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Sample records for xx xx household

  1. CAP XX Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: NSW 2066 Product: Australia-based designer and manufacturer of high power density supercapacitors. References: CAP-XX Pty Ltd1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  2. WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 16-XX EFFECTIVE DATE:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 16-XX EFFECTIVE DATE: SUBJECT: WEATHERIZATION OF RENTAL UNITS - Applicable to single family and multifamily dwellings PURPOSE: To provide Grantees with updated guidance on weatherizing rental units in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). DOE has answered specific questions from Grantees related to the weatherization of rental units, whether single family building or multifamily dwellings, over a number of years. However, the responses to these questions have

  3. RELAP5-3D V. 4.X.X

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    000191MLTPL01 NON-NRC FUNDED RELAP5-3D VERSION 4.x.x SOFTWARE REACTOR EXCURSION AND LEAK ANALYSIS PACKAGE - THREE DIMENSIONAL

  4. WEATHERIZATION PROGRAM NOTICE 16-XX EFFECTIVE DATE: SUBJECT: MULTIFAMILY WEATHERIZATION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6-XX EFFECTIVE DATE: SUBJECT: MULTIFAMILY WEATHERIZATION PURPOSE: To provide Grantees with consolidated guidance on previously issued Weatherization Program Notices (WPNs) on weatherizing multifamily buildings in the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP). This supersedes WPN 10-7 and WPN 11-9 SCOPE: The provisions of this guidance apply to Grantees applying for financial assistance under the Department of Energy (DOE) WAP. LEGAL AUTHORITY: Title IV, Energy Conservation and Production Act, as

  5. DOE G 441.1-XX Control and Release of Property with Residual...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 4, 2002 FROM: STEPHEN M. SMITH, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OFFICE OF CORPORATE SOLUTIONS, ME-80 TO: DIRECTIVES POINTS OF CONTACT SUBJECT: DRAFT DOE G 441.1-XX, CONTROL AND RELEASE OF ...

  6. Long-distance entanglement and quantum teleportation in XX spin chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campos Venuti, L.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Zanardi, P.

    2007-11-15

    Isotropic XX models of one-dimensional spin-1/2 chains are investigated with the aim to elucidate the formal structure and the physical properties that allow these systems to act as channels for long-distance, high-fidelity quantum teleportation. We introduce two types of models: (i) open, dimerized XX chains, and (ii) open XX chains with small end bonds. For both models we obtain the exact expressions for the end-to-end correlations and the scaling of the energy gap with the length of the chain. We determine the end-to-end concurrence and show that model (i) supports true long-distance entanglement at zero temperature, while model (ii) supports 'quasi-long-distance' entanglement that slowly falls off with the size of the chain. Due to the different scalings of the gaps, respectively exponential for model (i) and algebraic in model (ii), we demonstrate that the latter allows for efficient qubit teleportation with high fidelity in sufficiently long chains even at moderately low temperatures.

  7. XX 08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to protect the area from further damage. Northwest ratepayers will absorb the costs in electric rates, and BPA is offering a reward of up to 25,000 for information that leads...

  8. SF6432-EI (xx-xx-xx) Educational Institutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... prior to any attempts to enter a government site as shown ... premises are subject to search. (e) Contractor shall ... Control : SF 6432-EI Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for ...

  9. SF 6432-TM (xx-xx-xx) Time Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... as those materials which enter directly into the end ... SF 6432-TM Title: Standard Terms and Conditions for Time and ... premises are subject to search. (e) Contractor shall ...

  10. SF6432-EI (xx-xx-xx) Educational Institutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operations in flight or afloat, which are Control : SF 6432-EI Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Educational Institutions Owner: Procurement Policy & Quality Dept Release...

  11. SF6432-EI (xx-xx-xx) Educational Institutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laboratory procedures, loading or Control : SF 6432-EI Title: Standard Terms & Conditions for Educational Institutions Owner: Procurement Policy Department Release Date:...

  12. SF 6432-TM (xx-xx-xx) Time Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department Release Date: 11/17/15 Page 1 of 25 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-TM (11/2015) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR TIME AND MATERIALS LABOR- HOUR CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED AS BEING CHANGED SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING ISSUED BY THE SANDIA CONTRACTING

  13. SF 6432-TM (xx-xx-xx) Time Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /2015) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR TIME AND MATERIALS LABOR- HOUR CONTRACTS: THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED AS BEING CHANGED SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING ISSUED BY THE SANDIA CONTRACTING REPRESENTATIVE. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTORS

  14. SF 6432-TM (xx-xx-xx) Time Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7/31/13 Page 1 of 22 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-TM (07/2013) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR TIME AND MATERIALS LABOR- HOUR CONTRACTS: THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED AS BEING CHANGED SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING ISSUED BY THE SANDIA CONTRACTING REPRESENTATIVE. (CTRL+CLICK ON A

  15. SF6432-EI (xx-xx-xx) Educational Institutions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department Release Date: 11/17/15 Page 1 of 25 Printed copies of this document are uncontrolled. Retrieve latest version electronically. SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-El (11/2015) SECTION II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR ALL COST-REIMBURSEMENT OR ORDERING AGREEMENTS WITH EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I.

  16. Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative rates for Si-like Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2014-01-15

    The energy levels, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p and 3s{sup 2}3p4d configurations of silicon-like ions (Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX) have been calculated using the configuration-interaction code CIV3. The calculations have been carried out in the intermediate coupling scheme using the BreitPauli Hamiltonian. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels have also been calculated. -- Highlights: We have calculated the fine-structure energy levels of Si-like Zn, Ga, Ge and As. The calculations are performed using the configuration interaction method (CIV3). We have calculated the oscillator strengths, line strengths and transition rates. The wavelengths of the transitions are listed in this article. We also have made comparisons between our data and other calculations.

  17. A :netao '?X,S vrtttcn (XX-x-162) to ;,r+ allison dascrllltnPr a m?neral 7m~rM o

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A :netao '?X,S vrtttcn (XX-x-162) to ;,r+ allison dascrllltnPr a m?neral 7m~rM of metallurKic.%l, fabrication, and nhysicnf stuJles whtch owht to be carried out as lntcnsively as -loseible stnrtinr: imiaedintely, in order to Tmvide information for the desicn of efficient methods of using atomic noxer. This nrescnt memo becomes more snecific in q entionini: lines of vmr!: which the idetholis and iinterlals Section believes to bc of lnortence. It also tells names of neonle and olaces where useful

  18. Microsoft Word - xx xx 13 Midway pole replacement news release...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    local utilities. The public meeting is: Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Moxee City Hall 255 W. Seattle Ave. Moxee, WA 98936 Because there will not be a formal...

  19. Form Reclearance Approval Expires: XX/XX/XXXX

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    collection of information unless the form displays a valid OMB number. U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 Form EIA-858 Uranium...

  20. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    per Stream Day Quantity Used As Fuel or Feedstock Trucks Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity PART 5. ATMOSPHERIC CRUDE OIL DISTILLATION CAPACITY AS OF JANUARY 1 1...

  1. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    888 Total 999 Pipeline stocks must be greater than or equal to stocks in tanks and underground storage in Part 7. Finished Motor Gasoline Pipeline Stocks + Gulf Coast (PADD 3)...

  2. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    same, only complete the physical address. For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) Comments: Identify any...

  3. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov...

  4. OMB No. XXXX-XXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BARGE, AND RAIL MOVEMENTS ACTIVITY SUMMARY For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1) Mailing Address of...

  5. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF THE MONTH (Barrels per Calendar Day) For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) Mailing Address of...

  6. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    same, only complete the physical address. For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1) Month A completed form...

  7. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using one of the following methods: For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1) Enter barrels to the...

  8. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    day following the end of the report month. For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) Month Forms may be...

  9. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    comment from another, press ALT+ENTER.) For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) Forms may be submitted...

  10. Microsoft Word - xx xx 13 Bill Drummond sworn in as administrator...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and executive management to the agency. Before joining BPA, Drummond had managed Western Montana Electric Generating and Transmission Cooperative in Missoula, Mont., for...

  11. OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expiration Date: XX/XX/XXXX

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product Code Input Production Stocks End of Week Oxygenates, Renewable Fuels, and Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids*: 003 Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids* 242 Consumer and Export Grade Propane...

  12. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Coyote Creek land acquisition provides...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wingert, 503-230-4140 or 503-230-5131 Rare wet prairie, wildlife corridor protected by land acquisition in Willamette Valley Portland, Ore. - Building upon a well-established...

  13. Microsoft Word - XX 13 HRD dep adm release (3).doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capital management function and ensure it has high performing compliance and governance functions. First, Brian E. Carter, currently the CivilianHuman Resources Officer for the...

  14. ANL-78-XX-95 Energy Level Structure and Transition Probabilities

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Division Argonne National Laboratory Hannah Crosswhite and H. M. Crosswhite Department of Physics The Johns Hopkins University - N O T I C E - Thi* report w u prepared u an account...

  15. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Colville Tribe to celebrate opening of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will significantly boost the availability of chinook salmon for the tribe and for sport fishing in the Columbia River as well as reintroduce spring chinook to the Okanogan...

  16. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Science and education grants offered by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gotoEducationGrants . BPA's education program provides free presentations and information to K-12 schools in our region to help students achieve energy literacy, and to...

  17. Microsoft Word - XX 13 IG report statement 10-2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particularly against those who raise concerns. As we move forward to rebuild our human resource capabilities, all of us at BPA will continue to serve our core mission by...

  18. Microsoft Word - XX 15 BPA moving forward with Hooper Springs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-230-5840503-230-5131 BPA selects final path for its Hooper Springs Transmission project Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration has decided...

  19. Microsoft Word - XX 13 Public scoping Walla Walla Basin Spring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing adult holding and spawning facility on the South Fork Walla Walla River near Milton-Freewater in Umatilla County, Ore. This is the latest project in an ongoing...

  20. Microsoft Word - XX 14 Delwiche and Andrews appointments FINAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for BPA's power planning and scheduling functions; generation asset management; power contracts and rates; power purchases and acquisitions; and business relationships with...

  1. NAP-XX Defense Programs Business Requirements and Processes Manual

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (SD) establishes the Defense Programs Business Process System (DPBPS) Portal as the mechanism for implementing DOE Order (O) 452.3, Management of the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. ...

  2. SECTION L … ATTACHMENT xx … KEY PERSONNEL AND CRITICAL WORK...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Include any experience with international projects. 2. Describe the Implementation and Sustainability Program Manager's program management and leadership experience, including the ...

  3. Microsoft Word - XX 15 Jensen named BPA general counsel (3) FINAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in creating national guidelines for power marketing administrations in states where marijuana sales are lawful under state statutes. She also instituted new processes that enable...

  4. Microsoft Word - XX 14 Connolly named VP Gen - Asset Mgmt FINAL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 14 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Monday, Oct. 6, 2014 CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-230-5840503-230-5131 Kieran Connolly named BPA vice president of...

  5. Microsoft Word - xx 13 Treasury Payment Oct 2013 Final Oct 4...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Energy Northwest projects. Energy Northwest develops, owns and operates a diverse mix of electricity generating resources, including the Northwest's only nuclear generating...

  6. Microsoft Word - XX 14 15 minute scheduling release FINAL.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with abundant clean energy resources, led by the hydropower system," said John Prescott, president and CEO of PNGC Power. "BPA has been proactive in taking steps to increase...

  7. THE ANGLO-AUSTRALIAN PLANET SEARCH. XX. A SOLITARY ICE-GIANT PLANET ORBITING HD 102365

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinney, C. G.; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Bailey, Jeremy; Butler, R. Paul; Jones, Hugh R. A.; O'Toole, Simon; Carter, Brad D.

    2011-02-01

    We present 12 years of precision Doppler data for the very nearby G3 star HD 102365, which reveals the presence of a Neptune-like planet with a 16.0 M{sub Earth} minimum mass in a 122.1 day orbit. Very few 'Super Earth' planets have been discovered to date in orbits this large and those that have been found reside in multiple systems of between three and six planets. HD 102365 b, in contrast, appears to orbit its star in splendid isolation. Analysis of the residuals to our Keplerian fit for HD 102365 b indicates that there are no other planets with minimum mass above 0.3 M{sub Jup} orbiting within 5 AU and no other 'Super Earths' more massive than 10 M{sub Earth} orbiting at periods shorter than 50 days. At periods of less than 20 days these limits drop to as low as 6 M{sub Earth}. There are now 32 exoplanets known with minimum mass below 20 M{sub Earth}, and interestingly the period distributions of these low-mass planets seem to be similar whether they orbit M-, K-, or G-type dwarfs.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - xxDraft SEIS PUBLIC MEETING PRESENTATION...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ensuring those weapons remain safe and reliable * Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen and is an essential component of every weapon in the current and projected U.S....

  9. Microsoft Word - XX 13 New book reveals drama behind your light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evolving environmental values and building out the regional power grid. Filled with spectacular photographs, it tells the stories vividly through the lens of BPA, the federal...

  10. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-0XX-2016_A Users Guide to DFNGen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... A User's Guide to DFNGen 12 The second group of options involves saving DFNGen files. 11 The File>Save command will save the current data set using the current file name and ...

  11. A :netao '?X,S vrtttcn (XX-x-162) to ;,r+ allison dascrllltnPr...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Co12 rollin, fnclliti;s ,.qhlch hove been used on uraniai &Ist At estI&ho&in Rloomfield, Iw .Terney (.J. ' :I. Msr.ien) , (IL Fox, Site Y (Cyril Smith). and Nnt rolling work ...

  12. D:\0myfiles\DOE Policy (LBL) Blackout Final\final-blackout-body-xx.vp

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Canada Power System Outage Task Force Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations April 2004 U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and Recommendations April 2004 ii G U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force G August 14th Blackout: Causes and Recommendations G U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force March 31, 2004 Dear Mr. President and Prime

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - xxDraft SEIS PUBLIC MEETING PRESENTATION 9 sep 2014 [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Public Hearings on Draft SEIS September 9-10, 2014 National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Department of Energy (DOE) 1 Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor Background * NNSA is the federal agency responsible for providing the nation with nuclear weapons and ensuring those weapons remain safe and reliable * Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen and is an essential component of every weapon in the

  14. SECTION L … ATTACHMENT xx … KEY PERSONNEL AND CRITICAL WORK AREA PERSONNEL RESUME ELEMENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2] Attachment L-3a KEY PERSONNEL RESUME ELEMENTS 1. Name of Offeror: 2. Name of Key Person: 3. Proposed Position: 4. Duties and Responsibilities in Proposed Position including elements of SOW assigned: 5. Chronological Work History: Start with current position and work backwards. A. Name and Address of Firm: B. Position(s) Held: C. Dates of Employment: D. General Summary of Responsibilities: Provide a concise description of major duties and responsibilities for each job relevant to the proposed

  15. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Release Next Update: EIA has discontinued this series....

  16. char_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 122 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing

  17. Building Interoperability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Page 3 20XX-XX-XX Market Place Needs - Data Fatigue Carbon Emissions Alternative Energy Demand Response Distributed Power IAQ Personal UI Mobile Cloud IT Convergence Charging...

  18. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterfeldt, M. Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Trnkle, G.

    2014-08-14

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910?nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  19. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-0XX-2016_A Users Guide to DFNGen 2016.final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A User's Guide to DFNGen 28 January 2016 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-001-2016 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

  20. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Air Conditioning Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 138 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 2

  1. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Appliances Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 240 kb) Contents Pages HC5-1a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-3a. Appliances by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC5-6a. Appliances by Type of Rented

  2. usage_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Usage Indicators Tables (Million U.S. Households; 60 pages, 247 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5

  3. Appendix A, Sample Register REGISTER XY CONTRACTING OFFICE Initiation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Number Solicitation Number Business Instrument Number 08302011 XX REQ- 11XX12345 DE-SOL- XX12345 DE- XY12345 AmendmentModification REQ- 11XX12345.000 Modification 001...

  4. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Office Equipment Tables (Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 123 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

  5. housingunit_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Housing Unit Tables (Million U.S. Households; 49 pages, 210 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 5 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 4 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of

  6. appl_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  7. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  8. ac_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  9. char_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9a. Household Characteristics by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 6.0 4.4 1.6 3.5 2 Persons

  10. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or commercial trucks (See Table 1). Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 5 The 1991 RTECS count includes vehicles that were owned or used...

  11. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991...

  12. Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback * PrivacySecurity *...

  13. Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collecting Household Energy Data Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for ...

  14. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0a. Air Conditioning by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 20.5 13.6 6.8 2.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 Q Q 27.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  15. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1a. Air Conditioning by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 37.2 19.3 6.4 11.5 1.5 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.4 Q Q Q 28.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  16. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Air Conditioning by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.4 1.2 1.7 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 10.7 3.4 7.2 7.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.1 0.2 0.9 15.5 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 9.6 3.2

  17. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.6 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 4.9 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 21.8 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8a. Air Conditioning by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.8 1.4 1.3 1.4 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 36.8 13.6 18.9 13.6 4.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 1.2 0.2 0.4 0.3 21.4 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2 ........................................ 80.8 35.6 13.4

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9a. Air Conditioning by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 14.5 11.3 3.2 3.3 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.3 0.3 Q 28.3 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1

  20. char_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.0 1.2 1.2 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Household Size 1 Person ....................................... 28.2 2.5 4.5 5.1 4.0 3.7 8.3 7.5 2 Persons

  1. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16.8 17.4 18.6 18.9 1.7 2.2 0.6 1.5 Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 15 Vehicle Miles Traveled per Vehicle (Thousand) . . . . . . . . ....

  2. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than $14,999 $15,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $49,999 $50,000 or More 0.4 1.9 1.2 1.0 0.6 1.9 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 18.7 22.9 27.1 38.3 15.0 47.6 3.0 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 13.2 19.8 25.5 37.7

  3. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 15.0 13.2 1.8 Q ...

  4. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of...

  5. Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Cover Page of Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends...

  6. Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 G Approved: XX-XX-XX IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE for use with DOE M 435.1-1 Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE G 435.1-4 i (and ii) DRAFT XX-XX-XX LLW Maintenance Guide Revision 0, XX-XX-XX Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  7. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 82.9 13.6 16.0 14.7 10.4 10.5 17.6 4.7 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.3 0.5 0.3 0.4 0.5 27.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 2

  8. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.8 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 59.5 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 5.2 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 1.2 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.3 Households Using

  9. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6a. Air Conditioning by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.8 0.5 1.4 1.2 1.6 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ........ 23.4 58.7 6.5 12.4 5.3 6.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 0.9 1.1 Q 0.6 Q 23.0 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning

  10. char_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2001 Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Household Size 1 Person ...................................................... 28.2 2.2 2.4 1.8 1.7 7.3 2 Persons .................................................... 35.1 2.2 4.0 2.4 2.0 6.9 3 Persons

  11. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0a. Home Office Equipment by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 22.4 15.7 6.7 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0

  12. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1a. Home Office Equipment by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 34.6 18.4 6.0 10.1 1.2 Personal Computers 1

  13. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2a. Home Office Equipment by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 21.4 6.2 15.2 1.0 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 14.3 4.0 10.4 3.7 Number of

  14. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9a. Home Office Equipment by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.1 1.4 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 17.9 12.8 5.0 1.3 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 10.9

  15. Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 Fact 748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 The overall share of annual household ...

  16. NON-NRC FUNDED RELAP5-3D VERSION 4.x.x SOFTWARE REACTOR EXCURSION AND LEAK ANALYSIS PACKAGE - THREE DIMENSIONAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-26

    The RELAP5-3D Version 3.x code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of nuclear reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems including pressurized water reactors, boiling water reactors, Soviet-designed reactors, heavy water reactors, gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal and molten salt cooled reactors, and even fusion reactors. Numerical models include multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, 1- and 2-D heat transfer in metal walls, 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-D neutron kinetics, trips, and control systems. Secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.

  17. NON-NRC FUNDED RELAP5-3D VERSION 4.x.x SOFTWARE REACTOR EXCURSION AND LEAK ANALYSIS PACKAGE - THREE DIMENSIONAL

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-03-26

    The RELAP5-3D Version 3.x code has been developed for best-estimate transient simulation of nuclear reactor coolant systems during postulated accidents. The code models the coupled behavior of the reactor coolant system and the core for loss-of-coolant accidents and operational transients such as anticipated transient without scram, loss of offsite power, loss of feedwater, and loss of flow. A generic modeling approach is used that permits simulating a variety of thermal hydraulic systems including pressurized watermore » reactors, boiling water reactors, Soviet-designed reactors, heavy water reactors, gas-cooled reactors, liquid metal and molten salt cooled reactors, and even fusion reactors. Numerical models include multi-dimensional hydrodynamics, 1- and 2-D heat transfer in metal walls, 0-, 1-, 2-, and 3-D neutron kinetics, trips, and control systems. Secondary system components are included to permit modeling of plant controls, turbines, condensers, and secondary feedwater systems.« less

  18. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 2.1 1.0 0.9 1.5 1.0 Total Households With Air-Conditioning ........................... 82.9 5.4 20.9 20.2 14.2 22.1 8.1 Air Conditioners Not Used ............ 2.1 Q 0.4 0.3 0.8 0.4 23.2

  19. ac_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2001 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.7 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 82.9 4.9 6.0 7.4 6.2 2.4 Air Conditioners Not Used ........................... 2.1 0.1 0.8 Q 0.1 23.2 Households Using Electric Air-Conditioning 1 ........................................ 80.8 4.7 5.2 7.4 6.1 2.6 Type of Electric Air-Conditioning Used Central

  20. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.9 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 8.4 26.2 21.1 19.0

  1. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.4 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.2 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 96.2 14.9 16.7 17.0 12.2 13.0 22.4 4.4 Personal Computers 2

  2. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Appliances by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.5 1.0 1.7 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 22.1 6.6 15.5 1.1 1

  3. Guide Title

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE G XXX.X-X xx-xx-20XX Guide Title This Guide describes acceptable, but not mandatory means for complying with requirements. Guides are not requirements documents and are not...

  4. Microsoft Word - Revised DOE M 460 -Mar 2006.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DISTRIBUTION: INITIATED BY: All Departmental Elements Office of Environmental Management Approved: XX-XX-01 Sunset Review: XX-XX-03 Expires: XX-XX-05 DRAFT - March 8, 2006 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORTATION PRACTICES MANUAL for use with DOE O 460.2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management DOE M 460.2-1 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL TRANSPORTATION PRACTICES MANUAL 1. PURPOSE: This Manual establishes a set of standard transportation practices for U.S. Department of Energy

  5. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0a. Appliances by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 23.8 16.6 7.2 NE 1

  6. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1a. Appliances by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.8 1.1 1.4 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 36.2 19.4 6.4 10.3 1.5 1

  7. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4a. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.5 1.7 1.6 1.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 69.1 9.4 16.7 6.6 4.3 1

  8. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5a. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.4 2.1 3.1 1.3 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ...........................................

