/industrial oil combustion, residential oil combustion, and asphalt roofing, paving, and air blowing is also presented. The problem in the use of a chemical surrogate to sample for POM-containing emissions is discussed. A discussion of the problems in evaluating the carcinogenic potential of different POM-containing mixtures is also presented.

  7. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 390: AREAS 9, 10, AND 12 SPILL SITES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-10-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 390 consists four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 9, 10, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The closure activities performed at the CASs include: (1) CAS 09-99-03, Wax, Paraffin: 2 cubic yards of drilling polymer was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (2) CAS 10-99-01, Epoxy Tar Spill: 2 cubic feet of asphalt waste was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (3) CAS 10-99-03, Tar Spills: 3 cubic yards of deteriorated asphalt waste was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (4) CAS 12-25-03, Oil Stains (2); Container: Approximately 16 ounces of used oil were removed from ventilation equipment on June 28,2005, and recycled. One CAS 10-22-19, Drums, Stains, was originally part of CAU 390 but was transferred out of CAU 390 and into CAU 550, Drums, Batteries, and Lead Materials. The transfer was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on August 19,2005, and a copy of the approval letter is included in Appendix D of this report.

  8. Roof Integrated Solar Absorbers: The Measured Performance of ''Invisible'' Solar Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon, C. J. (Florida Solar Energy Center); Merrigan, T. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    2001-10-19

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), with the support of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has investigated the thermal performance of solar absorbers that are an integral, yet indistinguishable, part of a building's roof. The first roof-integrated solar absorber (RISA) system was retrofitted into FSEC's Flexible Roof Facility in Cocoa, Florida, in September 1998. This ''proof-of-concept'' system uses the asphalt shingle roof surface and the plywood decking under the shingles as an unglazed solar absorber. Data was gathered for a one-year period on the system performance. In Phase 2, two more RISA prototypes were constructed and submitted for testing. The first used the asphalt shingles on the roof surface with the tubing mounted on the underside of the plywood decking. The second prototype used metal roofing panels over a plywood substrate and placed the polymer tubing between the plywood decking and the metal roofing. This paper takes a first look at the thermal performance results for the ''invisible'' solar absorbers that use the actual roof surface of a building for solar heat collection.

  9. ACAA pavement manual. Recommended practice: Coal fly ash in pozzolanic stabilized mixtures for flexible pavement systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to guide pavement design engineers, materials engineers, and construction managers in the design and construction of flexible pavement systems in which low- to high-strength Pozzolanic Stabilized Mixtures' ( PSMs') serve as base layers. A PSM incorporates coal fly ash in combination with activators, aggregates and water. Each of three design methods is useful for determining the thickness of a PSM base layer for a flexible pavement system: Method A - American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) flexible pavement design procedures, using structural layer coefficients; Method B - Mechanistic pavement design procedures, using resilient modulus values for the pavement layers; and Method C - A combination of Method A and Method B, using mechanistic design concepts for determining pavement layer coefficients. PSMs offer several advantages: PSMs are strong, durable mixtures using locally available materials; PSMs are economically competitive with properly engineered full-depth asphalt or crushed stone base courses; PSMs are suited to stabilizing recycled base mixtures; and PSMs are placed and compacted with conventional construction equipment. To provide the needed guidance for capturing the long-term service and cost-saving features of a PSM design, this manual details the following: a procedure for proportioning PSMs; thickness design procedures which include base layer and asphalt wearing course; and proven techniques for PSM mixing and base layer construction.

  10. Price crash 1986: the waiting gams: implication for heavy crude

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-14

    Across the United States, oil producers are betting on price stabilization - because they can do little else. From Alaska to Louisiana, significant production is already uneconomic, but so far, most producers seem convinced it is safer to risk producing too long than to shut in prematurely - sounds like Norway and OPEC. In this issue, ED examines recent US oil-industry papers on production featuring California independents, and arrives at an overview of possible near-term price trends for light and heavy crude. This issue of ED also contains statistical data on: (1) asphalt export prices to the USA from Canada, N Antilles, and Venezuela; (2) USA imports of asphalt by country of origin; (3) refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore; (4) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of both the Eastern and Western Hemispheres; and (5) ED principal industrial fuel prices as of March 1986, for countries of both the Eastern and Western hemispheres.

  11. Monitoring pavement response and performance using in-situ instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.H.; Bilyeu, J.; Hugo, F.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the effectiveness of in-situ instrumentation on diagnosing the pavement layer conditions under full-scale accelerated traffic loading. The test section is an in-service pavement (US281) in Jacksboro, Texas. Multi-Depth Deflectometers (MDDs) are used to measure both permanent deformations and transient deflections, caused by accelerated traffic loading and Falling Weight Deflectometers (MDDs) are used to measure both permanent deformations and transient deflections, caused by accelerated traffic loading and Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) tests. Four different FWD loads of 25, 40, 52, and 67 kN were applied in close proximity to the MDDs at various traffic loading intervals to determine pavement conditions. It was found that the majority of rutting occurred in the newly recycled asphalt mix. The aged ({gt}40 years) underlying base and subgrade layers contributed less than 30% to overall rutting. Only the top recycled Asphalt layer underwent notable deterioration due to traffic loading. Up to 1.5 million axle repetitions, the test pad responded to FWD load almost linearly, not only over the whole pavement system but also within individual layers. However, under higher FWD loads, the percentage of total deflection contributed by the subgrade increased.

  12. Life Cycle Assessment of Pavements: A Critical Review of Existing Literature and Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santero, Nicholas; Masanet, Eric; Horvath, Arpad

    2010-04-20

    This report provides a critical review of existing literature and modeling tools related to life-cycle assessment (LCA) applied to pavements. The review finds that pavement LCA is an expanding but still limited research topic in the literature, and that the existing body of work exhibits methodological deficiencies and incompatibilities that serve as barriers to the widespread utilization of LCA by pavement engineers and policy makers. This review identifies five key issues in the current body of work: inconsistent functional units, improper system boundaries, imbalanced data for asphalt and cement, use of limited inventory and impact assessment categories, and poor overall utility. This review also identifies common data and modeling gaps in pavement LCAs that should be addressed in future work. These gaps include: the use phase (rolling resistance, albedo, carbonation, lighting, leachate, and tire wear and emissions), asphalt fumes, feedstock energy of bitumen, traffic delay, the maintenance phase, and the end-of-life phase. This review concludes with a comprehensive list of recommendations for future research, which shed light on where improvements in knowledge can be made that will benefit the accuracy and comprehensiveness of pavement LCAs moving forward.

  13. INTERIM BARRIER AT HANFORDS TY FARM TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER AT THE HANFORD SITE WASHINGTON USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARKER DL; HOLM MJ; HENDERSON JC; LOBER RW

    2011-01-13

    An innovative interim surface barrier was constructed as a demonstration project at the Hanford Site's TY Tank Farm. The purpose of the demonstration barrier is to stop rainwater and snowmelt from entering the soils within the tank farm and driving contamination from past leaks and spills toward the ground water. The interim barrier was constructed using a modified asphalt material with very low permeability developed by MatCon{reg_sign}. Approximately 2,400 cubic yards of fill material were added to the tank farm to create a sloped surface that will gravity drain precipitation to collection points where it will be routed through buried drain lines to an evapotranspiration basin adjacent to the farm. The evapotranspiration basin is a lined basin with a network of perforated drain lines covered with soil and planted with native grasses. The evapotranspiration concept was selected because it prevents the runoff from percolating into the soil column and also avoids potential monitoring and maintenance issues associated with standing water in a traditional evaporation pond. Because of issues associated with using standard excavation and earth moving equipment in the farm a number of alternate construction approaches were utilized to perform excavations and prepare the site for the modified asphalt.

  14. Liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buelt, J.L. (comp.)

    1983-09-01

    The Liner Evaluation for Uranium Mill Tailings Program was conducted to evaluate the need for and performance of prospective lining materials for the long-term management of inactive uranium mill tailings piles. On the basis of program results, two materials have been identified: natural foundation soil amended with 10% sodium bentonite; catalytic airblown asphalt membrane. The study showed that, for most situations, calcareous soils typical of Western US sites adequately buffer tailings leachates and prevent groundwater contamination without additional liner materials or amendments. Although mathematical modeling of disposal sites is recommended on a site-specific basis, there appears to be no reason to expect significant infiltration through the cover for most Western sites. The major water source through the tailings would be groundwater movement at sites with shallow groundwater tables. Even so column leaching studies showed that contaminant source terms were reduced to near maximum contaminant levels (MCL's) for drinking water within one or two pore volumes; thus, a limited source term for groundwater contamination exists. At sites where significant groundwater movement or infiltration is expected and the tailings leachates are alkaline, however, the sodium bentonite or asphalt membrane may be necessary.

  15. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.; Relyea, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  16. The Hanford Site 1000-Year Cap Design Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W. ); Ward, Anderson L. ); Wittreich, Curtis D.

    2002-12-27

    Surface barrier or capping technology is needed to isolate buried wastes. A successful cap must prevent the intrusion of plants, animals, and man into the underlying waste, minimize wind and water erosion, require minimal maintenance, and limit water intrusion to near-zero amounts. For some sites where wastes are long-lived, caps should potentially last a thousand years or more. At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State, a surface cap with a 1000-year design life was constructed and then tested and monitored for performance under wetting conditions that are extreme for the region. The cap was built in 1994 over an existing waste site as a part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) treatability test. The above-grade barrier or cap consists of a 2-m-thick silt-loam soil overlying layers (from top down) of sand, gravel, basalt rock (riprap), and a low-permeability asphalt. Two sideslope configurations, a clean-fill gravel on a 10:1 slope and a basalt riprap on a 2:1 slope were part of the overall design and testing. Design considerations included constructability; water-balance monitoring; wind and water erosion control and monitoring; surface revegetation, biointrusion control, subsidence, and sideslope stability; and durability of the asphalt layer.

  17. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis for the Production of the Hydrocarbon Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Robichaud, D. J.; Mukaratate, C.; Donohoe, B. S.; Iisa, K.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is a promising technique for conversion of biomass into hydrocarbons for use as transportation fuels. For over 30 years this process has been studied and it has been demonstrated that oils can be produced with high concentrations of hydrocarbons and low levels of oxygen. However, the yields from this type of conversion are typically low and the catalysts, which are often zeolites, are quickly deactivated through coking. In addition, the hydrocarbons produced are primarily aromatic molecules (benzene, toluene, xylene) that not desirable for petroleum refineries and are not well suited for diesel or jet engines. The goals of our research are to develop new multifunction catalysts for the production of gasoline, diesel and jet fuel range molecules and to improve process conditions for higher yields and low coking rates. We are investigating filtration and the use of hydrogen donor molecules to improve catalyst performance.

  18. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  19. Reduce emissions and operating costs with appropriate glycol selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covington, K.; Lyddon, L. [Bryan Research and Engineering, Inc., TX (United States); Ebeling, H. [Latoka Engineering L.L.C., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) emissions from glycol dehydration units have become a major concern and some form of control is necessary in many cases. One method of reducing BTEX emissions that is often overlooked is in the selection of the proper dehydrating agent. BTEX compounds are less soluble in diethylene glycol (DEG) than triethylene glycol (TEG) and considerably less soluble in ethylene glycol (EG). If the use of DEG or EG achieves the required gas dew point in cases where BTEX emissions are a concern, a significant savings in both operating costs and the cost of treating still vent gases may be achieved. This paper compares plant operations using TEG, DEG and EG from the viewpoint of BTEX emissions, circulating rates, utilities and dehydration capabilities.

  20. Aerosol characterization study using multi-spectrum remote sensing measurement techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen, Crystal Chanea; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2013-09-01

    A unique aerosol flow chamber coupled with a bistatic LIDAR system was implemented to measure the optical scattering cross sections and depolarization ratio of common atmospheric particulates. Each of seven particle types (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, black carbon and Arizona road dust) was aged by three anthropogenically relevant mechanisms: 1. Sulfuric acid deposition, 2. Toluene ozonolysis reactions, and 3. m-Xylene ozonolysis reactions. The results of pure particle scattering properties were compared with their aged equivalents. Results show that as most particles age under industrial plume conditions, their scattering cross sections are similar to pure black carbon, which has significant impacts to our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate. In addition, evidence emerges that suggest chloride-containing aerosols are chemically altered during the organic aging process. Here we present the direct measured scattering cross section and depolarization ratios for pure and aged atmospheric particulates.

  1. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  2. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glebov, V. Yu. Forrest, C. J.; Marshall, K. L.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D{sub 2} neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented.

  3. Natural bioreclamation of alkylbenzenes (BTEX) from a gasoline spill in methanogenic groundwater. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.T.; Kampbell, D.H.; Armstrong, J.

    1994-01-01

    A spill of gasoline from underground storage tanks (USTS) at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Benzie County, Michigan, produced a plume of contamination that reached the banks of the Platte River. The plume was short (70 feet) and it had a short residence time (5 to 53 weeks). The plume was in transmissive glacial sands and gravels. The groundwater is cold (10 to 11 C), hard (alkalinity 200 to 350 milligrams/L), and well buffered (pH 6.1 to 7.6). Along the most contaminated flow path, methanogenesis, nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction, iron reduction, and oxygen respiration accepted enough electrons to destroy 30, 14, 4.2, 1.1, and 0.8 milligrams/L of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX compounds) respectively. The actual concentration of BTEX compounds consumed was 42 milligrams/L.

  4. Experience in operating L-35-5 selective hydrocracking unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortov, V.Y.; Georgievskii, V.Y.; Semenov, V.F.; Shafranskii, E.L.; Shipikin, V.V.; Vasil'eva, M.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes how the L-35-11 unit at the Kuibyshev refinery was converted to the process of selective hydrocracking, using a mixture of raffinates and hexane cut as the feed which enabled high-octane automotive gasolines to be obtained in this refinery. Basic process indices were determined when two fixed runs were made on feed consisting of a mixture of raffinates and hexane cuts in different ratios. The feed for run I was a mixture of benzenetoulene and xylene raffinates, and the feed for run II was a mixture of benzene-toulene raffinate and hexane cut. The principal results from these runs are presented. Poisoning of the catalyst by the sulfur-containing feed was eliminated by treating the catalyst for 4 h in hydrogen-rich gas at the operating temperature. This also restored the catalyst activity almost completely.

  5. Survey shows over 1,000 refining catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1991-10-14

    The Journal's latest survey of worldwide refining catalysts reveals that there are more than 1,040 unique catalyst designations in commercial use in 19 processing categories - an increase of some 140 since the compilation of refining catalysts was last published. As a matter of interest, some 700 catalysts were determined during the first survey. The processing categories surveyed in this paper are: Catalytic naphtha reforming. Dimerization, Isomerization (C{sub 4}), Isomerization (C{sub 5} and C{sub 6}), Isomerization (xylenes), Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC), Hydrocracking, Mild hydrocracking, hydrotreating/hydrogenation/ saturation, Hydrorefining, Polymerization, Sulfur (elemental) recovery, Steam hydrocarbon reforming, Sweetening, Clause unit tail gas treatment, Oxygenates, Combustion promoters (FCC), Sulfur oxides reduction (FCC), and Other refining processes.

  6. Co-treatment of VOCs in low-pH sulfide biofilters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devinny, J.S.; Chitwood, D.E.; Choi, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    Biofiltration of off-gases from wastewater treatment plants requires removal of sulfides and volatile organic compounds. Sulfides are readily removed in low-pH biofilters filled with inorganic media. If the same biofilter could simultaneously remove the volatile organic compounds, an efficient single-step system would be possible. Laboratory work on co-treatment of toluene and sulfides, and fieldwork on several volatile compounds indicate that this is possible. Removals of over 90% of toluene, xylene, acetone, methanol, and ethylbenzene should be possible with an empty bed contact time of 60 s. Methyl tert-butyl ether, isopentane, chloroform and methylene chloride were removed with lower but still substantial efficiencies. Biofilters operated at steady state but non-neutral pHs represent a promising avenue of research.

  7. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  8. Health assessment for Vogel Paint and Wax, Maurice, Sioux County, Iowa, Region 7. CERCLIS No. IAD980630487. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-29

    The Vogel Paint and Wax National Priority List site is situated in northwest Iowa in Sioux County. Contaminants found at the site consist of heavy metals (particularly cadmium, chromium, lead, and mercury) and volatile organic compounds (benzene, ethylbenzene, methyl ethyl ketone, toluene, and xylene). Two towns, Maurice and Struble, and the Southern Sioux County Rural Water System well field are located within three miles of the site, and two families live within 1600 feet of the waste-disposal site. Environmental pathways include contaminated soil and ground water, as well as potential surface water and air contamination. Although there does not appear to be any immediate public health threat, the site is of potential health concern because of the possibility for further off-site migration of contaminants into the ground water aquifer and for direct on-site contact.

  9. Industrial hygiene survey report of worker exposures to organotins at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eissler, A.W.; Ferrel, T.W.; Bloom, T.F.; Fajen, J.M.

    1985-06-24

    Breathing-zone samples were analyzed for organotin compounds, copper, and xylene during spray application of organotin containing marine antifouling paint at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia, March, 1984. The survey was part of a NIOSH study of occupational exposures to organotin compounds, conducted as a component of an assessment to determine the feasibility of conducting a study of reproductive effects. Company personnel records were reviewed. Work practices were observed. The authors conclude that a potential exists for exposures to organotins and copper. As all employees were wearing respiratory protective equipment, actual exposures may be less than that indicated by the analytical data. The facility could contribute 16 potentially exposed workers to the reproductive effects study.

  10. Research and development of rapid hydrogenation for coal conversion to synthetic motor fuels (riser cracking of coal). Final report, April 1, 1976-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D. A.; Beeson, J. L.; Oberle, R. D.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of the program described was to develop a noncatalytic process for the hydropyrolysis of lignite and coal to produce high-octane blending gasoline constituents, methane, ethane, and carbon oxides. The process would operate in a balanced plant mode, using spent char to generate process hydrogen by steam-oxygen gasification. The technical program included the construction and operating of a bench-scale unit (5-10 lb/hr), the design, construction, and operation of a process development unit (PDU) (100 lb/hr), and a final technical and economic assessment of the process, called Riser Cracking of Coal. In the bench-scale unit program, 143 runs were made investigating the effects of pressure, temperature, heating rate, residence time, and particle size, processing North Dakota lignite in hydrogen. Some runs were made in which the hydrogen was preheated to pyrolysis temperatures prior to contact with the coal, and, also, in which steam was substituted for half of the hydrogen. Attempts to operate the bench-scale unit at 1200 psig and 1475/sup 0/F were not successful. Depth of carbon conversion was found to be influenced by hydrogen pressure, hydrogen-to-coal ratio, and the severity of the thermal treatment. The composition of hydrocarbon liquids produced was found to change with severity. At low severity, the liquids contained sizable fractions of phenols and cresols. At high severity, the fraction of phenols and cresols was much reduced, with an attendant increase in BTX. In operating the PDU, it was necessary to use more oxygen than was planned to achieve pyrolysis temperatures because of heat losses, and portions of hydrocarbon products were lost through combustion with a large increase in carbon oxide yields. Economic studies, however, showed that selling prices for gasoline blending stock, fuel oil, and fuel gas are competitive in current markets, so that the process is held to warrant further development.

  11. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  12. Tracking a defined route for O[subscript 2] migration in a dioxygen-activating diiron enzyme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Woon Ju; Gucinski, Grant; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Lippard, Stephen J. (MIT); (Pomona)

    2011-09-08

    For numerous enzymes reactive toward small gaseous compounds, growing evidence indicates that these substrates diffuse into active site pockets through defined pathways in the protein matrix. Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase is a dioxygen-activating enzyme. Structural analysis suggests two possible pathways for dioxygen access through the {alpha}-subunit to the diiron center: a channel or a series of hydrophobic cavities. To distinguish which is utilized as the O{sub 2} migration pathway, the dimensions of the cavities and the channel were independently varied by site-directed mutagenesis and confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The rate constants for dioxygen access to the diiron center were derived from the formation rates of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, generated upon treatment of the diiron(II) enzyme with O2. This reaction depends on the concentration of dioxygen to the first order. Altering the dimensions of the cavities, but not the channel, changed the rate of dioxygen reactivity with the enzyme. These results strongly suggest that voids comprising the cavities in toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase are not artifacts of protein packing/folding, but rather programmed routes for dioxygen migration through the protein matrix. Because the cavities are not fully connected into the diiron active center in the enzyme resting state, conformational changes will be required to facilitate dioxygen access to the diiron center. We propose that such temporary opening and closing of the cavities may occur in all bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases to control O{sub 2} consumption for efficient catalysis. Our findings suggest that other gas-utilizing enzymes may employ similar structural features to effect substrate passage through a protein matrix.

  13. Pilot-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Wood, Benjamin

    2014-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2) from the flue gas of coal-fired powerplants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO2-capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a pilot-scale continuous CO2 absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. As part of that effort, an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a CO2-capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired powerplant was conducted. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP- 1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonicacid (DDBSA) were also identified foranalysis. An EH&S assessment was also completed for the manufacturing process for the GAP-1m solvent. The chemicals associated with the manufacturing process include methanol, xylene, allyl chloride, potassium cyanate, sodium hydroxide (NaOH), tetramethyldisiloxane (TMDSO), tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide, Karstedt catalyst, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Aliquat 336, methyl carbamate, potassium chloride, trimethylamine, and (3-aminopropyl) dimethyl silanol. The toxicological effects of each component of both the CO2 capture system and the manufacturing process were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. Engineering and control systems, including environmental abatement, are described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  14. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  15. Hanford prototype-barrier status report: FY 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, A.L.; Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Link, S.O. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    An above-grade surface barrier consisting of a vegetated soil-cover, surrounded by gravel and rock side slopes, is being tested for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It is part of a treatability study at the 200-BP-1 Operable Unit in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. The surface barrier, constructed in 1994, covers 2.5 ha (6.9 acre) of land surface and is situated over an inactive liquid-waste disposal crib. A set of under drains, built into the barrier using curbed asphalt, allows precise measurement of drainage from the soil cover and the side slopes. The treatability test includes measurements of water balance, wind and water erosion, subsidence, plant growth, and plant and animal intrusion. The test compares the performance of the barrier under ambient and simulated climate change (elevated precipitation) conditions. This report documents findings from the third year of testing.

  16. Use and value of reactive lignin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, M.E.; Mednick, R.L.; Stern, K.M.

    1988-03-01

    New York State has ample reserves of wood that are not suitable for lumber nor paper making. The Energy Authority has several research projects to utilize wood for the production of fuels and energy intensive chemicals. The Energy Authority and Chem Systems set out to characterize the market potential for lignins derived as by-products of wood-to-ethanol processes. Based on these analyses and subsequent ranking of the potential applications, three end uses (Phenol-Formaldehyde resin adhesives, carbon black substitutes and diesel fuel cetane enhancers) were characterized as having a high potential of commercial success. Epoxies were characterized as having a low potential. The prospects of the remaining end uses (activated carbon replacements, polyurethanes, dietary adsorbents, phenol/benzene and asphalt extenders) were classified as intermediate, along with those of the Urea-Formaldehyde resin portion of the adhesive market.

  17. Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-06

    OAK A271 Rockwell International Hot Laboratory decontamination and dismantlement interim progress report 1987-1996. The Rockwell International Hot Laboratory (RIHL) is one of a number of former nuclear facilities undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The RIHL facility is in the later stages of dismantlement, with the final objective of returning the site location to its original natural state. This report documents the decontamination and dismantlement activities performed at the facility over the time period 1988 through 1996. At this time, the support buildings, all equipment associated with the facility, and the entire above-ground structure of the primary facility building (Building 020) have been removed. The basement portion of this building and the outside yard areas (primarily asphalt and soil) are scheduled for D&D activities beginning in 1997.

  18. Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compere, A L; Griffith, William {Bill} L

    2009-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

  19. Weathering of Roofing Materials-An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berdahl, Paul; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William A.

    2006-03-30

    An overview of several aspects of the weathering of roofing materials is presented. Degradation of materials initiated by ultraviolet radiation is discussed for plastics used in roofing, as well as wood and asphalt. Elevated temperatures accelerate many deleterious chemical reactions and hasten diffusion of material components. Effects of moisture include decay of wood, acceleration of corrosion of metals, staining of clay, and freeze-thaw damage. Soiling of roofing materials causes objectionable stains and reduces the solar reflectance of reflective materials. (Soiling of non-reflective materials can also increase solar reflectance.) Soiling can be attributed to biological growth (e.g., cyanobacteria, fungi, algae), deposits of organic and mineral particles, and to the accumulation of flyash, hydrocarbons and soot from combustion.