  9. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6a. Appliances by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 33.4 10.1 7.3 14.9 1.1

  10. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8a. Appliances by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.5 0.9 1.4 1.2 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.1 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 47.5 17.5 19.9 16.8 4.2 1

  11. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9a. Appliances by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.3 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 19.6 14.5 5.2 1.1 1

  12. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.1 1.0 1.5 1.5 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Households Using Office Equipment ......................................... 96.2 6.2 11.4 6.7 5.9 1.7 Personal Computers 1 ................................. 60.0 3.4 7.9 4.1 3.8 4.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1

  13. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0a. Space Heating by Midwest Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Midwest Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division East North Central West North Central 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 24.5 17.1 7.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.8 No

  14. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1a. Space Heating by South Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. South Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division South Atlantic East South Central West South Central 0.5 0.9 1.2 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 38.9 20.3 6.8 11.8 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 38.8 20.2 6.8 11.8 NE Do Not Heat Home

  15. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2a. Space Heating by West Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. West Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Mountain Pacific 0.6 1.0 1.6 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 23.3 6.7 16.6 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 22.6 6.7 15.9 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 Q 0.7 10.6 No Heating Equipment

  16. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6a. Space Heating by Type of Rented Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Rented Units Type of Rented Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.8 1.1 0.9 2.5 Total ............................................... 34.3 10.5 7.4 15.2 1.1 6.9 Heat Home ..................................... 33.7 10.4 7.4 14.8 1.1 6.9 Do Not Heat Home

  17. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8a. Space Heating by Urban/Rural Location, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Urban/Rural Location 1 RSE Row Factors City Town Suburbs Rural 0.6 0.9 1.3 1.3 1.2 Total .............................................................. 107.0 49.9 18.0 21.2 17.9 4.3 Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 49.1 18.0 21.2 17.8 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 0.7 0.1 0.1 0.1 25.8 No Heating

  18. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9a. Space Heating by Northeast Census Region, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Northeast Census Region RSE Row Factors Total Census Division Middle Atlantic New England 0.5 1.0 1.2 1.7 Total .............................................................. 107.0 20.3 14.8 5.4 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 20.1 14.7 5.4 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q Q Q 19.9 No

  19. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    a. Appliances by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.4 1.9 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 Total .................................................. 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 7.8 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven

  20. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Appliances by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.4 1.5 1.2 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.2 Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ........................................... 101.7 14.3 17.2 17.8 12.9 13.7 25.9 4.2 1

  1. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Climate Zone 1 RSE Row Factors Fewer than 2,000 CDD and -- 2,000 CDD or More and Fewer than 4,000 HDD More than 7,000 HDD 5,500 to 7,000 HDD 4,000 to 5,499 HDD Fewer than 4,000 HDD 0.5 1.6 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.0 Total ............................................... 107.0 9.2 28.6 24.0 21.0 24.1 8.2 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 9.2 28.6 23.9 20.7 23.6 8.2 Do Not

  2. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1 1980 to 1989 1970 to 1979 1960 to 1969 1950 to 1959 1949 or Before 0.5 1.5 1.1 1.1 1.1 1.1 0.9 Total ............................................... 107.0 15.5 18.2 18.8 13.8 14.2 26.6 4.3 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 15.4 18.2 18.6 13.6 13.9 26.4 4.3 Do Not Heat Home ........................

  3. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Type of Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.5 0.5 1.5 1.4 1.7 Total ............................................... 107.0 73.7 9.5 17.0 6.8 4.4 Heat Home ..................................... 106.0 73.4 9.4 16.4 6.8 4.5 Do Not Heat Home ........................ 1.0 0.3 Q 0.6 Q 19.0 No

  4. Fact #565: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 5: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income Fact #565: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income In the annual Consumer Expenditure Survey, household incomes are grouped into five equal parts called quintiles (each quintile is 20%). Households in the second and third quintiles consistently have a higher share of spending on gasoline each year than households in the other quintiles. Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income Quintile Bar graph

  5. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  6. Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Household Response To Dynamic Pricing Of Electricity: A Survey Of The Experimental Evidence Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Household Response To Dynamic...

  7. Energy Information Administration/Household Vehicles Energy Consumptio...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    , Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 ix Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 presents statistics about energy-related...

  8. Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site

  9. Microsoft Word - Household Energy Use CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 20 40 60 80 100 US PAC CA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US PAC CA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US PAC CA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household  California households use 62 million Btu of energy per home, 31% less than the U.S. average. The lower than average site

  10. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  11. Next Generation Household Refrigerator | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Next Generation Household Refrigerator Next Generation Household Refrigerator Embraco's high efficiency, oil-free linear compressor.<br /> Credit: Whirlpool Embraco's high efficiency, oil-free linear compressor. Credit: Whirlpool ORNL's Pradeep Bansal examines an Embraco linear compressor, which will be used in a Whirlpool-ORNL project aimed at building a more energy-efficient refrigerator. ORNL's Pradeep Bansal examines an Embraco linear compressor, which will be used in a Whirlpool-ORNL

  12. Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collecting Household Energy Data Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, July 19, 2012. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Homeowner and Contractor Surveys Mastermind: Jim Mikel, Spirit Foundation Generating Energy Efficiency Project Leads and Allocating Leads to Contractors

  13. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  14. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E (2001) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Electricity Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already provided information

  15. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    G (2001) -- Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S. have already

  16. Delivering Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Single Family Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-12-01

    Provides state and local policymakers with information on successful approaches to the design and implementation of residential efficiency programs for households ineligible for low-income programs.

  17. Barriers to household investment in residential energy conservation: preliminary assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, W.L.

    1982-12-01

    A general assessment of the range of barriers which impede household investments in weatherization and other energy efficiency improvements for their homes is provided. The relationship of similar factors to households' interest in receiving a free energy audits examined. Rates of return that underly household investments in major conservation improvements are assessed. A special analysis of household knowledge of economically attractive investments is provided that compares high payback improvements specified by the energy audit with the list of needed or desirable conservation improvements identified by respondents. (LEW)

  18. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ... to 79,999","80,000 or More" "Water Heating Characteristics" ...

  19. Source: Handbook for Handling, Storing, and Dispensing E85 and Other Ethanol Blends.

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    A2: Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends (Other Equipment). September 2013. Manufacturer Compatibility with Ethanol Blends (Other Equipment) Manufacturer Product Model Ethanol Compatibility Bravo Systems Fiberglass Fittings Series F, FF, FPE, FR, F Retrofit- S, RPE Retrofit-Si, F BLR, F D-BLR-S, TBF E0-E100 Bravo Systems Spill Buckets B3XX E0-E100 Bravo Systems Tank Sumps & Covers B4XX E0-E100 Bravo Systems Transition Sumps (planter, walkover, H-20 rated) B5XX, B6XX, B7XX, B8XX

  20. Reconstructing householder vectors from Tall-Skinny QR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Demmel, James; Grigori, Laura; Jacquelin, Mathias; Knight, Nicholas; Nguyen, Hong Diep

    2015-08-05

    The Tall-Skinny QR (TSQR) algorithm is more communication efficient than the standard Householder algorithm for QR decomposition of matrices with many more rows than columns. However, TSQR produces a different representation of the orthogonal factor and therefore requires more software development to support the new representation. Further, implicitly applying the orthogonal factor to the trailing matrix in the context of factoring a square matrix is more complicated and costly than with the Householder representation. We show how to perform TSQR and then reconstruct the Householder vector representation with the same asymptotic communication efficiency and little extra computational cost. We demonstratemore » the high performance and numerical stability of this algorithm both theoretically and empirically. The new Householder reconstruction algorithm allows us to design more efficient parallel QR algorithms, with significantly lower latency cost compared to Householder QR and lower bandwidth and latency costs compared with Communication-Avoiding QR (CAQR) algorithm. Experiments on supercomputers demonstrate the benefits of the communication cost improvements: in particular, our experiments show substantial improvements over tuned library implementations for tall-and-skinny matrices. Furthermore, we also provide algorithmic improvements to the Householder QR and CAQR algorithms, and we investigate several alternatives to the Householder reconstruction algorithm that sacrifice guarantees on numerical stability in some cases in order to obtain higher performance.« less

  1. Reconstructing householder vectors from Tall-Skinny QR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Demmel, James; Grigori, Laura; Jacquelin, Mathias; Knight, Nicholas; Nguyen, Hong Diep

    2015-08-05

    The Tall-Skinny QR (TSQR) algorithm is more communication efficient than the standard Householder algorithm for QR decomposition of matrices with many more rows than columns. However, TSQR produces a different representation of the orthogonal factor and therefore requires more software development to support the new representation. Further, implicitly applying the orthogonal factor to the trailing matrix in the context of factoring a square matrix is more complicated and costly than with the Householder representation. We show how to perform TSQR and then reconstruct the Householder vector representation with the same asymptotic communication efficiency and little extra computational cost. We demonstrate the high performance and numerical stability of this algorithm both theoretically and empirically. The new Householder reconstruction algorithm allows us to design more efficient parallel QR algorithms, with significantly lower latency cost compared to Householder QR and lower bandwidth and latency costs compared with Communication-Avoiding QR (CAQR) algorithm. Experiments on supercomputers demonstrate the benefits of the communication cost improvements: in particular, our experiments show substantial improvements over tuned library implementations for tall-and-skinny matrices. Furthermore, we also provide algorithmic improvements to the Householder QR and CAQR algorithms, and we investigate several alternatives to the Householder reconstruction algorithm that sacrifice guarantees on numerical stability in some cases in order to obtain higher performance.

  2. "Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  3. Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation, 1984-2010 | Department of Energy 8: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010 The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices were high, gasoline and motor oil made up a larger share of transportation

  4. Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08...

  5. Form EIA-457E (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas Usage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    F (2001) -- Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 ... This report is required by law. The timely submission of Form EIA-457F by those required ...

  6. Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Patricia S; Reuscher, Tim; Schmoyer, Richard L; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2007-05-01

    Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New England, Middle Atlantic, and Pacific), MSA size, and the availability of rail. Extrapolating NHTS data within small geographic areas could risk developing and subsequently using unreliable estimates. For example, if a planning agency in City X of State Y estimates travel rates and other travel characteristics based on survey data collected from NHTS sample households that were located in City X of State Y, then the agency could risk developing and using unreliable estimates for their planning process. Typically, this limitation significantly increases as the size of an area decreases. That said, the NHTS contains a wealth of information that could allow statistical inferences about small geographic areas, with a pre-determined level of statistical certainty. The question then becomes whether a method can be developed that integrates the NHTS data and other data to estimate key travel characteristics for small geographic areas such as Census tract and transportation analysis zone, and whether this method can outperform other, competing methods.

  7. Microsoft Word - o420.2cRevCom11-9-10

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Approved: XX-XX-2010 SAFETY OF ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science DRAFT DOE O 420.2C DOE O 420.2C 1 DRAFT XX-XX-2010 SAFETY OF ACCELERATOR FACILITIES 1. PURPOSE. To define accelerators and to establish accelerator specific safety requirements and approval authorities which, when supplemented by other applicable safety and health requirements, promotes worker health and safety within Department of Energy (DOE) including National Nuclear Security Administration

  8. EERE Success Story—Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydropower project produces enough electricity to annually power nearly 100 typical American households.

  9. Ethan Frome

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    xx/xx/xxxx Version No.: xxxx.xx Burden: 45 hours ANNUAL REPORT OF DOMESTIC OIL AND GAS RESERVES FORM EIA-23L County Level Report Instructions REPORT YEAR 201X Table of Contents Page General Instructions ......................................................................................... 2 A. Purpose .................................................................................................................. 2 B. Who Must Submit Form EIA-23L

  10. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Statistics | Department of Energy 8: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic Statistics Since 1969, the number of vehicles per household has increased by 66% and the number of vehicles per licensed driver has increased by 47%. The number of workers per household has changed the least of the statistics shown here. There has been a decline in the number of persons per household from 1969 to

  11. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, J.D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, J.E.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual household. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies. 21 refs., 3 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Modeling patterns of hot water use in households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, James D.; Liu, Xiaomin; McMahon, James E.; Dunham, Camilla; Shown, Leslie J.; McCure, Quandra T.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a detailed model of hot water use patterns in individual households. The model improves upon an existing model by including the effects of four conditions that were previously unaccounted for: the absence of a clothes washer; the absence of a dishwasher; a household consisting of seniors only; and a household that does not pay for its own hot water use. Although these four conditions can significantly affect residential hot water use, and have been noted in other studies, this is the first time that they have been incorporated into a detailed model. This model allows detailed evaluation of the impact of potential efficiency standards for water heaters and other market transformation policies.

  13. Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter U.S. consumers are expected to pay less this winter on their home heating bills because of lower oil and natural gas prices and projected milder temperatures than last winter. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said households that rely on heating oil which are mainly located in the Northeast will pay the lowest heating expenditures in 9 years down 25% from last winter as consumers are expected to save about

  14. A Glance at Chinas Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the worlds third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  15. Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Nevada-based contracting firm Nevada Controls, LLC used a low-interest loan from the Nevada State Office of Energy's Revolving Loan Fund to help construct a hydropower project in the small Nevada town of Kingston. The Kingston Creek Project-benefitting the Young Brothers Ranch-is a 175-kilowatt hydro generation plant on private land that takes advantage of an

  16. Shared Solar Projects Powering Households Throughout America | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Shared Solar Projects Powering Households Throughout America Shared Solar Projects Powering Households Throughout America January 31, 2014 - 2:30pm Addthis Shared solar projects allow consumers to take advantage of solar energy’s myriad benefits, even though the system is not located on the consumer’s own rooftop. | Photo courtesy of the Vote Solar Initiative Shared solar projects allow consumers to take advantage of solar energy's myriad benefits, even though the system

  17. Table HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 2001 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  18. Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Vehicles | Department of Energy 7: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own Three or More Vehicles Household vehicle ownership has changed over the last six decades. In 1960, over twenty percent of households did not own a vehicle, but by 2010, that number fell to less than 10%. The number of households with three or more vehicles grew from 2% in 1960 to nearly 20% in 2010. Before 1990,

  19. Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles Fact #729: May 28, 2012 Secondary Household Vehicles Travel Fewer Miles When a household has more than one vehicle, the secondary vehicles travel fewer miles than the primary vehicle. In a two-vehicle household, the second vehicle travels less than half of the miles that the primary vehicle travels in a day. In a six-vehicle household, the sixth vehicle travels fewer than five miles a day. Daily Vehicle

  20. Forum on Enhancing the Delivery of Energy Efficiency to Middle Income Households: Discussion Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-09-20

    Summarizes discussions and recommendations from a forum for practitioners and policymakers aiming to strengthen residential energy efficiency program design and delivery for middle income households.

  1. Effect of Income on Appliances in U.S. Households, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    Entails how people live, the factors that cause the most differences in home lifestyle, including energy use in geographic location, socioeconomics and household income.

  2. Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles Fact #614: March 15, 2010 Average Age of Household Vehicles The average age of household vehicles has increased from 6.6 years in 1977 to 9.2 years in 2009. Pickup trucks have the oldest average age in every year listed. Sport utility vehicles (SUVs), first reported in the 1995 survey, have the youngest average age. Average Vehicle Age by Vehicle Type Graph showing the average vehicle age by type (car, van, pickup, SUV, all household

  3. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications EcoHouse Program Overview Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households

  4. Energy-efficient housing alternatives: a predictive model of factors affecting household perceptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckengost, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The major purpose of this investigation was to assess the impact of household socio-economic factors, dwelling characteristics, energy conservation behavior, and energy attitudes on the perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Perceptions of passive solar, active solar, earth sheltered, and retrofitted housing were examined. Data used were from the Southern Regional Research Project, S-141, Housing for Low and Moderate Income Families. Responses from 1804 households living in seven southern states were analyzed. A conceptual model was proposed to test the hypothesized relationships which were examined by path analysis. Perceptions of energy efficient housing alternatives were found to be a function of selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, household economic factors, and household conservation behavior. Age and education of the respondent, family size, housing-income ratio, utility income ratio, energy attitude, and size of the dwelling unit were found to have direct and indirect effects on perceptions of energy-efficient housing alternatives. Energy conservation behavior made a significant direct impact with behavioral energy conservation changes having the most profound influence. Conservation behavior was influenced by selected household and dwelling characteristics, energy attitude, and household economic factors.

  5. Nuclear Safety Specialist FTCP Functional Area Qualification Standards - Draft

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    83-20XX DOE-STD-1183-20XX Draft: Month Year DOE STANDARD NUCLEAR SAFETY SPECIALIST FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1183-20XX ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at

  6. 201X EIA-23S Annual Report of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, Summary Level

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1X EIA-23S Annual Report of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves, Summary Level 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Office of Oil and Gas Washington, DC 20585 OMB Number: 1905-0057 Expiration Date: xx/xx/xxxx Version No.: xxxx.xx Burden: 8 hours ANNUAL REPORT OF DOMESTIC OIL AND GAS RESERVES FORM EIA-23S Summary Level Report Instructions SURVEY YEAR 201X Table of Contents Page General Instructions

  7. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses.The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  8. Laboratory Testing of Demand-Response Enabled Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparn, B.; Jin, X.; Earle, L.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems capable of two-way communications between the utility's grid and the building, there has been significant effort in the Automated Home Energy Management (AHEM) industry to develop capabilities that allow residential building systems to respond to utility demand events by temporarily reducing their electricity usage. Major appliance manufacturers are following suit by developing Home Area Network (HAN)-tied appliance suites that can take signals from the home's 'smart meter,' a.k.a. AMI meter, and adjust their run cycles accordingly. There are numerous strategies that can be employed by household appliances to respond to demand-side management opportunities, and they could result in substantial reductions in electricity bills for the residents depending on the pricing structures used by the utilities to incent these types of responses. The first step to quantifying these end effects is to test these systems and their responses in simulated demand-response (DR) conditions while monitoring energy use and overall system performance.

  9. Heating oil and propane households bills to be lower this winter despite recent cold spell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heating oil and propane households bills to be lower this winter despite recent cold spell Despite the recent cold weather, households that use heating oil or propane as their main space heating fuel are still expected to have lower heating bills compared with last winter. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the average household that uses heating oil will spend $1,780 this winter that's about $570 less than last winter. Those savings reflect lower crude

  10. Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy 6: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose Fact #616: March 29, 2010 Household Vehicle-Miles of Travel by Trip Purpose In 2009, getting to and from work accounted for about 27% of household vehicle-miles of travel (VMT). Work-related business was 8.4% of VMT in 2001, but declined to 6.7% in 2009, possibly due to advancements in computing technology making it possible for more business to be handled electronically. VMT for shopping was almost

  11. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington DC 20585 OMB No. 1905-0057 Expiration Date: xx/xx/xxxx Version No.: xxxx.xx Burden: 8 hours FORM EIA-23S ANNUAL REPORT OF DOMESTIC OIL AND GAS RESERVES REPORT YEAR 201X COVER PAGE This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information and sanction statements, see Section VII and VIII of the instructions. Resubmission? PART I. IDENTIFICATION Complete and return by June XX, 201X

  12. Notice of Intent to Issue DOE N 314.1, DOE-Flex: DOE's Telework Program while Developing a Successor Order (5-6-11)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-05-06

    This is to develop DOE N 3XX, which will establish the requirements and responsibilities for the Department's telework/flexiplace program.

  13. EPA Webinar: Bringing Energy Efficiency and Renewable Housing to Low-Income Households

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, this webinar will explore the topic of linking and leveraging energy efficiency and renewable energy programs for limited-income households, including the need to coordinate with other energy assistance programs.

  14. How Do You Encourage Everyone in Your Household to Save Energy?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anyone who has decided to save energy at home knows that the entire household needs to be involved if you really want to see savings. Some peoplebe they roommates, spouses, children, or maybe even...

  15. Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Money | Department of Energy Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households Some Money May 21, 2013 - 2:40pm Addthis Students can register now to save energy and win prizes with the Home Energy Challenge. Students can register now to save energy and win prizes with the Home Energy Challenge. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  16. Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

  17. "Table HC15.3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Household Characteristics by Four Most Populated States, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,"Housing Units (millions)","Four Most Populated States" "Household Characteristics",,"New York","Florida","Texas","California" "Total",111.1,7.1,7,8,12.1 "Household Size" "1 Person",30,1.8,1.9,2,3.2 "2 Persons",34.8,2.2,2.3,2.4,3.2 "3 Persons",18.4,1.1,1.3,1.2,1.8

  18. NYSERDA's Green Jobs-Green New York Program: Extending Energy Efficiency Financing To Underserved Households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimring, Mark; Fuller, Merrian

    2011-01-24

    The New York legislature passed the Green Jobs-Green New York (GJGNY) Act in 2009. Administered by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), GJGNY programs provide New Yorkers with access to free or low-cost energy assessments,1 energy upgrade services,2 low-cost financing, and training for various 'green-collar' careers. Launched in November 2010, GJGNY's residential initiative is notable for its use of novel underwriting criteria to expand access to energy efficiency financing for households seeking to participate in New York's Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program.3 The GJGNY financing program is a valuable test of whether alternatives to credit scores can be used to responsibly expand credit opportunities for households that do not qualify for traditional lending products and, in doing so, enable more households to make energy efficiency upgrades.

  19. Households to pay more than expected to stay warm this winter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Households to pay more than expected to stay warm this winter Following a colder-than-expected November, U.S. households are forecast to consume more heating fuels than previously expected....resulting in higher heating bills. Homeowners that rely on natural gas will see their total winter expenses rise nearly 13 percent from last winter....while users of electric heat will see a 2.6 percent increase in costs. That's the latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane

  20. Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during 2015 Even with the recent increases in gasoline prices, the average U.S. household is still expected save $710 in gasoline costs this year compared with what was paid at the pump in 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the national average price for regular gasoline is expected to be $2.39 per gallon this year. That's almost $1 less than the $3.36 average in 2014. Lower crude oil prices

  1. Average household expected to save $675 at the pump in 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Average household expected to save $675 at the pump in 2015 Although retail gasoline prices have risen in recent weeks U.S. consumers are still expected to save about $675 per household in motor fuel costs this year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says the average pump price for regular grade gasoline in 2015 will be $2.43 per gallon. That's about 93 cents lower than last year's average. The savings for consumers will be even bigger during the

  2. Comparison of energy expenditures by elderly and non-elderly households: 1975 and 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siler, A.

    1980-05-01

    The relative position of the elderly in the population is examined and their characteristic use of energy in relation to the total population and their non-elderly counterparts is observed. The 1985 projections are based on demographic, economic, and socio-economic, and energy data assumptions contained in the 1978 Annual Report to Congress. The model used for estimating household energy expenditure is MATH/CHRDS - Micro-Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System. Characteristics used include households disposable income, poverty status, location by DOE region and Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA), and race and sex of the household head as well as age. Energy use by fuel type will be identified for total home fuels, including electricity, natural gas, bottled gas and fuel oil, and for all fuels, where gasoline use is also included. Throughout the analysis, both income and expenditure-dollar amounts for 1975 and 1985 are expressed in constant 1978 dollars. Two appendices contain statistical information.

  3. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-03-23

    Over the past years the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed an econometric model that predicts appliance ownership at the household level based on macroeconomic variables such as household income (corrected for purchase power parity), electrification, urbanization and climate variables. Hundreds of data points from around the world were collected in order to understand trends in acquisition of new appliances by households, especially in developing countries. The appliances covered by this model are refrigerators, lighting fixtures, air conditioners, washing machines and televisions. The approach followed allows the modeler to construct a bottom-up analysis based at the end use and the household level. It captures the appliance uptake and the saturation effect which will affect the energy demand growth in the residential sector. With this approach, the modeler can also account for stock changes in technology and efficiency as a function of time. This serves two important functions with regard to evaluation of the impact of energy efficiency policies. First, it provides insight into which end uses will be responsible for the largest share of demand growth, and therefore should be policy priorities. Second, it provides a characterization of the rate at which policies affecting new equipment penetrate the appliance stock. Over the past 3 years, this method has been used to support the development of energy demand forecasts at the country, region or global level.

  4. Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics, Selected Years, 1978-2009 Appliance Year Change 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 1980 to 2009 Total Households (millions) 77 78 82 83 84 86 91 94 97 101 107 111 114 32 Percent of Households<//td> Space Heating - Main Fuel 1 Natural Gas 55 55 55 56 57 55 55 55 53 52 55 52 50 -5 Electricity 2 16 17 18 17 16 17 20 23 26 29 29 30 35 17 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 0 Distillate

  5. The importance of China's household sector for black carbon emissions - article no. L12708

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D.G.; Aunan, K.

    2005-06-30

    The combustion of coal and biofuels in Chinese households is a large source of black carbon (BC), representing about 10-15% of total global emissions during the past two decades, depending on the year. How the Chinese household sector develops during the next 50 years will have an important bearing on future aerosol concentrations, because the range of possible outcomes (about 550 Gg yr{sup -1}) is greater than total BC emissions in either the United States or Europe (each about 400-500 Gg yr{sup -1}). In some Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scenarios biofuels persist in rural China for at least the next 50 years, whereas in other scenarios a transition to cleaner fuels and technologies effectively mitigates BC emissions. This paper discusses measures and policies that would help this transition and also raises the possibility of including BC emission reductions as a post-Kyoto option for China and other developing countries.

  6. Characterization of household hazardous waste from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathje, W.L.; Wilson, D.C.; Lambou, V.W.; Herndon, R.C.

    1987-09-01

    There is a growing concern that certain constituents of common household products, that are discarded in residential garbage, may be potentially harmful to human health and the environment by adversely affecting the quality of ground and surface water. A survey of hazardous wastes in residential garbage from Marin County, California, and New Orleans, Louisiana, was conducted in order to determine the amount and characteristics of such wastes that are entering municipal landfills. The results of the survey indicate that approximately 642 metric tons of hazardous waste are discarded per year for the New Orleans study area and approximately 259 metric tons are discarded per year for the Marin County study area. Even though the percent of hazardous household waste in the garbage discarded in both study areas was less than 1%, it represents a significant quantity of hazardous waste because of the large volume of garbage involved.

  7. Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009 - Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009 Release date: February 3, 2015 Introduction In 2012, the residential sector accounted for 21% of total primary energy consumption and about 20% of carbon dioxide emissions in the United States (computed from EIA 2013). Because of the impacts of residential sector energy use on the environment and the economy, this study was undertaken to help provide a better understanding of the factors affecting energy

  8. Evaluation of bulk paint worker exposure to solvents at household hazardous waste collection events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, M.

    1995-09-01

    In fiscal year 93/94, over 250 governmental agencies were involved in the collection of household hazardous wastes in the State of California. During that time, over 3,237,000 lbs. of oil based paint were collected in 9,640 drums. Most of this was in lab pack drums, which can only hold up to 20 one gallon cans. Cost for disposal of such drums is approximately $1000. In contrast, during the same year, 1,228,000 lbs. of flammable liquid were collected in 2,098 drums in bulk form. Incineration of bulked flammable liquids is approximately $135 per drum. Clearly, it is most cost effective to bulk flammable liquids at household hazardous waste events. Currently, this is the procedure used at most Temporary Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facilities (THHWCFs). THHWCFs are regulated by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) under the new Permit-by Rule Regulations. These regulations specify certain requirements regarding traffic flow, emergency response notifications and prevention of exposure to the public. The regulations require that THHWCF operators bulk wastes only when the public is not present. [22 CCR, section 67450.4 (e) (2) (A)].Santa Clara County Environmental Health Department sponsors local THHWCF`s and does it`s own bulking. In order to save time and money, a variance from the regulation was requested and an employee monitoring program was initiated to determine actual exposure to workers. Results are presented.

  9. Household`s choices of efficiency levels for appliances: Using stated- and revealed-preference data to identify the importance of rebates and financing arrangements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Train, K.; Atherton, T.

    1994-11-01

    We examine customers` choice between standard and high-efficiency equipment, and the impact of utility incentives such as rebates and loans on this decision. Using data from interviews with 400 households, we identify the factors that customers consider in their choice of efficiency level for appliances and the relative importance of these factors. We build a model that describes customers` choices and can be used to predict choices in future situations under changes in the attributes of appliances and in the utility`s DSM and as part of the appliance-choice component of utilities` end-use forecasting systems. As examples, the model is used to predict the impacts of: doubling the size of rebates, replacing rebates with financing programs, and offering loans and rebates as alternative options for customers.

  10. Household magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Now which is stronger, gravity or magnetism? What is going on? How do flexible refrigerator magnets work? Get 2 of these magnets, they are often the size of a business card....

  11. Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total.............................................................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day........................................... 8.2 1.4 1.9 1.4 1.0 2.4 2 Times A Day........................................................ 24.6 4.3 7.6 4.3 4.8 3.7 Once a Day............................................................ 42.3 9.9

  12. Table HC6.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total...................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 16.3 9.4 4.0 2.7 3.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 13.8 25.4 14.4 13.2 8.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.9 17.4 8.5 7.3 5.2

  13. Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total................................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer............................. 35.5 16.3 9.4 4.0 2.7 3.2 Use a Personal Computer.......................................... 75.6 13.8 25.4 14.4 13.2 8.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model.....................................................

  14. Table HC6.2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total...................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 1.7 0.8 0.4 0.3 Q 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 10.2 6.4 3.4 2.3 1.5 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 5.5 6.3 3.0 3.3 2.6 1,500 to

  15. Table HC6.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total........................................................................ 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment.......................... 17.8 5.4 5.3 2.7 2.5 2.0 Have Cooling Equipment...................................... 93.3 24.6 29.6 15.7 13.4 10.0 Use Cooling Equipment....................................... 91.4 24.0 29.1 15.5 13.2 9.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it......................

  16. Table HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    HC6.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S.............................................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Cooking Appliances Conventional Ovens Use an Oven.................................................. 109.6 29.5 34.4 18.2 15.7 11.8 1................................................................. 103.3 28.4 32.0 17.3 14.7 11.0 2 or More.................................................... 6.2 1.1 2.5 1.0 0.9 0.8 Do Not

  17. Assessment of lead contamination in Bahrain environment. I. Analysis of household paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madany, I.M.; Ali, S.M.; Akhter, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis of lead in household paint collected from various old buildings in Bahrain is reported. The atomic absorption spectrophotometric method, both flame and flameless (graphite furnace) techniques, were used for the analysis. The concentrations of lead in paint were found in the range 200 to 5700 mg/kg, which are low compared to the limit of 0.5% in UK and 0.06% in USA. Nevertheless, these are hazardous. Recommendations are reported in order to avoid paint containing lead. 17 references, 1 table.

  18. The changing character of household waste in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 as a function of home heating methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolealov, Markta; Beneov, Libue; Zvodsk, Anita

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: The character of household waste in the three different types of households were assesed. The quantity, density and composition of household waste were determined. The physicochemical characteristics were determined. The changing character of household waste during past 10 years was described. The potential of energy recovery of household waste in Czech republic was assesed. - Abstract: The authors of this paper report on the changing character of household waste, in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 in households differentiated by their heating methods. The data presented are the result of two projects, financed by the Czech Ministry of Environment, which were undertaken during this time period with the aim of focusing on the waste characterisation and complete analysis of the physicochemical properties of the household waste. In the Czech Republic, the composition of household waste varies significantly between different types of households based on the methods of home heating employed. For the purposes of these studies, the types of homes were divided into three categories urban, mixed and rural. Some of the biggest differences were found in the quantities of certain subsample categories, especially fine residue (matter smaller than 20 mm), between urban households with central heating and rural households that primarily employ solid fuel such coal or wood. The use of these solid fuels increases the fraction of the finer categories because of the higher presence of ash. Heating values of the residual household waste from the three categories varied very significantly, ranging from 6.8 MJ/kg to 14.2 MJ/kg in 1999 and from 6.8 MJ/kg to 10.5 MJ/kg in 2009 depending on the type of household and season. The same factors affect moisture of residual household waste which varied from 23.2% to 33.3%. The chemical parameters also varied significantly, especially in the quantities of Tl, As, Cr, Zn, Fe and Mn, which were higher in rural households. Because knowledge about the properties of household waste, as well as its physicochemical characteristics, is very important not only for future waste management, but also for the prediction of the behaviour and influence of the waste on the environment as the country continues to streamline its legislation to the European Unions solid waste mandates, the results of these studies were employed by the Czech Ministry of Environment to optimise the national waste management strategy.

  19. Journal Name

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics Page 4 of 15 Journal Name Regeneration mechanisms of high-lithium content zirconates as CO2 capture sorbents: experimental measurements and theoretical Received 00th January 20xx, investigations Accepted 00th January 20xx DOI: 10.1039/x0xx00000x Yuhua and Jonathan www.rsc.org/ By combining TGA and XRD measurements with theoretical calculations of the capture of CO2 by lithium-rich zirconates (Li8ZrO6 and Li6Zr2O7), it has been demonstrated that the primary

  20. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington DC 20585 OMB No. 1905-0057 Expiration Date: xx/xx/xxxx Version No.: xxxx.xx Burden: 45 hours FORM EIA-23L ANNUAL REPORT OF DOMESTIC OIL AND GAS RESERVES REPORT YEAR 201X COVER PAGE This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information and sanction statements, see Section VII and VIII of the instructions. Resubmission? PART I. IDENTIFICATION Complete and return by May 1, 201X

  1. Survey of Recipients of WAP Services Assessment of Household Budget and Energy Behaviors Pre to Post Weatherization DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Hawkins, Beth A.

    2015-10-01

    This report presents results from the national survey of weatherization recipients. This research was one component of the retrospective and Recovery Act evaluations of the U.S. Department of Energy s Weatherization Assistance Program. Survey respondents were randomly selected from a nationally representative sample of weatherization recipients. The respondents and a comparison group were surveyed just prior to receiving their energy audits and then again approximately 18 months post-weatherization. This report focuses on budget issues faced by WAP households pre- and post-weatherization, whether household energy behaviors changed from pre- to post, the effectiveness of approaches to client energy education, and use and knowledge about thermostats.

  2. Table HC6.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total..................................................................... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............ 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment............... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Main Space Heating Equipment................. 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and

  3. Table HC6.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total U.S. Housing Units.................................. 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4 15.9 12.0 Do Not Have Heating Equipment..................... 1.2 0.3 0.3 Q 0.2 0.2 Have Space Heating Equipment....................... 109.8 29.7 34.5 18.2 15.6 11.8 Use Space Heating Equipment........................ 109.1 29.5 34.4 18.1 15.5 11.6 Have But Do Not Use Equipment.................... 0.8 Q Q Q Q Q Space Heating Usage During 2005

  4. An Analysis of the Price Elasticity of Demand for Household Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Kimberly; Dale, Larry; Fujita, K. Sydny

    2008-01-25

    This report summarizes our study of the price elasticity of demand for home appliances, including refrigerators, clothes washers, and dishwashers. In the context of increasingly stringent appliance standards, we are interested in what kind of impact the increased manufacturing costs caused by higher efficiency requirements will have on appliance sales. We begin with a review of existing economics literature describing the impact of economic variables on the sale of durable goods.We then describe the market for home appliances and changes in this market over the past 20 years, performing regression analysis on the shipments of home appliances and relevant economic variables including changes to operating cost and household income. Based on our analysis, we conclude that the demand for home appliances is price inelastic.

  5. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  6. Commercial viability of hybrid vehicles : best household use and cross national considerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Vyas, A. D.

    1999-07-16

    Japanese automakers have introduced hybrid passenger cars in Japan and will soon do so in the US. In this paper, we report how we used early computer simulation model results to compare the commercial viability of a hypothetical near-term (next decade) hybrid mid-size passenger car configuration under varying fuel price and driving patterns. The fuel prices and driving patterns evaluated are designed to span likely values for major OECD nations. Two types of models are used. One allows the ''design'' of a hybrid to a specified set of performance requirements and the prediction of fuel economy under a number of possible driving patterns (called driving cycles). Another provides an estimate of the incremental cost of the hybrid in comparison to a comparably performing conventional vehicle. In this paper, the models are applied to predict the NPV cost of conventional gasoline-fueled vehicles vs. parallel hybrid vehicles. The parallel hybrids are assumed to (1) be produced at high volume, (2) use nickel metal hydride battery packs, and (3) have high-strength steel bodies. The conventional vehicle also is assumed to have a high-strength steel body. The simulated vehicles are held constant in many respects, including 0-60 time, engine type, aerodynamic drag coefficient, tire rolling resistance, and frontal area. The hybrids analyzed use the minimum size battery pack and motor to meet specified 0-60 times. A key characteristic affecting commercial viability is noted and quantified: that hybrids achieve the most pronounced fuel economy increase (best use) in slow, average-speed, stop-and-go driving, but when households consistently drive these vehicles under these conditions, they tend to travel fewer miles than average vehicles. We find that hours driven is a more valuable measure than miles. Estimates are developed concerning hours of use of household vehicles versus driving cycle, and the pattern of minimum NPV incremental cost (or benefit) of selecting the hybrid over the conventional vehicle at various fuel prices is illustrated. These results are based on data from various OECD motions on fuel price, annual miles of travel per vehicle, and driving cycles assumed to be applicable in those nations. Scatter in results plotted as a function of average speed, related to details of driving cycles and the vehicles selected for analysis, is discussed.

  7. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gent, Janneane F.; Kezik, Julie M.; Hill, Melissa E.; Tsai, Eling; Li, De-Wei; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homes were sampled for these allergens and asthma morbidity monitored during the subsequent month. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children exposed and sensitized to Penicillium, Der p, Fel d, Can f risk increased asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These children might benefit from targeted intervention strategies.

  8. MAPPER - Sheet1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .13 204.66 RSF - DRAWN OF INCHES mm mm IN REV D 1 INITIAL ISSUE x x.xxx x.xx SIDNEY W. BARNES RESEARCH LABORATORY DESCRIPTION DATE ZONE 11 - .0005 .013 DEPT. OF...

  9. Metal to Insulator Transition on the N = 0 Landau Level in Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Khodas, M.; Valla, T.; Zaliznyak, I.A.

    2010-07-23

    The magnetotransport in single layer graphene has been experimentally investigated in magnetic fields up to 18 T as a function of temperature. A pronounced T dependence is observed for T {approx}< 50 K, which is either metallic, or insulating, depending on the filling factor {nu}. The metal-insulator transition (MIT) occurs at |{nu}{sub c}| {approx}0.65 and in the regime of the dissipative transport, where the longitudinal resistance R{sub xx} >1/2R{sub K}. The critical resistivity (R{sub xx} per square) is {rho}{sub xx}({nu}{sub c}) {approx} 1/2R{sub K} and is correlated with the appearance of zero plateau in Hall conductivity {sigma}{sub xy}({nu}) and peaks in {sigma}{sub xx}({nu}). This leads us to construct a universal low-T (n, B) phase diagram of this quantum phase transition.

  10. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  11. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    XX7 - - - - - 30 (30) 228 February Summary 120 75 195 10 185 50 135 Contract Budget Base (CBB) Log Page 4 Undistributed Budget Parameters * Should be distributed within two...

  12. Overview and Update LON and LONMARK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maintenance assigned to JTC-1SC 6 * IEEE 1473-L (Transportation) * SEMI E-56.6 ... Transport Services IPv6 Wireless 802.15.4 IEEE 1901.2 Ethernet wired & 802.11.xx Next Gen ...

  13. LCA for household waste management when planning a new urban settlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene; Brattebo, Helge

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Household waste management of a new carbon neutral settlement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EASEWASTE as a LCA tool to compare different centralised and decentralised solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental benefit or close to zero impact in most of the categories. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper and metal recycling important for the outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discusses the challenges of waste prevention planning. - Abstract: When planning for a new urban settlement, industrial ecology tools like scenario building and life cycle assessment can be used to assess the environmental quality of different infrastructure solutions. In Trondheim, a new greenfield settlement with carbon-neutral ambitions is being planned and five different scenarios for the waste management system of the new settlement have been compared. The results show small differences among the scenarios, however, some benefits from increased source separation of paper and metal could be found. The settlement should connect to the existing waste management system of the city, and not resort to decentralised waste treatment or recovery methods. However, as this is an urban development project with ambitious goals for lifestyle changes, effort should be put into research and initiatives for proactive waste prevention and reuse issues.

  14. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  15. Weatherization assistance for low-income households: An evaluation of local program performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, M.; Rayner, S.; Wolfe, A.K.; Mason, T.W.; Ragins, B.R.; Cartor, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    The US Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) funds local agencies to provide weatherization services to low-income households. This report describes the most salient features of this program, examines relationships between organization and program outcomes, and presents recommendations for the program's further development. Data were collected by written surveys administered to local weatherization agencies, a telephone survey of 38 states and eight DOE support offices, and site visits to selected local agencies. Locally controlled factors found to be significantly related to program performance include the amount of the weatherization director's time spent on program administration, the use of established client selection criteria, the frequency of evaluation of local goal attainment, and the type of weatherization crews used. Factors controlled at the state or federal levels that influence program performance include delays in state reimbursements of local agency expenditures and local flexibility in the choice of weatherization measures. Data-gathering difficulties experienced during this project indicate a need for possible improvements in goal-setting and record-keeping procedures.

  16. Estimating household fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and LPG prices by census region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to estimate individual fuel prices within the residential sector. The data from four US Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration, residential energy consumption surveys were used to estimate the models. For a number of important fuel types - fuel oil, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas - the estimation presents a problem because these fuels are not used by all households. Estimates obtained by using only data in which observed fuel prices are present would be biased. A correction for this self-selection bias is needed for estimating prices of these fuels. A literature search identified no past studies on application of the selectivity model for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. This report describes selectivity models that utilize the Dubin/McFadden correction method for estimating prices of residential fuel oil/kerosine, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas in the Northeast, Midwest, South, and West census regions. Statistically significant explanatory variables are identified and discussed in each of the models. This new application of the selectivity model should be of interest to energy policy makers, researchers, and academicians.

  17. Influence of assumptions about household waste composition in waste management LCAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagstad, Helene, E-mail: helene.slagstad@ntnu.no [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway); Brattebo, Helge [Department of Hydraulic and Environmental Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainty in waste composition of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systematically changed waste composition in a constructed waste management system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste composition important for the results of accounting LCA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust results for comparative LCA. - Abstract: This article takes a detailed look at an uncertainty factor in waste management LCA that has not been widely discussed previously, namely the uncertainty in waste composition. Waste composition is influenced by many factors; it can vary from year to year, seasonally, and with location, for example. The data publicly available at a municipal level can be highly aggregated and sometimes incomplete, and performing composition analysis is technically challenging. Uncertainty is therefore always present in waste composition. This article performs uncertainty analysis on a systematically modified waste composition using a constructed waste management system. In addition the environmental impacts of several waste management strategies are compared when applied to five different cities. We thus discuss the effect of uncertainty in both accounting LCA and comparative LCA. We found the waste composition to be important for the total environmental impact of the system, especially for the global warming, nutrient enrichment and human toxicity via water impact categories.

  18. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebersorger, S.; Beigl, P.

    2011-09-15

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

  19. NWPA-830G U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    xx/xx/xxxx Burden: 5 Hours Appendix G -Standard Remittance Advice for Payment of Fees This information is being collected under mandatory authorities vested in the U.S. Department of Energy under Public Law 97-425. Late filing, failure to file or otherwise comply with instructions provided may result in interest penalties as provided by Article VIII C of the Standard Contract of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High Level Radioactive Waste. For information concerning confidentiality of information see

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    For Payment of Fees OMB No: 1901-0260 (Expires: xx/xx/xxxx ) Section 1. Identification Information: Please first read the instructions on the back. Section 2. Net Electricity Generated Calculation 1.1 Purchaser Information: Item Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Station Total 1 1.11 Name:____________________________________________ 2.1 Unit ID Code: 1.12 Address:__________________________________________ 2.2 Gross Thermal Energy Generated (MWh): 1.13 Attention: _________________________________________ 2.3

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Form EIA-22M Monthly Biodiesel, Biojet, Biokerosene And Renewable Diesel Report Page 1 OMB No. XXXX-XXXX Expires XX/XX/XXXX Burden: 2.00 hours Reporting Month and Year: / Respondent ID: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data

  2. FTCP Functional Area Qualification Standards - TEMPLATE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    XXXX-20XX DOE-STD-XXXX-20XX Draft: Month Year DOE STANDARD NAME OF FUNCTIONAL AREA FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Instructions DELETE THIS BOX AFTER READING Before beginning, ensure review/track changes are enabled. Complete this form by revising the highlighted fields.

  3. Status of not-in-kind refrigeration technologies for household space conditioning, water heating and food refrigeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Pradeep; Vineyard, Edward Allan; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the next generation not-in-kind technologies to replace conventional vapor compression refrigeration technology for household applications. Such technologies are sought to provide energy savings or other environmental benefits for space conditioning, water heating and refrigeration for domestic use. These alternative technologies include: thermoacoustic refrigeration, thermoelectric refrigeration, thermotunneling, magnetic refrigeration, Stirling cycle refrigeration, pulse tube refrigeration, Malone cycle refrigeration, absorption refrigeration, adsorption refrigeration, and compressor driven metal hydride heat pumps. Furthermore, heat pump water heating and integrated heat pump systems are also discussed due to their significant energy saving potential for water heating and space conditioning in households. The paper provides a snapshot of the future R&D needs for each of the technologies along with the associated barriers. Both thermoelectric and magnetic technologies look relatively attractive due to recent developments in the materials and prototypes being manufactured.

  4. Cost comparison between private and public collection of residual household waste: Multiple case studies in the Flemish region of Belgium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, R.; Buysse, J.; Gellynck, X.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The goal is to compare collection costs for residual household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have clustered all municipalities in order to find mutual comparable pairs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Each pair consists of one private and one public operating waste collection program. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All cases show that private service has lower costs than public service. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Municipalities were contacted to identify the deeper causes for the waste management program. - Abstract: The rising pressure in terms of cost efficiency on public services pushes governments to transfer part of those services to the private sector. A trend towards more privatizing can be noticed in the collection of municipal household waste. This paper reports the findings of a research project aiming to compare the cost between the service of private and public collection of residual household waste. Multiple case studies of municipalities about the Flemish region of Belgium were conducted. Data concerning the year 2009 were gathered through in-depth interviews in 2010. In total 12 municipalities were investigated, divided into three mutual comparable pairs with a weekly and three mutual comparable pairs with a fortnightly residual waste collection. The results give a rough indication that in all cases the cost of private service is lower than public service in the collection of household waste. Albeit that there is an interest in establishing whether there are differences in the costs and service levels between public and private waste collection services, there are clear difficulties in establishing comparisons that can be made without having to rely on a large number of assumptions and corrections. However, given the cost difference, it remains the responsibility of the municipalities to decide upon the service they offer their citizens, regardless the cost efficiency: public or private.

  5. A life cycle approach to the management of household food waste - A Swedish full-scale case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A.; Cour Jansen, J. la

    2011-08-15

    Research Highlights: > The comparison of three different methods for management of household food waste show that anaerobic digestion provides greater environmental benefits in relation to global warming potential, acidification and ozone depilation compared to incineration and composting of food waste. Use of produced biogas as car fuel provides larger environmental benefits compared to a use of biogas for heat and power production. > The use of produced digestate from the anaerobic digestion as substitution for chemical fertilizer on farmland provides avoidance of environmental burdens in the same ratio as the substitution of fossil fuels with produced biogas. > Sensitivity analyses show that results are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding the environmental burdens connected to heat and energy supposedly substituted by the waste treatment. - Abstract: Environmental impacts from incineration, decentralised composting and centralised anaerobic digestion of solid organic household waste are compared using the EASEWASTE LCA-tool. The comparison is based on a full scale case study in southern Sweden and used input-data related to aspects such as source-separation behaviour, transport distances, etc. are site-specific. Results show that biological treatment methods - both anaerobic and aerobic, result in net avoidance of GHG-emissions, but give a larger contribution both to nutrient enrichment and acidification when compared to incineration. Results are to a high degree dependent on energy substitution and emissions during biological processes. It was seen that if it is assumed that produced biogas substitute electricity based on Danish coal power, this is preferable before use of biogas as car fuel. Use of biogas for Danish electricity substitution was also determined to be more beneficial compared to incineration of organic household waste. This is a result mainly of the use of plastic bags in the incineration alternative (compared to paper bags in the anaerobic) and the use of biofertiliser (digestate) from anaerobic treatment as substitution of chemical fertilisers used in an incineration alternative. Net impact related to GWP from the management chain varies from a contribution of 2.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if incineration is utilised, to an avoidance of 5.6 kg CO{sub 2}-eq/household and year if choosing anaerobic digestion and using produced biogas as car fuel. Impacts are often dependent on processes allocated far from the control of local decision-makers, indicating the importance of a holistic approach and extended collaboration between agents in the waste management chain.