  20. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, A.M.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-09-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: high-level waste immobilization; alternative waste forms; Nuclear Waste Materials Characterization Center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of fission products in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; systems study on engineered barriers; criteria for defining waste isolation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and development of backfill material.

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-18, 184-B Powerhouse Debris Pile, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-11-30

    The 100-B-18 Powerhouse Debris Pile contained miscellaneous demolition waste from the decommissioning activities of the 184-B Powerhouse. The debris covered an area roughly 15 m by 30 m and included materials such as concrete blocks, mixed aggregate/concrete slabs, stone rubble, asphalt rubble, traces of tar/coal, broken fluorescent lights, brick chimney remnants, and rubber hoses. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  2. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, October through December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-03-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented under the following headings: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology; high level waste form preparation; development of backfill material; development of structural engineered barriers; ONWI disposal charge analysis; spent fuel and fuel component integrity program; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; revegetation of inactive uranium tailing sites; verification instrument development.

  3. Strain concentrations in pipelines with concrete coating full scale bending tests and analytical calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verley, R.; Ness, O.B. [Statoil, Trondheim (Norway)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of full scale bending tests on 16 in. and 20 in. diameter, concrete coated pipes with polyethene and asphalt corrosion coatings. Constant moment, four-point bending was applied to a pipe string consisting of one pipe joint welded between two half-length joints. The strain concentration factor (SCF) at the field joints (FJ), expressing the ratio between the strain in the FJ and the average strain for the pipe joint, was investigated and compared to predictions using an analytical model presented in an accompanying paper (Ness and Verley, 1995). Material tests on the pipe steel, the corrosion coating and the concrete were conducted. The analytical model is found to give a good prediction of the strain distribution along the pipe joint, for both the steel and the concrete, and therefore also of the SCF. The sliding of the concrete over the steel is also predicted reasonably well.

  4. Nigerian refineries strive for product balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obuasi, P.A.

    1985-06-17

    This article discusses the growth patterns of the Nigerian refining industry. Production and consumption are expected to follow the pattern of consumption of fuel products by the domestic market, Presently, however, production and consumption are not evenly balanced for most fuel products, and non-fuel products are domestically consumed but not produced. Some progress has been made in the effort to match production and consumption of fuel products. But the progress that would have been made to balance non-fuel products has been nullified by 50% of the Daduna refinery being idle. This is due to problems associated with importation of heavy crude oil into Nigeria and also a weak market for asphalt in Nigeria.

  5. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  6. Testing and monitoring plan for the permanent isolation surface barrier prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, G.W.; Cadwell, L.L.; Freeman, H.D.; Ligotke, M.W.; Link, S.O.; Romine, R.A.; Walters, W.H. Jr.

    1993-06-01

    This document is a testing and monitoring plan for a prototype barrier to be constructed at the Hanford Site in 1993. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system, designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. These features include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, vegetated with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions.

  7. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Fletcher`s Paint Works and Storage, Milford, NH, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Fletcher`s Paint Works and Storage Facility Superfund Site (Site) located in Milford, New Hampshire. This ROD sets forth the selected remedy for Operable Unit On at the Fletcher`s Paint Site, which involves the excavation and on-site treatment of principal threat wastes which consist of primarily PCB contaminated soils, the replacement of those treated soils at the Site, and placement of a soil and asphalt cover over the residual low level threat wastes. The selected remedy also includes monitored natural attenuation of the contaminated groundwater in the overburdened and bedrock aquifers and institutional controls to prevent future ingestion of contaminated groundwater, as well as restrictions on the use and assess to the subsurface soils at the Elm Street Site.

  8. A Study of the Energy-Saving Potential of Metal Roofs Incorporating Dynamic Insulation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Kriner, Scott [Metal Construction Association, Glenview, IL; Manlove, Gary [Metanna, Monument, CO

    2013-01-01

    This article presents various metal roof configurations that were tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, U.S. between 2009 and 2013, and describes their potential for reducing the attic-generated space-conditioning loads. These roofs contained different combinations of phase-change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface, and above-sheathing ventilation with standing-seam metal panels on top. These roofs were designed to be installed on existing roofs decks, or on top of asphalt shingles for retrofit construction. All the tested roofs showed the potential for substantial energy savings compared to an asphalt shingle roof, which was used as a control for comparison. The roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. The attics were built on top of a conditioned room. All attics were vented at the soffit and ridge. The test roofs and attics were instrumented with an array of thermocouples. Heat flux transducers were installed in the roof deck and attic floor (ceiling) to measure the heat flows through the roof and between the attic and conditioned space below. Temperature and heat flux data were collected during the heating, cooling and swing seasons over a three-year period. Data from previous years of testing have been published. Here, data from the latest roof configurations being tested in year three of the project are presented. All test roofs were highly effective in reducing the heat flows through the roof and ceiling, and in reducing the diurnal attic-temperature fluctuations.

  9. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-10

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

  11. Genetic dissection of bioenerrgy traits in sorghum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermerris, Wilfred; Kresovich, Stephen; Murray, Seth; Pedersen, Jeffery; Rooney, William; Sattler, Scott.

    2012-06-15

    Specific Objectives: 1. To identify the gene(s) underlying a major QTL for stem sugar concentration located on chromosome 3. 2. To identify QTL for stem juice volume and stalk sugar concentration and to identify the underlying genes. 3. To classify 60 novel sorghum bmr mutants from the USDA TILLING population in allelic groups based on cell wall chemistry and allelism tests. 4. To select representative bmr mutants from each allelic group and selected NIR spectral mutants for their potential value as feedstock for ethanol production. 5. To clone and characterize those Bmr genes that represent loci other than Bmr12 and Bmr6 using a mapping and a candidate gene approach. Objective 1 The experiments for this objective are largely complete and the data have been analyzed. Data interpretation and follow-up experiments are still in progress. A manuscript is in preparation (Vermerris et al.; see publication list for full details). The main results are: 1) 16 cDNA libraries were prepared and sequenced at Cornell University. The libraries represent internode tissue and flag leaf tissue at booting, internode tissue and peduncle at soft-dough stage, from two plants per sampling time with the Rio allele for the QTL on chromosome 3, and two plants with the BTx623 allele on chromosome 3 (4 tissues x 2 genotypes x 2 replicates) 2) 480 million 86-nucleotide reads were generated from four lanes of Illuminia HiSeqII 3) 74% of the reads could be mapped to the sorghum transcriptome, indicative of good sequence quality 4) Of the 216 genes within the QTL, 17 genes were differentially expressed among plants with and without the Rio QTL. None of these 17 genes had obvious roles in sucrose metabolism 5) Clustering algorithms identified a group of 721 co-expressed genes. One of these genes is a sucrose synthase gene. This cluster also contains 10 genes from the QTL. 6) Among these co-expressed genes are regulatory genes for which knock-out lines in Arabidopsis have been obtained. Analysis of these lines is in progress. Objective 2 The experiments from this objective have been completed and the data were published in the journal Crop Science by Felderhoff et al. (2012). A second publication by Felderhoff et al. is in progress (see publication list for full details). The experiments were based on a mapping population derived from the sweet sorghum 'Rio' and the dry-stalk grain sorghum BTx3197. The main findings were: 1) The apparent juiciness of the sorghum stalk, based on the appearance of a cut stem surface (moist vs. pithy), is not representative of the moisture content of the stalk. This was surprising, as pithy stalks have been associated with low moisture content. This means that in order to assess 'juiciness', a different evaluation needs to be used, for example by removing juice with a roller press or by measuring the difference in mass between a fresh and dried stalk segment. 2) A total of five QTLs associated with juice volume (corrected for height) or moisture content were identified, but not all QTLs were detected in all environments, providing evidence for genotype x environment interactions. This finding complicates breeding for juice volume using marker-assisted selection. 3) The QTL for sugar concentration identified on chromosome 3, and the subject of Objective 1, was confirmed in this mapping population, but unlike in previous studies (Murray et al., 2008), the presence of this QTL was associated with negative impacts on agronomic performance (fresh and dry biomass yield, juice yield). Consequently, introgression of the Brix QTL from Rio as part of a commercial breeding program will require monitoring of the precise impacts of this QTL on agronomic performance. 4) The absence of dominance effects for the Brix trait (= sugar concentration) indicated that Brix must be high in both parents to produce high Brix in hybrids. This means an extra constraint on the development of hybrid parents. With the results from Objective 1, the selection of progeny containing favorable alleles for sugar concentration is expected to be more efficient.

  12. Pyrolysis of scrap tires: Can it be profitable?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Pyrolysis--the thermal degradation in the absence of oxygen--is one way to reprocess scrap tires. The products are fuel gas, oils, and a solid residue (char), which contains appreciable quantities of mineral matter and low-grade carbon black. The three products have comparable yields by weight. The two most important factors affecting process economics are the tipping fees charged for tire disposal and the selling prices of the products. Selling prices of the products yield low returns because of the low market value of the fuels and the low quality of the recovered char or carbon black. Therefore, to obtain a positive cash flow, it would be desirable to develop a process based on the recovery of value-added products such as high-grade carbon black, activated carbon, or valuable chemicals (e.g., benzene, toluene, and xylene). The authors believe that significant improvement in the economics can be accomplished by upgrading the primary pyrolysis products to secondary products of higher value.

  13. A Lean Methane Prelixed Laminar Flame Doped witg Components of Diesel Fuel. Part I: n)Butylbenzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pousse, Emir; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; 10.1016/j.combustflame.2008.09.012

    2009-01-01

    To better understand the chemistry involved during the combustion of components of diesel fuel, the structure of a laminar lean premixed methane flame doped with n-butylbenzene has been investigated. The inlet gases contained 7.1% (molar) of methane, 36.8% of oxygen and 0.96% of n-butylbenzene corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 0.74 and a ratio C10H14 / CH4 of 13.5%. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as diluent, with a gas velocity at the burner of 49.2 cm/s at 333 K. Quantified species included the usual methane C0-C2 combustion products, but also 16 C3-C5 hydrocarbons, 7 C1-C3 oxygenated compounds, as well as 20 aromatic products, namely benzene, toluene, phenylacetylene, styrene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, allylbenzene, propylbenzene, cumene, methylstyrenes, butenylbenzenes, indene, indane, naphthalene, phenol, benzaldehyde, anisole, benzylalcohol, benzofuran, and isomers of C10H10 (1-methylindene, dihydronaphtalene, butadienylbenzene). A new mechanism for the...

  14. Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATs) from High Efficiency Clean Combustion: Catalytic Exhaust Treatment Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) strategies such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) and pre-mixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) offer much promise for the reduction of NOx and PM from diesel engines. While delivering low PM and low NOx, these combustion modes often produce much higher levels of CO and HC than conventional diesel combustion modes. In addition, partially oxygenated species such as formaldehyde (an MSAT) and other aldehydes increase with HECC modes. The higher levels of CO and HCs have the potential to compromise the performance of the catalytic aftertreatment, specifically at low load operating points. As HECC strategies become incorporated into vehicle calibrations, manufacturers need to avoid producing MSATs in higher quantities than found in conventional combustion modes. This paper describes research on two different HECC strategies, HCCI and PCCI. Engine-out data for several MSAT species (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, PAHs, diesel PM) as well as other HC species are presented and compared when possible with conventional operation. In addition, catalyst-out values were measured to assess the destruction of individual MSATs over the catalyst. At low engine loads, MSATs were higher and catalyst performance was poorer. Particle sizing results identify large differences between PM from conventional and HECC operation.