  6. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, July 19, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    19, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Strategies for Collecting Household Energy Data Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  Is your program getting household energy data? How? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Janelle Beverly and Jeff Hughes, University of North Carolina Environmental Finance Center (http://www.efc.unc.edu/index.html) * Discussion:  What are successful strategies for obtaining

  7. Better Buildings Residential Network Multi-Family & Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, March 13, 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Family & Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households March 13, 2014 Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Featured Participants  Becca Harmon Murphy (Indianapolis Neighborhood Housing Partnership)  Discussion:  What strategies or approaches has your program used to build interest in your loan programs for moderate- and low-income households? What has worked well, and why do you think it was effective?  What

  8. Residential energy consumption across different population groups: Comparative analysis for Latino and non-Latino households in U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S.; Henderson, L.

    1998-05-01

    Residential energy cost, an important part of the household budget, varies significantly across different population groups. In the United States, researchers have conducted many studies of household fuel consumption by fuel type -- electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) -- and by geographic areas. The results of past research have also demonstrated significant variation in residential energy use across various population groups, including white, black, and Latino. However, research shows that residential energy demand by fuel type for Latinos, the fastest-growing population group in the United States, has not been explained by economic and noneconomic factors in any available statistical model. This paper presents a discussion of energy demand and expenditure patterns for Latino and non-Latino households in the United States. The statistical model developed to explain fuel consumption and expenditures for Latino households is based on Stone and Geary`s linear expenditure system model. For comparison, the authors also developed models for energy consumption in non-Latino, black, and nonblack households. These models estimate consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and LPG by various households at the national level. The study revealed significant variations in the patterns of fuel consumption for Latinos and non-Latinos. The model methodology and results of this research should be useful to energy policymakers in government and industry, researchers, and academicians who are concerned with economic and energy issues related to various population groups.

  9. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Home Electronics Characteristics"

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Living Space Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Living Space Characteristics"

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Housing Unit Characteristics"

  12. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Space Heating Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Space Heating Characteristics"

  13. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Household Income, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ,"Housing Units (millions)" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 or More" "Air Conditioning Characteristics"

  14. Separate collection of household food waste for anaerobic degradation - Comparison of different techniques from a systems perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstad, A.; Cour Jansen, J. la

    2012-05-15

    Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four modern and innovative systems for household food waste collection are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct emissions and resource use were based on full-scale data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conservation of nutrients/energy content over the system was considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Systems with high energy/nutrient recovery are most environmentally beneficial. - Abstract: Four systems for household food waste collection are compared in relation the environmental impact categories eutrophication potential, acidification potential, global warming potential as well as energy use. Also, a hotspot analysis is performed in order to suggest improvements in each of the compared collection systems. Separate collection of household food waste in paper bags (with and without drying prior to collection) with use of kitchen grinders and with use of vacuum system in kitchen sinks were compared. In all cases, food waste was used for anaerobic digestion with energy and nutrient recovery in all cases. Compared systems all resulted in net avoidance of assessed environmental impact categories; eutrophication potential (-0.1 to -2.4 kg NO{sub 3}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), acidification potential (-0.4 to -1.0 kg SO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste), global warming potential (-790 to -960 kg CO{sub 2}{sup -}eq/ton food waste) and primary energy use (-1.7 to -3.6 GJ/ton food waste). Collection with vacuum system results in the largest net avoidance of primary energy use, while disposal of food waste in paper bags for decentralized drying before collection result in a larger net avoidance of global warming, eutrophication and acidification. However, both these systems not have been taken into use in large scale systems yet and further investigations are needed in order to confirm the outcomes from the comparison. Ranking of scenarios differ largely if considering only emissions in the foreground system, indicating the importance of taking also downstream emissions into consideration when comparing different collection systems. The hot spot identification shows that losses of organic matter in mechanical pretreatment as well as tank connected food waste disposal systems and energy in drying and vacuum systems reply to the largest impact on the results in each system respectively.

  15. Process for the utilization of household rubbish or garbage and other organic waste products for the production of methane gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunziker, M.; Schildknecht, A.

    1985-04-16

    Non-organic substances are separated from household garbage and the organic substances are fed in proportioned manner into a mixing tank and converted into slurry by adding liquid. The slurry is crushed for homogenization purposes in a crushing means and passed into a closed holding container. It is then fed over a heat exchanger and heated to 55/sup 0/ to 60/sup 0/ C. The slurry passes into a plurality of reaction vessels in which the methane gas and carbon dioxide are produced. In a separating plant, the mixture of gaseous products is broken down into its components and some of the methane gas is recycled by bubbling it through both the holding tank and the reaction tank, the remainder being stored in gasholders. The organic substances are degraded much more rapidly through increasing the degradation temperature and as a result constructional expenditure can be reduced.

  16. Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans from the open burning of household waste in barrels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemieux, P.M.; Lutes, C.C.; Abbott, J.A.; Aldous, K.M.

    2000-02-01

    Backyard burning of household waste in barrels is a common waste disposal practice for which pollutant emissions have not been well characterized. This study measured the emissions of several pollutants, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs), from burning mixtures designed to simulate waste generated by a recycling and a nonrecycling family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. This paper focuses on the PCDD/PCDF emissions and discusses the factors influencing PCDD/PCDF formation for different test burns. Four test burns were made in which the amount of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amount actually burned varied from 46.6% to 68.1%. Emissions of total PCDDs/PCDFs ranged between 0.0046 and 0.48 mg/kg of waste burned. Emissions are also presented in terms of 2,3,7,8-TCDD toxic equivalents. Emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs appear to correlate with both copper and hydrochloric acid emissions. The results of this study indicate that backyard burning emits more PCDDs/PCDFs on a mass of refuse burned basis than various types of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). Comparison of burn barrel emissions to emissions from a hypothetical modern MWC equipped with high-efficiency flue gas cleaning technology indicates that about 2--40 households burning their trash daily in barrels can produce average PCDD/PCDF emissions comparable to a 182,000 kg/day (200 ton/day) MWC facility. This study provides important data on a potentially significant source of emissions of PCDDs/PCDFs.

  17. EIA - Household Transportation report: Household Vehicles Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    National Research Council, Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards (Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences, 2002), p. 85. 4 8.3 million...

  18. Table 2.4 Household Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household 1 Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted) Census Region 2 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 United States Total (does not include wood) 10.56 9.74 9.32 9.29 8.58 9.04 9.13 9.22 10.01 10.25 9.86 10.55 10.18 Natural Gas 5.58 5.31 4.97 5.27 4.74 4.98 4.83 4.86 5.27 5.28 4.84 4.79 4.69 Electricity 3 2.47 2.42 2.48 2.42 2.35 2.48 2.76 3.03 3.28 3.54 3.89 4.35 4.39 Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene 2.19

  19. User interface in ORACLE for the Worldwide Household Goods Information System for Transportation Modernization (WHIST-MOD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, T. ); Loftis, J. )

    1990-07-01

    The Directorate of Personal Property of the Military Traffic Management Command (MTMC) requested that Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) design a prototype decision support system, the Worldwide Household Goods Information System for Transportation Modernization (WHIST-MOD). This decision support system will automate current tasks and provide analysis tools for evaluating the Personal Property Program, predicting impacts to the program, and planning modifications to the program to meet the evolving needs of military service members and the transportation industry. The system designed by ORNL consists of three application modules: system dictionary applications, data acquisition and administration applications, and user applications. The development of the user applications module is divided into two phases. Round 1 is the data selection front-end interface, and Round 2 is the output or back-end interface. This report describes the prototyped front-end interface for the user application module. It discusses user requirements and the prototype design. The information contained in this report is the product of in-depth interviews with MTMC staff, prototype meetings with the users, and the research and design work conducted at ORNL. 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Search for new physics in t?+ large ET-> bb?qq?qq? + large ET final state in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The datamoreare consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.less

  1. Try This: Household Magnets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Now which is stronger, gravity or magnetism? What is going on? How do flexible refrigerator magnets work? Get two of these magnets, they are often the size of a business card....

  2. Next Generation Household Refrigerator

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partner: Whirlpool - Benton Harbor, MI

  3. Equivalence between XY and dimerized models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Roncaglia, Marco

    2010-06-15

    The spin-1/2 chain with XY anisotropic coupling in the plane and the XX isotropic dimerized chain are shown to be equivalent in the bulk. For finite systems, we prove that the equivalence is exact in given parity sectors, after taking care of the precise boundary conditions. The proof is given constructively by finding unitary transformations that map the models onto each other. Moreover, we considerably generalized our mapping and showed that even in the case of fully site-dependent couplings the XY chain can be mapped onto an XX model. This result has potential application in the study of disordered systems.

  4. Microsoft Word - TSA_Proprietary Boilerplate revised 7.29.13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TSA Proprietary Boilerplate Ames Laboratory, USDOE AL-TSA-20XX-XX 1 of 5 Initial _____ / _____ TECHNICAL SERVICE AGREEMENT No. __________ PROPRIETARY Article I. Parties to the Agreement The Parties to this Agreement are The Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University ("the Laboratory") operating under Prime Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 ("Prime Contract") with the United States Government ("Government") represented by the U. S. Department of Energy ("DOE"),

  5. Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    X EIA-64A Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production 1 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 Form Approved OMB Number: 1905-0057 Expiration Date: xx/xx/xxxx Burden: 6 hours ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ORIGIN OF NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS PRODUCTION FORM EIA-64A SURVEY YEAR 201X GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS PURPOSE The collection of basic, verifiable information on the Nation's reserves and production of natural gas liquids (NGL) is mandated by the Federal

  6. OMB Control Number: 1910-5165

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OMB Control Number: 1910-5165 Expires: xx/xx/201x SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT Please submit this Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report to your site DOE/NNSA Contractor Human Resource Division (CHRD) Office. If you do not have a DOE/NNSA CHRD Office, please submit the report to: DBAEnforcementReports@hq.doe.gov. The following questions regarding enforcement activity (Davis-Bacon and Related Acts) by this Agency are required by 29 CFR, Part 5.7(b), and Department of Labor, All

  7. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Average Square Footage of Northeast Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Northeast",20.8,2121,1663,921,836,656,363 "Northeast Divisions and

  8. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Average Square Footage of Midwest Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Midwest",25.9,2272,1898,1372,912,762,551 "Midwest Divisions and

  9. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Average Square Footage of South Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total South",42.1,1867,1637,1549,732,642,607 "South Divisions and

  10. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Average Square Footage of West Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total West",24.8,1708,1374,800,628,506,294 "West Divisions and States"

  11. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Average Square Footage of Single-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Single-Family",78.6,2422,2002,1522,880,727,553 "Census

  12. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Average Square Footage of Multi-Family Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Multi-Family",28.1,930,807,535,453,393,261 "Census Region"

  13. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Average Square Footage of Mobile Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total Mobile Homes",6.9,1087,985,746,413,375,283 "Census Region"

  14. ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Average Square Footage of U.S. Homes, by Housing Characteristics, 2009" " Final" ,"Housing Units1","Average Square Footage Per Housing Unit",,,"Average Square Footage Per Household Member" "Housing Characteristics","Millions","Total2","Heated","Cooled","Total2","Heated","Cooled" "Total",113.6,1971,1644,1230,766,639,478 "Census Region"

  15. Open Issues

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2011 Resolved: Pathscale/4.0.9 not compatible with default libraries October 14, 2011 by Helen He Symptom: New xt-libsci/11.x.x does not have pathscale support. Other default libraries (netcdf, hdf5, fftw, petsc, etc.) have no pathscale/4.0.9 support

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Low/Moderate Income Peer Exchange Call: Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low and Moderate Income Households Call Slides and Discussion Summary, October 11, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0, 2011 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Low/Moderate Income Peer Exchange Call: Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low and Moderate Income Households Call Slides and Discussion Summary Participating Grant Programs * Austin, TX * Bainbridge Is., WA * Carrboro, NC * Chicago, IL * Connecticut * Phoenix, AZ * Portland, OR * NYSERDA (Long Island, NY) * Michigan * New Hampshire * Indianapolis, IN * San Diego, CA * San Jose, CA * Seattle, WA 8/17/2014 2 Agenda * Call Logistics and

  17. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 7.6 2.1 3.3 2.2 11.5 Q Q Q 1.4 6.9 2.8 18.8 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 6.6 1.6 3.6 1.3 5.8 0.3 0.7...

  18. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Matching: A model-based procedure used to impute for item nonresponse. This method uses logistic models to compute predicted means that are used to statistically match each...

  19. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    were imputed as disposed vehicles. To impute vehicle stock changes in the 1991 RTECS, logistic regression equations were used to compute a predicted probability (or propensity)...

  20. appl_household2001.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2001 Appliance Types and Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.2 1.1 1.4 1.3 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Kitchen Appliances Cooking Appliances Oven ......................................................... 101.7 6.9 11.4 6.7 6.1 1.6 1 .............................................................. 95.2 6.2 10.7 6.3 6.0 2.1 2 or More

  1. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    production vehicles in order to assess compliance with Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. The EPA Composite MPG is based on the assumption of a "typical" vehicle-use...

  2. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    more fuel-efficient vehicles, and the implementation of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) 6 standards. Figure 13. Average Fuel Efficiency of All Vehicles, by Model Year 6...

  3. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the...

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for 1994, will continue the 3-year cycle. The RTECS, a subsample of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), is an integral part of a series of surveys designed by...

  5. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a comparison between the 1991 and previous years RTECS designs; (2) the sample design; (3) the data-collection procedures; (4) the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN); (5)...

  6. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DC, October 1995), Table DL-1B. 5. "Chained dollars" is a measure used to express real prices. Real prices are those that have been adjusted to remove the effect of changes...

  7. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    selected tabulations were produced using two different software programs, Table Producing Language (TPL) and Statistical Analysis System (SAS). Energy Information Administration...

  8. spaceheat_household2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2001 Space Heating Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total U.S. Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.5 1.1 1.0 1.2 1.6 Total .............................................................. 107.0 7.1 12.3 7.7 6.3 NE Heat Home .................................................... 106.0 7.1 12.0 7.7 6.2 NE Do Not Heat Home ....................................... 1.0 Q 0.3 Q 0.1 20.7 No Heating Equipment ................................ 0.5 Q 0.1 Q Q 41.3

  9. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 15.0 6.7 2.3 ... 4.9 Q Q 0.2 14.8 1 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  10. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 1.5 0.5 1.0 14.6 1 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  11. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 9.8 2.8 2.1 4.4 0.5 11.6 100 to 150 Percent ...... 5.1 1.4 1.1 2.3 Q 14.2 Above 150 ...

  12. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 1.2 0.7 0.5 11.3 1 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  13. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 5.2 3.9 Q Q 1.1 21.9 100 to 150 Percent ...... 6.4 5.2 0.2 Q 0.9 16.5 Above 150 Percent ...

  14. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 0.9 0.5 0.6 13.0 1 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  15. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... definition. 2 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  16. char_household2001.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent ...... 15.0 1.0 3.4 ... weather station. 2 Below 150 percent of poverty line or 60 percent of median State ...

  17. Notice of Intent to Develop a Page Change for DOE O 420.1C, Facility Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-06-21

    The Page Change will be strictly limited in scope to changes necessary to accomplish the following objectives: (1) to invoke revised DOE-STD- 1104-20xx, Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Document, as a required method; (2) to invoke revised DOE-STD-3009-20xx, Preparation of Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analysis, as a required method for new nuclear facilities as discussed below; and (3) to make miscellaneous administrative corrections and clarifications based on the one-year implementation review required by DOE O 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program. This JM is an update to one approved June 21, 2013.

  18. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: IDEXX Laboratories | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy IDEXX Laboratories Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: IDEXX Laboratories Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: IDEXX Laboratories IDEXX Laboratories is committed to providing a multitude of alternative transportation option to employees in the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase sustainability efforts. The IDEXX ParXX program encourages employees to take the initiative to purchase plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) by offering designated parking for PEVs. As part

  19. Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Diagnostics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Emittance and Phase Space Exchange for Advanced Beam Manipulation and Diagnostics Alternative chicane-type beam lines are proposed for exact emittance exchange between transverse phase space (x,x') and longitudinal phase space (z,{delta}), where x is the transverse position, x' is the transverse divergence, and z and {delta} are

  20. DATE:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4-35 DATE: July 09, 2014 TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Rescission of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Reporting Requirements. SUMMARY: Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2014-xx provides COs with: 1) notice of the recession of the reporting requirements for recipients of ARRA funds in accordance with the recently passed P.L. 113- 76, Consolidated Appropriations

  1. Microsoft Word - RM1_Tidal Turbine_ARL_PTO_OMAE_Paper-Abstract.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    xx by ASME 31st International Conference on Ocean Offshore and Arctic Engineering (OMAE) June 10-15, 2012, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil OMAE 2012 - 84074 Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy ABSTRACT Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical

  2. BWXT Pantex

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    [Enter Contractor name] FY 20XX [Enter year] Specific Plan for Workforce Restructuring: Involuntary Separation Program for the U.S. Department of Energy or National Nuclear Security Administration [Enter name of DOE or NNSA] Effective: [Enter Month and Year] May be exempt from public release under the Freedom of Information Act (5 USC 552) exemption number and category: #5, Privileged Information. Department of Energy review required before public release. Executive Summary During fiscal year

  3. U

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Configuration Management Plan September 2002 TEMPLATE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Organizational Title 1 Organizational Title 2 Change Control Page The following information is being used to control and track modifications made to this document. 1) Revision Date: Author: Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s): Title Page Document Name: Project Name Configuration Management Plan Publication Date: Month Year Contract Number: XX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXX Project Number: Task: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX Prepared

  4. U

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Name Feasibility Study Report September 2002 TEMPLATE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Organization Title 1 Organization Title 2 Change Control Page The following information is being used to control and track modifications made to this document. 1) Revision Date: Author: Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s): Title Page Document Name: Project Name Feasibility Study Report Publication Date: Month Year Contract Number: XX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXX Project Number: Task: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX Prepared

  5. U

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Design Document September 2002 TEMPLATE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Organizational Title 1 Organizational Title 2 Change Control Page The following information is being used to control and track modifications made to this document. 1) Revision Date: Author: Section(s): Page Number(s): Summary of Change(s): Title Page Document Name: Project Name System Design Document Publication Date: Month Year Contract Number: XX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXX Project Number: Task: XXXXXXXXXXXXXX Prepared by: XXXX

  6. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.

  7. X and Y chromosome behavior in brain tumors: Pieces in a puzzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, B.K. [Hecht Associates, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Chatel, M; Gioanni, J. [Univ. of Nice (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Sex chromosome behavior in selected somatic cells is baffling. We serendipitously encountered this sex chromosome shuffle while studying malignant gliomas. Tumor specimens from 3/10 (30%) females and 15/27 (56%) males had sex chromosome abnormalities. Specimens from females showed X loss in 2 cases and possible X gain in 1 case. In 2 cases with autosomal abnormalities, only XX cells were found, suggesting that sex chromosome changes are independent of autosomal changes. Specimens from males showed Y rearrangements in 3 cases, Y loss in 15 cases, XX in 3 cases and autosomal abnormalities in 9 cases. The Y rearrangements may provide a route to Y loss whereas the advent of XX clones in male tumors bespeaks X isodisomy, a mechanism for adding an extra active X. The autosomal changes were rearrangements against a pseudo-diploid background in 5 cases and near-triploidy/tetraploidy in 4 cases. The cases with autosomal changes tended not to have sex chromosome abnormalities (p<0.01) and, the converse, cases with sex chromosome anomalies were without autosomal abnormalities (p<0.05). The process of sex chromosome changes appears independent of the process of autosomal changes. The conventional interpretation: the sex chromosome changes in brain tumors are in non-malignant cells. An unconventional interpretation: sex chromosome changes represent an alternative avenue to malignancy.

  8. Search for Production of Heavy Particles Decaying to Top Quarks and Invisible Particles in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for a new particle T{prime} decaying to a top-quark via T{prime} {yields} t + X, where X is an invisible particle. In a data sample with 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, we search for pair production of T0 in the lepton+jets channel, p{bar p} {yields} t{bar t} + XX {yields} {ell}{nu}bqq{prime}b + XX. We interpret our results primarily in terms of a model where T{prime} are exotic fourth generation quarks and X are dark matter particles. The data are consistent with standard model expectations, and we set 95% confidence level limits on the generic production of T{prime}{bar T}{prime} {yields} t{bar t} + XX. We apply these limits to the dark matter model and exclude the fourth generation exotic quarks T{prime} at 95% confidence level up to m{sub T{prime}} = 360 GeV/c{sup 2} for m{sub x} {<=} 100 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  9. APS Science 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. M.; Fenner, R. B.; Long, G.; Borland, M.; Decker, G.

    2007-05-24

    In my five years as the Director of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), I have been fortunate to see major growth in the scientific impact from the APS. This year I am particularly enthusiastic about prospects for our longer-term future. Every scientific instrument must remain at the cutting edge to flourish. Our plans for the next generation of APS--an APS upgrade--got seriously in gear this year with strong encouragement from our users and sponsors. The most promising avenue that has emerged is the energy-recovery linac (ERL) (see article on page xx), for which we are beginning serious R&D. The ERL{at}APS would offer revolutionary performance, especially for x-ray imaging and ultrafast science, while not seriously disrupting the existing user base. I am very proud of our accelerator physics and engineering staff, who not only keep the current APS at the forefront, but were able to greatly impress our international Machine Advisory Committee with the quality of their work on the possible upgrade option (see page xx). As we prepare for long-term major upgrades, our plans to develop and optimize all the sectors at APS in the near future are advancing. Several new beamlines saw first light this year, including a dedicated powder diffraction beamline (11-BM), two instruments for inelastic x-ray scattering at sector 30, and the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) Nanoprobe beamline at sector 26. Our partnership in the first x-ray free-electron laser (LCLS) to be built at Stanford contributes to revolutionary growth in ultrafast science (see page xx), and we are developing a pulse chirping scheme to get ps pulses at sector 7 of the APS within a year or so. In this report, you will find selected highlights of scientific research at the APS from calendar year 2006. The highlighted work covers diverse disciplines, from fundamental to applied science. In the article on page xx you can see the direct impact of APS research on technology. Several new products have emerged from work at the APS, to complement the tremendous output of work in basic science, which often has payoff in technology but over decades rather than years. Highlights in this report also reflect the relevance of APS work to Department of Energy missions, for example a route to more efficient fuel cells (page xx mr-88-073113) addresses the energy challenge, and natural approaches to cleaning up the environment.

  10. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C : Q U A L I T Y O F T H E D ATA APPENDIX C A P P E N D I X C QUALITY OF THE DATA INTRODUCTION This section discusses several issues relating to the quality of the National...

  11. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E : C H R O N O L O G Y O F W O R L D O I L M A R K E T E V E N T S ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATIONHOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST DATA & TRENDS 177 APPENDIX E A P P E N D...

  12. Model development for household waste prevention behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortoleto, Ana Paula; Kurisu, Kiyo H.; Hanaki, Keisuke

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model waste prevention behaviour using structure equation modelling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We merge attitude-behaviour theories with wider models from environmental psychology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main behaviour predictors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental concern, moral obligation and inconvenience are the main influence on the behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste prevention and recycling are different dimensions of waste management behaviour. - Abstract: Understanding waste prevention behaviour (WPB) could enable local governments and decision makers to design more-effective policies for reducing the amount of waste that is generated. By merging well-known attitude-behaviour theories with elements from wider models from environmental psychology, an extensive cognitive framework that provides new and valuable insights is developed for understanding the involvement of individuals in waste prevention. The results confirm the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour and of Schwartz's altruistic behaviour model as bases for modelling participation in waste prevention. A more elaborate integrated model of prevention was shown to be necessary for the complete analysis of attitudinal aspects associated with waste prevention. A postal survey of 158 respondents provided empirical support for eight of 12 hypotheses. The proposed structural equation indicates that personal norms and perceived behaviour control are the main predictors and that, unlike the case of recycling, subjective norms have a weak influence on WPB. It also suggests that, since social norms have not presented a direct influence, WPB is likely to be influenced by a concern for the environment and the community as well by perceptions of moral obligation and inconvenience. Results also proved that recycling and waste prevention represent different dimensions of waste management behaviour requiring particular approaches to increase individuals' engagement in future policies.

  13. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel, diesel motor fuel, electric, and natural gas, excluding propane because NHTSA's CAFE program does not track these vehicles. See Gasoline, Gasohol, Unleaded Gasoline, Leaded...

  14. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on...

  15. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    vehicle type, and vehicle model year. "600" - represents a "match" based on EIA expert analysis using subject matter experience, in conjunction with past RTECS. Additionally,...

  16. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Laboratory (ORNL), Engineering Science Technology Division, Center for Transportation Analysis. For 1,262 vehicles, the work conducted by ORNL did not result in a viable annual VMT...

  17. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (EERE) program in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24. Note: * a recession year. Estimates are displayed as rounded values....

  18. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data & Trends

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Federal Highway Administration. Accessed on the world-wide web at http:www.fhwa.dot.govenvironmentcmaqpgsamaq03cmaq1fig3.htm on July 11, 2005. ENERGY INFORMATION...

  19. A Users Guide to the Comprehensive Water Quality Database for Groundwater in the Vicinity of the Nevada Test Site, Rev. No.: 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene

    2006-09-01

    This water quality database (viz.GeochemXX.mdb) has been developed as part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program with the cooperation of several agencies actively participating in ongoing evaluation and characterization activities under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The database has been constructed to provide up-to-date, comprehensive, and quality controlled data in a uniform format for the support of current and future projects. This database provides a valuable tool for geochemical and hydrogeologic evaluations of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and surrounding region. Chemistry data have been compiled for groundwater within the NTS and the surrounding region. These data include major ions, organic compounds, trace elements, radionuclides, various field parameters, and environmental isotopes. Colloid data are also included in the database. The GeochemXX.mdb database is distributed on an annual basis. The extension ''XX'' within the database title is replaced by the last two digits of the release year (e.g., Geochem06 for the version released during the 2006 fiscal year). The database is distributed via compact disc (CD) and is also uploaded to the Common Data Repository (CDR) in order to make it available to all agencies with DOE intranet access. This report provides an explanation of the database configuration and summarizes the general content and utility of the individual data tables. In addition to describing the data, subsequent sections of this report provide the data user with an explanation of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) protocols for this database.

  20. Evaluation of delivered monitor unit accuracy of gated step-and-shoot IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Lee, MeYeon; Kim, Su SSan; Park, SoAh; Hwang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To overcome the problem of organ motion in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), gated IMRT is often used for the treatment of lung cancer. In this study, the authors investigated the accuracy of the delivered monitor units (MUs) from each segment during gated IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array for user-specific verification purpose. Methods: The authors planned a 6 MV photon, seven-port step-and-shoot lung IMRT delivery. The respiration signals for gated IMRT delivery were obtained from the one-dimensional moving phantom using the real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The beams were delivered using a Clinac iX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with the Millennium 120 MLC. The MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Germany) was validated through consistency and reproducibility tests as well as comparison with measurements from a Farmer-type ion chamber. The authors delivered beams with varying dose rates and duty cycles and analyzed the MatriXX data to evaluate MU delivery accuracy. Results: There was quite good agreement between the planned segment MUs and the MUs computed from the MatriXX within {+-}2% error. The beam-on times computed from the MatriXX data were almost identical for all cases, and they matched well with the RPM beam-on and beam-off signals. A slight difference was observed between them, but it was less than 40 ms. The gated IMRT delivery demonstrated an MU delivery accuracy that was equivalent to ungated IMRT, and the delivered MUs with a gating signal agreed with the planned MUs within {+-}0.5 MU regardless of dose rate and duty cycle. Conclusions: The authors can conclude that gated IMRT is able to deliver an accurate dose to a patient during a procedure. The authors believe that the methodology and results can be transferred to other vendors' devices, particularly those that do not provide MLC log data for a verification purpose.

  1. "PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adjustment Data Report for Fiscal Years Prior to 2008" ,,,"FY","20XX" "Agency:","Department of X",,,"Prepared by:" "Date:",,,,"Phone:" "PART 1: ENERGY/WATER CONSUMPTION AND COST DATA" "1-1. NECPA/E.O. 13423 Goal Subject Buildings" "Energy Type","Consumption Units","Annual Consumption","Annual Cost (Thou. $)","Unit Cost ($)",,"Site-Delivered Btu

  2. EPACT Representation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    June 2005 EPACT REPRESENTATION FOR COVERED AWARDS OVER $100,000 Section 2306 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, as implemented in 10 CFR, Subpart F, establishes eligibility requirements for companies to participate in certain financial assistance programs covered under Titles XX through XXIII of the EPACT. For this purpose, "company" means any business entity other than an organization of the type described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 [26 U.S.C. Section

  3. Unilateral Nondisclosure Agreement - NREL Disclosing - Sample

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Rev 07/09) Page 1 of 2 UNILATERAL (OUT) NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT No. XX - XXXX ("Agreement") This Agreement is entered into by and between the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC ("Alliance"), the Manager and Operator of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL") under Prime Contract No. DE- AC36-08GO28308 for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"), located at 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO 80401, and COMPANY NAME ("Company"),

  4. SF6432-FP (02-01-12) Firm Fixed Price

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FP (xx-xxxx) Initial release SANDIA CORPORATION SF 6432-FP (04/2015) Section II STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR FIRM-FIXED PRICE CONTRACTS THE FOLLOWING CLAUSES APPLY TO THIS CONTRACT AS INDICATED UNLESS SPECIFICALLY DELETED, OR EXCEPT TO THE EXTENT THEY ARE SPECIFICALLY SUPPLEMENTED OR AMENDED IN WRITING IN THE COVER PAGE OR SECTION I. (CTRL+CLICK ON A LINK BELOW TO ADVANCE DIRECTLY TO THAT SECTION) ACCEPTANCE OF TERMS AND CONDITIONS (Ts&Cs) APPLICABLE LAW ASSIGNMENT BANKRUPTCY

  5. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UCRd1950 Unclassified-Chemistry Distribution U P I r n I T Y OF CALIFORNIA Radiation Laboratory Contract No. V-7405-eng-48 THE PATH OF CllRBOM I N PHOTOSYNTHFSIS. XX. THE STEADY STATE M. Calvin and Peter Massini September, 1952 Berkeley, California THE PATH O F C A R B O N IA? PHOTOSYfJTHESIS, no TKE STEWY S T A T E E 35 M a Calvin and Peter h s s f n i Radiation Labmatmy and Deparktienfi of Chemistry7 University of D a l i f ornia, ~crkeley** (*) Fellow of the Swias Foundation, mStStiftunk f k

  6. NREL Bilateral Nondisclosure Agreement - Sample

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REV 07/09) Page 1 of 3 BILATERAL NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT No. XX - XXXX ("Agreement") This Agreement is entered into by and between the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC ("Alliance"), the Manager and Operator of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL") under Prime Contract No. DE- AC36-08GO28308 for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"), located at 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO, 80401 and COMPANY NAME ("Company"), whose

  7. NREL Technology Partnership Participant Data Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F12XX-E(01/2006) Page 1 of 2 National Renewable Energy Laboratory PARTICIPANT DATA SHEET NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy owned laboratory. The information given below is for informational purposes only. 1.0 POINTS OF CONTACT. Identify specific points of contact (POCs) within your company. Company name: Technical POC. Please identify the technical POC within your company with whom NREL's technical staff will work. Name: Business address: Email: City: State: Country: Zip/postal code: Phone:

  8. NREL Unilateral Nondisclosure Agreement - Company Disclosing - Sample

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REV 07/09) Page 1 of 2 UNILATERAL (IN) NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT No. XX - XXXX ("Agreement") This Agreement is entered into by and between the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC ("Alliance"), the Manager and Operator of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL") under Prime Contract No. DE- AC36-08GO28308 for the U.S. Department of Energy (the "DOE"), located at 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO 80401, and DISCLOSING PARTY NAME

  9. LA-uR--85-4451 DE86

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uR--85-4451 DE86 004750 TflM: IMPROVEL'I MONTE CARLO RENORMALIZATION GROUP METHOD AuTHOR(S) Rajan Gupta, T-DO K. G. Wilson, Cornell University C. Umrigar, Cornell University SUWAITTEOTO: Paper to be published as t)artof i)roccedinas from Quantum Monte Carlo Conference, September ~985,- Los Alamos, NM. DISCLAIMER Th& report wxxprqmmd xx xn mmurrt of work Iportwmdby q xgancyof the United Wta Government, Noitbor tbo Unitaf Stxtat30vemmant nor~nyxpncy tbweof,no rxnyoftbdr am~m~ka xnyvwrxmy,expmw

  10. I~

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    __, I,- __.j .^,, ~~.,l~, _I.x__ . ,,,,, ,_^_ ,,_xx,. ,~.__~_x -,-.. _1 ,.,., - I~ .c \ -- - g-' . @ ~--~Z~, Ls-u &. 0 -*,- hiK ,,-& b TO FILE ' = .-. r. AUG 2 9 1945 A~TPPHC~~~ METALS COPUDOP~TIO~ '* ~,ci~ly~1~~ 41 BROAD STREET (In duplicate) November 6, 1942 The District Engineer, u. s . Zngineer Office, Zanhattarn District, P. 0. 30x 4.2, Station P., i?C:: York, X.Y. Attention: Idajo- Thomas T. Crenshav:. Gentlemen: Classification Cancc!!A ZG? ;~yp~~ Follo~5.nS our conversation of

  11. Template for Contracting Company Drug Testing for DOE Positions

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Address of Requestor Dear Sir or Madam: Subject: Last name, First name Middle initial - [last four digits of the SSN] xxx-xx-0123 This letter is in response to a request from [insert name of requestor] received on [insert date] to process [insert name] for a Department of Energy (DOE) security clearance in connection with his/her employment as [insert position] with [insert company name] under [insert site office] Contract No.: [insert contract number] Please be advised that your request for a

  12. Letter Report: INS-L-09-01

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wasi-lington, DC 20585 M E . h ~ l O ~ W ~ h ~ FC)XX. 'Hr.I&;<4.CTwpEf UTY SECRETARY S IJX33ECIT: IXFBWMAJllj: Letter Report on 1nspecti.on of "Depament of Ex~ergy ~itivities hvolving the 'President's Surveillance Program" (INS-L-09-01, in spec ti ax^ No. SOSHSO12) 'X'he Foreign Intelligeiice Su~-%leilBanc,x Act of 1978 (Act), ameridetl on July 10, 2008, requireti Lktt Intelligence Community Inspectors Generd retriew specified aspects c 9 f their respective agencies'

  13. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr.

  14. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    # Xx i' !325 8 I c&egJw, i&l d, 4 -1 United States Government Department of Energy DATE; AUG 3, 9 !gg4 I REPLYTo m-421 (W. A. Williams, 427-1719) sy I AlTN OF: SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program To' The File In 1990, with the assistance of Mr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Nichelle Landis, I reviewed a number of sites that had formerly provided goods a&/or services to the Fernald facility as subcontractors. For 24 of these sites,

  15. NY.O-20- I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ; I.-' NY.O-20- I ' 3% 3 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FKOM: An&x?! w311E? SUHYECT: .Elimination of Pyroferric Co. New Yor SITE ALT NAME: EYE&XCLG f2!Y2~!2Y 621 E. 216th St. CITY: N__ew_ yw-r; STATE: N__V _ok!kEKm. Past: P_rrof_errrLc Go: current: Qwner contacted X yes no; if yes, date co Past owner2 IYE OE C)PEEux!N g Research et Develapment Faci - Production scale testing x M XX - Experimental tests U - Henoh.Scale Process R - Theoretical Studies Gove - Sample % Analysis 0 Production

  16. Spencer Chetnical Ccmpny

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -146 I . . :, ~70-340 : .;, _. Spencer Chetnical Ccmpny &Q&t Building .:. /.: : Xensas City, Hiosouri .,i Attention: &.N~,~-l~ ~.I_ .z ,%;,.::.r .~'..; ,,., ,. : 1~. wt1-*: :,..: .,..' ..,,/ : f ,.,,. :;Lil~~.+ A,;; ;.,,I ~'~&:,.,3~ :;~ .: Thts refers to thr'iampactieo ckoducted.~~May 2 - 5, 1961, of activitiias at your~hawk~orlc8, Pfttsburg,~a;ansas, lic8msed under Source HaSerial Lieeme.Ho.C-4352 and Special Nuclear Material LiCans8 x011. 5xX-154 and a-329. ;. ; ., .,., :_:

  17. Department of Energy, Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity, Multiple Award, Energy Savings Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 DE-AM36-09GO290XX / Mod 6 Department of Energy, Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity, Multiple Award, Energy Savings Performance Contract Awarded by the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office to 16 Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) on December 17, 2008 What follows is a generic version of the contract. All 16 contracts are identical with the exception of the SF33, Solicitation, Offer and Award, and Attachment J-13, Subcontracting Plan, which are specific to each ESCO. This is a conformed

  18. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Ruijie; Wang, Junjie; Xu, Feng; Li, Hua; Zhang, Xile

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  19. The terminator "toy" chemistry test: A simple tool to assess errors in transport schemes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lauritzen, P. H.; Conley, A. J.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Vitt, F.; Taylor, M. A.

    2015-05-04

    This test extends the evaluation of transport schemes from prescribed advection of inert scalars to reactive species. The test consists of transporting two interacting chemical species in the Nair and Lauritzen 2-D idealized flow field. The sources and sinks for these two species are given by a simple, but non-linear, "toy" chemistry that represents combination (X+X → X2) and dissociation (X2 → X+X). This chemistry mimics photolysis-driven conditions near the solar terminator, where strong gradients in the spatial distribution of the species develop near its edge. Despite the large spatial variations in each species, the weighted sum XT = X+2X2more » should always be preserved at spatial scales at which molecular diffusion is excluded. The terminator test demonstrates how well the advection–transport scheme preserves linear correlations. Chemistry–transport (physics–dynamics) coupling can also be studied with this test. Examples of the consequences of this test are shown for illustration.« less

  20. The terminator "toy" chemistry test: A simple tool to assess errors in transport schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauritzen, P. H.; Conley, A. J.; Lamarque, J. -F.; Vitt, F.; Taylor, M. A.

    2015-05-04

    This test extends the evaluation of transport schemes from prescribed advection of inert scalars to reactive species. The test consists of transporting two interacting chemical species in the Nair and Lauritzen 2-D idealized flow field. The sources and sinks for these two species are given by a simple, but non-linear, "toy" chemistry that represents combination (X+X → X2) and dissociation (X2X+X). This chemistry mimics photolysis-driven conditions near the solar terminator, where strong gradients in the spatial distribution of the species develop near its edge. Despite the large spatial variations in each species, the weighted sum XT = X+2X2 should always be preserved at spatial scales at which molecular diffusion is excluded. The terminator test demonstrates how well the advection–transport scheme preserves linear correlations. Chemistry–transport (physics–dynamics) coupling can also be studied with this test. Examples of the consequences of this test are shown for illustration.

  1. Lifetime and Polarization of the Radiative Decay of Excitons, Biexcitons, and Trions in CdSe Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Califano, M.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2007-01-01

    Using the pseudopotential configuration-interaction method, we calculate the intrinsic lifetime and polarization of the radiative decay of single excitons (X), positive and negative trions (X{sup +} and X{sup -}), and biexcitons (XX) in CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots. We investigate the effects of the inclusion of increasingly more complex many-body treatments, starting from the single-particle approach and culminating with the configuration-interaction scheme. Our configuration-interaction results for the size dependence of the single-exciton radiative lifetime at room temperature are in excellent agreement with recent experimental data. We also find the following. (i) Whereas the polarization of the bright exciton emission is always perpendicular to the hexagonal c axis, the polarization of the dark exciton switches from perpendicular to parallel to the hexagonal c axis in large dots, in agreement with experiment. (ii) The ratio of the radiative lifetimes of mono- and biexcitons (X):(XX) is {approx}1:1 in large dots (R=19.2 {angstrom}). This ratio increases with decreasing nanocrystal size, approaching 2 in small dots (R=10.3 {angstrom}). (iii) The calculated ratio (X{sup +}):(X{sup -}) between positive and negative trion lifetimes is close to 2 for all dot sizes considered.

  2. Evaluation of stacking faults and associated partial dislocations in AlSb/GaAs (001) interface by aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, C.; Ge, B. H.; Cui, Y. X.; Li, F. H.; Zhu, J.; Yu, R.; Cheng, Z. Y.

    2014-11-15

    The stacking faults (SFs) in an AlSb/GaAs (001) interface were investigated using a 300 kV spherical aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The structure and strain distribution of the single and intersecting (V-shaped) SFs associated with partial dislocations (PDs) were characterized by the [110] HRTEM images and geometric phase analysis, respectively. In the biaxial strain maps ?{sub xx} and ?{sub yy}, a SF can be divided into several sections under different strain states (positive or negative strain values). Furthermore, the strain state for the same section of a SF is in contrast to each other in ?{sub xx} and ?{sub yy} strain maps. The modification in the strain states was attributed to the variation in the local atomic displacements for the SF in the AlSb film on the GaAs substrate recorded in the lattice image. Finally, the single SF was found to be bounded by two 30 PDs. A pair of 30 PDs near the heteroepitaxial interface reacted to form a Lomer-Cottrell sessile dislocation located at the vertices of V-shaped SFs with opposite screw components. The roles of misfit dislocations, such as the PDs, in strain relaxation were also discussed.

  3. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 9.6 5.0 100 4.4 6.2 4.5 0.8 6.8 4.5 Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent... 11.4 6.0 116 5.1 5.6...

  4. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    11.5 0.8 1.0 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.8 0.7 1.6 1.4 0.8 0.5 0.2 0.1 0.7 0.4 Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent... 13.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.6...

  5. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends - Table...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 6.5 1.5 15.4 957 1,031 Income Relative to Poverty Line Below 100 Percent... 7.9 1.4 14.7 942 937...

  6. Loan Programs for Low- and Moderate-Income Households | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications EcoHouse Program Overview Strengthening Relationships Between Energy Programs and Housing Programs Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and ...

  7. Household Vehicles Energy Use: Latest Data and Trends

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    This report provides newly available national and regional data and analyzes the nation's energy use by light-duty vehicles. This release represents the analytical component of the report, with a data component having been released in early 2005.

  8. Special Topics on Energy Use in Household Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    compare your estimate of your car's mpg to the average of everyone else who takes the test. (Released 04112000; Updated Yearly for Fuel Economies and Weekly for Fuel Prices)...

  9. EIA - Appendix B: Estimation Methodologies of Household Vehicles...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    production vehicles in order to assess compliance with Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. The EPA Composite MPG is based on the assumption of a "typical" vehicle-use...

  10. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    annual electricity savings of more than 5 million kilowatt-hours; estimated natural gas savings of 71,580 British therms; and 653,245 estimated annual cost savings. In New...

  11. Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Imagine if the same mold that ruins old grapes and onions could double as a key ingredient in the recipe to reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes.

  12. Competition Helps Kids Learn About Energy and Save Their Households...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    starting up for next school year that challenges students to learn about energy, develop techniques for saving energy, and help their families save money on their energy bills. ...

  13. Residential Network Members Impact More Than 42,000 Households

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Eligible Better Buildings Residential Network members reported completing 27,563 home energy upgrades during 2013 as part of the Residential Network’s first reporting cycle. In addition, 13 Better...

  14. Polynomial solutions of the Monge-Ampre equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminov, Yu A

    2014-11-30

    The question of the existence of polynomial solutions to the Monge-Ampre equation z{sub xx}z{sub yy}?z{sub xy}{sup 2}=f(x,y) is considered in the case when f(x,y) is apolynomial. It is proved that if f is apolynomial of the second degree, which is positive for all values of its arguments and has apositive squared part, then no polynomial solution exists. On the other hand, asolution which is not polynomial but is analytic in the whole of the x,y-plane is produced. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of polynomial solutions of degree up to 4 are found and methods for the construction of such solutions are indicated. An approximation theorem is proved. Bibliography: 10 titles.

  15. Section 34

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x ' j N r'1 C xr j N s'1 A &1 rs N s (2 &2 x ) 2 ' C xx & j N r,s'1 C xr C xs A &1 rs F(x) ' exp(&x 2 / R 2 c ) % e < exp(&x 2 / R 2 n ) Session Papers 149 (1) (2) (3) Estimation of Errors in Objectively Analyzed Fields and Sensitivity to Number and Spacing of Stations M.J. Leach, J.J. Yio, and R.T. Cederwall Atmospheric Science Division Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Motivation Single-column models (SCMs) are designed to test param-

  16. Effect of enhanced C{sub 2} growth chemistry on nanodiamond film deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teii, Kungen; Ikeda, Tomohiro

    2007-03-12

    A route to high-purity nanocrystalline diamond films from C{sub 2} dimers and related mechanisms have been investigated by enhancing C{sub 2} growth chemistry in Ar-rich microwave plasmas. Efficient C{sub 2} production by direct dissociation from acetylene causes the micro- to nanocrystal transition with a low threshold Ar concentration of {approx}70% and produces films of {approx}20 nm grains with a distinct visible-Raman peak of diamond. C{sub 2} grows nanodiamond on diamond surfaces but rarely initiates nucleation on foreign surfaces. The phase purity can be improved by increasing the dominance of nanodiamond growth from C{sub 2} over nondiamond growth from CH{sub x}(x=0-3) and large radicals.

  17. Casimir effect in the nonequilibrium steady state of a quantum spin chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez-Cabrera, D. L.; Racz, Z.

    2010-05-15

    We present a fully microscopics-based calculation of the Casimir effect in a nonequilibrium system, namely, an energy-flux-driven quantum XX chain. The force between the walls (transverse-field impurities) is calculated in a nonequilibrium steady state which is prepared by letting the system evolve from an initial state with the two halves of the chain prepared at equilibrium at different temperatures. The steady state emerging in the large-time limit is homogeneous but carries an energy flux. The Casimir force in this nonequilibrium state is calculated analytically in the limit when the transverse fields are small. We find that the the Casimir force range is reduced compared to the equilibrium case, and suggest that the reason for this is the reduction of fluctuations in the flux-carrying steady state.

  18. SU-E-T-421: Feasibility Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Constant Dose Rate for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. Methods: The nine-Field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry Run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs Decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. Conclusion: VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability. This work is supported by the grant project, National Natural; Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237)

  19. Carrier Multiplication in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Theoretical Screening of Candidate Materials Based on Band-Structure Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, J. W.; Franceschetti, A.; Zunger, A.

    2008-01-01

    Direct carrier multiplication (DCM) occurs when a highly excited electron-hole pair decays by transferring its excess energy to the electrons rather than to the lattice, possibly exciting additional electron-hole pairs. Atomistic electronic structure calculations have shown that DCM can be induced by electron-hole Coulomb interactions, in an impact-ionization-like process whose rate is proportional to the density of biexciton states {rho}{sub XX}. Here we introduce a DCM 'figure of merit' R{sub 2}(E) which is proportional to the ratio between the biexciton density of states {rho}{sub XX} and the single-exciton density of states {rho}{sub x}, restricted to single-exciton and biexciton states that are coupled by Coulomb interactions. Using R{sub 2}(E), we consider GaAs, InAs, InP, GaSb, InSb, CdSe, Ge, Si, and PbSe nanocrystals of different sizes. Although DCM can be affected by both quantum-confinement effects (reflecting the underly electronic structure of the confined dot-interior states) and surface effects, here we are interested to isolate the former. To this end the nanocrystal energy levels are obtained from the corresponding bulk band structure via the truncated crystal approximation. We find that PbSe, Si, GaAs, CdSe, and InP nanocrystals have larger DCM figure of merit than the other nanocrystals. Our calculations suggest that high DCM efficiency requires high degeneracy of the corresponding bulk band-edge states. Interestingly, by considering band structure effects we find that as the dot size increases the DCM critical energy E{sub 0} (the energy at which R{sub 2}(E) becomes {ge}1) is reduced, suggesting improved DCM. However, whether the normalized E{sub 0}/{var_epsilon}{sub g} increases or decreases as the dot size increases depends on dot material.