  15. Modeling gated neutron images of THD capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Douglas Carl; Grim, Gary P; Tregillis, Ian L; Wilke, Mark D; Morgan, George L; Loomis, Eric N; Wilde, Carl H; Oertel, John A; Fatherley, Valerie E; Clark, David D; Schmitt, Mark J; Merrill, Frank E; Wang, Tai - Sen F; Danly, Christopher R; Batha, Steven H; Patel, M; Sepke, S; Hatarik, R; Fittinghoff, D; Bower, D; Marinak, M; Munro, D; Moran, M; Hilko, R; Frank, M; Buckles, R

    2010-01-01

    Time gating a neutron detector 28m from a NIF implosion can produce images at different energies. The brighter image near 14 MeV reflects the size and symmetry of the capsule 'hot spot'. Scattered neutrons, {approx}9.5-13 MeV, reflect the size and symmetry of colder, denser fuel, but with only {approx}1-7% of the neutrons. The gated detector records both the scattered neutron image, and, to a good approximation, an attenuated copy of the primary image left by scintillator decay. By modeling the imaging system the energy band for the scattered neutron image (10-12 MeV) can be chosen, trading off the decayed primary image and the decrease of scattered image brightness with energy. Modeling light decay from EJ399, BC422, BCF99-55, Xylene, DPAC-30, and Liquid A leads to a preference from BCF99-55 for the first NIF detector, but DPAC 30 and Liquid A would be preferred if incorporated into a system. Measurement of the delayed light from the NIF scintillator using implosions at the Omega laser shows BCF99-55 to be a good choice for down-scattered imaging at 28m.

  16. Introducing constricted variational density functional theory in its relaxed self-consistent formulation (RSCF-CV-DFT) as an alternative to adiabatic time dependent density functional theory for studies of charge transfer transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krykunov, Mykhaylo; Seth, Mike; Ziegler, Tom

    2014-05-14

    We have applied the relaxed and self-consistent extension of constricted variational density functional theory (RSCF-CV-DFT) for the calculation of the lowest charge transfer transitions in the molecular complex X-TCNE between X = benzene and TCNE = tetracyanoethylene. Use was made of functionals with a fixed fraction (?) of Hartree-Fock exchange ranging from ? = 0 to ? = 0.5 as well as functionals with a long range correction (LC) that introduces Hartree-Fock exchange for longer inter-electronic distances. A detailed comparison and analysis is given for each functional between the performance of RSCF-CV-DFT and adiabatic time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation. It is shown that in this particular case, all functionals afford the same reasonable agreement with experiment for RSCF-CV-DFT whereas only the LC-functionals afford a fair agreement with experiment using TDDFT. We have in addition calculated the CT transition energy for X-TCNE with X = toluene, o-xylene, and naphthalene employing the same functionals as for X = benzene. It is shown that the calculated charge transfer excitation energies are in as good agreement with experiment as those obtained from highly optimized LC-functionals using adiabatic TDDFT. We finally discuss the relation between the optimization of length separation parameters and orbital relaxation in the RSCF-CV-DFT scheme.

  17. Surface acoustic wave sensors/gas chromatography; and Low quality natural gas sulfur removal and recovery CNG Claus sulfur recovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klint, B.W.; Dale, P.R.; Stephenson, C.

    1997-12-01

    This topical report consists of the two titled projects. Surface Acoustic Wave/Gas Chromatography (SAW/GC) provides a cost-effective system for collecting real-time field screening data for characterization of vapor streams contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Model 4100 can be used in a field screening mode to produce chromatograms in 10 seconds. This capability will allow a project manager to make immediate decisions and to avoid the long delays and high costs associated with analysis by off-site analytical laboratories. The Model 4100 is currently under evaluation by the California Environmental Protection Agency Technology Certification Program. Initial certification focuses upon the following organics: cis-dichloroethylene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, tetrachloroethylene, tetrachloroethane, benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and o-xylene. In the second study the CNG Claus process is being evaluated for conversion and recovery of elemental sulfur from hydrogen sulfide, especially found in low quality natural gas. This report describes the design, construction and operation of a pilot scale plant built to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the integrated CNG Claus process.

  18. Thermal stability, acidity, catalytic properties, and deactivation behaviour of SAPO-5 catalysts: Effect of silicon content, acid treatment, and Na exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akolekar, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Crystalline microporous SAPO-5 molecular sieves with different silicon content, acid-treated SAPO-5 and Na-exchanged SAPO-5 were investigated for their thermal stability, and acidic and catalytic properties. SAPO-5 materials with increasing SI framework content exhibited lower thermal stability. The effects of the thermal treatment and Na exchange on the N{sub 2}-sorption capacity (at 78 K) of these materials were studied. In situ IR spectroscopic investigations of pyridine chemisorbed on the aluminophosphate catalysts revealed that the concentration of Broensted and Lewis acid sites are strongly affected by the Si content in the AlPO{sub 4} framework, acid treatment, and Na exchange. The results of temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and stepwise thermal desorption of pyridine suggest that there exists a broad site energy distribution over the aluminophosphate catalysts increases with the increasing Si content in the AlPO{sub 4} framework. The acid treatment and Na exchange showed a decrease in the number of strong acid sites on SAPO-5. The TPD of pyridine over SAPO-5, acid-treated SAPO-5, and Na-exchanged SAPO-5 indicated the presence of two types of acid sites. Correlation between the number of strong acid sites (measured in terms of the chemisorption of pyridine at 673 K) and framework charge on the aluminophosphate catalysts has also been obtained. The catalytic activities of SAPO-5 catalysts in the ethanol, n-hexane, isooctane, toluene, and o-xylene conversion reactions were studied. 22 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-04-22

    A series of bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) ligands was synthesized, and their respective uranyl complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. These structures were inspected for high-energy conformations and evaluated using a series of metrics to measure co-planarity of chelating moieties with each other and the uranyl coordination plane, as well as to measure coordinative crowding about the uranyl dication. Both very short (ethyl, 3,4-thiophene and o-phenylene) and very long ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}-m-xylene and 1,8-fluorene) linkers provide optimal ligand geometries about the uranyl cation, resulting in planar, unstrained molecular arrangements. The planarity of the rigid linkers also suggests there is a degree of pre-organization for a planar coordination mode that is ideal for uranyl-selective ligand design. Comparison of intramolecular N{sub amide}-O{sub phenolate} distances and {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts of amide protons supports earlier results that short linkers provide the optimal geometry for intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  20. Volatile organic compounds: Comparison of two sample collection and preservation methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liikala, T.L.; Olsen, K.B.; Teel, S.S.; Lanigan, D.C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Two soil sample collection and preservation methods for volatile organic compounds, used during site characterization activities, were evaluated using standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency analytical methods. A conventional bulk method recommends completely filling a sample container with soil; a less commonly used methanol method recommends placing a soil aliquot into methanol. Analytical results showed large negative biases associated with the bulk samples as compared to the methanol samples for aromatic compounds. Order of magnitude differences in concentrations measured between the methods were observed for benzene and toluene. Lesser differences were noted for xylenes and ethylbenzene. Limited data for chlorinated compounds suggest behavior similar to the aromatic species. A limited spike recovery study was conducted using the methanol method on laboratory and field samples. Samples were analyzed 82 days after spike addition. Poorer spike recoveries were noted from spiked methanol vials transported to the field and used for collection of soil samples. Differences between mean recovery values for the laboratory and field samples appear to be the result of losses during sample collection and transport. Despite the 82-day holding time, spike recoveries were within 70% of initial spike concentrations. These results demonstrate the stability of using methanol as a preservative for soil samples. 17 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Dissolution of monoaromatic hydrocarbons into groundwater from gasoline-oxygenate mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poulsen, M.; Lemon, L.; Barker, J.F. (Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    The effects of the [open quotes]oxygenate[close quotes] additives methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) on the aqueous solubility of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from gasoline were evaluated through equilibrium batch experiments. For a gasoline:water ratio of 1:10 (v/v), up to 15% MTBE or up to 85% methanol in gasoline produced no enhanced BTEX solubility. However, at higher gasoline:water ratios, aqueous methanol concentrations above 10% enhanced BTEX solubility. The initial methanol content of the gasoline and the equilibrating gasoline- to water-phase ratio controlled the aqueous methanol concentration. Partitioning theory and the experimental results were used to calculate aqueous benzene and methanol concentrations in successive batches of fresh groundwater equilibrating with the fuel and subsequent residuals. These successive batches simulated formation of a plume of contaminated groundwater. The front of the plume generated from high-methanol gasoline equilibrating with groundwater at a gasoline:water ratio of more than 1 had high methanol content and elevated BTEX concentrations. Thus, release of high-methanol fuels could have a more serious, initial impact on groundwater than do releases of methanol-free gasoline. 22 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. FCC Tail Gas olefins conversion to gasoline via catalytic distillation with aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partin, E.E. (Brown and Root U.S.A., Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1988-01-01

    The goal of every refiner is to continually improve profitability by such means as increasing gasoline production, increasing gasoline octane pool and in cases where fuel balance becomes a problem, decreasing refinery fuel gas production. A new refinery process is currently being developed which accomplish these goals. Chemical Research and Licensing Company (CR and L) developed Catalytic Distillation technology in 1978 to produce MTBE. They have since used the Catalytic Distillation technique to produce cumene. CR and L has further developed this technology to convert olefin gases currently consumed as refinery fuel, to high octane gasoline components. The process, known as CATSTILL, alkylates olefin gases such as ethylene, propylene and butylene, present in FCC Tail Gas with light aromatics such as benzene, toluene and xylene, present in reformate, to produce additional quantities of high octane gasoline components. A portable CATSTILL demonstration plant has been constructed by Brown and Root U.S.A., under an agreement with CR and L, for placement in a refinery to further develop data necessary to design commercial plants. This paper presents current data relative to the CATSTILL development.

  3. Process for the removal of impurities from combustion fullerenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Bolskar, Robert

    2005-08-02

    The invention generally relates to purification of carbon nanomaterials, particularly fullerenes, by removal of PAHs and other hydrocarbon impurities. The inventive process involves extracting a sample containing carbon nanomaterials with a solvent in which the PAHs are substantially soluble but in which the carbon nanomaterials are not substantially soluble. The sample can be repeatedly or continuously extracted with one or more solvents to remove a greater amount of impurities. Preferred solvents include ethanol, diethyl ether, and acetone. The invention also provides a process for efficiently separating solvent extractable fullerenes from samples containing fullerenes and PAHs wherein the sample is extracted with a solvent in which both fullerenes and PAHs are substantially soluble and the sample extract then undergoes selective extraction to remove PAHs. Suitable solvents in which both fullerenes and PAHs are soluble include o-xylene, toluene, and o-dichlorobenzene. The purification process is capable of treating quantities of combustion soot in excess of one kilogram and can produce fullerenes or fullerenic soot of suitable purity for many applications.

  4. Operable Unit 1 remedial investigation report, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, T.J.; Fruland, R.M.; Liikala, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    This remedial investigation report for operable Unit 1 (OU-1) at Eielson Air Force Base presents data, calculations, and conclusions as to the nature and extent of surface and subsurface contamination at the eight source areas that make up OU-1. The information is based on the 1993 field investigation result and previous investigations. This report is the first in a set of three for OU-1. The other reports are the baseline risk assessment and feasibility study. The information in these reports will lead to a Record of Decision that will guide and conclude the environmental restoration effort for OU-1 at Eielson Air Force Base. The primary contaminants of concern include fuels and fuel-related contaminants (diesel; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene; total petroleum hydrocarbon; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), maintenance-related solvents and cleaners (volatile chlorinated hydrocarbons such as trichloroothylene), polychlorinated biphenyls, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The origins of contaminants of concern include leaks from storage tanks, drums and piping, and spills. Ongoing operations and past sitewide practices also contribute to contaminants of concern at OU-1 source areas. These include spraying mixed oil and solvent wastes on unpaved roads and aerial spraying of DDT.

  5. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  6. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K.

    2014-01-28

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl{sub 2}?8H{sub 2}O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  7. Henry's law constants for paint solvents and their implications on volatile organic compound emissions from automotive painting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B.R.; Kalis, E.M.; DeWulf, T.; Andrews, K.M.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes experimental results of equilibrium partitioning of several significant paint solvents and formaldehyde between air and water to quantify the potential for capturing and retaining the constituents in spraybooth scrubber water during automotive painting. The compounds studied are toluene, n-butanol, methyl ethyl ketone methyl propyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, methyl amyl ketone, butyl cellosolve, butyl cellosolve acetate, butyl carbitol, and n-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone. A set of field data collected at a Ford Motor Company assembly plant was also analyzed to determine whether data were consistent with the equilibrium phenomenon. The primary findings include: (a) There were more than six orders of magnitude difference in the Henry's law constants among the solvents studied. A solvent with a smaller constant is less easily stripped from water. The Henry's law constants decrease in the following order: toluene and xylenes > methyl ethyl ketone > n-butanol > butyl cellosolve acetate > butyl cellosolve > formaldehyde > butyl carbitol > n-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone. (b) Field data showed accumulation of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and stable concentrations of butyl carbitol, butyl cellosolve, and n-butanol in the paint-sludge pit water during a 2-month period. Stable concentrations indicate a continuous, balanced capture and stripping of the solvents. Data were consistent with measured Henry's law constants. (c) The low Henry's law constant for formaldehyde is the result of the fact that it is hydrated when dissolved in water.