  20. Dispersion of the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of the CuAl(S{sub 1x}Se{sub x})? mixed chaclcopyrite compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reshak, A. H.; Brik, M. G.; Auluck, S.

    2014-09-14

    Based on the electronic band structure, we have calculated the dispersion of the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities for the mixed CuAl(S{sub 1x}Se{sub x})? chaclcopyrite compounds with x=0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0. Calculations are performed within the Perdew-Becke-Ernzerhof general gradient approximation. The investigated compounds possess a direct band gap of about 2.2 eV (CuAlS?), 1.9 eV (CuAl(S?.??Se?.??)?), 1.7 eV (CuAl(S?.?Se?.?)?), 1.5 eV (CuAl(S?.??Se?.??)?), and 1.4 eV (CuAlSe?) which tuned to make them optically active for the optoelectronics and photovoltaic applications. These results confirm that substituting S by Se causes significant band gaps' reduction. The optical function's dispersion ??{sup xx}(?) and ??{sup zz}(?)/??{sup xx}(?), ??{sup yy}(?), and ??{sup zz}(?) was calculated and discussed in detail. To demonstrate the effect of substituting S by Se on the complex second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility tensors, we performed detailed calculations for the complex second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility tensors, which show that the neat parents compounds CuAlS? and CuAlSe? exhibit | ????}(-2?;?;?) | as the dominant component, while the mixed alloys exhibit | ????(-2?;?;?) | as the dominant component. The features of | ????}(-2?;?;?) | and | ?{sub 111}}(-2?;?;?) | spectra were analyzed on the basis of the absorptive part of the corresponding dielectric function ??(?) as a function of both ?/2 and ?.

  1. Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slovak, M.L. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

  2. Methods for separating oxygen from oxygen-containing gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackay, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention provides mixed conducting metal oxides particularly useful for the manufacture of catalytic membranes for gas-phase oxygen separation processes. The materials of this invention have the general formula: A.sub.x A'.sub.x A".sub.2-(x+x') B.sub.y B'.sub.y B".sub.2-(y+y') O.sub.5+z ; where x and x' are greater than 0; y and y' are greater than 0; x+x' is less than or equal to 2; y+y' is less than or equal to 2; z is a number that makes the metal oxide charge neutral; A is an element selected from the f block lanthanide elements; A' is an element selected from Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; A" is an element selected from the f block lanthanides or Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; B is an element selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof; and B' and B" are different elements and are independently selected from the group of elements Mg or the d-block transition elements. The invention also provides methods for oxygen separation and oxygen enrichment of oxygen deficient gases which employ mixed conducting metal oxides of the above formula. Examples of the materials used for the preparation of the membrane include A.sub.x Sr.sub.x' B.sub.y Fe.sub.y' Co.sub.2-(y+y') O.sub.5+z, where x is about 0.3 to about 0.5, x' is about 1.5 to about 1.7, y is 0.6, y' is between about 1.0 and 1.4 and B is Ga or Al.

  3. Characterization and use of a 2D-array of ion chambers for brachytherapy dosimetric quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yewondwossen, Mammo

    2012-10-01

    The two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array MatriXX Evolution is one of the 2D ionization chamber arrays developed by IBA Dosimetry (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) for megavoltage real-time absolute 2D dosimetry and verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the performance of ion chamber array for submegavoltage range brachytherapy beam dose verification and quality assurance (QA) and (2) use the end-to-end dosimetric evaluation that mimics a patient treatment procedure and confirm the primary source strength calibration agrees in both the treatment planning system (TPS) and treatment delivery console computers. The dose linearity and energy dependence of the 2D ion chamber array was studied using kilovoltage X-ray beams (100, 180 and 300 kVp). The detector calibration factor was determined using 300 kVp X-ray beams so that we can use the same calibration factor for dosimetric verification of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The phantom used for this measurement consists of multiple catheters, the IBA MatriXX detector, and water-equivalent slab of RW3 to provide full scattering conditions. The treatment planning system (TPS) (Oncentra brachy version 3.3, Nucletron BV, Veenendaal, the Netherlands) dose distribution was calculated on the computed tomography (CT) scan of this phantom. The measured and TPS calculated distributions were compared in IBA Dosimetry OmniPro-I'mRT software. The quality of agreement was quantified by the gamma ({gamma}) index (with 3% delta dose and distance criterion of 2 mm) for 9 sets of plans. Using a dedicated phantom capable of receiving 5 brachytherapy intralumenal catheters a QA procedure was developed for end-to-end dosimetric evaluation for routine QA checks. The 2D ion chamber array dose dependence was found to be linear for 100-300 kVp and the detector response (k{sub user}) showed strong energy dependence for 100-300 kVp energy range. For the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR source, dosimetric evaluation k{sub user} factor determined by photon beam of energy of 300 kVp was used. The maximum mean difference between ion chamber array measured and TPS calculated was 3.7%. Comparisons of dose distribution for different test plans have shown agreement with >94.5% for {gamma} {<=}1. Dosimetric QA can be performed with the 2D ion chamber array to confirm primary source strength calibration is properly updated in both the TPS and treatment delivery console computers. The MatriXX Evolution ionization chamber array has been found to be reliable for measurement of both absolute dose and relative dose distributions for the Ir-192 brachytherapy HDR source.

  4. Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    More ... 8.2 Q 1.7 1.9 1.7 2.6 6.1 2.0 Q Q Q 16.7 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 9.0 2.5 3.6 1.3 1.0 0.6 Q...

  5. Table 5.2. U.S. per Household Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    75,000 or More ... 8.2 2.3 28.5 1,443 1,692 5.2 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 9.0 1.4 14.7 769 890 7.3 125...

  6. Table 5.12. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 30.8 25.1 28.9 42.6 27.1 Q Q Q 25.2 31.8 23.3 13.7 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 16.6 15.4 16.2 19.5 12.8 Q...

  7. Table 5.18. U.S. Average Household and Vehicle Energy Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 8.5 3,447 0.3 1,676 8.2 3,519 1,827 1,692 8.6 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 14.7 1,600 5.7 935 9.0 2,022...

  8. Householder's Perceptions of Insulation Adequacy and Drafts in the Home in 2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2004-01-01

    In order to improve the estimation of end-use heating consumption, the Energy Information Administration's (EIA), 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), for the first time, asked respondents to judge how drafty they perceived their homes to be as a measure of insulation quality.

  9. Fact #727: May 14, 2012 Nearly Twenty Percent of Households Own...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Trends in the United States and its Major Metropolitan Area, 1960-1990, Cambridge, MA, 1994, p. 2-2. 2000 data - U.S. Bureau of the Census, American Fact Finder, ...

  10. EERE Success Story-Kingston Creek Hydro Project Powers 100 Households...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Kingston Creek Project-benefitting the Young Brothers Ranch-is a 175-kilowatt hydro generation plant on private land that takes advantage of an existing stream and power line. ...

  11. "Table HC7.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Household Income...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Thermostats" "Reduces Temperature During Day" "Yes",18.6,1.9,3.3,4,3.1,6.2,1.2,3.2 "No",14.5,2.3,3.1,2.5,2.4,4.2,1.3,3.5 "Reduces Temperature at Night" ...

  12. "Table HC7.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Household...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...ff",43.6,6.3,11.7,9.6,6.5,9.5,4.3,11.9 "Manually Put into Sleep Mode",19.4,1.9,3.6,4.4,2.9,6.6,1.2,3.7 "CPU Goes to Sleep When PC is Left On" "Yes",9.1,1,1.8,1.7,1.2,3.3,0.7,1.8 ...

  13. Table 2.5 Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures by End...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Space Heating Air Conditioning Water Heating Appliances, 2 Electronics, and Lighting Natural Gas Elec- tricity 3 Fuel Oil 4 LPG 5 Total Electricity 3 Natural Gas Elec- tricity ...

  14. Electricity storage for grid-connected household dwellings with PV panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulder, Grietus; Six, Daan; Ridder, Fjo De

    2010-07-15

    Classically electricity storage for PV panels is mostly designed for stand-alone applications. In contrast, we focus in this article on houses connected to the grid with a small-scale storage to store a part of the solar power for postponed consumption within the day or the next days. In this way the house owner becomes less dependent on the grid and does only pay for the net shortage of his energy production. Local storage solutions pave the way for many new applications like omitting over-voltage of the line and bridging periods of power-line black-out. Since 2009 using self-consumption of PV energy is publicly encouraged in Germany, which can be realised by electric storage. This paper develops methods to determine the optimal storage size for grid-connected dwellings with PV panels. From measurements in houses we were able to establish calculation rules for sizing the storage. Two situations for electricity storage are covered: - the storage system is an optimum to cover most of the electricity needs; - it is an optimum for covering the peak power need of a dwelling. After these calculation rules a second step is needed to determine the size of the real battery. The article treats the aspects that should be taken into consideration before buying a specific battery like lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries. (author)

  15. Lubricant return comparison of naphthenic and polyol ester oils in R-134a household refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes-Gavilan, J.L.; Flak, G.T.; Tritcak, T.R.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents mineral oils and polyol esters as possible lubricant options for domestic refrigeration applications employing R-134a as the heat exchange fluid. A performance comparison, based on data presented, is made between the mineral oils and polyol esters evaluated. To more closely examine lubricant return with N-70 and R-134a and ensure that the oil is not contributing to any deterioration in efficiency due to its accumulation in evaporators, a special test unit was designed with a difficult oil return configuration and its performance carefully monitored. Oil return with a hydrofluorocarbon-miscible polyol ester, R-133-O was also evaluated in this setup and its performance results compared to those obtained with the naphthenic refrigeration oil.

  16. Fact #618: April 12, 2010 Vehicles per Household and Other Demographic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sources: U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, 1990 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey: Summary of Travel Trends, FHWA-PL-92-027, Washington, ...

  17. Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in 2015 U.S. electric power producers are increasing their use of natural gas and burning less coal for generating electricity. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information ...

  18. Drivers of U.S. Household Energy Consumption, 1980-2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1980-2009 February 2015 Independent Statistics & ... DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Drivers ... 9 Total electricity ......

  19. Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    drivers to see big savings at the gasoline pump this summer U.S. consumers are expected to pay the lowest average price for gasoline in six years during this summer's driving season, mostly because of lower crude oil costs. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the price for regular gasoline should average $2.45 per gallon this summer. That's down more than a dollar from the $3.59 per gallon seen last summer, and the cheapest average summer pump price since 2009.

  20. Average U.S. household to spend $710 less on gasoline during 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    natural gas inventories at end of winter higher than last year Despite recent cold temperatures in some parts of the country, U.S. natural gas inventories ended the winter heating season in better shape than last year. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said natural gas inventories near the end of March were 75% higher compared with the same period in 2014. That sets up adequate supplies for gas-fired power plants this summer to meet electric cooling needs of

  1. Low-cost household paint abatement to reduce children's blood lead levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, T.; Kanarek, M.S.; Schultz, B.D.; Murphy, A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of low-cost abatement on children's blood lead levels. Blood lead was analyzed before and after abatement in 37 homes of children under 7 years old with initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL. Ninety-five percent of homes were built before 1950. Abatement methods used were wet-scraping and repainting deteriorated surfaces and wrapping window wells with aluminum or vinyl. A control group was retrospectively selected. Control children were under 7 years old, had initial blood lead levels of 25--44 {micro}g/dL and a follow-up level at least 28 days afterward, and did not have abatements performed in their homes between blood lead levels. After abatement, statistically significant declines occurred in the intervention children's blood lead levels. The mean decline was 22%, 1 to 6 months after treatment. After adjustment for seasonality and child's age, the mean decline was 6.0 {micro}g/dL, or 18%. The control children's blood levels did not decline significantly. There was a mean decline of 0.25 {micro}g/dL, or 0.39%. After adjustment for seasonality and age, the mean decline for control children was 1.6 {micro}g/dL, or 1.8%. Low-cost abatement and education are effective short-term interim controls.

  2. Evaluating the biogas potential of the dry fraction from pretreatment of food waste from households

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murto, Marika; Bjrnsson, Lovisa; Rosqvist, Hkan; Bohn, Irene

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? A novel approach for biogas production from a waste fraction that today is incinerated. ? Biogas production is possible in spite of the impurities of the waste. ? Tracer studies are applied in a novel way. ? Structural material is needed to improve the flow pattern of the waste. ? We provide a solution to biological treatment for the complex waste fraction. - Abstract: At the waste handling company NSR, Helsingborg, Sweden, the food waste fraction of source separated municipal solid waste is pretreated to obtain a liquid fraction, which is used for biogas production, and a dry fraction, which is at present incinerated. This pretreatment and separation is performed to remove impurities, however also some of the organic material is removed. The possibility of realising the methane potential of the dry fraction through batch-wise dry anaerobic digestion was investigated. The anaerobic digestion technique used was a two-stage process consisting of a static leach bed reactor and a methane reactor. Treatment of the dry fraction alone and in a mixture with structural material was tested to investigate the effect on the porosity of the leach bed. A tracer experiment was carried out to investigate the liquid flow through the leach beds, and this method proved useful in demonstrating a more homogenous flow through the leach bed when structural material was added. Addition of structural material to the dry fraction was needed to achieve a functional digestion process. A methane yield of 98 m{sup 3}/ton was obtained from the dry fraction mixed with structural material after 76 days of digestion. This was in the same range as obtained in the laboratory scale biochemical methane potential test, showing that it was possible to extract the organic content in the dry fraction in this type of dry digestion system for the production of methane.

  3. SU-E-T-415: An Ionization Chamber Array with High Spatial Resolution for External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Togno, M; Wilkens, J; Menichelli, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize an ionization chamber array technology with high spatial resolution and high charge collection efficiency for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: The prototype under test is a linear array of air vented ionization chambers developed by IBA Dosimetry, consisting of 80 pixels with 3.5mm spatial resolution and 4mm{sup 3} sensitive volume. The detector was characterized in a plastic phantom with {sup 60} Co radiation and MV X-rays from an ELEKTA Agility LINAC (with flattened and unflattened beam qualities). Bias voltage was varied in order to evaluate charge collection efficiency. A commercial array of ionization chambers (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry) and an amorphous silicon flat panel in direct conversion configuration were used as references. Results: Repeatability (0.4%) and stability under continuous gamma irradiation (0.3%) are very good, in spite of low active volume and sensitivity (?200pC/Gy). Charge collection efficiency is higher than 99% already at 150V with ?2mGy dose per pulse, leading to a 1.1% sensitivity change with dose per pulse in the range 0.09-2mGy (covering all flattened and unflattened applications). Measured dose profiles are in agreement with MatriXX for fields larger than 22cm{sup 2}, in which case the linear array offers a much better characterization of the penumbra region. Down to 11cm{sup 2}, measured profiles are in very good agreement with the flat panel. Conclusion: The array represents a valuable tool for the characterization of treatment fields in which high spatial resolution is required, together with the dosimetric performance of air vented ionization chambers. Such a technology would be particularly valuable in association with advanced treatment modalities such as rotational radiotherapy, stereotactic treatments (even with unflattened beam qualities) and proton therapy, due to the insensitivity of the chambers on dose per pulse. In the future, a two dimensional prototype based on this technology will be developed and tested. This research project has been supported by a Marie Curie Early Initial Training Network Fellowship of the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme under contract number (PITN-GA-2011-289198-.

  4. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, R.V.; Parida, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441 having a marginally lower lithium content, compared to 80xx and 20xx series Al-Li alloys is presented in this paper. This investigation was conducted on single edge tension--SE(T)--specimens, under constant amplitude as well as under MiniLCA flight spectrum loading with the specific objective of determining the effects of stress ratio, orientation, thickness and cladding. Three thicknesses were considered: 1.2 mm(clad and unclad), 2.0 mm(clad and unclad) and 8.0 mm unclad. Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at stress ratios of {minus}0.3, 0.1 and 0.7. Testing was performed under ambient conditions and along three orientations, namely L-T, T-L and L+45 degrees. Crack growth characteristics of this alloy are compared with that of BS:L73 (2014-T4 equivalent) for assessing the possibility of replacing BS:L73. Significant effect of stress ratio on crack growth rate was observed in all thicknesses. However, in case of 1.2 and 2.0 mm thick sheets, the effect was minimal at intermediate-crack growth regime. The orientation of the specimen does not adversely affect the fatigue crack growth behavior of 8.0 mm and 2.0 mm thick specimens. However, for 1.2 mm unclad sheet crack growth resistance in L-T direction was found to be superior to that along T-L direction. In majority of test cases considered, no significant effect was observed on crack growth rate due to thickness or cladding. Crack growth characteristics of Al-Li alloy 1441 and Al-Cu alloy BS:L73 under constant amplitude as well as MiniLCA spectrum loading are similar in the low and intermediate-crack growth rate regime. Based on these observations, it is felt that this Al-Li alloy has the potential for future aerospace applications.

  5. Solid state proton and electron mediating membrane and use in catalytic membrane reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, James H.; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides catalytic proton and electron mediating membranes useful in catalytic reactors. The membranes have an oxidation and a reduction surface and comprise a single-phase mixed metal oxide material of the formula: AB.sub.1-x B'.sub.x O.sub.3-y wherein A is selected from Ca, Sr or Ba ions; B is selected from Ce, Tb, Pr, or Th ions; B' is selected from Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al, Ga, or In ions, or combinations thereof; and x is greater than or equal to 0.02 and less than or equal to 0.5. The membranes can further comprise a catalyst on either the oxidation or reduction surface, or both. Membranes include those which are fabricated-by combining powders of metal oxides or metal carbonates of metal A ion, metal B ion and metal B' ion such that the stoichiometric ratio A:B:B' is 1:1-x:x where 0.2.ltoreq..times.0.5, repeatedly calcining and milling the combined powders until a single-phase material is obtained and pressing and sintering the singlephase material to obtain a membrane.

  6. Materials and methods for the separation of oxygen from air

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKay, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2003-07-15

    Metal oxides particularly useful for the manufacture of catalytic membranes for gas-phase oxygen separation processes having the formula: O.sub.5+z where: x and x' are greater than 0; y and y' are greater than 0; x+x' is equal to 2; y+y' is less than or equal to 2; z is a number that makes the metal oxide charge neutral; A is an element selected from the lanthanide elements; A' is an element selected from Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; A" is an element selected from the f block lanthanides, Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra; B is an element selected from the group consisting of Al, Ga, In or mixtures thereof and B" is Co or Mg, with the exception that when B" is Mg, A' and A" are not Mg. The metal oxides are useful for preparation of dense membranes which may be formed from dense thin films of the mixed metal oxide on a porous metal oxide element. The invention also provides methods and catalytic reactors for oxygen separation and oxygen enrichment of oxygen deficient gases which employ mixed conducting metal oxides of the above formula.

  7. Limits on Variations in Fundamental Constants from 21-cm and Ultraviolet Quasar Absorption Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Webb, J.K.; Flambaum, V.V.; Curran, S.J.; Murphy, M.T.

    2005-07-22

    Quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and UV rest wavelengths are used to estimate the time variation of x{identical_to}{alpha}{sup 2}g{sub p}{mu}, where {alpha} is the fine structure constant, g{sub p} the proton g factor, and m{sub e}/m{sub p}{identical_to}{mu} the electron/proton mass ratio. Over a redshift range 0.24 < or approx. z{sub abs} < or approx. 2.04, <{delta}x/x>{sub total}{sup weighted}=(1.17{+-}1.01)x10{sup -5}. A linear fit gives x/x=(-1.43{+-}1.27)x10{sup -15} yr{sup -1}. Two previous results on varying {alpha} yield the strong limits {delta}{mu}/{mu}=(2.31{+-}1.03)x10{sup -5} and {delta}{mu}/{mu}=(1.29{+-}1.01)x10{sup -5}. Our sample, 8x larger than any previous, provides the first direct estimate of the intrinsic 21-cm and UV velocity differences {approx}6 km s{sup -1}.

  8. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor coremore » examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a ¼ pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.« less

  9. A study of nitrogenation of a NdFe{sub 12-x}Mo{sub x} compound by in situ neutron powder diffraction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.; Lin, J.; Loong, C.-K.; Short, S. M.

    1997-11-18

    The effects on the crystal lattice of a NdFe{sub 12{minus}x}Mo{sub x}(x {approx_equal} 1.7) compound which contained {approximately}12 vol% of bcc-Fe were studied by neutron powder diffraction during controlled nitrogenation over the 25-600 C temperature range. The sample inside the furnace was connected to a closed volume of ultra-pure nitrogen gas while neutron data were collected over regular time intervals during sequential heating. Substantial nitrogen absorption occurred between 500 to 600 C. During the nitrogenation process the NdFe{sub 12{minus}x}Mo{sub x}N{sub y} lattice expanded while the bcc-Fe lattice contracted. An increasing decomposition of the compound into bcc-Fe at 600 C was observed. The average size of the NdFe{sub 12{minus}x}Mo{sub x}N{sub y} crystalline grains decreased starting at {approximately}300 C, reaching a minimum at {approximately}500 C and then increased markedly at higher temperatures. The development of lattice strains, on the other hand, showed an opposite trend, i.e., a maximum at 500 C. A correlation of structural modification of the crystalline phases and the nitrogenation process is discussed.

  10. Overview of the US Department of Energy Master Safeguards and Security Agreement program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billings, M.P.; Duncan, M.R.; Craig, J.R.

    1988-06-01

    The Master Safeguards and Security Agreement establishes a contract between the US Department of Energy-Headquarters and a US Department of Energy regional Operations Office regarding protection strategies, protection system performance, and acceptability of risks for US Department of Energy Safeguards and Security interests at a facility or site. An approved Master Safeguards and Security Agreement defines the protection system performance baseline for evaluations, inspections, and audits, and can introduce exceptions to US Department of Energy orders. Responsibilities and authorities for development and approval of a Master Safeguards and Security Agreement are outlined in US Department of Energy Order 5630.13, ''Master Safeguards and Security Agreement'' and US Department of Energy Order 5630.xx, ''Safeguards and Security Planning Program'' (draft). To date, 14 Master Safeguards and Security Agreements have been approved by the US Department of Energy-Headquarters and about 34 are in preparation or review. A total of approximately 50 are anticipated before completion of the program. The Master Safeguards and Security agreement program has been positively received by both the US Department of Energy-Headquarters and the US Department of Energy Operations Offices, because it provides visibility as to the effectiveness of Safeguards and Security protection systems and affords a sensible foundation for security planning based on risk. 6 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Electronic structure of antifluorite Cu{sub 2}X (X = S, Se, Te) within the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yubo; Wang, Youwei; Xi, Lili; Qiu, Ruihao; Shi, Xun; Zhang, Peihong E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu; Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 ; Zhang, Wenqing E-mail: pzhang3@buffalo.edu; School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Sate Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing University, Jiangsu 210093

    2014-02-21

    The traditional photon absorbers Cu{sub 2?x}X (X = S, Se, and Te) have regained significant research attention in the search of earth-abundant photovoltaic materials. These moderate- and narrow-gap materials have also been shown to exhibit excellent thermoelectric properties recently. However, semimetallic band structures with inverted band orderings are predicted for antifluorite structure Cu{sub 2}X using density functional theory with the local density approximation or the generalized gradient approximation. We find that semiconducting band structures and normal band orderings can be obtained using the modified Becke-Johnson potential plus an on-site Coulomb U (the mBJ+U approach), which is consistent with our earlier finding for diamond-like Cu-based multinary semiconductors [Y. Zhang, J. Zhang, W. Gao, T. A. Abtew, Y. Wang, P. Zhang, and W. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 184706 (2013)]. The trend of the chemical bonding of Cu{sub 2}X is analyzed, which shows that the positions of the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum are strongly affected by the inter-site pd and intra-site sp hybridizations, respectively. The calculated gaps of Cu{sub 2}S and Cu{sub 2}Se still seem to be underestimated compared with experimental results. We also discuss the effects of different structural phases and Cu disordering and deficiency on the bandgaps of these materials.

  12. Generating unstructured nuclear reactor core meshes in parallel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Rajeev; Tautges, Timothy J.

    2014-10-24

    Recent advances in supercomputers and parallel solver techniques have enabled users to run large simulations problems using millions of processors. Techniques for multiphysics nuclear reactor core simulations are under active development in several countries. Most of these techniques require large unstructured meshes that can be hard to generate in a standalone desktop computers because of high memory requirements, limited processing power, and other complexities. We have previously reported on a hierarchical lattice-based approach for generating reactor core meshes. Here, we describe efforts to exploit coarse-grained parallelism during reactor assembly and reactor core mesh generation processes. We highlight several reactor core examples including a very high temperature reactor, a full-core model of the Korean MONJU reactor, a pressurized water reactor core, the fast reactor Experimental Breeder Reactor-II core with a XX09 assembly, and an advanced breeder test reactor core. The times required to generate large mesh models, along with speedups obtained from running these problems in parallel, are reported. A graphical user interface to the tools described here has also been developed.

  13. Combustion performance of porous silicon-based energetic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Benjamin Aaron; Son, Steve F; Asay, Blaine W; Cho, Kevin Y

    2009-01-01

    The combustion performance of oxidizer filled porous silicon(PSi) was studied. PSi samples with diameters of 2.54 cm were fabricated by electrochemical etching. The % porosity of the samples ranged from 55 to 82%. The samples were cut into 3-5 mm strips and filled with the oxidizers NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O, Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 4H{sub 2}O, S and perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The filled PSi was then burned by igniting the sample with a hot NiChrome{trademark} wire. The burns were recorded using high speed photography from which bring rates were calculated. That burning rates showed a strong dependency on quality of the oxidizer loading. The % porosity did not appear to have a direct affect on the burning rates for those studied. PSi loaded with NaClO{sub 4} x 1H{sub 2}O produced burning rates that ranged from 216-349 cm/s. PSi loaded with Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub x}x 4 H{sub 2}O had burning rates of 154-285 cm/s. An S filled PSi sample burned a rate of 16 to 290 cm/s, and perfluoropolyether loaded PSi burned at a rate of 1.4 cm/s.

  14. Printability and inspectability of programmed pit defects on teh masks in EUV lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, I.-Y.; Seo, H.-S.; Ahn, B.-S.; Lee, D.-G.; Kim, D.; Huh, S.; Koh, C.-W.; Cha, B.; Kim, S.-S.; Cho, H.-K.; Mochi, I.; Goldberg, K. A.

    2010-03-12

    Printability and inspectability of phase defects in ELlVL mask originated from substrate pit were investigated. For this purpose, PDMs with programmed pits on substrate were fabricated using different ML sources from several suppliers. Simulations with 32-nm HP L/S show that substrate pits with below {approx}20 nm in depth would not be printed on the wafer if they could be smoothed by ML process down to {approx}1 nm in depth on ML surface. Through the investigation of inspectability for programmed pits, minimum pit sizes detected by KLA6xx, AIT, and M7360 depend on ML smoothing performance. Furthermore, printability results for pit defects also correlate with smoothed pit sizes. AIT results for pattemed mask with 32-nm HP L/S represents that minimum printable size of pits could be {approx}28.3 nm of SEVD. In addition, printability of pits became more printable as defocus moves to (-) directions. Consequently, printability of phase defects strongly depends on their locations with respect to those of absorber patterns. This indicates that defect compensation by pattern shift could be a key technique to realize zero printable phase defects in EUVL masks.

  15. Electricity Demand of PHEVs Operated by Private Households and Commercial Fleets: Effects of Driving and Charging Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Smart; Matthew Shirk; Ken Kurani; Casey Quinn; Jamie Davies

    2010-11-01

    Automotive and energy researchers have made considerable efforts to predict the impact of plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) charging on the electrical grid. This work has been done primarily through computer modeling and simulation. The US Department of Energys (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), in partnership with the University of California at Daviss Institute for Transportation Stuides, have been collecting data from a diverse fleet of PHEVs. The AVTA is conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory for DOEs Vehicle Technologies Program. This work provides the opportunity to quantify the petroleum displacement potential of early PHEV models, and also observe, rather than simulate, the charging behavior of vehicle users. This paper presents actual charging behavior and the resulting electricity demand from these PHEVs operating in undirected, real-world conditions. Charging patterns are examined for both commercial-use and personal-use vehicles. Underlying reasons for charging behavior in both groups are also presented.

  16. SU-E-T-219: Investigation of IMRT Out-Of-Field Dose Calculation Accuracy for a Commercial Treatment Planning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Inaccuracies in out-of-field calculations could lead to underestimation of dose to organs-at-risk. This study evaluates the dose calculation accuracy of a model-based calculation algorithm at points outside the primary treatment field for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan using experimental measurements. Methods: The treatment planning system investigated is Varian Eclipse V.10 with Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA). The IMRT fields investigated are from real patient treatment plans. The doses from a dynamic (DMLC) IMRT brain plan were calculated and compared with measured doses at locations outside the primary treatment fields. Measurements were performed with a MatriXX system (2-D chamber array) placed in solid water. All fields were set vertically incident on the phantom and were 9 cm 6 cm or smaller. The dose was normalized to the central axis for points up to 15 cm off isocenter. The comparisons were performed at depths of 2, 10, 15, and 20 cm Results: The measurements have shown that AAA calculations underestimate doses at points outside the primary treatment field. The underestimation occurs at 2 cm depth and decreases down to a factor of 2 as depth increases to 20 cm. In low dose (<2% of target dose) regions outside the primary fields the local dose underestimations can be >200% compared to measured doses. Relative to the plan target dose, the measured doses to points outside the field were less than 1% at shallow depths and less than 2% at greater depths. Conclusion: Compared to measurements, the AAA algorithm underestimated the dose at points outside the treatment field with the greatest differences observed at shallow depths. Despite large local dose uncertainties predicted by the treatment planning system, the impact of these uncertainties is expected to be insignificant as doses at these points were less than 1-2% of the prescribed treatment dose.

  17. Comparison of Elekta VMAT with helical tomotherapy and fixed field IMRT: Plan quality, delivery efficiency and accuracy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao Min; Yang Wensha; Chen Fan; Sheng Ke; Ye Jinsong; Mehta, Vivek; Shepard, David; Cao Daliang

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Helical tomotherapy (HT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are arc-based approaches to IMRT delivery. The objective of this study is to compare VMAT to both HT and fixed field IMRT in terms of plan quality, delivery efficiency, and accuracy. Methods: Eighteen cases including six prostate, six head-and-neck, and six lung cases were selected for this study. IMRT plans were developed using direct machine parameter optimization in the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. HT plans were developed using a Hi-Art II planning station. VMAT plans were generated using both the Pinnacle{sup 3} SmartArc IMRT module and a home-grown arc sequencing algorithm. VMAT and HT plans were delivered using Elekta's PreciseBeam VMAT linac control system (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) and a TomoTherapy Hi-Art II system (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI), respectively. Treatment plan quality assurance (QA) for VMAT was performed using the IBA MatriXX system while an ion chamber and films were used for HT plan QA. Results: The results demonstrate that both VMAT and HT are capable of providing more uniform target doses and improved normal tissue sparing as compared with fixed field IMRT. In terms of delivery efficiency, VMAT plan deliveries on average took 2.2 min for prostate and lung cases and 4.6 min for head-and-neck cases. These values increased to 4.7 and 7.0 min for HT plans. Conclusions: Both VMAT and HT plans can be delivered accurately based on their own QA standards. Overall, VMAT was able to provide approximately a 40% reduction in treatment time while maintaining comparable plan quality to that of HT.

  18. SU-E-J-91: Novel Epitaxial Silicon Array for Quality Assurance in Photon and Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamonti, C; Zani, M; Scaringella, M; Bruzzi, M; Bucciolini, M; Menichelli, D; Friedl, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: to demonstrate suitability of a novel silicon array for measuring the dose properties of highly conformal photon and proton beams. Methods: prototype under test is a 24cm long linear array prototype, although the underlying technology is suitable to construct 2D arrays as well. It is based on a 64pixels monolithic sensor with 1mm pixel pitch, made of epitaxial ptype silicon. Thanks to design modularity, more sensors can be placed side by side without breaking pixel pitch. Flattened and unflattened photon beams, as well as proton radiation from a cyclotron in pencil beam scanning mode, were considered. Measurements of beam characteristics as percentage depth doses, dose profiles, output factors and energy response, which are necessary to deliver radiation with high precision and reliability, were performed. Results: Dose rate independence with photons was verified in the dose per pulse range 0.03 to 2mGy. Results clearly indicate nondependence of the detector sensitivity both for flattened and unflattened beams, with a variation of at most 0.5percentage. OFs were obtained for field with a lateral size ranging from 0.8cm to 16cm and the results are in good agreement with ion chamber A1SL, max difference less than 1.5percentage. Field sizes and beam penumbra were measured and compared to EBT film results. Concerning proton beams, sensitivity independence on dose rate was verified by changing the beam current in the interval 2-130Gy/s. Field sizes and beam penumbra measurements are in agreement with data taken with a scintillating 2D array with 0.5mm resolution IBA Lynx, and a better penumbra definition than an array of ionization chambers IBA MatriXX is reached. Conclusion: The device is a novel and valuable tool for QA both for photon and proton dose delivery. All measurements demonstrated its capability to measure with high spatial resolution many crucial properties of the RT beam.

  19. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: • Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions. • Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process. • Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens. • Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds. • Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life . • Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates. • Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses. • Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage. • Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength. • Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads. • Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  20. SciFri PM: Dosimetry06: Commissioning of a 3D patient specific QA system for hypofractionated prostate treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivest, R; Venkataraman, S; McCurdy, B

    2014-08-15

    The objective of this work is to commission the 6MV-SRS beam model in COMPASS (v2.1, IBA-Dosimetry) and validate its use for patient specific QA of hypofractionated prostate treatments. The COMPASS system consists of a 2D ion chamber array (MatriXX{sup Evolution}), an independent gantry angle sensor and associated software. The system can either directly calculate or reconstruct (using measured detector responses) a 3D dose distribution on the patient CT dataset for plan verification. Beam models are developed and commissioned in the same manner as a beam model is commissioned in a standard treatment planning system. Model validation was initially performed by comparing both COMPASS calculations and reconstructions to measured open field beam data. Next, 10 hypofractionated prostate RapidArc plans were delivered to both the COMPASS system and a phantom with ion chamber and film inserted. COMPASS dose distributions calculated and reconstructed on the phantom CT dataset were compared to the chamber and film measurements. The mean ( standard deviation) difference between COMPASS reconstructed dose and ion chamber measurement was 1.4 1.0%. The maximum discrepancy was 2.6%. Corresponding values for COMPASS calculation were 0.9 0.9% and 2.6%, respectively. The average gamma agreement index (3%/3mm) for COMPAS reconstruction and film was 96.7% and 95.3% when using 70% and 20% dose thresholds, respectively. The corresponding values for COMPASS calculation were 97.1% and 97.1%, respectively. Based on our results, COMPASS can be used for the patient specific QA of hypofractionated prostate treatments delivered with the 6MV-SRS beam.

  1. Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists (COMIS) fundamentals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feustel, H.E.; Rayner-Hooson, A.

    1990-05-01

    The COMIS workshop (Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists) was a joint research effort to develop a multizone infiltration mode. This workshop (October 1988--September 1989) was hosted by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Applied Science Division. The task of the workshop was to develop a detailed multizone infiltration program taking crack flow, HVAC-systems, single-sided ventilation and transport mechanism through large openings into account. This work was accomplished not by investigating into numerical description of physical phenomena but by reviewing the literature for the best suitable algorithm. The numerical description of physical phenomena is clearly a task of IEA-Annex XX Air Flow Patterns in Buildings,'' which will be finished in September 1991. Multigas tracer measurements and wind tunnel data will be used to check the model. The agenda integrated all participants' contributions into a single model containing a large library of modules. The user-friendly program is aimed at researchers and building professionals. From its announcement in December 1986, COMIS was well received by the research community. Due to the internationality of the group, several national and international research programmes were co-ordinated with the COMIS workshop. Colleagues for France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, People's Republic of China, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States of America were working together on the development of the model. Even though this kind of co-operation is well known in other fields of research, e.g., high energy physics; for the field of building physics it is a new approach. This document contains an overview about infiltration modelling as well as the physics and the mathematics behind the COMIS model. 91 refs., 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Residential Transportation Historical Data Tables for 1983-2001

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per household and per vehicle; fuel consumption; fuel expenditures; and fuel economy. Excel PDF Trends in Households & Vehicles Table 1. Number of Households with Vehicles excel...

  3. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Family Income by Number of Household Members, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Household Members Family Income All Households...

  4. Title Slide Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5,444 228 Suspended Reports Per Household Measured Savings 208.1 12.0 Per Household Joint Rebate Program Savings 0.5 1.0 Per Household Joint Upstream Savings 43.3 na Per Household...

  5. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households; 13 pages, 52 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1a. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC2-2a. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-3a. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-4a. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-5a. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S.

  6. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 13 pages, 54 kb) Contents Pages HC2-1b. Household Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC2-2b. Household Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-3b. Household Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-4b. Household Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC2-5b. Household Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

  7. SU-E-T-606: A Novel Integrated VMAT/IMRT Technique For the Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, N; Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate a novel Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique which combines volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: 2 partial arcs VMAT, 5-field IMRT and Integrated VMAT/IMRT plans were created for 17 patients with NSCLC. The Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique consisted of 2 partial VMAT arcs and 5 IMRT fields. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for Integrated VMAT/IMRT was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Integrated VMAT/IMRT significantly improved the target conformity and homogeneity. The V30 of normal lung for Integrated plans was significantly lower than IMRT plans (8.4% vs 9.2%; p<0.05). The V5 and mean lung dose (MLD) of normal lung for Integrated plans were 9.8% and 4.6% lower than VMAT plans (p<0.05). The maximum dose of spinal cord for Integrated plans was 4.9 Gy lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean delivery time of IMRT, VMAT and Integrated plans was 280 s, 114 s, and 327 s, respectively. The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT and Integrated plans were 933, 512, and 737, respectively. The gamma pass rates were beyond 90% at the 3%/3 mm criteria when the gantry angles were set to 0 for pretreatment verification. Conclusion: Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique significantly reduced V5, V10 and MLD of normal lung compared with VMAT, and the irradiated volume of the OARs receiving medium to high dose with fewer MUs compared with IMRT. Integrated VMAT/IMRT technique can be a feasible radiotherapy technique with better plan quality and accurately delivered on the linear accelerator. Ruijie Yang was funded by the grant project: National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237). Other authors have no competing interest for this work.

  8. SU-E-T-77: Comparison of 2D and 3D Gamma Analysis in Patient-Specific QA for Prostate VMAT Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific QA procedures for IMRT and VMAT are traditionally performed by comparing TPS calculations with measured single point values and plane dose distributions by means of gamma analysis. New QA devices permit us to calculate 3D dose distributions on patient anatomy as redundant secondary check and reconstruct it from measurements taken with 2D and 3D detector arrays. 3D dose calculations allow us to perform DVH-based comparisons with clinical relevance, as well as 3D gamma analysis. One of these systems (Compass, IBA Dosimetry) combines traditional 2D with new anatomical-based 3D gamma analysis. This work shows the ability of this system by comparing 2D and 3D gamma analysis in pre-treatment QA for several VMAT prostate plans. Methods: Compass is capable of calculating dose as secondary check from DICOM TPS data and reconstructing it from measurements taken by a 2D ion chamber array (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry). Both 2D and 3D gamma tests are available to compare calculated and reconstructed dose in Compass with TPS RT Dose. Results: 15 VMAT prostate plans have been measured with Compass. Dose is reconstructed with Compass for these plans. 2D gamma comparisons can be done for any plane from dose matrix. Mean gamma passing rates for isocenter planes (axial, coronal, sagittal) are (99.70.2)%, (99.90.1)%, (99.90.1)% for reconstructed dose planes. 3D mean gamma passing rates are (98.51.7)% for PTVs, (99.11.5)% for rectum, (100.00.0)% for bladder, (99.60.7)% for femoral heads and (98.14.1)% for penile bulb. Conclusion: Compass is a powerful tool to perform a complete pre-treatment QA analysis, from 2D techniques to 3D DVH-based techniques with clinical relevance. All reported values for VMAT prostate plans are in good agreement with TPS values. This system permits us to ensure the accuracy in the delivery of VMAT treatments completing a full patient-specific QA program.

  9. SU-E-T-407: Evaluation of Four Commercial Dosimetry Systems for Routine Patient-Specific Tomotherapy Delivery Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, A; Arumugam, S; Deshpande, S; George, A; Holloway, L; Vial, P; Goozee, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to evaluate the performance of four commercially available dosimetry systems for Tomotherapy delivery quality assurance (DQA). Methods: Eight clinical patient plans were chosen to represent a range of treatment sites and typical clinical plans. Four DQA plans for each patient plan were created using the TomoTherapy DQA Station (Hi-Art version 4.2.1) on CT images of the ScandiDose Delta4, IBA MatriXX Evolution, PTW Octavius 4D and Sun Nuclear ArcCHECK phantoms. Each detector was calibrated following the manufacture-provided procedure. No angular response correction was applied. All DQA plans for each detector were delivered on the Tomotherapy Hi-Art unit in a single measurement session but on different days. The measured results were loaded into the vendor supplied software for each QA system for comparison with the TPS-calculated dose. The Gamma index was calculated using 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm with 10% dose threshold of maximum TPS calculated dose. Results: Four detector systems showed comparable gamma pass rates for 3%/3m, which is recommended by AAPM TG119 and commonly used within the radiotherapy community. The averaged pass rates standard deviation for all DQA plans were (98.351.97)% for ArcCHECK, (99.9%0.87)% for Matrix, (98.5%5.09)% for Octavius 4D, (98.7%1.27)% for Delata4. The rank of the gamma pass rate for individual plans was consistent between detectors. Using 2%/2mm Gamma criteria for analysis, the Gamma pass rate decreased on average by 9%, 8%, 6.6% and 5% respectively. Profile and Gamma failure map analysis using the software tools from each dosimetry system indicated that decreased passing rate is mainly due to the threading effect of Tomo plan. Conclusion: Despite the variation in detector type and resolution, phantom geometry and software implementation, the four systems demonstrated similar dosimetric performance, with the rank of the gamma pass rate consistent for the plans considered.

  10. SU-E-T-199: How Number of Control Points Influences the Dynamic IMRT Plan Quality and Deliverability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S; Manigandan, D; Chander, S; Subramani, V; Julka, P; Rath, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of number of control points on plan quality and deliverability. Methods: Five previously treated patients of carcinoma of rectum were selected. Planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) i.e. bladder and bowel were contoured. Dynamic IMRT plans (6MV, 7-fields, 45Gy/25 fractions and prescribed at 95% isodose) were created in Eclipse (Varian medical system, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system (TPS) for Varian CL2300C/D linear-accelerator. Base plan was calculated with 166 control points, variable mode (Eclipse Default). For generating other plans, all parameters were kept constant, only number of control points (Fixed mode) was varied as follows: 100, 166 and 200. Then, plan quality was analyzed in terms of maximum and mean dose received by the PTV and OARs. For plan deliverability, TPS calculated fluence was verified with ImatriXX (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) array and compared with TPS dose-plane using gamma index criteria of 3% dose difference and 3mm distance to agreement (DTA). Total number of monitor units (MU) required to deliver a plan was also noted. Results: The maximum variation for the PTV maximum with respect to eclipse default control point (166) was 0.28% (0.14Gy). Similarly, PTV mean varied only up to 0.22 %( 0.11Gy). Bladder maximum and bladder mean varied up to 0.51% (0.24Gy) and 0.16% (0.06Gy). The variation for the bowel maximum and bowel mean was also only 0.39% (0.19Gy) and 0.33% (0.04Gy). Total MU was within 0.32 % (4MU). Average gamma pass rate using different control points for five patients are 98.750.33%, 99.370.09%, 99.290.12%, 98.140.13% and 99.250.14% respectively. Conclusion: Slight variation (<1%) in PTV and OARs maximum and mean doses was observed with varying number of control points. Monitor unit was also not varied much. Reducing number of control points did not showed any comprise in plan deliverability in terms of gamma index pass rate.

  11. Chandra spectroscopy of MAXI J1305704: Detection of an infalling black hole disk wind?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J. M.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Degenaar, N.; King, A. L.; Raymond, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Proga, D.; Reynolds, C. S.; Cackett, E. M.; Kennea, J. A.; Beardmore, A.

    2014-06-10

    We report on a high-resolution Chandra/HETG X-ray spectrum of the transient X-ray binary MAXI J1305704. A rich absorption complex is detected in the Fe L band, including density-sensitive lines from Fe XX, Fe XXI, and Fe XXII. Spectral analysis over three wavelength bands with a large grid of XSTAR photoionization models generally requires a gas density of n ? 10{sup 17} cm{sup 3}. Assuming a luminosity of L = 10{sup 37} erg s{sup 1}, fits to the 10-14 band constrain the absorbing gas to lie within r = (3.9 0.7) 10{sup 3} km from the central engine, or about r = 520 90 (M/5 M {sub ?}) r{sub g} , where r{sub g} = GM/c {sup 2}. At this small distance from the compact object, gas in stable orbits should have a gravitational redshift of z = v/c ? (3 1) 10{sup 3} (M/5 M {sub ?}), and any tenuous inflowing gas should have a free-fall velocity of v/c ? (6 1) 10{sup 2} (M/5 M {sub ?}){sup 1/2}. The best-fit single-zone photoionization models measure a redshift of v/c = (2.6-3.2) 10{sup 3}. Models with two absorbing zones provide significantly improved fits, and the additional zone is measured to have a redshift of v/c = (4.6-4.9) 10{sup 2} (models including two zones suggest slightly different radii and may point to lower densities). Thus, the observed shifts are broadly consistent with those expected at the photoionization radius. The absorption spectrum revealed in MAXI J1305704 may be best explained in terms of a 'failed wind' like those predicted in some recent numerical simulations of black hole accretion flows. The robustness of the velocity shifts was explored through detailed simulations with the Chandra/MARX ray-tracing package and analysis of the zeroth-order ACIS-S3 spectrum. These tests are particularly important given the anomalously large angle between the source and the optical axis in this observation. The simulations and ACIS spectrum suggest that the shifts are not instrumental; however, strong caution is warranted. We discuss our results in the context of accretion flows in stellar-mass black holes and active galactic nuclei, as well as the potential role of failed winds in emerging connections between disk outflows and black hole state transitions.

  12. Comparison of the Energy Efficiency Prescribed by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 and ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2006-12-01

    This document presents the qualitative comparison of DOEs formal determination of energy savings of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The term qualitative is used in the sense of identifying whether or not changes have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on energy efficiency of the standard, with no attempt made to quantify that impact. A companion document will present the quantitative comparison of DOEs determination. The quantitative comparison will be based on whole building simulation of selected building prototypes in selected climates. This document presents a comparison of the energy efficiency requirements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-1999 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-1999) and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-2004). The comparison was done through a thorough review of all addenda to Standard 90.1-1999 that were included in the published ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2001 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-2001) and also all addenda to Standard 90.1-2001 that were included in the published Standard 90.1-2004. A summary table showing the impact of each addendum is provided. Each addendum to both Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001 was evaluated as to its impact on the energy efficiency requirements of the standard (greater efficiency, lesser efficiency) and as to significance. The final section of this document summarizes the impacts of the various addenda and proposes which addenda should be included in the companion quantitative portion of DOEs determination. Addenda are referred to with the nomenclature addendum 90.1-xxz, where xx is either 99 for 1999 or 01 for 2001, and z is the ASHRAE letter designation for the addendum. Addenda names are shown in bold face in text. DOE has chosen not to prepare a separate evaluation of Standard 90.1-2001 as that standard does not appear to improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. What this means for the determination of energy savings for Standard 90.1-2004 is that the baseline standard for comparison is Standard 90.1-1999 and all addenda to both Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001 must be considered to determine the overall change in efficiency between Standard 90.1-1999 and Standard 90.1-2004.