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Vogel Paint and Wax, Maurice, IA. (First remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-20

    The Vogel Paint and Wax (VPW) site is an approximately two-acre disposal area two miles southwest of the town of Maurice, in Sioux County, Iowa. Adjacent land uses are primarily agricultural; however, several private residences are within one-quarter mile of the site. A surficial sand and gravel aquifer underlies the site and supplies nearby private wells and the Southern Sioux County Rural Water System, located a mile and one half southeast of the site. Paint sludge, resins, solvents, and other paint-manufacturing wastes were disposed of at the site between 1971 and 1979. VPW records indicate that approximately 43,000 gallons of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and 6,000 pounds of metals waste were buried at the site. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including benzene, toluene, and xylenes; and metals including chromium and lead. The selected remedial action for this site includes excavation of contaminated soil and separation of solid and liquid wastes; onsite bioremediation of 3,000 cubic yards of the contaminated soil in a fully contained surface impoundment unit, or onsite thermal treatment if soil contains high metal content; and stabilization of treated soil, if necessary to prevent leaching of metals, followed by disposal in the excavated area.

  9. Atmosphere contamination following repainting of a human hyperbaric chamber complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillo, R.S.; Morris, J.W.; Caldwell, J.M.; Balk, D.M.; Flynn, E.T. )

    1990-09-01

    The Naval Medical Research Institute currently conducts hyperbaric research in a Man-Rated Chamber Complex (MRCC) originally installed in 1977. Significant engineering alterations to the MRCC and rusting of some of its interior sections necessitated repainting, which was completed in 1988. Great care was taken in selecting an appropriate paint (polyamide epoxy) and in ensuring correct application and curing procedures. Only very low levels of hydrocarbons were found in the MRCC atmosphere before initial pressurization after painting and curing. After pressurization, however, significant chemical contamination was found. The primary contaminants were aromatic hydrocarbons: xylenes (which were a major component of both the primer and topcoat paint) and ethyl benzene. The role that pressure played in stimulating off-gassing from the paint is not clear; the off-gassing rate was observed to be similar over a large range in chamber pressures from 1.6 to 31.0 atm abs. Scrubbing the chamber atmosphere with the chemical absorbent Purafil was effective in removing the contaminants. Contamination has been observed to slowly decline with chamber use and is expected to continue to improve with time. However, this contamination experience emphasizes the need for a high precision gas analysis program at any diving facility to ensure the safety of the breathing gas and chamber atmosphere.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant, Fridley, MN. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The 82.6-acre Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant (NIROP) site is a weapons system manufacturing facility in Fridley, Minnesota, which began operations in 1940. The site is a government-owned, contractor-operated, plant located just north of the FMC Corp. During the 1970s, paint sludge and chlorinated solvents were disposed of onsite in pits and trenches. In 1981, State investigations identified TCE in onsite water supply wells drawing from the Prairie DuChien/Jordan aquifer, and the wells were shut down. In 1983, EPA found drummed waste in the trenches or pits at the northern portion of the site, and as a result, during 1983 and 1984, the Navy authorized an installation restoration program, during which approximately 1,200 cubic yards of contaminated soil and 42 drums were excavated and landfilled offsite. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remediation of a shallow ground water operable unit. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, toluene, and xylene.

  11. Refiner/marketer targets production of transportation fuels and distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    Citgo Petroleum Corp., the wholly owned subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), the Venezuelan national oil company, owns two gasoline producing refineries, a 305,000-b/d system in Lake Charles, La., and a 130,000-b/d facility in Corpus Christi, Texas. Each is considered a deep conversion facility capable of converting heavy, sour crudes into a high percentage of transportation fuels and distillates. Two smaller refineries, one in Paulsboro, N.J., and one in Savannah, GA., have the capacity to process 40,000 b/d and 28,000 b/d of crude, respectively, for asphalt products. In the past two years, Citgo`s light oils refineries operated safely and reliably with a minimum of unscheduled shutdowns. An ongoing emphasis to increase reliability has resulted in extended run lengths at the refineries. Citgo has invested $314 million at its facilities in 1995, much of this toward environmental and regulatory projects, such as the new waste water treatment unit at the Lake Charles refinery. Over the next few years, Citgo expects to complete $1.5 billion in capital spending for major processing units such as a 60,000-b/d FCC feed hydrotreater unit at the Lake Charles refinery and crude expansion at the Corpus Christi refinery. Product exchanges and expanded transport agreements are allowing Citgo to extend its marketing reach.

  12. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  13. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickford, D.F.

    1995-01-01

    A process for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovery metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process are described. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate form the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile.

  14. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bickford, D.F.

    1997-09-02

    A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig.

  15. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post-remedial-action survey report for SNAP-8 Experimental Reactor Facility, Building 010 site, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Mayes, C.B.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of the radiological assessment, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group arrived at the following conclusions: (1) soil contaminated with the radionuclides /sup 60/Co and /sup 152/Eu of undetermined origin was detected in the southwest quadrant of the Building 010 site. /sup 60/Co was also detected in one environmental sample taken from an area northwest of the site and in a borehole sample taken from the area that previously held the radioactive gas hold-up tanks. Uranium was detected in soil from a hole in the center of the building site and in a second hole southwest of the building site. In all cases, the radionuclide levels encountered in the soil were well below the criteria set by DOE for this site; and (2) the direct instrument readings at the surface of the site were probably the result of natural radiation (terrestrial and celestial), as well as shine from the material being stored at the nearby RMDF facility. There was no evidence that the contaminated soil under the asphalt pad contributed detectable levels to the total background readings.

  16. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  17. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  18. Economic contribution of lignins to ethanol production from biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chum, H.L.; Parker, S.K.; Feinberg, D.A.; Wright, J.D.; Rice, P.A.; Sinclair, S.A.; Glasser, W.G.

    1985-05-01

    Lignin, one of the three major polymeric components of biomass (16% to 33% by weight in wood), has the highest specific heat content. Therefore, it can be burned for process fuel. Compared to coal, its fuel value is 2.2 cents/lb. This report investigates markets for lignin utilization of higher value. After lignin isolation from the process, purchase of replacement fuel (coal was analyzed), lignin sale for the manufacture of solid materials or higher value octane enhancers was evaluated. Polymeric applications evaluated were: surfactants, asphalt, carbon black, adhesives, and lignin plastics; agricultural applications were briefly reviewed. These lignins would generate coproduct credits of 25 cents to 150 cents/gallon of ethanol respectively for 7.5 cents to 60 cents/lb lignin value (isolation and eventual modification costs were taken into account). Overall markets for these polymeric applications were projected at 11 billion lb/year by the year 2000. These projections are intensities of demand and not actual shipments of lignins. In addition, this report investigates the possibility of converting lignins into mixtures of methyls aryl ethers and methyl substituted-aryl ethers which are high value octane enhancers, fully compatible with gasoline. The report intends to show that if fuel ethanol production in the billions of gallons scale occurs lignin markets would not be saturated. 10 refs., 14 figs., 36 tabs.

  19. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY)

    1996-01-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants.

  20. Negative margins and OPEC prices: how buyers and sellers are coping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-28

    Apparent refining margins are so poor that many US refiners have accelerated their destocking, waiting for market uncertainty to be resolved. Margins based on official OPEC prices continue to be virtually all negative, including very light oils from the Middle East; by now, up to half the world's oil trade may reflect spot marketing, compared to less than 10% a few years ago. In today's buyer's market for crude oil, several sellers are resorting to multi-faceted discounts amounting to as much as US $4.50 or more under official OPEC prices. But meanwhile, US oil importers have learned how not to rely so much on a traditional run of crude oil: they are running reduced crude, resid, cat feed, condensate; and they are blending components for lighter products by importing and swapping whenever even pennies per barrel can be saved. This issue presents: (1) refining netback data, US Gulf and West Coasts, late November 1984 (official/contract vs spot crude prices; (2) asphalt export prices to the US from Canada, N. Antilles, and Venezuela; and (3) the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices as of October 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  1. Restacking the old deck: with heavy crude wild cards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-02

    OPEC and various other crude oil producers are not playing with a full deck - yet. The OPEC production and price system has yet to take into account truly heavy crude, of the types Venezuela and Mexico export and California and Canada produce for domestic consumption. Generally, analysts providing projections to governments and oil companies fail to address heavy crude's increasing influence on world refining demand. There are indications that high-tech refiner's advantageous buying price spread between heavy and light crude will widen further for the next several years - and that heavy crude producers will enter a new competitive phase. This issue includes the following ED Data: (1) US asphalt import tonnage prices (by area), and tonnages (by country), and prices ($1 bbl.) as imported from N. Antilles, Canada, and Venezuela; (2) refining netback data from the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of Sept. 27, 1985; (3) the fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, dates ranging from Jan. 1984 through Oct. 1985; and (4) principal industrial fuel prices for some of these countries as of Sept. 1985.

  2. Crude price free-fall. Yamanis mission: to prevent it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-30

    On January 30, 1985, OPEC announced price cuts effective February 1 for very-light and medium-light grades of crude, except for Nigeria's which, already having cut US $2/bbl on its own, increased its price for 37/sup 0/ API Bonny Light by US $0.65. The traditional OPEC marker crude, 34/sup 0/ API Arabian Light, is cut US $1.00 to $28.00/bbl. Arabian Heavy, about 27/sup 0/ API, stays at US $26.50. Prior to the cuts, the maximum spread between extra-light OPEC crude and Arabian Heavy was US $4.00/bbl. The spread between extra-light and the then-benchmark was US $1.50 at most, and between Arabian Heavy and the then-benchmark, US $2.50. Now, the official spreads are: Bonny Light-Arabian Heavy, US $2.15/bbl; Bonny Light-Arabian Light, US $0.65/bbl; Arabian Light-Arabian Heavy, US $1.50/bbl. These decisions have brought OPEC instant credibility, and could calm skeptics still warning of a free-fall in prices. This issue presents the refining netback data, US Gulf and West Coasts, late January 1985. The issue also contains the fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for December 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. Asphalt export prices to the US for each month of 1984 are also listed.

  3. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  4. Chemical class fractionation and thermophysical property measurements of solvent refined coal liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewitt, J.D.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1980-01-01

    Coal liquids are a potpourri of organic molecules and inorganic particles; they cannot be considered as a single entity because of variations in coals and processing conditions during conversion to liquids. A method of solubility class fractionation originally developed for petroleum asphalts was adapted to coal liquids. The component classes - asphaltols, asphaltenes, resins, and oils - were separated according to their solubilities in benzene, pentane, and propane. Important physical and thermodynamic properties (viscosity, density, dielectric constant, and conductivity) of these fractions were determined as a function of temperature. In many cases these are the only values currently available to other investigators and are much in demand. We observed that density was most affected by the solids, as expected; however, the dielectric constant was most affected by the asphaltols, the viscosity by the resins (closely followed by the asphaltenes), and the conductivity by the resins. This led to the conclusion that the asphaltols contain the most polarizable material and the resins the most ionizable material. The conductivity remaining after all these materials were removed (10/sup -9/ mho/cm) and the dielectric constant (4.5) are still significantly higher than the corresponding values for most pure hydrocarbons and are important characteristics of these materials.

  5. The development of surface barriers at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wing, N.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Gee, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Engineered barriers are being developed to isolate wastes disposed of near the earth`s surface at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Much of the waste that would be disposed of by in-place stabilization currently is located in relatively shallow subsurface structures such as solid waste burial grounds, tanks, vaults, and cribs. Unless protected in some way, the wastes could be transported to the accessible environment via the following pathways: plant, animal, and human intrusion; water infiltration; erosion; and the exhalation of noxious gases. Permanent isolation surface barriers have been proposed to protect wastes disposed of ``in place`` from the transport pathways identified previously (Figure 1). The protective barrier consists of a variety of different materials (e.g., fine soil, sand, gravel, riprap, asphalt, etc.) placed in layers to form an above-grade mound directly over the waste zone. Surface markers are being considered for placement around the periphery of the waste sites to inform future generations of the nature and hazards of the buried wastes. In addition, throughout the protective barrier, subsurface markers could be placed to warn any inadvertent human intruders of the dangers of the buried wastes (Figure 2).

  6. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Annual report, July 1991--July 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The University of Utah tar sand research and development program is concerned with research and development on Utah is extensive oil sands deposits. The program has been intended to develop a scientific and technological base required for eventual commercial recovery of the heavy oils from oil sands and processing these oils to produce synthetic crude oil and other products such as asphalt. The overall program is based on mining the oil sand, processing the mined sand to recover the heavy oils and upgrading them to products. Multiple deposits are being investigated since it is believed that a large scale (approximately 20,000 bbl/day) plant would require the use of resources from more than one deposit. The tasks or projects in the program are organized according to the following classification: Recovery technologies which includes thermal recovery methods, water extraction methods, and solvent extraction methods; upgrading and processing technologies which covers hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and hydropyrolysis; solvent extraction; production of specialty products; and environmental aspects of the production and processing technologies. These tasks are covered in this report.

  7. Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Wells

    2006-09-19

    The remedial design/remedial action for Operable Unit 6-05 (Waste Area Group 6) and Operable Unit 10-04 (Waste Area Group 10) - collectively called Operable Unit 10-04 has been divided into four phases. Phase I consists of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operable Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase III will remediate lead contamination at a gun range, and Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance. This Phase III remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility (STF)-02 Gun Range located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Remediation of the STF-02 Gun Range will include excavating contaminated soils; physically separating copper and lead for recycling; returning separated soils below the remediation goal to the site; stabilizing contaminated soils, as required, and disposing of the separated soils that exceed the remediation goal; encapsulating and disposing of creosote-contaminated railroad ties and power poles; removing and disposing of the wooden building and asphalt pads found at the STF-02 Gun Range; sampling and analyzing soil to determine the excavation requirements; and when the remediation goals have been met, backfilling and contouring excavated areas and revegetating the affected area.

  8. Nuclear waste management. Quarterly progress report, January-March, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comp.)

    1981-06-01

    Reports and summaries are provided for the following programs: high-level waste process development; alternative waste forms; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton solidification; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclide in soils; low-level waste generation reduction handbook; waste management system studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing of uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  9. Nuclear-waste-management. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikalla, T.D.; Powell, J.A. (comps.)

    1981-12-01

    Progress reports and summaries are presented for the following: high-level waste process development, alternate waste forms; TMI zeolite vitrification demonstration program; nuclear waste materials characterization center; TRU waste immobilization; TRU waste decontamination; krypton implantation; thermal outgassing; iodine-129 fixation; NWVP off-gas analysis; monitoring and physical characterization of unsaturated zone transport; well-logging instrumentation development; verification instrument development; mobility of organic complexes of radionuclides in soils; handbook of methods to decrease the generation of low-level waste; waste management system studies; waste management safety studies; assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems; waste/rock interactions technology program; high-level waste form preparation; development of backfill materials; development of structural engineered barriers; disposal charge analysis; analysis of spent fuel policy implementation; spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity program; analysis of postulated criticality events in a storage array of spent LWR fuel; asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; multilayer barriers for sealing uranium tailings; application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings; and revegetation of inactive uranium tailings sites.

  10. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  11. Hindered diffusion of coal liquids. Quarterly report No. 5, September 18, 1993--December 17, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsotsis, T.T.; Sahimi, M. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Webster, I.A. [UNOCAL Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The design of industrial catalysts requires that the diffusivity of the reacting species within the catalyst be accurately known. Nowhere is this more important than in the area of coal liquefaction and upgrading of coal liquids. In this area one is faced with the task of processing a number of heavy oils, containing metals and other contaminants, in a variety of process dependent solvents. It is important, therefore, on the basis of predicting catalyst activity, selectivity, and optimizing reactor performance, that the diffusivities of these oil species be accurately known. In this report, the authors report the publication of model studies of the diffusivity of Lennard-Jones particles in porous systems with dimensionality between two and three. Such a modeled system includes pillared clays. They also published a paper which addresses the sorption and aggregation of asphaltene particles with porous media such as catalysts. The paper presents new experimental data for the amount of asphalt precipitation formed with various solvents. The experimental results are compared to model calculations.

  12. Method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, J.F.

    1996-10-01

    Provided is a method for testing earth samples for contamination by organic contaminants, and particularly for aromatic compounds such as those found in diesel fuel and other heavy fuel oils, kerosene, creosote, coal oil, tars and asphalts. A drying step is provided in which a drying agent is contacted with either the earth sample or a liquid extract phase to reduce to possibility of false indications of contamination that could occur when humic material is present in the earth sample. This is particularly a problem when using relatively safe, non-toxic and inexpensive polar solvents such as isopropyl alcohol since the humic material tends to be very soluble in those solvents when water is present. Also provided is an ultraviolet spectroscopic measuring technique for obtaining an indication as to whether a liquid extract phase contains aromatic organic contaminants. In one embodiment, the liquid extract phase is subjected to a narrow and discrete band of radiation including a desired wave length and the ability of the liquid extract phase to absorb that wavelength of ultraviolet radiation is measured to provide an indication of the presence of aromatic organic contaminants. 2 figs.

  13. Relationships among oils and water compositions in Niger delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickey, P.A.; George, G.O.; Barker, C.

    1987-10-01

    In some fields of the Tertiary Niger delta of Nigeria, heavy, asphaltic oil is found in shallow reservoirs and light, waxy oil is found in deeper reservoirs in the same field. Both oils appears to have had the same source. The change with depth from heavy to light oil is usually abrupt and occurs at a reservoir temperature between 150/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/F (66/sup 0/ and 82/sup 0/C). In other areas similar degradation of oil has been ascribed to bacteria brought into the oil reservoir by invading meteoric water. In Nigeria, meteoric water is low in dissolved solids and high in bicarbonate, whereas connate water is saltier and contains more chloride. Samples of both types of oil and associated water from six fields were analyzed and compared with previously acquired analyses from these fields. No clear relationship between meteoric water and degraded oil was found. Degraded oil may occur with either meteoric or connate water, and undegraded oil is sometimes found with meteoric water. This suggests extensive secondary migration of oil from one structure to another as well as deep penetration of meteoric water. 14 figures, 1 table.

  14. Decontamination of surfaces by blasting with crystals of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.E.; Parfitt, J.E.; Patton, B.D.

    1995-02-01

    A major mission of the US Department of Energy during the 1990s is site and environmental cleanup. In pursuit of this mission, numerous remediation projects are under way and many others are being planned at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this report, tests using two proposed methods for decontaminating surfaces one using water ice crystals [Crystalline Ice Blast (CIB)], the other using dry ice crystals (CO{sub 2} Cleanblast{trademark}) -- are described. Both methods are adaptations of the commonly used sand blasting technology. The two methods tested differ from sand blasting in that the particles are not particularly abrasive and do not accumulate as particles in the wastes. They differ from each other in that the CO{sub 2} particles sublime during and after impact and the ice particles melt. Thus, the two demonstrations provide important information about two strong candidate decontamination methodologies. Each process was tested at ORNL using contaminated lead bricks and contaminated tools and equipment. Demonstrations with the prototype Crystalline Ice Blast and the CO{sub 2} Cleanblast systems showed that paint, grease, and oil can be removed from metal, plastic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces. Furthermore, removal of contamination from lead bricks was highly effective. Both processes were found to be less effective, under the conditions tested, with contaminated tools and equipment that had chemically bonded contamination or contamination located in crevices since neither technology abrades the substrates or penetrates deeply into crevices to remove particulates. Some process improvements are recommended.

  15. Wax and hydrate control with electrical power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    Electrical heating of subsea flowlines is an effective way to prevent wax and hydrate information, especially for long transportation distances and in low-temperature deep water. Systems are available for use in conjunction with bundles, pipe-in-pipe, and wet-thermal-insulation systems. These systems provide environmentally friendly fluid-temperature control without chemicals or flaring for pipeline depressurizing. Enhanced production is achieved because no time is lost by unnecessary depressurizing, pigging, heating-medium circulation, or removal of hydrate and wax blockages. The seabed temperature at 100-m and greater water depths may range from 7 to {minus}1.5 C, causing a rapid cooling of the hot well streams being transported in subsea flowlines. Under these supercooling conditions, vulnerable crude oils and multiphase compositions will deposit wax and asphalts; also the gas/water phase may freeze solid with hydrate particles. The paper discusses thermal-insulated flowlines, heat-loss compensation with electrical power, electrical power consumption and operation, and subsea electrical-power distribution system.

  16. The role of plants on isolation barrier systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, S.O.; Downs, J.L.; Waugh, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    Surface barriers are used to isolate buried wastes from the environment. Most have been built for short-term isolation. The need to isolate radioactive wastes from the environment requires that the functional integrity of a barrier be maintained for thousands of years. Barrier function strongly depends on vegetation. Plants reduce wind and water erosion and minimize drainage, but may transport contaminants if roots extend into buried wastes. Our review of the function of plants on surface barriers focuses on the role of plants across mesic to arid environments and gives special consideration to studies done at Hanford. The Hanford Barrier Development Program was created to design and test an earthen cover system to inhibit water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion, while isolating buried wastes for at least 1000 years. Studies at the Hanford have shown that plants will significantly interact with the barrier. Plants transpire soil water back into the atmosphere. Deep-rooted perennials best recycle water; soil water may drain through the root zone of shallow-rooted annuals. Lysimeter studies indicate that a surface layer of fine soil with deep-rooted plants precludes drainage even with three times normal precipitation. The presence of vegetation greatly reduces water and wind erosion, but deep-rooted plants pose a threat of biointrusion and contaminant transport. The Hanford barrier includes a buried rock layer and asphalt layer to prevent biointrusion.

  17. Examples of cooler reflective streets for urban heat-island mitigation : Portland cement concrete and chip seals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomerantz, M.; Akbari, H.; Chang, S.-C.; Levinson, R.; Pon, B.

    2003-04-30

    Part of the urban heat island effect can be attributed to dark pavements that are commonly used on streets and parking lots. In this paper we consider two light colored, hence cooler, alternative paving materials that are in actual use in cities today. These are Portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements and chip seals. We report measurements of the albedos of some PCC and chip sealed pavements in the San Francisco Bay Area. The albedos of the PCC pavements ranged from about 0.18 to 0.35. The temperatures of some PCC pavements are also measured and calculated. We then consider how the albedos of the constituent materials of the PCC (stone, sand and cement) contribute to the albedos of the resulting finished concrete. The albedos of a set of chip sealed pavements in San Jose, CA, were measured and correlated with the times of their placement. It is found that the albedos decrease with age (and use) but remain higher than that of standard asphalt concrete (AC) for about five years. After t hat, the albedos of the chip seals are about 0.12, similar to aged AC. The fact that many PCC pavements have albedos at least twice as high as aged AC suggests that it is possible to have pavement albedos that remain high for many years.

  18. Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used.

  19. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier -- 15 Years of Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Link, Steven O.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2011-09-30

    Monitoring is an essential component of engineered barrier system design and operation. A composite capacitive cover, including a capillary break and an evapotranspiration (ET) barrier at the Hanford Site, is generating data that can be used to help resolve these issues. The prototype Hanford barrier was constructed over the 216-B-57 Crib in 1994 to evaluate surface-barrier constructability, construction costs, and physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. The barrier has been routinely monitored between November 1994 and September 1998 as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) treatability test of barrier performance for the 200 BP 1 Operable Unit. Since FY 1998, monitoring has focused on a more limited set of key water balance, stability, and biotic parameters. In FY 2009, data collection was focused on: (1) water-balance monitoring, consisting of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture storage, and drainage measurements with evapotranspiration calculated by difference; (2) stability monitoring, consisting of asphalt-layer-settlement, basalt-side-slope-stability, and surface-elevation measurements; (3) vegetation dynamics; and (4) animal use. September 2009 marked 15 years since the start of monitoring and the collection of performance data. This report describes the results of monitoring activities during the period October 1, 2008, through September 30, 2009, and summarizes the 15 years of performance data collected from September 1994 through September 2009.

  20. Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1984-02-15

    The subject invention comprises the steps of first reacting particulate coal with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500/sup 0/C to 1100/sup 0/C and at a partial pressure of methane of less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds. More preferably, the method of the subject invention is carried out at a temperature of approximately 850/sup 0/C to 1000/sup 0/C and a pressure of 50 psig for a period of approximately 1.5 seconds. Surprisingly, it has been found that in the practice of the subject invention not only are commercially significant quantities of ethylene produced, namely yields in excess of 10% (percent carbon converted to product), along with economically significant quantities of-benzene and light oils, namely toluene and xylene, but also that there is little, if any, net consumption of methane in the reaction and possibly even a small net production. Since it is apparent that the carbonaceous solids or char remaining after the reaction is carried out may be burned to provide the necessary energy to carry out the process of the subject invention, it is apparent that the subject invention advantageously provides a method for the conversion of coal to economically significant quantities of ethylene, benzene and light oils while requiring only coal and, possibly, small amounts of make-up methane. Other objects and advantages of the subject invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from a consideration of the attached drawings, the detailed description of the invention, and the experimental examples set forth below.

  1. Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO{sub 2} Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresia, Megan; Vogt, Kirk

    2013-12-31

    GE Global Research is developing technology to remove carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. A mixture of 3-aminopropyl end-capped polydimethylsiloxane (GAP-1m) and triethylene glycol (TEG) is the preferred CO{sub 2} capture solvent. GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to test a bench-scale continuous CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption system using a GAP-1m/TEG mixture as the solvent. SiVance LLC was sub-contracted to provide the GAP-1m material and conduct an Environmental, Health, and Safety (EH&S) assessment for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. Five components of the solvent, CAS#2469-55-8 (GAP-0), CAS#106214-84-0 (GAP-1-4), TEG, and methanol and xylene (minor contaminants from the aminosilicone) are included in this assessment. One by-product, GAP-1m/SOX salt, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA) were also identified for analysis. All of the solvent components and DDBSA are listed on the EPA’s TSCA Inventory allowing companies to manufacture and use the chemicals commercially. The toxicological effects of each component were defined, and control mechanisms necessary to comply with U.S. EH&S regulations are summarized. An engineering and control system, including environmental abatement, was described for minimizing exposure and release of the chemical components. Proper handling and storage recommendations are made for each chemical to minimize risk to workers and the surrounding community.

  2. A lean methane premixed laminar flame doped with components of diesel fuel part III: Indane and comparison between n-butylbenzene, n-propylcyclohexane and indane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pousse, E.; Tian, Z.Y.; Glaude, P.A.; Fournet, R.; Battin-Leclerc, F. [Laboratoire des Reactions et de Genie des Procedes, CNRS, Nancy Universite, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 NANCY Cedex (France)

    2010-07-15

    To better understand the chemistry of the combustion of components of diesel fuel, the structure of a laminar lean premixed methane flame doped with indane has been investigated. The inlet gases contained 7.1% (molar) of methane, 36.8% of oxygen and 0.9% of indane corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 0.67 and a ratio C{sub 10}H{sub 14}/CH{sub 4} of 12.8%. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa (50 Torr) using argon as diluent, with a gas velocity at the burner of 49.1 cm s{sup -1} at 333 K. Quantified species included the usual methane C{sub 0}-C{sub 2} combustion products, but also 16 C{sub 3}-C{sub 5} non-aromatic hydrocarbons, 6 C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} non-aromatic oxygenated compounds, as well as 22 aromatic products, namely benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenylacetylene, ethylbenzene, styrene, propenylbenzene, allylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, methylstyrenes, ethyltoluenes, trimethylbenzenes, n-butylbenzene, dimethylethylbenzene, indene, methylindenes, methylindane, benzocyclobutene, naphthalene, phenol, benzaldehyde, and benzofuran. A new mechanism for the oxidation of indane was proposed whose predictions were in satisfactory agreement with measured species profiles in both flames and jet-stirred reactor experiments. The main reaction pathways of consumption of indane have been derived from flow rate analyses in the two types of reactors. A comparison of the effect of the addition of three components of diesel fuel, namely indane, n-butylbenzene and n-propylcyclohexane (parts I and II of this series of paper), on the structure of a laminar lean premixed methane flame is also presented. (author)

  3. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  4. Inhibition of inflammatory mediators contributes to the anti-inflammatory activity of KYKZL-1 via MAPK and NF-?B pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Guang-Lin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States); Du, Yi-Fang; Cheng, Jing; Huan, Lin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Chen, Shi-Cui [Jinhu Food and Drug Administration, Jiangsu (China); Wei, Shao-Hua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Gong, Zhu-Nan, E-mail: biopharmacology@126.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Cai, Jie; Qiu, Ting; Wu, Hao; Sun, Ting [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Molecular and Medical Biotechnology, College of Life Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing (China); Ao, Gui-Zhen [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Soochow University, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-10-01

    KYKZL-1, a newly synthesized compound with COX/5-LOX dual inhibition, was subjected to the anti-inflammatory activity test focusing on its modulation of inflammatory mediators as well as intracellular MAPK and NF-?B signaling pathways. In acute ear edema model, pretreatment with KYKZL-1 (p.o.) dose-dependently inhibited the xylene-induced ear edema in mice with a higher inhibition than diclofenac. In a three-day TPA-induced inflammation, KYKZL-1 also showed significant anti-inflammatory activity with inhibition ranging between 20% and 64%. In gastric lesion test, KYKZL-1 elicited markedly fewer stomach lesions with a low index of ulcer as compared to diclofenac in rats. In further studies, KYKZL-1 was found to significantly inhibit the production of NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4} in LPS challenged RAW264.7, which is parallel to its attenuation of the expression of iNOS, COX-2, 5-LOX mRNAs or proteins and inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-?B. Taken together, our data indicate that KYKZL-1 comprises dual inhibition of COX and 5-LOX and exerts an obvious anti-inflammatory activity with an enhanced gastric safety profile via simultaneous inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAPKs and activation of NF-?B. - Highlights: • KYKZL-1 is designed to exhibit COX/5-LOX dual inhibition. • KYKZL-1 inhibits NO, PGE{sub 2} and LTB{sub 4} and iNOS, COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNAs and MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inhibits phosphorylation of MAPKs. • KYKZL-1 inactivates NF-?B pathway.

  5. Associations of indoor carbon dioxide concentrations, VOCS, environmental susceptibilities with mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, M.G.; Erdmann, C.A.

    2002-10-01

    Using the 100 office-building Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study dataset, we performed multivariate logistic regression analyses to quantify the associations between indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} (dCO{sub 2}) concentrations and mucous membrane (MM) and lower respiratory system (Lresp) Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Using principal components analysis we identified a number of possible sources of 73 measured volatile organic compounds in the office buildings, and assessed the impact of these VOCs on the probability of presenting the SBS symptoms. Additionally we included analysis adjusting for the risks for predisposition of having SBS symptoms associated with the allergic, asthmatic, and environmentally sensitive subpopulations within the office buildings. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for statistically significant, dose-dependant associations (p<0.05) for dry eyes, sore throat, nose/sinus congestion, and wheeze symptoms with 100-ppm increases in dCO{sub 2} ranged from 1.1 to 1.2. These results suggest that increases in the ventilation rates per person among typical office buildings will, on average significantly reduce the prevalence of several SBS symptoms, up to 80%, even when these buildings meet the existing ASHRAE ventilation standards for office buildings. VOC sources were observed to play an role in direct association with mucous membrane and lower respiratory irritation, and possibly to be indirectly involved in indoor chemical reactions with ozone that produce irritating compounds associated with SBS symptoms. O-xylene, possibly emitted from furniture coatings was associated with shortness of breath (OR at the maximum concentration = 8, p < 0.05). The environmental sensitivities of a large subset of the office building population add to the overall risk of SBS symptoms (ORs ranging from 2 to above 11) within the buildings.

  6. Effect of hydrotropic salts on phase relationships involving hydrocarbons, water, and alcohols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, P.C.; Kraus, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    Hydrotropic salts, which can increase the solubility of organic materials in aqueous solutions, are useful to tertiary oil recovery. We have examined effects on solubility of hydrocarbons in water (with and without alcohols) through addition of inorganic hydrotropic salts, such as perchlorates, thiocyanates, and iodides - high in the usual Hofmeister series - and of organic salts such as short chain alkyl benzene sulfonates and other salts based on substituted benzene derivatives. Although the inorganic salts are relatively ineffective in increasing solubility of hydrocarbons in water, many of the organic salts are excellent hydrotropic agents for hydrocarbons. We have examined the phase relationships for several series of aromatic salts such as sulfonates, carboxylates and hydroxycarboxylates, as a function of alkyl-carbon substitution in three-component (hydrocarbon, salt, water) and in four-component (hydrocarbon, salt, alcohol, water) systems. We have also examined miscibility relationships for a given hydrotropic salt as the chain length of alkanes and alkyl benzenes is systematically varied. While miscibilities decrease with increase in chain length of the hydrocarbon, the hydrotropic properties in these systems increase rapidly with the number of alkyl carbons on the benzene ring of the salts and they are relatively insensitive to the type of charged group (sulfonate vs carboxylate) attached to the benzene ring. However, there were significant increases in hydrotropy as one goes from equally substituted sulfonates or carboxylates to salicylates. A number of salts have been identified which have much greater hydrotropic properties for hydrocarbons than such well-known hydrotropic materials as toluene and xylene sulfonates.

  7. Growth and properties of Lithium Salicylate single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hull, G; Saw, C; Carman, L; Cherepy, N; Payne, S

    2009-02-13

    An attractive feature of {sup 6}Li containing fluorescence materials that determines their potential application in radiation detection is the capture reaction with slow ({approx}< 100 keV) neutrons: {sup 6}Li + n = {sup 4}He + {sup 3}H + 4.8MeV. The use of {sup 6}Li-salicylate (LiSal, LiC{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}) for thermal neutron detection was previously studied in liquid and polycrystalline scintillators. The studies showed that both liquid and polycrystalline LiSal scintillators could be utilized in pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques that enable separation of neutrons from the background gamma radiation. However, it was found that the efficiency of neutron detection using LiSal in liquid solutions was severely limited by its low solubility in commonly used organic solvents like, for example, toluene or xylene. Better results were obtained with neutron detectors containing the compound in its crystalline form, such as pressed pellets, or microscopic-scale (7-14 micron) crystals dispersed in various media. The expectation drown from these studies was that further improvement of pulse height, PSD, and efficiency characteristics could be reached with larger and more transparent LiSal crystals, growth of which has not been reported so far. In this paper, we present the first results on growth and characterization of relatively large, a cm-scale size, single crystals of LiSal with good optical quality. The crystals were grown both from aqueous and anhydrous (methanol) media, mainly for neutron detection studies. However, the results on growth and structural characterization may be interesting for other fields where LiSal, together with other alkali metal salicylates, is used for biological, medical, and chemical (as catalyst) applications.

  8. 200-BP-1 Prototype Hanford Barrier Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Years 2005 Through 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Link, Steven O.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2008-02-01

    A prototype Hanford barrier was deployed over the 216-B-57 Crib at the Hanford Site in 1994 to prevent percolation through the underlying waste and to minimize spreading of buried contaminants. This barrier is being monitored to evaluate physical and hydrologic performance at the field scale. This report summarizes data collected during the period FY 2005 through FY 2007. In FY 2007, monitoring of the prototype Hanford barrier focused on barrier stability, vegetative cover, evidence of plant and animal intrusion, and the main components of the water balance, including precipitation, runoff, storage, drainage, and deep percolation. Owing to a hiatus in funding in FY 2005 through 2006, data collected were limited to automated measurements of the water-balance components. For the reporting period (October 2004 through September 2007) precipitation amount and distribution were close to normal. The cumulative amount of water received from October 1994 through September 2007 was 3043.45 mm on the northern half of the barrier, which is the formerly irrigated treatment, and 2370.58 mm on the southern, non-irrigated treatments. Water storage continued to show a cyclic pattern, increasing in the winter and declining in the spring and summer to a lower limit of around 100 mm in response to evapotranspiration. The 600-mm design storage has never been exceeded. For the reporting period, the total drainage from the soil-covered plots ranged from near zero amounts under the soil-covered plots to almost 20 mm under the side slopes. Over the 13-yr monitoring period, side slope drainage accounted for about 20 percent of total precipitation while the soil-covered plots account for only 0.12 mm total. Above-asphalt and below-asphalt moisture measurements show no evidence of deep percolation of water. Topographic surveys show the barrier and protective side slopes to be stable. Plant surveys show a relatively high coverage of native plants still persists after the initial revegetation in 1994 although species diversity on the soil cover continues to decrease, from 35 in 1997 to 12 in 2007. The formerly irrigated treatments continue to show greater cover of grasses and litter than the non-irrigated treatments. On the formerly irrigated treatments, the mean cover class was 25 to 50 percent for both grasses and shrubs. On the non-irrigated treatments, the mean cover class was 5 to 25 percent from grasses and 25 to 50 percent for shrubs. The western and northern side slopes of the barrier show less plant cover than the soil surface, but show higher species diversity. This may be due to the influence of windblown soil and seeds from adjacent land, or the lack of shrubs competing for resources. Insects and small mammals continue to use the barrier surface and several holes and mounds were observed during the last year. This suggests that the restored barrier surface is beginning to function like a recovering ecosystem. Small-mammal burrowing on the top and sides of the barrier is most prevalent on the finer-grained and disturbed soils while active ant mounds were observed on the northern and western slopes.

  9. RMDF leach-field decontamination. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, J W; Marzec, J M; Stelle, A M

    1982-09-15

    The objective of the decontamination effort was to place the Radioactive Materials Disposal Facility (RMDF) leach field in a condition suitable for release for unrestricted use. Radioactively contaminated soil was excavated from the leach field to produce a condition of contamination as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The contaminated soil was boxed and shipped to an NRC-licensed burial site at Beatty, Nevada, and to the DOE burial site at Hanford, Washington. The soil excavation project successfully reduced the contamination level in the leach field to background levels, except for less than 0.6 mCi of Sr-90 and trace amounts of Cs-137 that are isolated in cracks in the bedrock. The cracks are greater than 10 ft below the surface and have been sealed with a bituminous asphalt mastic. A pathways analysis for radiation exposure to humans from the remaining radionuclides was performed, assuming intensive home gardening, and the results show that the total first year whole body dose equivalent would be about 0.1 mrem/year. This dose equivalent is a projection for the hypothetical ingestion of vegetables grown on the site. Assuming that an average adult consumes 64 kg of green leafy vegetables per year and that the entire yearly supply could be grown on the site, the amount of ingested Sr-90 and Cs-137 is calculated to be 1100 pCi/year and 200 pCi/year. This ingested quantity would produce a total first year whole body dose equivalent of 0.10 mrem, using the accepted soil-to-plant transfer factors of 0.0172 and 0.010 for Sr-90 and Cs-137, respectively. The whole body dose equivalent exposure value of 0.1 mrem/year is far below the tentative limit established by NRC of 5 mrem/year for areas released for unrestricted use.

  10. Western Area Power Administration annual site environmental report for calendar year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-12-31

    This document outlines the accomplishments and status of the environmental program of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) for calendar year 2005. In 2005, Western submitted 190 reports to state and local emergency response personnel and had 60 California Hazardous Materials Business Plans in place as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. These reports identify the hazardous substances contained at these sites. At sites where potential oil spills could harm surrounding ecosystems and waterways, Western prepares Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. These plans identify measures to prevent spills from harming the environment, such as identifying the need for secondary containment at facilities. Western currently has SPCC plans for 154 facilities in 13 states. In 2005, Western updated 19 SPCC plans and prepared one new plan. Western operated under 107 environmental permits in 2005. Western evaluates the impact of its planned actions on the environment by preparing National Environmental Policy Act documentation. In 2005, Western completed or was working on 60 categorical exclusions, 18 environmental assessments and eight environmental impact statements, issued six Findings of No Significant Impact, and prepared four Mitigation Action Plans. Western held several public workshops/meetings and consulted with 70 American Indian Tribes for various projects. In 2005, Western was working on or had completed 11 Section 7 consultations under the Endangered Species Act. In 2005, Western recycled more than 3,600 metric tons of electrical equipment, mineral oil dielectric fluid, asphalt, fluorescent and metal halide light bulbs, wood poles and crossarms, and other items as well as office waste. Western made $437,816 worth of purchases containing recovered content materials. Western met the requirement of Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management to have its Environmental Management System in place by December 31, 2005.

  11. Field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The former YS-860 Firing Ranges are located at the eastern end of the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant outside the primary facility fence line and west of Scarboro Road within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. A decision has been made by the US Department of Energy to conduct a removal action of lead-contaminated soils at this site as part of early source actions within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek watershed. This non-time critical removal action of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the YS-860 Firing Ranges is being conducted as a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 action. These actions are consistent with the Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Restoration Program. The removal action will focus on the excavation of bullets and lead-contaminated soil from the shooting range berms, transportation of the material to a permitted treatment facility for disposal, demolition and land filling of a concrete trench and asphalt pathways at the site, and grading and revegetating of the entire site. This report is the field sampling and analysis plan for the removal action at the former YS-860 Firing Ranges. The field sampling and analysis plan addresses environmental sampling for lead after the removal of lead-contaminated soil from the target berm area. The objective of this sampling plan is to obtain sufficient analytical data to confirm that the removal action excavation has successfully reduced lead levels in soil to below the action level of 1,400 micrograms/g.

  12. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for Coal Storage Area Stabilization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project and Design Engineering

    2011-03-01

    The scope of this project is to stabilize the abandoned coal storage area and redirect the storm water runoff from sanitary sewer system to the storm drain system. Currently, the existing storm water runoff is directed to a perimeter concrete drainage swale and collected in a containment basin. The collected water is then pumped to a treatment facility and after treatment, is discharged to the Y-12 sanitary sewer system. The existing drainage swale and collection basin along with silt fencing will be used during aggregate placement and grading to provide erosion and sediment control. Inlet protection will also be installed around existing structures during the storm water diversion construction. This project scope will include the installation of a non-woven geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base (paving optional) to stabilize the site. The geotextile specifications are provided on the vendor cut sheets in Appendix B. The installation of a storm water collection/retention area will also be installed on the southern side of the site in accordance with EPA Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act. The total area to be disturbed is approximately 2.5 acres. The order of activities for this Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) will be: (1) post notice of coverage (NOC) in a prominent display near entrance of the site; (2) install rain gauge on site or contact Y-12 Plant Shift Superintendent daily for Met tower rain gauge readings; (3) install stabilized construction exit on site; (4) install silt fencing along perimeter as indicated on the attached site plan; (5) regrade site; (6) install geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base; (7) install catch basin inlet protection where required; (8) excavate and lower existing catch basin tops, re-grade and asphalt to drain; and (9) when all disturbed areas are re-stabilized, remove silt fencing and any other temporary erosion control.

  13. Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV

    2001-04-05

    This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

  14. Savannah River Site waste vitrification projects initiated throughout the United States: Disposal and recycle options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-04-10

    A vitrification process was developed and successfully implemented by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to convert high-level liquid nuclear wastes (HLLW) to a solid borosilicate glass for safe long term geologic disposal. Over the last decade, SRS has successfully completed two additional vitrification projects to safely dispose of mixed low level wastes (MLLW) (radioactive and hazardous) at the SRS and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The SRS, in conjunction with other laboratories, has also demonstrated that vitrification can be used to dispose of a wide variety of MLLW and low-level wastes (LLW) at the SRS, at ORR, at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), at Rocky Flats (RF), at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP). The SRS, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA), have demonstrated that vitrification can also be used to safely dispose of ion-exchange (IEX) resins and sludges from commercial nuclear reactors. In addition, the SRS has successfully demonstrated that numerous wastes declared hazardous by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can be vitrified, e.g. mining industry wastes, contaminated harbor sludges, asbestos containing material (ACM), Pb-paint on army tanks and bridges. Once these EPA hazardous wastes are vitrified, the waste glass is rendered non-hazardous allowing these materials to be recycled as glassphalt (glass impregnated asphalt for roads and runways), roofing shingles, glasscrete (glass used as aggregate in concrete), or other uses. Glass is also being used as a medium to transport SRS americium (Am) and curium (Cm) to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for recycle in the ORR medical source program and use in smoke detectors at an estimated value of $1.5 billion to the general public.

  15. Health-hazard Evaluation Report Heta 90-179-2172, National Park Service, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Hilo, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, G.A.; Stephenson, R.L.; Kawamoto, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    In response to a request from the National Park Service, an evaluation was undertaken of possible hazardous exposures to volcanic emissions, both gases and particulates, at the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (SIC-7999) on the island of Hawaii in the State of Hawaii. Concerns included exposures to sulfur-dioxide (7446095) (SO2), asphalt decomposition products from burning pavement, acid mists when lava enters the ocean, volcanic caused smog, and Pele's hair (a fibrous glass like material). Two other related requests for study were also received in regard to civil defense workers in these areas. No detectable levels of SO2 were found during long term colorimetric detector tube sampling used to characterize park workers' personal full shift exposures. Short term detector tube samples collected near a naturally occurring sulfur vent showed SO2 levels of 1.2 parts per million (ppm). Work related symptoms reported by more than 50% of the respondents included headache, eye irritation, throat irritation, cough, and phlegm. Chest tightness or wheezing and shortness of breath were also frequently reported. Samples collected for hydrochloric-acid (7647010) and hydrofluoric-acid (7664393) recorded concentrations of up to 15ppm for the former and 1.0ppm for the latter acid. Airborne particulates in the laze plume were comprised largely of chloride salts. Airborne fibers were detected at a concentration of 0.16 fibers per cubic centimeter. The authors conclude that excessive exposure to SO2 can occur at some locations within the park. The authors recommend that workers and visitors to the park be informed of the potential for exposures.

  16. Health and environmental effects document for direct coal liquefaction - 1981.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Wilson, B.W.; Mahlum, D.D.; Sever, L.E.; Olsen, A.R.

    1982-09-01

    This document presents initial estimates of potential human health effects from inhalation of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) that may be released from a future hypothetical industry producing about 600,000 bb1/day of synthetic fuel by direct liquefaction of coal. The assessment approach starts wth general assumptions that are then refined in a tiered sequence that considers available epidemiological, environmental and chemical data. The uncertainties involved in such an evaluation have been quantified where possible at this early stage of health risk analysis. Many surrogate data bases were considered for application to coal liquefaction including coke oven, British gas retort, roofing tar and asphalts, and cigarette smoke. The coke oven data base was selected for this assessment because the chemical and physical nature of coke oven emissions are judged to more closely approximate potential coal liquefaction emissions. Utilizing the extensive epidemiological data base for coke oven workers as a surrogate model, health effects from release of coal liquefaction NMHC may be quantified. This method results in estimates of about 1 x 10/sup -3/ excess cancer deaths/yr to an industrial work force of 7800 persons and 5 x 10/sup -2/ excess cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole from NMHC that boil above 600/sup 0/F. Sources of uncertainty in the estimates are listed. Using these uncertainties, it is estimated that from 2 x 10/sup -4/ to 5 x 10/sup -3/ lung cancer deaths/yr may occur in the industrial work force and from 1 x 10/sup -2/ to 2.5 x 10/sup -1/ lung cancer deaths/yr in the U.S. population as a whole. On an individual basis, the excess lifetime risk to occupationally exposed workers is estimated to be 500 times greater than to members of the U.S. public.

  17. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  18. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  19. Cancer Research Center Indiana University School of Medicine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to authorize the Indiana School of Medicine to proceed with the detailed design, construction and equipping of the proposed Cancer Research Center (CRC). A grant was executed with the University on April 21, 1992. A four-story building with basement would be constructed on the proposed site over a 24-month period. The proposed project would bring together, in one building, three existing hematology/oncology basic research programs, with improved cost-effectiveness through the sharing of common resources. The proposed site is currently covered with asphaltic pavement and is used as a campus parking lot. The surrounding area is developed campus, characterized by buildings, walkways, with minimal lawns and plantings. The proposed site has no history of prior structures and no evidence of potential sources of prior contamination of the soil. Environmental impacts of construction would be limited to minor increases in traffic, and the typical noises associated with standard building construction. The proposed CRC project operation would involve the use radionuclides and various hazardous materials in conducting clinical studies. Storage, removal and disposal of hazardous wastes would be managed under existing University programs that comply with federal and state requirements. Radiological safety programs would be governed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license and applicable Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations. There are no other NEPA reviews currently active which are in relationship to this proposed site. The proposed project is part of a Medical Campus master plan and is consistent with applicable local zoning and land use requirements.

  20. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-11-18

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.