  13. table4.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household, Selected Survey Years Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.2 Age of Oldest Child Under...

  14. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    household (2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to...

  15. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Need 3 Significant number of low-income customers. * 12% of families below federal poverty level. * 18% of households receive food stamps. * 34% have household incomes income...

  16. BENTON PUD LOW INCOME CONSERVATION PROGRAM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    result in a preference being given to households with incomes below 125% of Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG) Upper low income households with incomes between 125 and 200%...

  17. Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. U.S. Average Vehicle-Miles Traveled by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Thousand Miles per Household) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE:...

  18. Microsoft Word - 20050821_Appendix_A.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. U.S. Average Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Family Income and Poverty Status, 2001 (Gallons per Household) ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION HOUSEHOLD VEHICLES ENERGY USE: LATEST...

  19. table13.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Survey Years (Nominal Dollars) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 599 708 722 886 Age of Oldest Child Under...

  20. table2.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vehicles, Selected Survey Years Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 91 92 91 93 Age of Oldest Child Under 7...

  1. Fuel Consumption per Vehicle.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Survey Years (Gallons) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 609 597 625 665 Age of Oldest Child Under...

  2. table14.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Survey Years (Nominal Dollars) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 1,198 1,395 1,453 1,903 Age of Oldest...

  3. table5.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Survey Years (Billions) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 674 753 796 1,078 Age of Oldest Child...

  4. Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Better Buildings ...

  5. US SoAtl FL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Half of energy consumed by Florida households is for appliances, electronics, and lighting... conditioning Appliances, electronics, lighting Household Energy Use in Florida A closer ...

  6. DOE/EIA-032171(84) Energy Information Administration Residential...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    it was used to screen households for participation in the Household Transportation Panel. 190 1984 RECS: Consumption and Expenditures, National Data Energy Information...

  7. Buildings and Energy in the 1980s

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    No. PB83-199554, 220. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Household Transportation Panel Monthly Gas Purchases and Vehicle and Household Characteristics, 679-981; Order...

  8. DOE/EIA-0516(85) Energy Information Administration Manufacturing...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Order No. PB83- 199554HAA Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HouseholdTransportation Panel Monthly Gas Purchases and Vehicle and Household Characteristics, 6179-9181 * Order...

  9. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household...

  10. " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,,"2005...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ... for 2005 Household Income",,,,,"Below Poverty Line","Eligible for Federal Assistance1" ...

  11. " Million U.S. Housing Units,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" "Structural and Geographic ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  12. Table 4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Mean Annual Electricity Consumption for Lighting, by Number of Household Members by Number of Rooms, 1993 (Kilowatthours) Number of Rooms Number of Household Members All...

  13. Buildings and Energy in the 1980s

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    conducted in two stages: (1) A Household (RECS)Building (CBECS) Survey and an Energy Suppliers Survey. The HouseholdBuilding Characteristics Survey consists of personal...

  14. Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean M. McDeavitt

    2011-04-29

    Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500C to 600C) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment Extrusion database on DU metal Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment Sintering database on DU metal Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix AMSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors Appendix BExternal presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors, Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process, Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix CFuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow, entitled Uranium Metal Powder Production, Particle Distribution Analysis, and Reaction Rate Studies of a Hydride-Dehydride Process ?

  15. spaceheat_percent2001.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Space Heating Tables (Percent of U.S. Households; 24 pages, 133 kb) Contents Pages HC3-1b. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC3-2b. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC3-3b. Space Heating by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC3-4b. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 2001 2 HC3-5b. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 2001 2

  16. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Space Heating Tables (Percent of U.S. Households; 24 pages, 85 kb) Contents Pages HC3-1b. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-2b. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-3b. Space Heating by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-4b. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-5b. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2

  17. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 78 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1a. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-2a. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-3a. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-4a. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-5a. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-6a. Air Conditioning by

  18. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 47 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-3a. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-4a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1

  19. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households; 48 pages, 134 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1a. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-2a. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-4a. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-5a. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-6a. Usage Indicators by

  20. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household Energy Consumption Household Energy Consumpton by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009¹ Household Energy Consumption by Source, 2009 Energy Consumption per Household, Selected Years, 1978-2009¹ Energy Consumption per Household, by Census Region, 2009 50 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 For years not shown, there are no data available. 2 Liquefied petroleum gases. Notes: * Data include natural gas, electricity, distillate fuel oil, kerosene,

  1. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 81.6 65.3 142.5 38 17 30.3 11 625 0.29 500 178 Census Region and Division

  2. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 1 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.1 66.1 144.2 37 17 29.1 10 678 0.31 539 192 Census Region and Division

  3. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 2 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 83.7 66.0 142.2 36 16 28.0 10 708 0.33 558 204 Census Region and Division

  4. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 4 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 86.3 67.4 144.3 37 17 28.8 11 808 0.38 632 234 Census Region and Division

  5. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 7 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 90.5 70.4 156.8 39 18 30.5 12 875 0.39 680 262 Census Region and Division

  6. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 97 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 101.4 83.2 168.8 42 21 35.0 13 1,061 0.52 871 337 Census Region and

  7. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 2001 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total 107.0 85.2 211.2 46 18 36.0 14 1,178 0.48 938 366 Census Region and Division

  8. Fact #747: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Household Expenditure | Department of Energy 7: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top Household Expenditure Fact #747: October 1, 2012 Behind Housing, Transportation is the Top Household Expenditure Except for housing, transportation was the largest single expenditure for the average American household in 2010. The average household spends more on transportation in a year than on food. Vehicle purchases, along with gasoline and motor oil, make up a large part of vehicle

  9. Impact of leaf motion constraints on IMAT plan quality, deliver accuracy, and efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Fan; Rao Min; Ye Jinsong; Shepard, David M.; Cao Daliang

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) is a radiation therapy delivery technique that combines the efficiency of arc based delivery with the dose painting capabilities of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A key challenge in developing robust inverse planning solutions for IMAT is the need to account for the connectivity of the beam shapes as the gantry rotates from one beam angle to the next. To overcome this challenge, inverse planning solutions typically impose a leaf motion constraint that defines the maximum distance a multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf can travel between adjacent control points. The leaf motion constraint ensures the deliverability of the optimized plan, but it also impacts the plan quality, the delivery accuracy, and the delivery efficiency. In this work, the authors have studied leaf motion constraints in detail and have developed recommendations for optimizing the balance between plan quality and delivery efficiency. Methods: Two steps were used to generate optimized IMAT treatment plans. The first was the direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) inverse planning module in the Pinnacle{sup 3} planning system. Then, a home-grown arc sequencer was applied to convert the optimized intensity maps into deliverable IMAT arcs. IMAT leaf motion constraints were imposed using limits of between 1 and 30 mm/deg. Dose distributions were calculated using the convolution/superposition algorithm in the Pinnacle{sup 3} planning system. The IMAT plan dose calculation accuracy was examined using a finer sampling calculation and the quality assurance verification. All plans were delivered on an Elekta Synergy with an 80-leaf MLC and were verified using an IBA MatriXX 2D ion chamber array inserted in a MultiCube solid water phantom. Results: The use of a more restrictive leaf motion constraint (less than 1-2 mm/deg) results in inferior plan quality. A less restrictive leaf motion constraint (greater than 5 mm/deg) results in improved plan quality but can lead to less accurate dose distribution as evidenced by increasing discrepancies between the planned and the delivered doses. For example, the results from our patient-specific quality assurance measurements demonstrated that the average gamma analysis passing rate decreased from 98% to 80% when the allowable leaf motion increased from 3 to 20 mm/deg. Larger leaf motion constraints also led to longer treatment delivery times (2 to 4 folds) due to the additional MLC leaf motion. Conclusions: Leaf motion constraints significantly impact IMAT plans in terms of plan quality, delivery accuracy, and delivery efficiency with the impact magnified for more complex cases. Our studies indicate that a leaf motion constraint of 2 to 3 mm/deg of gantry rotation can provide an optimal balance between plan quality, delivery accuracy, and efficiency.

  10. Criteria and Processes for the Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous and Non-Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, J

    2008-12-18

    This document details Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) criteria and processes for determining if potentially volumetrically contaminated or potentially surface contaminated wastes are to be managed as material containing residual radioactivity or as non-radioactive. This document updates and replaces UCRL-AR-109662, Criteria and Procedures for the Certification of Nonradioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 1), also known as 'The Moratorium', and follows the guidance found in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) document, Performance Objective for Certification of Non-Radioactive Hazardous Waste (Reference 2). The 1992 Moratorium document (UCRL-AR-109662) is three volumes and 703 pages. The first volume provides an overview of the certification process and lists the key radioanalytical methods and their associated Limits of Sensitivities. Volumes Two and Three contain supporting documents and include over 30 operating procedures, QA plans, training documents and organizational charts that describe the hazardous and radioactive waste management system in place in 1992. This current document is intended to update the previous Moratorium documents and to serve as the top-tier LLNL institutional Moratorium document. The 1992 Moratorium document was restricted to certification of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), State and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) hazardous waste from Radioactive Material Management Areas (RMMA). This still remains the primary focus of the Moratorium; however, this document increases the scope to allow use of this methodology to certify other LLNL wastes and materials destined for off-site disposal, transfer, and re-use including non-hazardous wastes and wastes generated outside of RMMAs with the potential for DOE added radioactivity. The LLNL organization that authorizes off-site transfer/disposal of a material or waste stream is responsible for implementing the requirements of this document. The LLNL Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) organization is responsible for the review and maintenance of this document. It should be noted that the DOE metal recycling moratorium is still in effect and is implemented as outlined in reference 17 when metals are being dispositioned for disposal/re-use/recycling off-site. This document follows the same methodology as described in the previously approved 1992 Moratorium document. Generator knowledge and certification are the primary means of characterization. Sampling and analysis are used when there is insufficient knowledge of a waste to determine if it contains added radioactivity. Table 1 (page 12) presents a list of LLNL's analytical methods for evaluating volumetrically contaminated waste and updates the reasonably achievable analytical-method-specific Minimum Detectable Concentrations (MDCs) for various matrices. Results from sampling and analysis are compared against the maximum MDCs for the given analytical method and the sample specific MDC to determine if the sample contains DOE added volumetric radioactivity. The evaluation of an item that has a physical form, and history of use, such that accessible surfaces may be potentially contaminated, is based on DOE Order 5400.5 (Reference 3), and its associated implementation guidance document DOE G 441.1-XX, Control and Release of Property with Residual Radioactive Material (Reference 4). The guidance document was made available for use via DOE Memorandum (Reference 5). Waste and materials containing residual radioactivity transferred off-site must meet the receiving facilities Waste Acceptance Criteria (if applicable) and be in compliance with other applicable federal or state requirements.

  11. Probing variations in fundamental constants with radio and optical quasar absorption-line observations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanavaris, P.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Curran, S. J.; Physics; Univ. of New South Wales; Inst. of Astronomy

    2007-01-01

    Nine quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and ultraviolet (UV) rest-frame wavelengths are used to estimate possible variations in x {triple_bond} {alpha}{sup 2}g{sub p}{mu}, where {alpha} is the fine structure constant, g{sub p} the proton g-factor and {mu} {triple_bond} m{sub e}/m{sub p} is the electron-to-proton mass ratio. We find <{Delta}x/x>{sub total}{sup weighted} = (0.63 {+-} 0.99) x 10{sup -5} over a redshift range 0.23 {le} z{sub abs} {le} 2.35 which corresponds to look-back times of 2.7-10.5 billion years. A linear fit against look-back time, tied to {Delta}x/x = 0 at z = 0, gives a best-fitting rate of change of {dot x}/x = (-0.6 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1}. We find no evidence for strong angular variations in x across the sky. Our sample is much larger than most previous samples and demonstrates that intrinsic line-of-sight velocity differences between the 21-cm and UV absorption redshifts, which have a random sign and magnitude in each absorption system, limit our precision. The data directly imply that the average magnitude of this difference is {Delta}v{sub los}-6 km s{sup -1}. Combining our {Delta}x/x measurement with absorption-line constraints on {alpha}-variation yields strong limits on the variation of {mu}. Our most conservative estimate, obtained by assuming no variations in {alpha} or g{sub p} is simply {Delta}{mu}/{mu} = <{Delta}x/x>{sub total}{sup weighted}. If we use only the four high-redshift absorbers in our sample, we obtain {Delta}{mu}/{mu} = (0.58 {+-} 1.95) x 10{sup -5}, which agrees (2{sigma}) with recent, more direct estimates from two absorption systems containing molecular hydrogen, also at high redshift, and which have hinted at a possible {mu}-variation, {Delta}{mu}/{mu} = (-2.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup -5}. Our method of constraining {Delta}{mu}/{mu} is completely independent from the molecular hydrogen observations. If we include the low-redshift systems, our {Delta}{mu}/{mu} result differs significantly from the high-redshift molecular hydrogen results. We detect a dipole variation in {mu} across the sky, but given the sparse angular distribution of quasar sight lines we find that this model is required by the data at only the 88 percent confidence level. Clearly, much larger samples of 21-cm and molecular hydrogen absorbers are required to adequately resolve the issue of the variation of {mu} and x.

  12. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Home Office Equipment Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 13 pages, 48 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1b. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-2b. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-3b. Home Office Equipment by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-4b. Home Office Equipment by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-5b. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S.

  13. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Million U.S. Households; 45 pages, 128 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,

  14. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 45 pages, 121 kb) Contents Pages HC1-1b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-2b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-3b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC1-4b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 3 HC1-5b. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied

  15. R93HC.PDF

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Total Air-Conditioning in U.S. Households, 1993 Housing Unit and Household Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Households (millions) Cooled Floorspace (square feet per household) Number of Cooling Degree-Days per Household Air-Conditioner Use in Summer 1993 1 (percent of households) RSE Row Factors 1993 Normal Total Not at All Only a Few Times Quite a Bit All Summer 0.8 0.6 0.6 0.6 3.5 0.9 1.4 1.2 Total .................................................... 66.1 1,416 1,536 1,438 100.0 3.4

  16. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 0 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 94.0 74.2 169.2 124 54 98.1 38 1,485 0.65 1,172 450 Census

  17. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 3 Average Electricity Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 96.6 76.4 181.2 43 18 34.0 13 1,061 0.45 840 321 Census Region

  18. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 0 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census

  19. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 1 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 14.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census

  20. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 2 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census

  1. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 4 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.5 13.8 32.0 91 39 71.9 27 697 0.30 550 203 Census

  2. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 17.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census

  3. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 90 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 16.3 13.5 33.2 77 31 63.9 23 609 0.25 506 181 Census

  4. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 3 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census

  5. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 7 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census

  6. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires Fuel Oil/Kerosene, 2001 Average Fuel Oil/Kerosene Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26

  7. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 0 Average LPG Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures per Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 7.7 7.4 12.1 47 29 45.6 16 379 0.23 365 125 Census Region and Division

  8. Residential Buildings Historical Publications reports, data and housing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    questionnaires 0 Average of Major Energy Sources Residential Buildings Consumption Expenditures Total per per per per Total Total Floorspace per Square per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion Building Foot Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) (million Btu) (thousand Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 81.6 65.4 142.5 143 65 114.1 41 1,156 0.53 926 330

  9. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    V 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Space Heating Tables (Million U.S. Households; 24 pages, 83 kb) Contents Pages HC3-1a. Space Heating by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-2a. Space Heating by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-3a. Space Heating by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-4a. Space Heating by Type of Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC3-5a. Space Heating by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S.

  10. table12.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Years (Billion Nominal Dollars) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 35.9 46.1 46.7 70.7 Age of Oldest Child...

  11. table1.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Survey Years (Millions) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 29.9 33.0 32.1 37.1 Age of Oldest Child...

  12. " East North Central",1296,1220,977,1185,1225,1577

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    More Persons",1790,1711,1422,1500,1700,2202 "Household Composition" " Households With Children","NA","NA",1198,1395,1453,1903 " Age of Oldest Child" " Under 7 Years","NA","NA",1057...

  13. table8.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Survey Years (Billion Gallons) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 36.4 38.9 40.4 53.1 Age of Oldest Child...

  14. table3.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Survey Years (Millions) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 59.8 65.1 64.6 79.8 Age of Oldest Child...

  15. table7.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Survey Years (Thousands) Survey Years Household Composition Households With Children... NA NA 22.5 22.8 24.8 29.2 Age of Oldest Child...

  16. Table 4

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4. Light Usage by Total Number of Rooms, Percent of U.S. Households, 1993 Total Number of Rooms Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total 1 or 2 3 to 5 6 to 8 9 or More RSE...

  17. Table 4

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. Light Usage by Total Number of Rooms, Million U.S. Households, 1993 Total Number of Rooms (excluding bathrooms) Housing Unit and Household Characteristics Total 1 or 2 3 to 5 6...

  18. Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

  19. S:\\VM3\\RX97\\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million U.S. Households; 12 pages, 47 kb) Contents Pages HC7-1a. Home Office Equipment by Climate Zone, Million U.S. Households, 1997 1 HC7-2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of ...

  20. STEO October 2012 - wood

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    that households across the U.S. use as a supplemental heating source. Almost half of all rural households use wood this way, in addition to using it for cooking or water heating

  1. Z

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or the population as a whole. Alternative vehicle usage within a household is a real option for those households which have more than one vehicle. The use of large...

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Housing Characteristics...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    either air or liquid as the working fluid. It does not refer :<: passive collection of solar thermal energy. Fuel Oil Paid by Household: The household paid directly to the fuel...

  3. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.7,2.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  4. TableHC7.1.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Housing Units (millions) 2005 Household Income 40,000 to 59,999 Below Poverty Line ... Housing Units (millions) 2005 Household Income 40,000 to 59,999 Below Poverty Line ...

  5. TableHC2.1.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Housing Units (millions) 2005 Household Income 40,000 to 59,999 Below Poverty Line ... Housing Units (millions) 2005 Household Income 40,000 to 59,999 Below Poverty Line ...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.7,10.1,... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  8. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,3.1,0.9,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  9. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.9,3.7,7... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line3" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5.4,5.6,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,7.2,3.4,0... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,..."Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than 20,000","20,000 to ... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  13. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Housing Unit Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ... RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral ...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,6.9,0.9,2... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,5,3.9,2.9... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Income Relative to Poverty Line2" "Below 100 Percent",16.9,2.4,1,2.1... the number of households below the poverty line, the annual household income and ...

  17. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Overall, 18 percent of households below the poverty line do not have any air conditioning equipment at all. About a third of households below the poverty line use room air ...

  18. win0102

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    gas-heated homes, 17 percent for oil-heated households, 23 percent for residences using propane as a main heating fuel, and perhaps 3 to 4 percent for households heating with...

  19. U.S. monthly oil production tops 8 million barrels per day for...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of U.S. households heat with natural gas, while almost 40 percent of households depend on electricity as their primary heating source. Heating oil and propane each heat about 5% of...

  20. Categories of Data

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > 1995 Detailed Tables > Data Categories Column Categories | Row Categories |...

  1. Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Full Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Introduction Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Overview of Commercial Buildings Print Report: PDF Overview of...

  2. Crafty Gifts for the Energy Conscious

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out these homemade gifts that can help your loved ones be energy efficient in their households.

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures Household Energy Consumption by End Use, Selected Years, Household Energy Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 1978-2005¹ Household Energy Consumption for Space Heating by Fuel 2005 Appliances, Electronics, and Lighting Expenditures, Selected Years, 1978-2005¹ 52 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 For years not shown, there are no data available. 2 Prices are not adjusted for inflation. See "Nominal

  4. Untitled Document

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey Executive Summary This report, Household Vehicles Energy...

  5. Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Households | Department of Energy Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Low- / Moderate-Income Peer Exchange Call: Targeted Marketing and Program Design for Low- and Moderate-Income Households, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, October 11, 2011. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Loan Programs

  6. Service Report Energy Information Administration Office of Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Millions of Households) ... 43 Table 12. Insulation and Air Infiltration Protection By Year House Was Built and Census Region...

  7. Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment.

  8. http://www.census.gov/

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    People & Households American Community Survey * Estimates * Projections Income | State Median Income * Poverty * Health Insurance International * Genealogy * Census 2000 * More ...

  9. file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\VM3\My%20Documents\hc6-3a_

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3a. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Million U.S. Households, 2001 ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ | | | | | | | 2001 Household Income | | Eli- | | | | | gible | | |___________________________________| | for | | | | | | | | Fed- | | | Less | $15,000| $30,000| $50,000| Below | eral | | | than | to | to | or | Poverty| Assist-| Usage Indicators | Total | $14,999| $29,999| $49,999| More | Line | ance 1 |

  10. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 24 pages, 81 kb) Contents Pages HC4-1b. Air Conditioning by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-2b. Air Conditioning by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-3b. Air Conditioning by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-4b. Air Conditioning by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-5b. Air Conditioning by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 2 HC4-6b. Air

  11. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Appliances Tables (Percent of U.S. Households; 48 pages, 144 kb) Contents Pages HC5-1b. Appliances by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC5-2b. Appliances by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC5-3b. Appliances by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC5-4b. Appliances by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC5-5b. Appliances by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC5-6b. Appliances by

  12. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Percent of U.S. Households; 48 pages, 139 kb) Contents Pages HC6-1b. Usage Indicators by Climate Zone, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-2b. Usage Indicators by Year of Construction, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-3b. Usage Indicators by Household Income, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-4b. Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-5b. Usage Indicators by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 4 HC6-6b.

  13. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly

  14. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and Electronics Share of Households With Selected Appliances, 1980 and 2009 Space Heating by Main Fuel, 2009 Share of Households With Selected Electronics, 1997 and 2009 Air-Conditioning Equipment, 1980 and 2009 54 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Natural gas and electric. 2 Liquefied petroleum gases. 3 Includes kerosene. 4 Coal, solar, other fuel, or no heating equipment. 5 Video Cassette Recorder. 6 Digital Video

  15. Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update The original estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level (as reported in the Marginal Energy Prices Report, http://www.eren.doe.gov/buildings/codes_standards/applbrf/pdfs/marginal_ energy_price.pdf) was based on household energy billing data from EIA's 1993 RECS survey. When the 1997 RECS survey data became available, LBNL updated its estimation of residential marginal energy prices at the individual household level

  16. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) 3 RECS Survey Data 2009 | 2005 | 2001 | 1997 | 1993 | Previous Housing characteristics Consumption & expenditures Microdata Methodology Housing Characteristics Tables Topical Sections Entire Section All Detailed Tables PDF Tables: HC1 Household Characteristics, Million U.S. Households Presents data relating to location, type, ownership, age, size, construction, and householder demographic and income characteristics. PDF Tables: HC2 Space Heating, Million

  17. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Winter Fuels Outlook  EIA projects average household expenditures for heating oil and natural gas will increase by 19 percent and 15 percent, respectively, this winter (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected household expenditures are 5 percent higher for electricity and 13 percent higher for propane this winter. Average expenditures for households that heat with heating oil are forecast to be higher than any previous winter on record (see EIA Short-Term Energy

  18. 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    D (2001) -- Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring February 29, 2004 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About the Household Bottled Gas (LPG or Propane) Usage Form What is the purpose of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey? The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) collects data on energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. housing units. Over 5,000 statistically selected households across the U.S.

  19. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call

  20. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E (2005) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Electricity Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask