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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

2

CSV  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"STUB_1","Field Production","Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production","Refinery and Blender Net Production","Imports (PADD of Entry)","Net Receipts ...

3

CSV  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Missouri","Total","Texas Inland","Texas Gulf Coast","Louisiana Gulf Coast ... 7,084" "Asphalt and Road Oil","1,256","674","1,930","3,528 ... Loss ...

4

CSV  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Missouri","Total","Texas Inland","Texas Gulf Coast","Louisiana Gulf Coast ... 5.4" "Asphalt and Road Oil","3.9","23.7","5.5","5.3","11.0 ... Loss ...

5

CSV  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... ","12","900","293","4","55","1,265","41" "Fuel Ethanol","12","650","128","-","48","839","27" ...

6

CSV  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... ","Other Oxygen- ates","Fuel Ethanol","Biomass- Based Diesel","Other Renewable Diesel","Other Renewable Fuels","15 ppm sulfur and under","Greater than 15 ppm ...

7

Template:CompanyCsvDownloadCount | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

number of companies. Should be called in the following format CompanyCsvDownloadCount |cat Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTemplate:CompanyCsvDownloadC...

8

SEDS CSV File Documentation: Price and Expenditure  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prices and Expenditures Prices and Expenditures The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain the price and expenditure estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are three files that contain estimates for all states and years. Prices contains the price estimates for all states and Expenditures contains the expenditure estimates for all states. The third file, Adjusted Consumption for Expenditure Calculations contains adjusted consumption estimates used in calculating expenditures (see Appendix E below). Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named with the two-letter U.S. Postal Code listed in Appendix A, as well as a file for the United States.

9

graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... C++). More information. Journal of Combinatorics dynamic surveys DS8 and DS9 are a bibliography and glossary of graphs. ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

10

Monthly Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: 12.1 by Source: PDF XLS CSV GRAPH: 12.2 Residential Sector: PDF XLS CSV GRAPH: 12.3 Commercial Sector:

11

Template:CompanyCsvPostOffsetQuery | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

template. It should be called in the following format: CompanyCsvPostOffsetQuery |cat |offset |limit |searchlabel Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

12

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10.4 Biodiesel Overview, 2001– XLS CSV: INTERACTIVE: 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992– PDF XLS GRAPH:

13

Monthly Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... 1.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy: PDF XLS CSV GRAPH: INTERACTIVE:

14

Attachment B.xls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B.xls Attachment B.xls More Documents & Publications Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0;...

15

OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Intnl-NatUnionlistingfor web page2.07Rev2.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0;...

16

ITP_Data_Centers.xls | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITPDataCenters.xls ITPDataCenters.xls ITPDataCenters.xls More Documents & Publications ProjectDescriptionsITPARRAAwards.xls 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0;...

17

How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software?  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? Home > Groups > Geospatial I downloaded the Map of Wind Farms data as a .csv from http://en.openei.org/wiki/Map_of_Wind_Farms/Data. The downloaded data contains the latitude and longitude values in a single column. ArcMap requires separate fields for lat/long. Also, there is a strange character at the end of the coordinate values, °. It looks like this might be due to using the degree symbol? Will this cause an issue when attempting to import the downloaded data into ESRI ArcMap software? Thanks for any guidance you can provide! Submitted by Scourer on 10 September, 2013 - 09:40 1 answer Points: 1 Hi- Yes, you are correct with determining why the ° characters appear in the CSV. This is an artifact of transforming the coordinates to values for the

18

NREL RSF Weather Data 2011 A csv containing hourly weather data...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL RSF Weather Data 2011 A csv containing hourly weather data at NREL's Research and Support Facility (RSF) for 2011. 2013-02-12T18:36:26Z 2013-02-12T18:36:26Z I am submitting...

19

FIMS Data Validation Schedule FY 2010_090729.xls | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIMS Data Validation Schedule FY 2010090729.xls FIMS Data Validation Schedule FY 2010090729.xls FIMS Data Validation Schedule FY 2010090729.xls More Documents & Publications...

20

How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software?  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? How do I display the Map of Wind Farms csv coordinates in ArcMap software? Home > Groups > Geospatial I downloaded the Map of Wind Farms data as a .csv from http://en.openei.org/wiki/Map_of_Wind_Farms/Data. The downloaded data contains the latitude and longitude values in a single column. ArcMap requires separate fields for lat/long. Also, there is a strange character at the end of the coordinate values, °. It looks like this might be due to using the degree symbol? Will this cause an issue when attempting to import the downloaded data into ESRI ArcMap software? Thanks for any guidance you can provide! Submitted by Scourer on 10 September, 2013 - 09:40 1 answer Points: 1 Hi- Yes, you are correct with determining why the ° characters appear in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

graph drawing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Layout Program (C). Graphviz: Graph Visualization Software (C), consisting of many graph drawing programs, viewers (C, Java, and TCL/TK), etc. ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; More Documents & Publications Attachment 6 Volume V...

23

xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

a Includes refuse recovery. capacity data. b Marketed production. e Production of federal offshore natural gas along the c Includes lease condensate.

24

XLS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fig5 Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2013 Natural Gas Prices (Dollars per thousand cubic feet) Month Residential Henry Hub Source: Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

25

Motion graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel method for creating realistic, controllable motion. Given a corpus of motion capture data, we automatically construct a directed graph called a motion graph that encapsulates connections among the database. The ... Keywords: animation with constraints, motion capture, motion synthesis

Lucas Kovar; Michael Gleicher; Frédéric Pighin

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

EI7223_Information Retrieval_101019.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7223_Information Retrieval_101019.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Modulbezeichnung (en.): Information Retrieval in High Dimensional Data Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel: Untertitel Semesterende: Modulbeschreibung Seite 1 von 4 #12;EI7223_Information Retrieval_101019.xls Beschreibung: Inhalt

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

27

EI7157_Molecular_Electronics.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7157_Molecular_Electronics.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7157 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Molecular Electronics Modulbezeichnung (en.): Molecular Electronics Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel: Untertitel7157_Molecular_Electronics.xls Beschreibung: Inhalt: Introduction to organic chemistry. Molecular

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

28

EI7272_Molecular Electronics.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7272_Molecular Electronics.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7272 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Molekulare Elektronik Modulbezeichnung (en.): Molecular Electronics Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel: Mol #12;EI7272_Molecular Electronics.xls Modulbeschreibung Beschreibung: Inhalt: 1) Introduction, history

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

29

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949– XLS CSV ... 6.7 Natural Gas Wellhead, City Gate, and Imports Prices, 1949– XLS CSV:

30

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6.7 Natural Gas Wellhead, City Gate, and Imports Prices, 1949– XLS CSV: INTERACTIVE: 6.8 Natural Gas Prices by Sector, 1967– XLS CSV: INTERACTIVE: ...

31

2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls 2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls 2011 Cost Symposium Agenda 4-28-11 web draft.xls More Documents & Publications...

32

2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; 2003 DOE IGCA Inventory Data for web.xls&0; More Documents & Publications...

33

FFATA sub reporting data model_draft_100715.xls | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

data modeldraft100715.xls More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2013-46 Awardee in STRIPES Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-82 Attachment 1 Guide to Financial Assistance...

34

PDSF Utilization Graphs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphs Graphs Utilization Graphs This page contains a series of graphs that use data from the PDSF batch scheduler (SGE) to show the utilization of the cluster over the past 24 hours. The graphs were generated with RRDTool and are updated approximately every 15 minutes. This graph shows the aggregate cluster CPU availablity and usage according to sgeload: 24 hour rolling usage graph (click to see long term averages) This graph shows the number of jobs being run by each group: Rolling 24 Running Jobs by Group (click to see long term averages) This is the same graph as above weighted by the clockspeed (GHz) of the node used for the job: Rolling 24 Running Jobs by Group (click to see long term averages) This graph show the number of pending jobs by group: Rolling 24 Pending Jobs

35

DOE Recovery Act Awardees The data contained within the .xls...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be updated weekly by the DOE.
2010-12-16T22:30:08Z 2011-01-03T16:54:34Z http:www.energy.govrecoverydocumentsrecoveryactfunding.xls I accessed this dataset from a public...

36

EI7203_Quantum_Nanoelectronics.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7203_Quantum_Nanoelectronics.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7203 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Quantum Nanoelectronics Modulbezeichnung (en.): Quantum Nanoelectronics Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel Folgesemester: Ja Wiederholung auch am Semesterende: Nein Modulbeschreibung Seite 1 von 4 #12;EI7203_Quantum

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

37

EI7135_Industrielle_Energiewirtschaft.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7135_Industrielle_Energiewirtschaft.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7135 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Industrielle Energiewirtschaft Modulbezeichnung (en.): Industrial Energy Economy Modulniveau Folgesemester: Wiederholung auch am Semesterende: Modulbeschreibung Seite 1 von 4 #12;EI7135_Industrielle_Energiewirtschaft

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

38

Graph sketcher: extending illustration to quantitative graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientists, engineers, and educators commonly need to make graphs that quickly illustrate quantitative ideas yet are not based on specific data sets. We call these graphs quantitative concept diagrams (QCDs). Existing charting and illustration programs ... Keywords: charting, constraint-based layout, illustration, information visualization, planar map coloring, quantitative concept diagrams, snap-dragging

Robin Stewart; m.c. schraefel

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Learning Graph Matching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a fundamental problem in pattern recognition, graph matching has applications in a variety of fields, from computer vision to computational biology. In graph matching, patterns are modeled as graphs and pattern recognition amounts to finding a correspondence between the nodes of different graphs. Many formulations of this problem can be cast in general as a quadratic assignment problem, where a linear term in the objective function encodes node compatibility and a quadratic term encodes edge compatibility. The main research focus in this theme is about designing efficient algorithms for approximately solving the quadratic assignment problem, since it is NP-hard. In this paper we turn our attention to a different question: how to estimate compatibility functions such that the solution of the resulting graph matching problem best matches the expected solution that a human would manually provide. We present a method for learning graph matching: the training examples are pairs of graphs and the `labels' are ma...

Caetano, Tiberio S; Cheng, Li; Le, Quoc V; Smola, Alex J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tub - XLS Oil and Gas Recovery Data from the Riser Insertion Tube from May 17 until the Riser Insertion Tube was disconnected...

42

FY 2007 Operating Plan for DOE--March 16, 2007.xls | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan for DOE--March 16, 2007.xls FY 2007 Operating Plan for DOE--March 16, 2007.xls U.S Department of Energy 2007 operating plan by appropriation. FY 2007 Operating Plan for...

43

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

44

Claw-free graphs and line graphs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research of my dissertation is motivated by the conjecture ofThomassen that every 4-connected line graph is hamiltonian and by the conjecture ofTutte that every… (more)

Shao, Yehong, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Almost self-centered graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The center of a graph is the set of vertices with minimum eccentricity. Graphs in which all vertices are central are called self-centered graphs. In this paper almost self-centered (ASC) graphs are introduced as the graphs with exactly two non-central vertices. The block structure of these graphs is described and constructions for generating such graphs are proposed. Embeddings of arbitrary graphs into ASC graphs are studied. In particular it is shown that any graph can be embedded into an ASC graph of prescribed radius. Embeddings into ASC graphs of radius two are studied in more detail. Embedding index of a graph G is introduced as the smallest number of vertices needed to add to G such that G is an induced subgraph of an ASC graph.

Sandi Klavzar; et al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

directed acyclic word graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and R. Verin, Direct Construction of Compact Directed Acyclic Word Graphs, 8th Annual Symposium, CPM 97, Aarhus, Denmark, 116-129, 1997. ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

47

Undirected Graphs maze exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Adar, 2004 corporate e-mail #12;5 Power transmission grid of Western US Reference: Duncan Watts #12 The Internet as mapped by The Opte Project http://www.opte.org #12;8 Graph terminology #12;9 Some graph

Sedgewick, Robert

48

Detachments of Complete Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detachment of a graph $G$ is formed by splitting each vertex into one or more subvertices, and sharing the incident edges arbitrarily among the subvertices. In this paper we consider the question of whether a graph $H$ is a detachment of some complete ...

Keith Edwards

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

EI7203_Quantum_Nanoelectronics.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7203_Quantum_Nanoelectronics.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7203 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Quantum Nanoelectronics Modulbezeichnung (en.): Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel: Untertitel: Semesterdauer: 1 Folgesemester: Ja Wiederholung auch am Semesterende: Nein Modulbeschreibung Seite 1 von 4 #12;EI7203_Quantum

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

50

Slicibility of rectangular graphs and floorplan optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: floorplanning, graph dualization, heuristic search, nonslicible floorplans, planar graphs, slicible floorplans, very large scale integration

Partha S. Dasgupta; Susmita Sur-Kolay

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Semantic Graph Query Language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semantic graphs can be used to organize large amounts of information from a number of sources into one unified structure. A semantic query language provides a foundation for extracting information from the semantic graph. The graph query language described here provides a simple, powerful method for querying semantic graphs.

Kaplan, I L

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

52

Crawling Online Social Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unbiased sampling of facebook,” 2009. [9] A. Korolova, R.these users. For example, Facebook was ranked as the 4thsample (1M node) of the Facebook graph. The basic idea is

Ye, Shaozhi; Lang, Juan; Wu, S F

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Graph Transformations in Relational Databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theory of graph transformation [2] was originally developed as a generalization of Chomsky grammars from strings to graphs. Methods, techniques, and tools from the area of graph transformations have already been studied and applied in many fields of computer science such as formal language theory, pattern recognition and generation, compiler construction, software engineering, etc. Despite the large variety of existing graph transformation tools, the implementation of their graph transformation engine typically follows the same principle. In this respect, first a matching occurrence of the left-hand side (LHS) of the graph transformation rule is being found by some sophisticated graph pattern matching algorithm. Then the engine performs some local modifications to add or remove graph elements to the matching pattern, and the entire process starts all over again. Since graph pattern matching leads to the subgraph isomorphism problem that is known to be NPcomplete in general, this step is considered to be the most crucial in the overall performance of a graph transformation engine. Current tools (e.g., PROGRES [4]) use different efficient strategies for the graph pattern matching phase. However, I argue that the overall complexity of a graph transformation engine is not necessarily equal to the complexity of the graph pattern matching phase, especially for long transformation sequences.

Gergely Varró

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Analysis of multilevel graph partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a number of researchers have investigated a class of algorithms that are based on multilevel graph partitioning that have moderate computational complexity, and provide excellent graph partitions. However, there exists little theoretical analysis ...

George Karypis; Vipin Kumar

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Taxonomy-superimposed graph mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New graph structures where node labels are members of hierarchically organized ontologies or taxonomies have become commonplace in different domains, e.g., life sciences. It is a challenging task to mine for frequent patterns in this new graph model ...

Ali Cakmak; Gultekin Ozsoyoglu

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Algorithms for string and graph layout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many graph optimization problems can be viewed as graph layout problems. A layout of a graph is a geometric arrangement of the vertices subject to given constraints. For example, the vertices of a graph can be arranged on ...

Newman, Alantha.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Towards graph containment search and indexing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given a set of model graphs D and a query graph q, containment search aims to find all model graphs g ? D such that q contains g (q ? g). Due to the wide adoption of graph models, fast containment search ...

Chen Chen; Xifeng Yan; Philip S. Yu; Jiawei Han; Dong-Qing Zhang; Xiaohui Gu

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Temporal Representation in Semantic Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wide range of knowledge discovery and analysis applications, ranging from business to biological, make use of semantic graphs when modeling relationships and concepts. Most of the semantic graphs used in these applications are assumed to be static pieces of information, meaning temporal evolution of concepts and relationships are not taken into account. Guided by the need for more advanced semantic graph queries involving temporal concepts, this paper surveys the existing work involving temporal representations in semantic graphs.

Levandoski, J J; Abdulla, G M

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Errors in graph embedding algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One major area of difficulty in developing an algorithm for embedding a graph on a surface is handling bridges which have more than one possible placement. This paper addresses a number of published algorithms where this has not been handled correctly. ... Keywords: Algorithm, Graph embedding, Graph genus, Torus

Wendy Myrvold; William Kocay

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Extremal graphs without 4-cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We prove an upper bound for the number of edges a C"4-free graph on q^2+q vertices can contain for q even. This upper bound is achieved whenever there is an orthogonal polarity graph of a plane of even order q. Keywords: Extremal graph, Polarity, Projective plane

Frank A. Firke, Peter M. Kosek, Evan D. Nash, Jason Williford

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Power domination in block graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of monitoring an electric power system by placing as few measurement devices in the system as possible is closely related to the well-known domination problem in graphs. In 2002, Haynes et al. considered the graph theoretical representation ... Keywords: algorithm, block graphs, electric power system, power dominating set

Guangjun Xu; Liying Kang; Erfang Shan; Min Zhao

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Graph theoretic approach to parallel gene assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study parallel complexity of signed graphs motivated by the highly complex genetic recombination processes in ciliates. The molecular gene assembly operations have been modeled by operations of signed graphs, i.e., graphs where the vertices have a ... Keywords: Double-split graphs, Gene assembly, Local complement, Parallel assembly, Perfect matching, Signed graphs, Split graphs

Tero Harju; Chang Li; Ion Petre

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Quantum chaos on discrete graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adapting a method developed for the study of quantum chaos on {\\it quantum (metric)} graphs \\cite {KS}, spectral $\\zeta$ functions and trace formulae for {\\it discrete} Laplacians on graphs are derived. This is achieved by expressing the spectral secular equation in terms of the periodic orbits of the graph, and obtaining functions which belongs to the class of $\\zeta$ functions proposed originally by Ihara \\cite {Ihara}, and expanded by subsequent authors \\cite {Stark,Sunada}. Finally, a model of "classical dynamics" on the discrete graph is proposed. It is analogous to the corresponding classical dynamics derived for quantum graphs \\cite {KS}.

Uzy Smilansky

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Graph Homomorphisms for Quantum Players  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A homomorphism from a graph X to a graph Y is an adjacency preserving mapping f:V(X)->V(Y). We consider a nonlocal game in which Alice and Bob are trying to convince a verifier with certainty that a graph X admits a homomorphism to Y. This is a generalization of the well-studied graph coloring game. Via systematic study of quantum homomorphisms we prove new results for graph coloring. Most importantly, we show that the Lovasz theta number of the complement lower bounds the quantum chromatic number, which itself is not known to be computable. We also show that other quantum graph parameters, such as quantum independence number, can differ from their classical counterparts. Finally, we show that quantum homomorphisms closely relate to zero-error channel capacity. In particular, we use quantum homomorphisms to construct graphs for which entanglement-assistance increases their one-shot zero-error capacity.

David E. Roberson; Laura Mancinska

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Games on Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and study Maker-Breaker positional games on random graphs. Our goal is to determine the threshold probability pF for the existence of Maker's strategy to claim a member of F in the unbiased (one-on-one) game played on the edges of the random graph G(n; p), for various target families F of winning sets. More generally, for each probability above this threshold we study the smallest bias b such that Maker wins the (1: b) biased game. We investigate these functions for a number of basic games, like the connectivity game, the perfect matching game, the clique game, the Hamiltonian cycle game and the tree game. Particular attention is devoted to unbiased games, when b = 1. Next, we consider the planarity game and the k-coloring game on the complete graph on n vertices. In the planarity game the winning sets are all non-planar subgraphs, and in the k-coloring game the winning sets are all non-k-colorable subgraphs. For both of the games we look at a (1: b) biased game. We are interested in determining the largest bias b such that Maker wins the Maker-Breaker version of the game. On the other hand, we want to find the largest bias b such that Forcer wins the Avoider-Forcer version of the game. Finally, we deal with balanced online games on the random graph process. The game is played by a player called Painter. Edges in the random graph process are introduced two at a time. For each pair of edges Painter immediately and irrevocably chooses one of the two possibilities to color one of them red and the other one blue. His goal is to avoid creating a monochromatic copy of a prescribed fixed graph H, for as long as possible. We study the threshold mH for the number of edges to be played to know that Painter almost surely will create a monochromatic copy of H, for H being a cycle, a path and a star.

Milos Stojakovic

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Energy Review Annual Energy Review Superseded -- see MER for key annual tables Annual Energy Review archives for data year: 2011 2010 2009 2008 all archives Go EIA has expanded the Monthly Energy Review (MER) to include annual data as far back as 1949 for those data tables that are found in both the Annual Energy Review (AER) and the MER . During this transition, EIA will not publish the 2012 edition of the AER. In the list of tables below, grayed-out table numbers now go to MER tables that contain 1949-2012 (and later) data series. New interactive tables and graphs have also been added and are currently on EIA's Beta site. Data categories + EXPAND ALL Energy Overview 1.0 Total Energy Flow, GRAPH 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949- PDF XLS CSV INTERACTIVE 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source, 1949- PDF XLS CSV INTERACTIVE

67

Distributed large-scale natural graph factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural graphs, such as social networks, email graphs, or instant messaging patterns, have become pervasive through the internet. These graphs are massive, often containing hundreds of millions of nodes and billions of edges. While some theoretical models ... Keywords: asynchronous algorithms, distributed optimization, graph algorithms, graph factorization, large-scale machine learning, matrix factorization

Amr Ahmed, Nino Shervashidze, Shravan Narayanamurthy, Vanja Josifovski, Alexander J. Smola

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

On crossing numbers of geometric proximity graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let P be a set of n points in the plane. A geometric proximity graph on P is a graph where two points are connected by a straight-line segment if they satisfy some prescribed proximity rule. We consider four classes of higher order proximity graphs, ... Keywords: Crossing number, Geometric graphs, Proximity graphs

Bernardo M. Ábrego; Ruy Fabila-Monroy; Silvia Fernández-Merchant; David Flores-Peñaloza; Ferran Hurtado; Vera Sacristán; Maria Saumell

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A history of graph entropy measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This survey seeks to describe methods for measuring the entropy of graphs and to demonstrate the wide applicability of entropy measures. Setting the scene with a review of classical measures for determining the structural information content of graphs, ... Keywords: Entropy, Graph complexity, Graph entropy, Graphs, Information inequalities, Information measures, Information theory, Structural complexity

Matthias Dehmer; Abbe Mowshowitz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy of graphs and digraphs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The energy of a graph is the sum of the absolute values of the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. The concept is related to the… (more)

Jahanbakht, Nafiseh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Skewed graph partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graph partitioning is an important abstraction used in solving many scientific computing problems. Unfortunately, the standard partitioning model does not incorporate considerations that are important in many settings. We address this by describing a generalized partitioning model which incorporates the notion of partition skew and is applicable to a variety of problems. We then develop enhancements to several important partitioning algorithms necessary to solve the generalized partitioning problem. Finally we demonstrate the benefit of employing several of these generalized methods to static decomposition of parallel computing problems.

Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Van Driessche, R. [Alcatel Telecom, Antwerp (Belgium)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A graph theoretic approach to ultrafast information distribution: Borel Cayley graph resizing algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A graph theoretic approach is proposed to formulate communication graphs that enable ultrafast information distribution. In our earlier work, we reported that Borel Cayley graph (BCG) is a promising candidate as a logical topology for fast information ... Keywords: Borel Cayley graph, Cayley graph, Graph theory, Interconnection networks, Network modeling

Jaewook Yu; Eric Noel; K. Wendy Tang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Clustering based on a near neighbor graph and a grid cell graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents two novel graph-clustering algorithms, Clustering based on a Near Neighbor Graph (CNNG) and Clustering based on a Grid Cell Graph (CGCG). CNNG algorithm inspired by the idea of near neighbors is an improved graph-clustering method ... Keywords: Clustering, Grid Cell Graph, Grid cell, Near Neighbor Graph, Near neighbor point set

Xinquan Chen

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

EI7153_Praktikum_Simulation_and_Characterization_of_Molecular_Devices.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7153_Praktikum_Simulation_and_Characterization_of_Molecular_Devices.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7153 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Praktikum Simulation and Characterization of Molecular Devices Modulbezeichnung (en.): Praktikum Simulation and Characterization of Molecular Devices Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

75

EI7154_Projektpraktikum_Design_of_Molecular_Circuits.xls Allgemeine Daten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EI7154_Projektpraktikum_Design_of_Molecular_Circuits.xls Allgemeine Daten: Modulnummer: EI7154 Modulbezeichnung (dt.): Projektpraktikum Design of Molecular Circuits Modulbezeichnung (en.): Projektpraktikum Design of Molecular Circuits Modulniveau: MSc Kürzel: Untertitel: Semesterdauer: 1 Semester Häufigkeit

Kuehnlenz, Kolja

76

Robust Hamiltonicity of Dirac graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A graph is Hamiltonian if it contains a cycle which passes through every vertex of the graph exactly once. A classical theorem of Dirac from 1952 asserts that every graph on $n$ vertices with minimum degree at least $n/2$ is Hamiltonian. We refer to such graphs as Dirac graphs. In this paper we extend Dirac's theorem in two directions and show that Dirac graphs are robustly Hamiltonian in a very strong sense. First, we consider a random subgraph of a Dirac graph obtained by taking each edge independently with probability $p$, and prove that there exists a constant $C$ such that if $p \\ge C \\log n / n$, then a.a.s. the resulting random subgraph is still Hamiltonian. Second, we prove that if a $(1:b)$ Maker-Breaker game is played on a Dirac graph, then Maker can construct a Hamiltonian subgraph as long as the bias $b$ is at most $cn /\\log n$ for some absolute constant $c > 0$. Both of these results are tight up to a constant factor, and are proved under one general framework.

Krivelevich, Michael; Sudakov, Benny

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Quantum networks modelled by graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum networks are often modelled using Schrödinger operators on metric graphs. To give meaning to such models one has to know how to interpret the boundary conditions which match the wave functions at the graph vertices. In this article we give a survey

Pavel Exner; Olaf Post

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

On Generating Random Network Structures: Connected Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

are presented for random generation of connected graphs, sugraphs (sub- graphs on the ... a distribution and take it into account at estimation. Attainability is ...

79

From quantum graphs to quantum random walks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a short overview over recent developments on quantum graphs and outline the connection between general quantum graphs and so-called quantum random walks.

Gregor Tanner

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

Graph anomalies in cyber communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

Vander Wiel, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandine, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisk, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Probe threshold and probe trivially perfect graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An undirected graph G=(V,E) is a probeC graph if its vertex set can be partitioned into two sets, N (nonprobes) and P (probes) where N is independent and there exists E^'@?NxN such that G^'=(V,E@?E^') is a C graph. In this article we investigate probe ... Keywords: 2-SAT, Graph class, Probe graphs, Probe interval, Probe threshold, Probe trivially perfect

Daniel Bayer; Van Bang Le; H. N. de Ridder

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nested (2,r)-regular graphs and their network properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A graph G is a (t, r)-regular graph if every collection of t independent vertices is collectively adjacent to exactly r vertices. If a graph… (more)

Brooks, Josh Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

APPROXIMATING THE CHROMATIC NUMBER OF A GRAPH BY ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 16, 2005 ... ?(G) of a graph G. We introduce an operator ? mapping any graph parameter ?( G), nested between ...... On the Shannon capacity of a graph.

84

Time Series Graphs of Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Series Graphs of Global and Hemispheric Temperature Anomalies graphics Graph - Global and Hemispheric Annual Temperature Anomalies, 1850-2012 graphics Graph - Northern...

85

Positional Games on Random Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and study Maker/Breaker-type positional games on random graphs. Our main concern is to determine the threshold probability pF for the existence of Maker's strategy to claim a member of in the unbiased game played on the edges of random graph G(n, p), for various target families of winning sets. More generally, for each probability above this threshold we study the smallest bias b such that Maker wins the (1: b) biased game. We investigate these functions for a number of basic games, like the connectivity game, the perfect matching game, the clique game and the Hamiltonian cycle game.

Milos Stojakovic; Tibor Szabo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A discrete curvature on a planar graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a planar graph derived from a spherical, euclidean or hyperbolic tessellation, one can define a discrete curvature by combinatorial properties, which after embedding the graph in a compact 2d-manifold, becomes the Gaussian curvature.

M. Lorente

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Graph coloring and related symmetric functions - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metric functions), pa (the power sum symmetric functions), s~ (the Schur functions ), ..... It is true for line graphs (a special class of claw-free graphs) by a result of.

88

0-1 graph partitioning and image segmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graph partitioning is the grouping of all the nodes in a graph into two or more partitions based on certain criteria. Graph cut techniques are used to partition a graph. The Minimum Cut method gives imbalanced partitions. ...

Goh, Chun Fan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Mining closed relational graphs with connectivity constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relational graphs are widely used in modeling large scale networks such as biological networks and social networks. In this kind of graph, connectivity becomes critical in identifying highly associated groups and clusters. In this paper, we investigate ... Keywords: closed pattern, connectivity, graph

Xifeng Yan; X. Jasmine Zhou; Jiawei Han

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Graph Analytical Approach for Topic Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic detection with large and noisy data collections such as social media must address both scalability and accuracy challenges. KeyGraph is an efficient method that improves on current solutions by considering keyword cooccurrence. We show that KeyGraph ... Keywords: KeyGraph-based Topic Detection, Topic detection, community detection, network analysis

Hassan Sayyadi, Louiqa Raschid

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Bipartite graph partitioning and data clustering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many data types arising from data mining applications can be modeled as bipartite graphs, examples include terms and documents in a text corpus, customers and purchasing items in market basket analysis and reviewers and movies in a movie recommender ... Keywords: bipartite graph, correspondence analysis, document clustering, graph partitioning, singular value decomposition, spectral relaxation

Hongyuan Zha; Xiaofeng He; Chris Ding; Horst Simon; Ming Gu

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Introducing complete graphs in molecular connectivity studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical model of the molecular polarizability of fifty-four organic compounds, of the lattice enthalpy of twenty metal halides, and of the partition coefficient of twenty-five organic compounds has been used to test four different complete graph, ... Keywords: Mathematical model, algorithms, chemical graphs, complete graphs, core electrons, molecular connectivity, polarizability

Lionello Pogliani

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Graph partitioning via recurrent multivalued neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the well-known Graph Partitioning (GP) problem for undirected weighted graphs has been studied from two points of view: maximizing (MaxCut) or minimizing (MinCut) the cost of the cut induced in the graph by the partition. An unified model, ...

Enrique Mérida-Casermeiro; Domingo López-Rodríguez

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Drawing graphs nicely using simulated annealing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paradigm of simulated annealing is applied to the problem of drawing graphs “nicely.” Our algorithm deals with general undirected graphs with straight-line edges, and employs several simple criteria for the aesthetic quality of the result. ... Keywords: aesthetics, graph drawing, simulated annealing

Ron Davidson; David Harel

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Constrained Graph Optimization: Interdiction and Preservation Problems  

SciTech Connect

The maximum flow, shortest path, and maximum matching problems are a set of basic graph problems that are critical in theoretical computer science and applications. Constrained graph optimization, a variation of these basic graph problems involving modification of the underlying graph, is equally important but sometimes significantly harder. In particular, one can explore these optimization problems with additional cost constraints. In the preservation case, the optimizer has a budget to preserve vertices or edges of a graph, preventing them from being deleted. The optimizer wants to find the best set of preserved edges/vertices in which the cost constraints are satisfied and the basic graph problems are optimized. For example, in shortest path preservation, the optimizer wants to find a set of edges/vertices within which the shortest path between two predetermined points is smallest. In interdiction problems, one deletes vertices or edges from the graph with a particular cost in order to impede the basic graph problems as much as possible (for example, delete edges/vertices to maximize the shortest path between two predetermined vertices). Applications of preservation problems include optimal road maintenance, power grid maintenance, and job scheduling, while interdiction problems are related to drug trafficking prevention, network stability assessment, and counterterrorism. Computational hardness results are presented, along with heuristic methods for approximating solutions to the matching interdiction problem. Also, efficient algorithms are presented for special cases of graphs, including on planar graphs. The graphs in many of the listed applications are planar, so these algorithms have important practical implications.

Schild, Aaron V [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6.6 Natural Gas Underground Storage, End of Year 1954– PDF XLS CSV: INTERACTIVE: 6.7 Natural Gas Wellhead, City Gate, and Imports Prices, 1949– PDF ...

97

Annual Energy Review - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Survey Forms › Facebook Twitter ... 5.11 Petroleum Products Supplied by Type, 1949– XLS CSV: INTERACTIVE: 5.12 Heat Content of Petroleum Products Supplied ...

98

Happy Endings for Flip Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We show that the triangulations of a finite point set form a flip graph that can be embedded isometrically into a hypercube, if and only if the point set has no empty convex pentagon. Point sets of this type include convex subsets of lattices, points on two lines, and several other infinite families. As a consequence, flip distance in such point sets can be computed efficiently. 1

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Happy Endings for Flip Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the triangulations of a finite point set form a flip graph that can be embedded isometrically into a hypercube, if and only if the point set has no empty convex pentagon. Point sets of this type include intersections of lattices with convex sets, points on two lines, and several other infinite families. As a consequence, flip distance in such point sets can be computed efficiently.

David Eppstein

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Computing Information Value from RDF Graph Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information value has been implicitly utilized and mostly non-subjectively computed in information retrieval (IR) systems. We explicitly define and compute the value of an information piece as a function of two parameters, the first is the potential semantic impact the target information can subjectively have on its recipient's world-knowledge, and the second parameter is trust in the information source. We model these two parameters as properties of RDF graphs. Two graphs are constructed, a target graph representing the semantics of the target body of information and a context graph representing the context of the consumer of that information. We compute information value subjectively as a function of both potential change to the context graph (impact) and the overlap between the two graphs (trust). Graph change is computed as a graph edit distance measuring the dissimilarity between the context graph before and after the learning of the target graph. A particular application of this subjective information valuation is in the construction of a personalized ranking component in Web search engines. Based on our method, we construct a Web re-ranking system that personalizes the information experience for the information-consumer.

al-Saffar, Sinan; Heileman, Gregory

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

API Requirements for Dynamic Graph Prediction  

SciTech Connect

Given a large-scale time-evolving multi-modal and multi-relational complex network (a.k.a., a large-scale dynamic semantic graph), we want to implement algorithms that discover patterns of activities on the graph and learn predictive models of those discovered patterns. This document outlines the application programming interface (API) requirements for fast prototyping of feature extraction, learning, and prediction algorithms on large dynamic semantic graphs. Since our algorithms must operate on large-scale dynamic semantic graphs, we have chosen to use the graph API developed in the CASC Complex Networks Project. This API is supported on the back end by a semantic graph database (developed by Scott Kohn and his team). The advantages of using this API are (i) we have full-control of its development and (ii) the current API meets almost all of the requirements outlined in this document.

Gallagher, B; Eliassi-Rad, T

2006-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Mixture graph based semi-supervised dimensionality reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graph structure is crucial to graph based dimensionality reduction. A mixture graph based semi-supervised dimensionality reduction (MGSSDR) method with pairwise constraints is proposed. MGSSDR first constructs multiple diverse graphs on different random ... Keywords: dimensionality reduction, mixture graph, noise, pairwise constraints

G. X. Yu; H. Peng; J. Wei; Q. L. Ma

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

LINEAR INEQUALITIES AMONG GRAPH INVARIANTS: USING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[30] P. Fowler, P. Hansen, G. Caporossi, and A. Soncini, Polyenes with maximum homo-lumo gap. (variable neighborhood search for extremal graphs 7), ...

104

Graph algorithms in the titan toolkit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graph algorithms are a key component in a wide variety of intelligence analysis activities. The Graph-Based Informatics for Non-Proliferation and Counter-Terrorism project addresses the critical need of making these graph algorithms accessible to Sandia analysts in a manner that is both intuitive and effective. Specifically we describe the design and implementation of an open source toolkit for doing graph analysis, informatics, and visualization that provides Sandia with novel analysis capability for non-proliferation and counter-terrorism.

McLendon, William Clarence, III; Wylie, Brian Neil

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A copositive programming approach to graph partitioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 3, 2005 ... the random graph we can determine OPTMC by inspection, see column 3. The last 4 columns .... completeness. Freeman, San Francisco, 1979.

106

Line graph explorer: scalable display of line graphs using Focus+Context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scientific measurements are often depicted as line graphs. State-of-the-art high throughput systems in life sciences, telemetry and electronics measurement rapidly generate hundreds to thousands of such graphs. Despite the increasing volume and ubiquity ... Keywords: Focus+Context, line graph

Robert Kincaid; Heidi Lam

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Multithreaded Algorithms for Graph Coloring  

SciTech Connect

Graph algorithms are challenging to parallelize when high performance and scalability are primary goals. Low concurrency, poor data locality, irregular access pattern, and high data access to computation ratio are among the chief reasons for the challenge. The performance implication of these features is exasperated on distributed memory machines. More success is being achieved on shared-memory, multi-core architectures supporting multithreading. We consider a prototypical graph problem, coloring, and show how a greedy algorithm for solving it can be e*ectively parallelized on multithreaded architectures. We present in particular two di*erent parallel algorithms. The first relies on speculation and iteration, and is suitable for any shared-memory, multithreaded system. The second uses data ow principles and is targeted at the massively multithreaded Cray XMT system. We benchmark the algorithms on three di*erent platforms and demonstrate scalable runtime performance. In terms of quality of solution, both algorithms use nearly the same number of colors as the serial algorithm.

Catalyurek, Umit V.; Feo, John T.; Gebremedhin, Assefaw H.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Pothen, Alex

2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

Feature Tracking Using Reeb Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking features and exploring their temporal dynamics can aid scientists in identifying interesting time intervals in a simulation and serve as basis for performing quantitative analyses of temporal phenomena. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for tracking subsets of isosurfaces, such as burning regions in simulated flames, which are defined as areas of high fuel consumption on a temperature isosurface. Tracking such regions as they merge and split over time can provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. However, the convoluted nature of the temperature isosurface and its rapid movement make this analysis particularly challenging. Our approach tracks burning regions by extracting a temperature isovolume from the four-dimensional space-time temperature field. It then obtains isosurfaces for the original simulation time steps and labels individual connected 'burning' regions based on the local fuel consumption value. Based on this information, a boundary surface between burning and non-burning regions is constructed. The Reeb graph of this boundary surface is the tracking graph for burning regions.

Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.; Pascucci, Valerio

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Scalable modeling of real graphs using Kronecker multiplication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given a large, real graph, how can we generate a synthetic graph that matches its properties, i.e., it has similar degree distribution, similar (small) diameter, similar spectrum, etc? We propose to use "Kronecker graphs", which naturally obey ...

Jure Leskovec; Christos Faloutsos

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Generating random graphs with large girth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a simple and efficient algorithm for randomly generating simple graphs without small cycles. These graphs can be used to design high performance Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. For any constant k, ? ? 1/2k(k ...

Mohsen Bayati; Andrea Montanari; Amin Saberi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Collaborative robotic instruction: A graph teaching experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphing is a key skill in the study of Physics. Drawing and interpreting graphs play a key role in the understanding of science, while the lack of these has proved to be a handicap and a limiting factor in the learning of scientific concepts. It has ... Keywords: Face-to-face computer supported collaborative learning, Intelligent tutoring systems, Interactive learning environments, Robotic assisted teaching

Rubén Mitnik; Matías Recabarren; Miguel Nussbaum; Alvaro Soto

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Inflo: collaborative reasoning via open calculation graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inflo is a web tool that introduces new ways to collaboratively construct and deconstruct logical arguments drawn as visual dataflow graphs. Inflo graphs are dynamic: nodes are logical propositions that can contain computations based on ... Keywords: collaboration, decision making, knowledge curation

Jonathan Lung; Steve Easterbrook

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Anonymizing bipartite graph data using safe groupings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Private data often come in the form of associations between entities, such as customers and products bought from a pharmacy, which are naturally represented in the form of a large, sparse bipartite graph. As with tabular data, it is desirable to be able ... Keywords: Graph, Microdata, Privacy, Query answering

Graham Cormode; Divesh Srivastava; Ting Yu; Qing Zhang

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Expressing graph algorithms using generalized active messages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, graph computation has emerged as an important class of high-performance computing application whose characteristics differ markedly from those of traditional, compute-bound, kernels. Libraries such as BLAS, LAPACK, and others have been successful ... Keywords: active messages, parallel graph algorithms, parallel programming models

Nick Edmonds; Jeremiah Willcock; Andrew Lumsdaine

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Improved call graph comparison using simulated annealing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of suspicious binary executables submitted to Anti-Virus (AV) companies are in the order of tens of thousands per day. Current hash-based signature methods are easy to deceive and are inefficient for identifying known malware that have undergone ... Keywords: call graph, graph edit distance, malware, simulated annealing, static analysis

Orestis Kostakis; Joris Kinable; Hamed Mahmoudi; Kimmo Mustonen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Graph mining: Laws, generators, and algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How does the Web look? How could we tell an abnormal social network from a normal one? These and similar questions are important in many fields where the data can intuitively be cast as a graph; examples range from computer networks to sociology to biology ... Keywords: Generators, graphs, patterns, social networks

Deepayan Chakrabarti; Christos Faloutsos

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Quantum Algorithms for Graph Problems -- A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this survey we give an overview about important methods to construct quantum algorithms and quantum lower bounds for graph problems. We show how to use these methods, and we give a summary about the quantum complexity of the most important graph problems. At the end of our paper, we give some interesting questions in this research area.

Sebastian Dörn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Oriented unicyclic graphs with extremal skew energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\G$ be an oriented graph of order $n$ and $\\a_1,\\a_2,..., \\a_n$ denote all the eigenvalues of the skew-adjacency matrix of $\\G.$ The skew energy $\\displaystyle{\\cal E}_s(\\G)= \\sum_{i=1}^{n} |\\a_i|.$ In this paper, the oriented unicyclic graphs with minimal and maximal skew energy are determined.

Yaoping, Hou; Chongyan, Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Bond Graph Modeling Of Variable Structure Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of describing variable structure models in a compact, object--oriented fashion is revisited and analyzed from the perspective of bond graph modeling. Traditionally, bond graphs have always been used to describe continuous-- time physical processes with a fixed structure. Yet, this paper shall demonstrate that bond graphs are equally suitable to describe variable structure models as fixed structure models. Moreover, a bond graph description of variable structure models can teach us a lot about the essential properties of variable structure models, properties that are not easily visible when other modeling approaches are taken. The paper discusses issues related to causality reassignment and conditional index changes as a consequence of switching in a physical system. Keywords: Bond graphs, variable structure system, computational causality, conditional index change, switching, object--oriented modeling, Dymola. INTRODUCTION When the causality strokes were added to the forme...

François E. Cellier; Martin Otter; Hilding Elmqvist

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Annual Energy Review - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3.2 Value of Fossil Fuel Production, 1949– PDF XLS GRAPH: 3.3 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970– PDF XLS GRAPH:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A combinatorial construction of almost-ramanujan graphs using the zig-zag product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reingold, Vadhan and Wigderson [21] introduced the graph zig-zag product. This product combines a large graph and a small graph into one graph, such that the resulting graph inherits its size from the large graph, its degree from the small graph ... Keywords: expander graphs, zig-zag product

Avraham Ben-Aroya; Amnon Ta-Shma

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Bond graph modeling of centrifugal compressor system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system, active surge control. A novel method of modeling centrifugal compression systems for surge control purposes by using bond graphs is presented. By using the bond graph method, we get a simple description of compression systems based on physical phenomena and it is straight forward to get the dynamic equations. It is demonstrated that several active surge control methods can be represented by the same bond graph. It is also shown how methods for active surge control can be classified using energy flow in terms of upstream energy injection or downstream energy dissipation. A model of a compression system with recycle flow is derived in this work. 1.

Nur Uddin; Jan Tommy Gravdahl

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Upper oriented chromatic number of undirected graphs and oriented colorings of product graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oriented chromatic number of an oriented graph $\\vec G$ is the minimum order of an oriented graph $\\vev H$ such that $\\vec G$ admits a homomorphism to $\\vev H$. The oriented chromatic number of an undirected graph $G$ is then the greatest oriented chromatic number of its orientations. In this paper, we introduce the new notion of the upper oriented chromatic number of an undirected graph $G$, defined as the minimum order of an oriented graph $\\vev U$ such that every orientation $\\vec G$ of $G$ admits a homomorphism to $\\vec U$. We give some properties of this parameter, derive some general upper bounds on the ordinary and upper oriented chromatic numbers of Cartesian, strong, direct and lexicographic products of graphs, and consider the particular case of products of paths.

Sopena, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Image segmentation by iterated region merging with localized graph cuts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an iterated region merging-based graph cuts algorithm which is a novel extension of the standard graph cuts algorithm. Graph cuts addresses segmentation in an optimization framework and finds a globally optimal solution to a wide ... Keywords: Graph cuts, Image segmentation, Region merging

Bo Peng; Lei Zhang; David Zhang; Jian Yang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The depleted hydrogen atoms in chemical graph theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm which explicitly describes the depleted hydrogen atoms is proposed for chemical graph computations, and especially for molecular connectivity model studies. The new algorithm continues to be centred on the concepts of complete graphs ... Keywords: General chemical graphs, complete graphs, hydrogen perturbation, molecular connectivity computations

Lionello Pogliani

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

On the density of a graph and its blowup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that, of all graphs with edge-density p, the random graph G(n,p) contains the smallest density of copies of K"t","t, the complete bipartite graph of size 2t. Since K"t","t is a t-blowup of an edge, the following intriguing open question ... Keywords: Blowup, Graph density, Triangle density

Asaf Shapira; Raphael Yuster

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Theoretical underpinnings for maximal clique enumeration on perturbed graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of enumerating the maximal cliques of a graph is a computationally expensive problem with applications in a number of different domains. Sometimes the benefit of knowing the maximal clique enumeration (MCE) of a single graph is worth investing ... Keywords: Graph algorithms, Graph perturbation theory, Maximal clique enumeration, Uncertain and noisy data

William Hendrix; Matthew C. Schmidt; Paul Breimyer; Nagiza F. Samatova

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Graph Invariants and Large Cycles - a Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graph invariants are the best and single tools for investigation of abstract structures of graphs. They, combined in convenient relations, carry global and general information about a graph and its various substructures (cycle structures, factors, colorings, coverings, and so on). In this survey paper we have attempted to bring together all direct (pure) relations between basic invariants of a graph and its large cycle structures, perhaps the most important cycle structures, namely Hamilton, longest, dominating and some generalized cycles including Hamilton and dominating cycles as special cases. These very few relations actually form a source (basis) from which nearly all possible hamiltonian results can be developed further based on generalized and extended invariants, extended list of path or cycle structures and additional structural limitations.

Nikoghosyan, Zh G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Electronic tools for designing charts and graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the issues involved in designing an interactive chart and graph making system, especially tailored to the needs of the graphic designer. It defines a set of user interface requirements and describe the ...

Jones, Mary, M.S.V.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Gram dimension of a graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be a Gram representation of Xi and let U an orthogonal matrix mapping u. (1) j to u. (2) ...... On the Shannon capacity of a graph IEEE Trans. Inform. Th. IT-25:.

131

Continuous Time Group Discovery in Dynamic Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rise in availability and importance of graphs and networks, it has become increasingly important to have good models to describe their behavior. While much work has focused on modeling static graphs, we focus on group discovery in dynamic graphs. We adapt a dynamic extension of Latent Dirichlet Allocation to this task and demonstrate good performance on two datasets. Modeling relational data has become increasingly important in recent years. Much work has focused on static graphs - that is fixed graphs at a single point in time. Here we focus on the problem of modeling dynamic (i.e. time-evolving) graphs. We propose a scalable Bayesian approach for community discovery in dynamic graphs. Our approach is based on extensions of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA). LDA is a latent variable model for topic modeling in text corpora. It was extended to deal with topic changes in discrete time and later in continuous time. These models were referred to as the discrete Dynamic Topic Model (dDTM) and the continuous Dynamic Topic Model (cDTM), respectively. When adapting these models to graphs, we take our inspiration from LDA-G and SSN-LDA, applications of LDA to static graphs that have been shown to effectively factor out community structure to explain link patterns in graphs. In this paper, we demonstrate how to adapt and apply the cDTM to the task of finding communities in dynamic networks. We use link prediction to measure the quality of the discovered community structure and apply it to two different relational datasets - DBLP author-keyword and CAIDA autonomous systems relationships. We also discuss a parallel implementation of this approach using Hadoop. In Section 2, we review LDA and LDA-G. In Section 3, we review the cDTM and introduce cDTMG, its adaptation to modeling dynamic graphs. We discuss inference for the cDTM-G and details of our parallel implementation in Section 4 and present its performance on two datasets in Section 5 before concluding in Section 6.

Miller, K; Eliassi-Rad, T

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

132

Semiregular Factorization of Simple Graphs A. J. W. Hilton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

]. A (d, d + 1)-graph is said to be semiregular. An (r, r + 1)-factorization of a graph is a decomposition of the graph into edge-disjoint (r, r + 1)-factors. We discuss here the state of knowledge about (r, r +1)-factorizations of d-regular graphs and of (d, d + 1)-graphs. For r, s 0, let (r, s) be the least integer

Wojciechowski, Jerzy

133

Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - Energy Information Administration - November  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SEE CURRENT NATURAL GAS MONTHLY UPDATE SEE CURRENT NATURAL GAS MONTHLY UPDATE Natural Gas Monthly Data for September 2013 | Release Date: December 12, 2013 | Next Release: January 7, 2014 | full report  | Previous Issues Month: October 2013 September 2013 August 2013 July 2013 June 2013 May 2013 April 2013 March 2013 February 2013 January 2013 December 2012 November 2012 October 2012 September 2012 prior issues Go Table of Contentsall tables Tables 1 Summary of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2008-2013 XLS PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 2008-2013 XLS PDF CSV 3 Selected National Average Natural Gas Prices, 2008-2013 XLS PDF CSV 4 U.S. Natural Gas Imports, 2011-2013 XLS PDF CSV 5 U.S. Natural Gas Exports, 2011-2013 XLS PDF CSV

134

Monthly Energy Review - June 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Publications: Other monthly EIA reports are Petroleum Supply Monthly Publications: Other monthly EIA reports are Petroleum Supply Monthly, Petroleum Marketing Monthly, Natural Gas Monthly, Electric Power Monthly, and Inter- national Petroleum Monthly. For more information, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 or InfoCtr@eia.doe.gov. Electronic Access The MER is available on EIA's Web site in a variety of formats at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/mer. Complete MER, and individual MER sections: Portable Document Format (PDF) files. Individual table and graph pages: PDF files. Data files for individual tables: Excel (XLS) files and ASCII comma-delimited (CSV) files. Note: PDF files display selected annual and monthly data. Excel and CSV files display all avail- able annual and monthly data, often at a greater level of precision than the PDF files.

135

Improving accessibility to statistical graphs: the iGraph-Lite system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is often presented in graphical form. Unfortunately, current assistive technologies such as screen readers are not well-equipped to handle these representations. To provide accessibility to graphs published in ``The Daily" (Statistics Canada's ... Keywords: accessibility (blind and visually impaired), natural language interaction, statistical graphs

Leo Ferres; Petro Verkhogliad; Gitte Lindgaard; Louis Boucher; Antoine Chretien; Martin Lachance

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ion shaking in the 200 MeV XLS-ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that ions, trapped inside the beam`s potential, can be removed by the clearing electrodes when the amplitude of the ion oscillation is increased by vertically shaking the ions. We will report on a similar experiment in the 200 Mev XLS ring. The design of the ion clearing system for the ring and the first results obtained, were already reported. In the present series of experiments, RF voltage was applied on a pair of vertical strip-lines. The frequency was scanned in the range of the ion (from H{sub 2} to CO{sub 2}) bounce frequencies in the ring (1--10 MHz). The response of the beam size, vertical betatron tune and lifetime was studied.

Bozoki, E.; Kramer, S.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ion shaking in the 200 MeV XLS-ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that ions, trapped inside the beam's potential, can be removed by the clearing electrodes when the amplitude of the ion oscillation is increased by vertically shaking the ions. We will report on a similar experiment in the 200 Mev XLS ring. The design of the ion clearing system for the ring and the first results obtained, were already reported. In the present series of experiments, RF voltage was applied on a pair of vertical strip-lines. The frequency was scanned in the range of the ion (from H[sub 2] to CO[sub 2]) bounce frequencies in the ring (1--10 MHz). The response of the beam size, vertical betatron tune and lifetime was studied.

Bozoki, E.; Kramer, S.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

GRAPHS AND (Z2) k-ACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Let (?, M n) be an effective smooth action of (Z2) k on an n-dimensional smooth closed connected manifold having a finite fixed set. One can associate to this action a regular graph of valency n. If the action is nonbounding one uses this graph to obtain a lower bound for the number of fixed points. Furthermore, this result is applied to a general nonbounding (Z2) k-action fixing a finite fixed set. With the help of graphs and the Kosniowski-Stong formula, up to cobordism all (Z2) k-actions fixing three isolated points (resp. four isolated points) are classified completely, and at the same time, the Smith problem for (Z2) k-actions fixing three isolated points (resp. four isolated points) is also solved. 1.

Zhi L Ü

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Graph clustering with network structure indices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graph clustering has become ubiquitous in the study of relational data sets. We examine two simple algorithms: a new graphical adaptation of the k-medoids algorithm and the Girvan-Newman method based on edge betweenness centrality. We show that they can be effective at discovering the latent groups or communities that are defined by the link structure of a graph. However, both approaches rely on prohibitively expensive computations, given the size of modern relational data sets. Network structure indices (NSIs) are a proven technique for indexing network structure and efficiently finding short paths. We show how incorporating NSIs into these graph clustering algorithms can overcome these complexity limitations. We also present promising quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the modified algorithms on synthetic and real data sets. 1.

Matthew J. Rattigan; Marc Maier; David Jensen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Subgraphs of quasi-random oriented graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One cannot guarantee the presence of an oriented four-cycle in an oriented graph $D$ simply by demanding it has many edges, as an acyclic orientation of the complete graph on $n$ vertices has $\\binom{n}{2}$ edges -- the most possible -- but contains no oriented cycle. We show that a simple quasi-randomness condition on the orientation of $D$ does allow one to guarantee the presence of an oriented four-cycle. Significantly our results work even for sparse oriented graphs. Furthermore, we give examples which show that, in a sense, our result is best possible. We also prove a result concerning oriented six-cycles and a more general result in the case $D$ is dense. Finally, we raise a number of questions and conjectures related to these results.

Amini, Omid; Huc, Florian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An empirical comparison of some approximate methods for graph coloring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Graph Coloring Problem (GCP) is a classical NP-complete problem for which several approximate solution algorithms have been proposed: Brelaz algorithm, simulated annealing (SA), ant colony optimization (ACO). This paper reports empirical results ... Keywords: graph coloring, gravitational swarm

Israel Rebollo-Ruiz; Manuel Graña

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sequoia tops Graph 500 list of 'big data' supercomputers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATL062113_graph ATL062113_graph 06/21/2013 The Livermore Lab's Sequoia supercomputer topped the biannual Graph 500 list of the world's fastest systems for "big data" this week. The Graph 500 benchmark measures the speed with which a supercomputer can "connect the dots" within a massive set of data. Sequoia traversed 15,363 connections per second. Sequoia tops Graph 500 list of 'big data' supercomputers Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer has retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

143

Long alternating cycles in edge-colored complete graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let Knc denote a complete graph on n vertices whose edges are colored in an arbitrary way. And let ?(Knc) denote the maximum number of edges of the same ... Keywords: alternating cycle, color degree, edge-colored graph

Hao Li; Guanghui Wang; Shan Zhou

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Using constraints to achieve stability in automatic graph layout algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automatic layout algorithms are commonly used when displaying graphs on the screen because they provide a “nice” drawing of the graph without user intervention. There are, however, a couple of disadvantages to automatic layout. Without user ...

Karl-Friedrich Böhringer; Frances Newbery Paulisch

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Efficient algorithms for graph all-matching and containment search.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent advances in database research have shown the potential of graph in modelling complicated data. Graph data have pervaded many modern applications including bio-informatics, chem-informatics,… (more)

Zhu, Gaoping

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The cost of monotonicity in distributed graph searching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are placed at a particular vertex of the graph, called the homebase. Moreover, this sequence of moves must is aiming at clearing the whole network. Given a graph G and a homebase v0 V (G), the search problem

Ilcinkas, David

147

The cost of monotonicity in distributed graph searching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the graph, called the homebase. Moreover, this sequence of moves must satisfy that recontamination never network. Given a graph G and a homebase v0 V (G), the search problem consists in designing a distributed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

FASTEST MIXING MARKOV CHAIN ON GRAPHS WITH SYMMETRIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how to exploit symmetries of a graph to efficiently compute the fastest mixing Markov chain on the graph (i.e., find the transition probabilities on the edges to minimize the second-largest eigenvalue modulus of ...

Xiao, Lin

149

Computing maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider computing a maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs. For a convex bipartite graph of n vertices and m edges, we present an O (n logn ...

Danny Z. Chen; Xiaomin Liu; Haitao Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

A hybrid parallel genetic algorithm approach for graph coloring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graph-Coloring problem (GCP) deals with assigning labels (colors) to the vertices of a graph such that adjacent vertices do not get the same color. Coloring a graph with minimum number of colors is a well-known NP-hard problem. In this paper a new permutation ... Keywords: Graph coloring problem, message passing interface (MPI), migration model, parallel genetic algorithm, static wavelength assignment

S. N. Sivanandam; S. Sumathi; T. Hamsapriya

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

THE OPERATOR © FOR THE CHROMATIC NUMBER OF A GRAPH£ ¡  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce an operator © mapping any graph parameter ¬( ), nested between the stability number ...... Local chromatic number and Sperner capacity. ?ournal.

152

Hamiltonian Graphs and the Traveling Salesman Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new characterization of Hamiltonian graphs using f-cutset matrix is proposed. A new exact polynomial time algorithm for the traveling salesman problem (TSP) based on this new characterization is developed. We then define so called ordered weighted adjacency list for given weighted complete graph and proceed to the main result of the paper, namely, the exact algorithm based on utilization of ordered weighted adjacency list and the simple properties that any path or circuit must satisfy. This algorithm performs checking of sub-lists, containing (p-1) entries (edge pairs) for paths and p entries (edge pairs) for circuits, chosen from ordered adjacency list in a well defined sequence to determine exactly the shortest Hamiltonian path and shortest Hamiltonian circuit in a weighted complete graph of p vertices. The procedure has intrinsic advantage of landing on the desired solution in quickest possible time and even in worst case in polynomial time. A new characterization of shortest Hamiltonian tour for a weighted complete graph satisfying triangle inequality (i.e. for tours passing through every city on a realistic map of cities where cities can be taken as points on a Euclidean plane) is also proposed. Finally, we discuss a novel classical algorithm for unstructured search and its effect on any of the NP-Complete problems.

Dhananjay P. Mehendale

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Multilevel heuristic algorithm for graph partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many real applications involve optimisation problems where more than one objective has to be optimised at the same time. One of these kinds of problems is graph partitioning, that appears in applications such as VLSI design, data-mining, efficient disc ...

Raul Baños; Consolación Gil; Julio Ortega; Francisco G. Montoya

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Exploiting graph properties of game trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state space of most adversary games is a directed graph. However, due to the success of simple recursive algorithms based on Alpha-Beta, theoreticians and practitioners have concentrated on the traversal of trees, giving the field the name "game-tree ... Keywords: game playing, search

Aske Plaat; Jonathan Schaeffer; Wim Pijls; Arie de Bruin

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Suggesting friends using the implicit social graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although users of online communication tools rarely categorize their contacts into groups such as "family", "co-workers", or "jogging buddies", they nonetheless implicitly cluster contacts, by virtue of their interactions with them, forming implicit ... Keywords: contact group clustering, implicit social graph, tie strength

Maayan Roth; Assaf Ben-David; David Deutscher; Guy Flysher; Ilan Horn; Ari Leichtberg; Naty Leiser; Yossi Matias; Ron Merom

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Graph clustering with network structure indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graph clustering has become ubiquitous in the study of relational data sets. We examine two simple algorithms: a new graphical adaptation of the k-medoids algorithm and the Girvan-Newman method based on edge betweenness centrality. We show that ...

Matthew J. Rattigan; Marc Maier; David Jensen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Grid smoothing: a graph-based approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past few years, mesh representation of images has attracted a lot of research interest due to its wide area of applications in image processing. In the mesh framework, an image is represented by a graph in which the nodes represent the pixels ... Keywords: content adaptative mesh, grid smoothing, image coding, non-linear optimisation

Guillaume Noel; Karim Djouani; Yskandar Hamam

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Graph grammars with string-regulated rewriting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multicellular organisms undergo a complex developmental process, orchestrated by the genetic information in their cells, in order to form a newborn individual from a fertilized egg. This complex process, not completely understood yet, is believed to ... Keywords: Development, Expressive power, Genetic regulation, Graph grammars, Regulated rewriting

Daniel Lobo; Francisco J. Vico; Jürgen Dassow

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Computing role assignments of chordal graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In social network theory, a simple graph G is called k-role assignable if there is a surjective mapping that assigns a number from {1,...,k} called a role to each vertex of G such that any two vertices with the same role have ...

Pim Van't Hof; Daniël Paulusma; Johan M. M. Van Rooij

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Diagnosability of star graphs with missing edges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the system diagnosis on an n-dimensional star under the comparison model. Following the concept of local diagnosability [3], the strong local diagnosability property [7] is discussed; this property describes the equivalence of ... Keywords: Comparison diagnosis model, Extended star structure, Local diagnosability, MM* diagnosis model, Star graph, Strong local diagnosability property

Chieh-Feng Chiang; Guo-Huang Hsu; Lun-Min Shih; Jimmy J. M. Tan

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Quantum secret sharing with qudit graph states  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a unified formalism for threshold quantum secret sharing using graph states of systems with prime dimension. We construct protocols for three varieties of secret sharing: with classical and quantum secrets shared between parties over both classical and quantum channels.

Keet, Adrian; Fortescue, Ben; Sanders, Barry C. [Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Markham, Damian [LTCI-CNRS, Telecom ParisTech, 37/39 rue Dareau, F-75014 Paris (France)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Quantum secret sharing with qudit graph states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a unified formalism for threshold quantum secret sharing using graph states of systems with prime dimension. We construct protocols for three varieties of secret sharing: with classical and quantum secrets shared between parties over both classical and quantum channels.

Adrian Keet; Ben Fortescue; Damian Markham; Barry C. Sanders

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hiroshi Ishikawa A Practical Introduction to Graph Cut  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Contents Overview / Brief history Energy minimization Graphs and their minimum cuts Energy Elevation map #12;History Probablistic methods (SA, ICM,...) have been used for energy minimization OR has Overview / Brief history Energy minimization Graphs and their minimum cuts Energy minimization via graph

Ishikawa, Hiroshi

164

A graph based method for faster display for distribution networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents our logical display approach for Distribution Networks based on the concept of Microsoft graphs. We demonstrate that by using Microsoft graphs we do not have to redraw the circuits after each switching operation or after a change ... Keywords: algorithms, distribution, graphs, logical display, network systems

Mansoor Al-A'ali

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Kinetic and stationary point-set embeddability for plane graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a kinetic version of point-set embeddability. Given a plane graph G(V,E) where |V|=n, and a set P of n moving points where the trajectory of each point is an algebraic function of constant ... Keywords: kinetic algorithm, kinetic graph drawing, plane graph, point-set embeddability

Zahed Rahmati; Sue H. Whitesides; Valerie King

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Modeling molecular polarizabilities with graph-theoretical concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model study of the molecular polarizabilities of a wide heterogeneous class of organic compounds was carried out. The model of this property was based on graph-theoretical molecular connectivity and pseudoconnectivity basis indices, including the corresponding ... Keywords: complete graphs, core electrons, graph-theoretical connectivity indices, molecular polarizabilities

Lionello Pogliani

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Discovering informative connection subgraphs in multi-relational graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering patterns in graphs has long been an area of interest. In most approaches to such pattern discovery either quantitative anomalies, frequency of substructure or maximum flow is used to measure the interestingness of a pattern. In this paper ... Keywords: multi-relational graphs, semantic pattern discovery in RDF graphs, subgraph discovery

Cartic Ramakrishnan; William H. Milnor; Matthew Perry; Amit P. Sheth

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Image segmentation using quadtree-based similarity graph and normalized cut  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The graph cuts in image segmentation have been widely used in recent years because it regards the problem of image partitioning as a graph partitioning issue, a well-known problem in graph theory. The normalized cut approach uses spectral graph properties ... Keywords: graph partitioning, image segmentation, quadtree, spectral graph

Marco Antonio Garcia De Carvalho; Anselmo Castelo Branco Ferreira; André Luis Costa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

StreamWorks - A system for Dynamic Graph Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acting on time-critical events by processing ever growing social media, news or cyber data streams is a major technical challenge. Many of these data sources can be modeled as multi-relational graphs. Mining and searching for subgraph patterns in a continuous setting requires an efficient approach to incremental graph search. The goal of our work is to enable real-time search capabilities for graph databases. This demonstration will present a dynamic graph query system that leverages the structural and semantic characteristics of the underlying multi-relational graph.

Choudhury, Sutanay; Holder, Larry; Chin, George; Ray, Abhik; Beus, Sherman J.; Feo, John T.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Maker Can Construct a Sparse Graph on a Small Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study Maker/Breaker games on the edges of sparse graphs. Maker and Breaker take turns in claiming previously unclaimed edges of a given graph H. Maker aims to occupy a given target graph G and Breaker tries to prevent Maker from achieving his goal. We define a function f and show that for every d-regular graph G on n vertices there is a graph H with at most f(d)n edges such that Maker can occupy a copy of G in the game on H.

Gebauer, Heidi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Implementing Graph Pattern Queries on a Relational Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a graph database is implemented on top of a relational database, queries in the graph query language are translated into relational SQL queries. Graph pattern queries are an important feature of a graph query language. Translating graph pattern queries into single SQL statements results in very poor query performance. By taking into account the pattern query structure and generating multiple SQL statements, pattern query performance can be dramatically improved. The performance problems encountered with the single SQL statements generated for pattern queries reflects a problem in the SQL query planner and optimizer. Addressing this problem would allow relational databases to better support semantic graph databases. Relational database systems that provide good support for graph databases may also be more flexible platforms for data warehouses.

Kaplan, I L; Abdulla, G M; Brugger, S T; Kohn, S R

2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Visibility graph analysis of solar wind velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze in situ measurements of solar wind velocity obtained by Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft and Helios spacecraft during the years 1998-2012 and 1975-1983 respectively. The data belong to mainly solar cycle 23 (1996-2008) and solar cycle 21 (1976-1986) respectively. We use Directed Horizontal Visibility graph (DHVg) algorithm and estimate a graph functional, namely, the degree distance (D) as the Kullback-Leibler divergence (KLD) argument to understand time irreversibility of solar wind time series. We estimate this degree distance irreversibility parameter for these time series at different phases of solar activity cycle. Irreversibility parameter is first established for known dynamical data and then applied for solar wind velocity time series. It is observed that irreversibility in solar wind velocity fluctuations show similar behaviour at 0.3 AU (Helios data) and 1 AU (ACE data). Moreover it changes over the different phases of solar activity cycle.

Suyal, Vinita; Singh, Harinder P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A Concatenational Graph Evolution Aging Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling the long-term face aging process is of great importance for face recognition and animation, but there is a lack of sufficient long-term face aging sequences for model learning. To address this problem, we propose a CONcatenational GRaph Evolution ... Keywords: Aging,Face,Active appearance model,Correlation,Computational modeling,Data models,Muscles,ANOVA,Face aging,aging model evaluation,long-term aging,short-term aging

Jinli Suo; Xilin Chen; Shiguang Shan; Wen Gao; Qionghai Dai

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Graph operations that are good for greedoids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

S is a local maximum stable set of a graph G, and we write S@?@J(G), if the set S is a maximum stable set of the subgraph induced by S@?N(S), where N(S) is the neighborhood of S. In Levit and Mandrescu (2002) [5] we have proved that @J(G) is a greedoid ... Keywords: Corona, Greedoid, Local maximum stable set, Zykov sum

Vadim E. Levit; Eugen Mandrescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

On a base exchange game on graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the following maker-breaker game on a graph G that has a partition of the edge set E into two spanning trees E1 and E2. Initially the edges of E1 are purple and the edges of E2 blue. Maker and breaker move alternately. In a move of the maker a blue edge is coloured purple. The breaker then has to recolour a different edge blue in such a way that the purple and the blue edges are spanning trees again. The goal of the maker is to exchange all colours, i.e. to make E1 blue and E2 purple. We prove that a sufficient but not necessary condition for the breaker to win is that the graph contains an induced K4. Furthermore we characterize the structure of a partition of a wheel into two spanning trees and show that the maker wins on wheels Wn with n ? 4 and provide an example of a graph where, for some partitions, the maker wins, for some others, the breaker wins.

Stephan Dominique Andres; Winfried Hochstättler; Markus Merkel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Modeling and Analysis of Time-Varying Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We live in a world increasingly dominated by networks -- communications, social, information, biological etc. A central attribute of many of these networks is that they are dynamic, that is, they exhibit structural changes over time. While the practice of dynamic networks has proliferated, we lag behind in the fundamental, mathematical understanding of network dynamism. Existing research on time-varying graphs ranges from preliminary algorithmic studies (e.g., Ferreira's work on evolving graphs) to analysis of specific properties such as flooding time in dynamic random graphs. A popular model for studying dynamic graphs is a sequence of graphs arranged by increasing snapshots of time. In this paper, we study the fundamental property of reachability in a time-varying graph over time and characterize the latency with respect to two metrics, namely store-or-advance latency and cut-through latency. Instead of expected value analysis, we concentrate on characterizing the exact probability distribution of routing l...

Basu, Prithwish; Ramanathan, Ram; Johnson, Matthew P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Strict inequalities for connective constants of transitive graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The connective constant of a graph is the exponential growth rate of the number of self-avoiding walks starting at a given vertex. Strict inequalities are proved for connective constants of vertex-transitive graphs. Firstly, the connective constant decreases strictly when the graph is replaced by a non-trivial quotient graph. Secondly, the connective constant increases strictly when a quasi-transitive family of new edges is added. These results have the following implications for Cayley graphs. The connective constant of a Cayley graph decreases strictly when a new relator is added to the group, and increases strictly when a non-trivial group element is declared to be a generator.

Geoffrey R. Grimmett; Zhongyang Li

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Coloring kk-free intersection graphs of geometric objects in the plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intersection graph of a collection C of sets is a graph on the vertex set C, in which C1,C2 ? C are joined by an edge if and only if C1 ? C2 ... Keywords: chromatic number, intersection graph, quasi-planar, string graph, topological graph

Jacob Fox; János Pach

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

An extended star graph: a proposal of a new network topology and its fundamental properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past years, various network architectures for parallel computers have been proposed, for example, hyper cubes or star graphs. These classes of networks are known as Cayley graphs. In recent years, there have been some proposals of new families ... Keywords: Cayley graphs, degree four Cayley graphs, diameter, hypercubes, interconnection networks, network topology, routing algorithms, star graphs

Satoru Watanabe; Satoshi Okawa

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Graduated assignment algorithm for finding the common labelling of a set of graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In pattern recognition applications, it is useful to represent objects by attributed graphs considering their structural properties. Besides, some graph matching problems need a Common Labelling between vertices of a set of graphs. Computing this Common ... Keywords: graduated assignment, graph common labelling, inconsistent labelling, multiple graph matching, softassign

Albert Solé-Ribalta; Francesc Serratosa

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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181

A Graph Theory Package for Maple - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{jfarr,mahdad,skhodada,mmonagan}@cecm.sfu.ca. Abstract. We present a new graph theory package for Maple. The package is presently intended for teaching  ...

182

New Benchmark Instances for the Steiner Problem in Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 26, 2001 ... New Benchmark Instances for the Steiner Problem in Graphs. Isabel Rosseti ( rosseti ***at*** inf.puc-rio.br) Marcus Poggi de Aragão (poggi ...

183

GreenArrow© - A New Graph Labeling Technique - Available ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; GreenArrow© - A New Graph Labeling Technique. Battelle Number(s): ...

184

Joint Spectral Radius and Path-Complete Graph Lyapunov Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 22, 2011 ... Abstract: We introduce the framework of path-complete graph Lyapunov functions for approximation of the joint spectral radius. The approach is ...

185

Finding good nearly balanced cuts in power law graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The green dots in figure 8-A represent cuts that were obtained using Spectral plus Swept Hyperplane .... Fast approximate energy minimization via graph cuts.

186

Enhancing graph production skills via programmed instruction: An experimental analysis of the effect of guided-practice on data-based graph production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer-based graphing simulator used tutorial modules to teach 61 undergraduate college students how to create cumulative graphs from sets of data. One group was required to complete the steps of constructing an appropriate graph within a computer-provided ... Keywords: Computer-based instruction, Graphing, Programmed instruction, Simulation

Darrel R. Davis

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Noisy evolution of graph-state entanglement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general method for the study of the entanglement evolution of graph states under the action of Pauli maps was recently proposed in Cavalcanti et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 030502 (2009)]. This method is based on lower and upper bounds to the entanglement of the entire state as a function only of the state of a (typically) considerably smaller subsystem undergoing an effective noise process related to the original map. This provides a huge decrease in the size of the matrices involved in the calculation of entanglement in these systems. In the present paper we elaborate on this method in detail and generalize it to other natural situations not described by Pauli maps. Specifically, for Pauli maps we introduce an explicit formula for the characterization of the resulting effective noise. Beyond Pauli maps, we show that the same ideas can be applied to the case of thermal reservoirs at arbitrary temperature. In the latter case, we discuss how to optimize the bounds as a function of the noise strength. We illustrate our ideas with explicit exemplary results for several different graphs and particular decoherence processes. The limitations of the method are also discussed.

Aolita, L.; Dhara, C. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Cavalcanti, D. [Centre for Quantum Technologies, University of Singapore (Singapore); Chaves, R.; Davidovich, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Acin, A. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, Lluis Companys 23, E-08010 Barcelona (Spain)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

EntityAuthority: Semantically Enriched Graph-Based Authority Propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

embedded in the text of Web pages, and to transform the page-level graph into a generalized data graph- ply be Page, InfoUnit, or richer concept names such as Person, Organization, etc., that can. Thus each node in the EWG corresponds to ei- ther a Web page or an information unit (InfoUnit for short

Pennsylvania, University of

189

On bounding the bandwidth of graphs with symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission can be formulated as the bandwidth problem for the ... [6], the hypercube graph [23], the grid graph [7], the complete k-level t-ary tree [39], the .... The 'diag' operator maps an n × n matrix to the n-vector given by its diagonal, while.

190

Cell-graph modeling of salivary gland morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Branching morphogenesis is a developmental process shared by many organs, including the submandibular salivary gland. During morphogenesis, cells within the gland undergo rearrangements to cause changes in the overall tissue morphology. This work presents ... Keywords: branching morphogenesis, cell-graphs, graph-mining, salivary gland

Cemal Cagatay Bilgin; Shayoni Ray; William P. Daley; Banu Baydil; Sharon J. Sequeira; Bülent Yener; Melinda Larsen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

On the connectivity of extremal Ramsey graphs Andrew Beveridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Computer Science Macalester College Saint Paul, MN 55105 Oleg Pikhurko # Department of Mathematical Sciences Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Received: 1 December 2006, Accepted: 31 October 2007 Abstract An (r, b)­graph is a graph that contains no clique of size r and no independent set

Pikhurko, Oleg

192

Commute-time convolution kernels for graph clustering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commute time has proved to be a powerful attribute for clustering and characterising graph structure, and which is easily computed from the Laplacian spectrum. Moreover, commute time is robust to deletions of random edges and noisy edge weights. In this ... Keywords: commute times, convolution kernel, graph kernel, laplacian

Normawati A. Rahman; Edwin R. Hancock

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analyzing uncertainty in TG protection graphs with TG/MC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce TG/MC, a Monte Carlo approach for evaluating the impact of uncertainty about vulnerabilities upon forecasts of security for a real-world system modeled by a protection graph. A TG/MC model defines a vulnerability as a potential change to ... Keywords: Monte Carlo, TG, Take-Grant, protection graph, security

James R. Conrad; Jim Alves-Foss; Sauchi Stephen Lee

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Exclusivity structures and graph representatives of local complementation orbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a construction that maps any connected graph G on three or more vertices into a larger graph, H(G), whose independence number is strictly smaller than its Lov\\'asz number which is equal to its fractional packing number. The vertices of H(G) represent all possible events consistent with the stabilizer group of the graph state associated with G, and exclusive events are adjacent. Mathematically, the graph H(G) corresponds to the orbit of G under local complementation. Physically, the construction translates into graph-theoretic terms the connection between a graph state and a Bell inequality maximally violated by quantum mechanics. In the context of zero-error information theory, the construction suggests a protocol achieving the maximum rate of entanglement-assisted capacity, a quantum mechanical analogue of the Shannon capacity, for each H(G). The violation of the Bell inequality is expressed by the one-shot version of this capacity being strictly larger than the independence number. Finally, given the correspondence between graphs and exclusivity structures, we are able to compute the independence number for certain infinite families of graphs with the use of quantum non-locality, therefore highlighting an application of quantum theory in the proof of a purely combinatorial statement.

Adan Cabello; Matthew G. Parker; Giannicola Scarpa; Simone Severini

2012-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

Detecting research topics via the correlation between graphs and texts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we address the problem of detecting topics in large-scale linked document collections. Recently, topic detection has become a very active area of research due to its utility for information navigation, trend analysis, and high-level description ... Keywords: citation graphs, correlation of text and links, graph mining, probabilistic measure, topic detection

Yookyung Jo; Carl Lagoze; C. Lee Giles

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Quantum graphs where back-scattering is prohibited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new class of scattering matrices for quantum graphs in which back-scattering is prohibited. We discuss some properties of quantum graphs with these scattering matrices and explain the advantages and interest in their study. We also provide two methods to build the vertex scattering matrices needed for their construction.

J. M. Harrison; U. Smilansky; B. Winn

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

197

Quantum graphs: an introduction and a brief survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this text is to set up a few basic notions concerning quantum graphs, to indicate some areas addressed in the quantum graph research, and to provide some pointers to the literature. The pointers in many cases are secondary, i.e. they refer to other surveys.

Peter Kuchment

2008-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

198

Embedding of hypercubes into necklace, windmill and snake graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graph embedding problems have gained importance in the field of interconnection networks for parallel computer architectures. In this paper, we determine the exact wirelength of embedding hypercubes into necklace, windmill and snake graphs. Keywords: Congestion, Edge isoperimetric problem, Embedding, Hypercubes, Interconnection networks, Wirelength

Indra Rajasingh; Bharati Rajan; R. Sundara Rajan

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

On Characterizing Game-Perfect Graphs by Forbidden Induced Subgraphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A graph G is called g-perfect if, for any induced subgraph H of G, the game chromatic number of H equals the clique number of H. A graph G is called g-col-perfect if, for any induced subgraph H of G, the game coloring number of H equals the clique number of H. In this paper we characterize the classes of g-perfect resp. g-col-perfect graphs by a set of forbidden induced subgraphs and explicitly. Moreover, we study similar notions for variants of the game chromatic number, namely B-perfect and [A, B]-perfect graphs, and for several variants of the game coloring number, and characterize the classes of these graphs.

Stephan Dominique Andres

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Horizontal Visibility graphs generated by type-II intermittency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution we study the onset of chaos via type-II intermittency within the framework of Horizontal Visibility graph theory. We construct graphs associated to time series generated by an iterated map close to a Neimark-Sacker bifurcation and study, both numerically and analytically, their main topological properties. We find well defined equivalences between the main statistical properties of intermittent series (scaling of laminar trends and Lyapunov exponent) and those of the resulting graphs, and accordingly construct a graph theoretical description of type-II intermittency. We finally recast this theory into a graph-theoretical renormalization group framework, and show that the fixed point structure of RG flow diagram separates regular, critical and chaotic dynamics.

Ángel M. Núñez; José Patricio Gómez; Lucas Lacasa

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

An Experiment on Graph Analysis Methodologies for Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Visual graph representations are increasingly used to represent, display, and explore scenarios and the structure of organizations. The graph representations of scenarios are readily understood, and commercial software is available to create and manage these representations. The purpose of the research presented in this paper is to explore whether these graph representations support quantitative assessments of the underlying scenarios. The underlying structure of the scenarios is the information that is being targeted in the experiment and the extent to which the scenarios are similar in content. An experiment was designed that incorporated both the contents of the scenarios and analysts’ graph representations of the scenarios. The scenarios’ content was represented graphically by analysts, and both the structure and the semantics of the graph representation were attempted to be used to understand the content. The structure information was not found to be discriminating for the content of the scenarios in this experiment; but, the semantic information was discriminating.

Brothers, Alan J.; Whitney, Paul D.; Wolf, Katherine E.; Kuchar, Olga A.; Chin, George

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

R:\\Test Library\\Inventory\\Inventory as of March 21.07.xls TEST LIBRARY INVENTORY AS OF MARCH 21, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R:\\Test Library\\Inventory\\Inventory as of March 21.07.xls TEST LIBRARY INVENTORY AS OF MARCH 21 Complete test (box) Shelf #2 1 ASDS Asperger Syndrome Diagnostic Scale 2001 Complete test Drawer #1 1 AOIR Assessment of Interpersonal Relations 1993 Test - restricted Drawer #1 1 ADI-R Autism Diagnostic Interview

Saskatchewan, University of

203

Quantum query complexity of some graph problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum algorithms for graph problems are considered, both in the adjacency matrix model and in an adjacency list-like array model. We give almost tight lower and upper bounds for the bounded error quantum query complexity of Connectivity, Strong Connectivity, Minimum Spanning Tree, and Single Source Shortest Paths. For example we show that the query complexity of Minimum Spanning Tree is in Theta(n^{3/2}) in the matrix model and in Theta(sqrt{nm}) in the array model, while the complexity of Connectivity is also in Theta(n^{3/2}) in the matrix model, but in Theta(n) in the array model. The upper bounds utilize search procedures for finding minima of functions under various conditions.

Christoph Durr; Mark Heiligman; Peter Hoyer; Mehdi Mhalla

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Efficient broadcast on random geometric graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Randon Geometric Graph (RGG) is constructed by distributing n nodes uniformly at random in the unit square and connecting two nodes if their Euclidean distance is at most r, for some prescribed r. They analyze the following randomized broadcast algorithm on RGGs. At the beginning, there is only one informed node. Then in each round, each informed node chooses a neighbor uniformly at random and informs it. They prove that this algorithm informs every node in the largest component of a RGG in {Omicron}({radical}n/r) rounds with high probability. This holds for any value of r larger than the critical value for the emergence of a giant component. In particular, the result implies that the diameter of the giant component is {Theta}({radical}n/r).

Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elsasser, Robert [UNIV OF PADERBORN; Friedrich, Tobias [INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SCI.; Sauerwald, Thomas [INTERNATIONAL COMPUTER SCI.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A sequential growth dynamics for a directed acyclic dyadic graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of discrete spacetime on a microscopic level is considered. It is a directed acyclic dyadic graph. This is the particular case of a causal set. The goal of this model is to describe particles as some repetitive symmetrical self-organized structures of the graph without any reference to continuous spacetime. The dynamics of the model is considered. This dynamics is stochastic sequential additions of new vertexes. Growth of the graph is a Markovian process. This dynamics is a consequence of a causality principle.

Alexey L. Krugly

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nested cycles in large triangulations and crossing-critical graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that every sufficiently large plane triangulation has a large collection of nested cycles that either are pairwise disjoint, or pairwise intersect in exactly one vertex, or pairwise intersect in exactly two vertices. We apply this result to show that for each fixed positive integer $k$, there are only finitely many $k$-crossing-critical simple graphs of average degree at least six. Combined with the recent constructions of crossing-critical graphs given by Bokal, this settles the question of for which numbers $q>0$ there is an infinite family of $k$-crossing-critical simple graphs of average degree $q$.

Hernandez-Velez, Cesar; Thomas, Robin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Graph Laplacian and the Dynamics of Complex Networks  

SciTech Connect

In this talk, we explore the structure of networks from a spectral graph-theoretic perspective by analyzing the properties of the Laplacian matrix associated with the graph induced by a network. We will see how the eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian relate to the underlying network structure and dynamics and provides insight into a phenomenon frequently observed in real world networks - the emergence of collective behavior from purely local interactions seen in the coordinated motion of animals and phase transitions in biological networks, to name a few.

Thulasidasan, Sunil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

A new framework for elimination-based data flow analysis using DJ graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: DJ graphs, Tarjan's interval, exhaustive and incremental data flow analysis, irreducible flowgraphs, reducible flowgraphs

Vugranam C. Sreedhar; Guang R. Gao; Yong-Fong Lee

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A graph-theoretic model of lexical syntactic acquisition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a graph-theoretic model of the acquisition of lexical syntactic representations. The representations the model learns are non-categorical or graded. We propose a new evaluation methodology of syntactic acquisition in the framework ...

Hinrich Schütze; Michael Walsh

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effective Graph Clustering for Path Queries in Digital Map Databases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an experimental evaluation of graph clustering strategies in terms of their effectiveness in optimizing I/O for path query processing in digital map databases. Clustering optimization is attractive because it does not incurs any run-time cost, and is complimentary to many of the existing techniques in path query optimization. We first propose a novel graph clustering technique, called Spatial Partition Clustering (SPC), that creates balanced partitions of links based on the spatial proximity of their origin nodes. We then select three alternative clustering techniques from the literature, namely two-way partitioning, approximately topological clustering, and random clustering, to compare their performance in path query processing with SPC. Experimental evaluation indicates that our SPC performs the best for the high-locality graphs (such as GIS maps), whereas the two-way partitioning approach performs the best for no-locality random graphs. 1 Introduction 1....

Yun-Wu Huang; Ning Jing; Elke A. Rundensteiner

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Chip-Firing and Rotor-Routing on Directed Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a rigorous and self-contained survey of the abelian sandpile model and rotor-router model on finite directed graphs, highlighting the connections between them. We present several intriguing open problems.

Holroyd, Alexander E; Meszaros, Karola; Peres, Yuval; Propp, James; Wilson, David B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Graph-Theoretic Techniques for Web Content Mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Describing exciting new opportunities for utilizing robust graph representations of data with common machine learning algorithms, this book demonstrates and investigates these novel techniques through the domain of web content mining.

Adam Schenker; Horst Bunke; Mark Last; Abraham Kandel

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Geometry of loop quantum gravity on a graph  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the meaning of geometrical constructions associated to loop quantum gravity states on a graph. In particular, we discuss the 'twisted geometries' and derive a simple relation between these and Regge geometries.

Rovelli, Carlo; Speziale, Simone [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS-Luminy Case 907, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Investigation of bond graphs for nuclear reactor simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work proposes a simple and effective approach to modeling multiphysics nuclear reactor problems using bond graphs. The conventional method of modeling the coupled multiphysics transients in nuclear reactors is operator ...

Sosnovsky, Eugeny

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions  

SciTech Connect

Although many $\\cal{NP}$-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of the necessary dynamic programming tables and excessive runtimes of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree decomposition-based approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

Sullivan, Blair D [ORNL; Weerapurage, Dinesh P [ORNL; Groer, Christopher S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Modelling structured domains using description graphs and logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although OWL 2 is widely used to describe complex objects such as chemical molecules, it cannot represent ‘structural' features of chemical entities (e.g., having a ring). A combination of rules and description graphs (DGs) has been proposed ...

Despoina Magka; Boris Motik; Ian Horrocks

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Interactive searching and visualization of patterns in attributed graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Searching for patterns in graphs and visualizing the search results is an active area of research with numerous applications. With the continual growth of database size, querying these databases often results in multiple solutions. Text-based systems ...

Pierre-Yves Koenig; Faraz Zaidi; Daniel Archambault

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Temporally Scalable Visual SLAM using a Reduced Pose Graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate a system for temporally scalable visual SLAM using a reduced pose graph representation. Unlike previous visual SLAM approaches that use keyframes, our approach continually uses new measurements ...

Johannsson, Hordur

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

On electric resistances for distance-regular graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behavior of electric potentials on distance-regular graphs, and extend some results of a prior paper. Our main result, Theorem 4, shows(together with Corollary 3) that if distance is measured by the electric resistance between points then all points are close to being equidistant on a distance-regular graph with large valency. A number of auxiliary results are also presented.

Koolen, Jack; Park, Jongyook

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Confusability graphs for symmetric sets of quantum states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a set of quantum states generated by the action of a group, we consider the graph obtained by considering two group elements adjacent whenever the corresponding states are non-orthogonal. We analyze the structure of the connected components of the graph and show two applications to the optimal estimation of an unknown group action and to the search for decoherence free subspaces of quantum channels with symmetry.

Giulio Chiribella; Yuxiang Yang

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Scalable methods for representing, characterizing, and generating large graphs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal - design methods to characterize and identify a low dimensional representation of graphs. Impact - enabling predictive simulation; monitoring dynamics on graphs; and sampling and recovering network structure from limited observations. Areas to explore are: (1) Enabling technologies - develop novel algorithms and tailor existing ones for complex networks; (2) Modeling and generation - Identify the right parameters for graph representation and develop algorithms to compute these parameters and generate graphs from these parameters; and (3) Comparison - Given two graphs how do we tell they are similar? Some conclusions are: (1) A bad metric can make anything look good; (2) A metric that is based an edge-by edge prediction will suffer from the skewed distribution of present and absent edges; (3) The dominant signal is the sparsity, edges only add a noise on top of the signal, the real signal, structure of the graph is often lost behind the dominant signal; and (4) Proposed alternative: comparison based on carefully chosen set of features, it is more efficient, sensitive to selection of features, finding independent set of features is an important area, and keep an eye on us for some important results.

Grace, Matthew D.; Dunlavy, Daniel M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Ray, Jaideep; Pinar, Ali; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Phillips, Cynthia Ann (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

pGraph: Efficient Parallel Construction of Large-Scale Protein Sequence Homology Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detecting sequence homology between protein sequences is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology, with a pervasive application in nearly all analyses that aim to structurally and functionally characterize protein molecules. While detecting the homology between two protein sequences is relatively inexpensive, detecting pairwise homology for a large number of protein sequences can become computationally prohibitive for modern inputs, often requiring millions of CPU hours. Yet, there is currently no robust support to parallelize this kernel. In this paper, we identify the key characteristics that make this problemparticularly hard to parallelize, and then propose a new parallel algorithm that is suited for detecting homology on large data sets using distributed memory parallel computers. Our method, called pGraph, is a novel hybrid between the hierarchical multiple-master/worker model and producer-consumer model, and is designed to break the irregularities imposed by alignment computation and work generation. Experimental results show that pGraph achieves linear scaling on a 2,048 processor distributed memory cluster for a wide range of inputs ranging from as small as 20,000 sequences to 2,560,000 sequences. In addition to demonstrating strong scaling, we present an extensive report on the performance of the various system components and related parametric studies.

Wu, Changjun; Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Anatomy of a young giant component in the random graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a complete description of the giant component of the Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graph $G(n,p)$ as soon as it emerges from the scaling window, i.e., for $p = (1+\\epsilon)/n$ where $\\epsilon^3 n \\to \\infty$ and $\\epsilon=o(1)$. Our description is particularly simple for $\\epsilon = o(n^{-1/4})$, where the giant component $C_1$ is contiguous with the following model (i.e., every graph property that holds with high probability for this model also holds w.h.p. for $C_1$). Let $Z$ be normal with mean $\\frac23 \\epsilon^3 n$ and variance $\\epsilon^3 n$, and let $K$ be a random 3-regular graph on $2\\lfloor Z\\rfloor$ vertices. Replace each edge of $K$ by a path, where the path lengths are i.i.d. geometric with mean $1/\\epsilon$. Finally, attach an independent Poisson($1-\\epsilon$)-Galton-Watson tree to each vertex. A similar picture is obtained for larger $\\epsilon=o(1)$, in which case the random 3-regular graph is replaced by a random graph with $N_k$ vertices of degree $k$ for $k\\geq 3$, where $N_k$ has mean...

Ding, Jian; Lubetzky, Eyal; Peres, Yuval

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mining Large Heterogeneous Graphs using Cray s Urika  

SciTech Connect

Pattern discovery and predictive modeling from seemingly related Big Data represented as massive, ad-hoc, heterogeneous networks (e.g., extremely large graphs with complex, possibly unknown structure) is an outstanding problem in many application domains. To address this problem, we are designing graph-mining algorithms capable of discovering relationship-patterns from such data and using those discovered patterns as features for classification and predictive modeling. Specifically, we are: (i) exploring statistical properties, mechanics and generative models of behavior patterns in heterogeneous information networks, (ii) developing novel, automated and scalable graph-pattern discovery algorithms and (iii) applying our relationship-analytics (data science + network science) expertise to domains spanning healthcare to homeland security.

Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL] ORNL; Bond, Nathaniel A [ORNL] ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Weaving independently generated photons into an arbitrary graph state  

SciTech Connect

The controlled-Z (cz) operations acting separately on pairs of qubits are commonly adopted in the schemes of generating graph states, the multipartite entangled states for the one-way quantum computing. For this purpose, we propose a setup of cascade cz operation on a whole group of qubits in sequence. The operation of the setup starts with entangling an ancilla photon with the first photon as qubit, and this ancilla automatically moves from one entanglement link to another in assisting the formation of a string in graph states. The generation of some special types of graph states, such as the three-dimensional ones, can be greatly simplified in this approach. The setup presented uses weak nonlinearities, but an implementation using probabilistic linear optics is also possible.

Lin, Qing [College of Information Science and Engineering, Huaqiao University (Xiamen), Xiamen 361021 (China); He, Bing [University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States); Institute for Quantum Information Science, University of Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Weaving independently generated photons into an arbitrary graph state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The controlled Z (CZ) operations acting separately on pairs of qubits are commonly adopted in the schemes of generating graph states, the multi-partite entangled states for the one-way quantum computing. For this purpose, we propose a setup of cascade CZ operation on a whole group of qubits in sequence. The operation of the setup starts with entangling an ancilla photon to the first photon as qubit, and this ancilla automatically moves from one entanglement link to another in assisting the formation of a string in graph states. The generation of some special types of graph states, such as the three-dimensional ones, can be greatly simplified in this approach. The setup presented uses weak nonlinearities, but an implementation using probabilistic linear optics is also possible.

Qing Lin; Bing He

2010-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

227

Generalizing GraphPlan by Formulating Planning as a CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the approach of encoding planning problems as CSPs more closely. First we present a simple CSP encoding for planning problems and then a set of transformations that can be used to eliminate variables and add new constraints to the encoding. We show that our transformations uncover additional structure in the planning problem, structure that subsumes the structure uncovered by GRAPHPLAN planning graphs. We solve the CSP encoded planning problem by using standard CSP algorithms. Empirical evidence is presented to validate the effectiveness of this approach to solving planning problems, and to show that even a prototype implementation is more effective than standard GRAPHPLAN. Our prototype is even competitive with far more optimized planning graph based implementations. We also demonstrate that this approach can be more easily lifted to more complex types of planning than can planning graphs. In particular, we show that the approach can be easily extended to planning with resources.

Adriana Lopez; Fahiem Bacchus

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Applying a Model Transformation Taxonomy to Graph Transformation Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A taxonomy of model transformations was introduced in [16]. Among others, such a taxonomy can help developers in deciding which language, forma lism, tool or mechanism is best suited to carry out a particular model transformation activity. In this paper we apply the taxonomy to the technique of graph transformation, and we exemplify it by referring to four representative graph transformation tools. As a byproduct of our analysis, we discuss how well each of the considered tools carry out the activity of model transformation.

Tom Mens; Pieter Van Gorp; Dániel Varró; Gabor Karsai

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Create reports and graphs | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Create reports and graphs Create reports and graphs Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker How Portfolio Manager calculates metrics

230

Graph Based Modeling and Implementation with EER/GRAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a cohesive approach to modeling and implementation with graphs. This approach uses extended entity relationship (EER) diagrams supplemented with the Z-like constraint language GRAL. Due to the foundation of EER/GRAL on Z a common formal basis exists. EER/GRAL descriptions give conceptual models which can be implemented in a seamless manner by efficient data structures using the GraLab graph library. Descriptions of four medium size EER/GRAL-applications conclude the paper to demonstrate the usefulness of the approach in practice.

J. Ebert; A. Winter; P. Dahm; A. Franzke; R. Süttenbach

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Monthly Energy Review - January 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

publications: Other monthly EIA reports are Petroleum Supply Monthly, Petroleum publications: Other monthly EIA reports are Petroleum Supply Monthly, Petroleum Marketing Monthly, Natural Gas Monthly, Electric Power Monthly, and International Petroleum Monthly. Readers of the MER may also be interested in EIA's Annual Energy Review, where many of the same data series are provided annually beginning with 1949. For more information, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 or InfoCtr@eia.doe.gov. Electronic Access The MER is available on EIA's Web site in a variety of formats at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/mer. Complete MER, and individual MER sections: Portable Document Format (PDF) files. Individual table and graph pages: PDF files. Data files for individual tables: Excel (XLS) files and ASCII comma-delimited (CSV) files.

232

Multithreaded Asynchronous Graph Traversal for In-Memory and Semi-External Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processing large graphs is becoming increasingly important for many domains such as social networks, bioinformatics, etc. Unfortunately, many algorithms and implementations do not scale with increasing graph sizes. As a result, researchers have attempted ...

Roger Pearce; Maya Gokhale; Nancy M. Amato

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Graph of words embedding for molecular structure-activity relationship analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure-Activity relationship analysis aims at discovering chemical activity of molecular compounds based on their structure. In this article we make use of a particular graph representation of molecules and propose a new graph embedding procedure ...

Jaume Gibert; Ernest Valveny; Horst Bunke

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

PTAS for maximum weight independent set problem with random weights in bounded degree graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding the largest independent set in a graph is a notoriously difficult NP-complete combinatorial optimization problem. Moreover, even for graphs with largest degree 3, no polynomial time approximation algorithm exists ...

Gamarnik, David

235

Graph-based reference table construction to facilitate entity matching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Entity matching plays a crucial role in information integration among heterogeneous data sources, and numerous solutions have been developed. Entity resolution based on reference table has the benefits of high efficiency and being easy to update. In ... Keywords: Entity matching, Graph clustering, Reference table

Fangda Wang, Hongzhi Wang, Jianzhong Li, Hong Gao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Tree/Graph Visualization CMSC 436/636  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grid, transportation routes, trade, immigration ­ Connections: relationships, causality, citations, disease transmission vectors, #12;Hierarchical and Relational Data · Conceptually a graph · Key challenges · Distortion mapping Clustering · Group nodes into clusters · Use clusters for layout · Display appropriate

Rheingans, Penny

237

MML Inference of Decision Graphs with Multi-way Joins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A decision tree is a comprehensible representation that has been widely used in many machine learning domains. But in the area of supervised learning, decision trees have their limitations. Two notable problems are those of replication and fragmentation. ... Keywords: MDL, MML, decision graphs, decision trees, machine learning, minimum message length, probabilistic prediction, supervised learning

Peter J. Tan; David L. Dowe

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nodal domains on graphs - How to count them and why?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present manuscript is to collect known results and present some new ones relating to nodal domains on graphs, with special emphasize on nodal counts. Several methods for counting nodal domains will be presented, and their relevance as a tool in spectral analysis will be discussed.

Ram Band; Idan Oren; Uzy Smilansky

2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nodal domains on graphs - How to count them and why?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present manuscript is to collect known results and present some new ones relating to nodal domains on graphs, with special emphasize on nodal counts. Several methods for counting nodal domains will be presented, and their relevance as a tool in spectral analysis will be discussed.

Band, Ram; Smilansky, Uzy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

An unified transition detection based on bipartite graph matching approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses transition detection which consists in identifying the boundary between consecutive shots. In this work, we propose an approach to cope with transition detection in which we define and use a new dissimilarity measure based on the ... Keywords: bipartite graph matching, cut, gradual transition

Zenilton Kleber Gonçalves Do Patrocínio, Jr.; Silvio Jamil F. Guimaräes; Henrique Batista Da Silva; Kleber Jacques Ferreira De Souza

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Object oriented parallelisation of graph algorithms using parallel iterator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-core machines are becoming widely used which, as a consequence, forces parallel computing to move from research labs to being adopted everywhere. Due to the fact that developing parallel code is a significantly complex process, the main focus of ... Keywords: graph algorithms, object oriented parallelisation, parallel computing, parallel iterator

Lama Akeila; Oliver Sinnen; Wafaa Humadi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Simulation of an Electrical Substation Using the Bond Graph Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation and especially computer simulation, is a basic tool since it enables engineers to understand how systems work without actually needing to see them. They can learn how they work in different circumstances and optimize their design with considerably ... Keywords: simulation, electrical substations, elements, electricity, bond graph

Gregorio Romero; Jesus Felez; Joaquin Maroto; Jose Manuel Mera

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Global Maker-Breaker games on sparse graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider Maker-Breaker games, played on the edges of sparse graphs. For a given graph property P we seek a graph (board of the game) with the smallest number of edges on which Maker can build a subgraph that satisfies P. In this paper we focus on global properties. We prove the following results: 1) for the positive minimum degree game, there is a winning board with n vertices and about 10n/7 edges, on the other hand, at least 11n/8 edges are required; 2) for the spanning k-connectivity game, there is a winning board with n vertices and (1+ok(1))kn edges; 3) for the Hamiltonicity game, there is a winning board of constant average degree; 4) for a tree T on n vertices of bounded maximum degree ?, there is a graph G on n vertices and at most f(?) · n edges, on which Maker can construct a copy of T. We also discuss biased versions on these games and argue that the picture changes quite drastically there. 1

Dan Hefetz; Michael Krivelevich; Tibor Szabó

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Winning Strategy for the Ramsey Graph Game  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a "Maker-Breaker" version of the Ramsey Graph Game, RG(n), and present a winning strategy for Maker requiring at most (n 0 3)2 n01 + n + 1 moves. This is the fastest winning strategy known so far. We also demonstrate how the ideas presented can be used to develop winning strategies for some related combinatorial games. Keywords: Combinatorial Games, Algorithms on Graphs, Ramsey Theory 1 Introduction The Ramsey Graph Game, RG(n), on a complete graph on N vertices, KN , is considered. Two players, Maker (red) and Breaker (blue) alternately color the edges of KN . Maker is first to play, and the players color one edge per move. Maker wins the game if there is a red Kn . Breaker wins if there is no red Kn after all the N (N 0 1)=2 edges have been colored. Let R(n; n) denote the n-th Ramsey number, i.e., the smallest number R such that for every two-coloring of the edges of KR there exsist a monochromatic Kn ae KR . Maker has a simple winning strategy if N 2R(n; n). Note ...

Aleksandar Pekec

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Weighted graph comparison techniques for brain connectivity analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of brain connectivity is a vast field in neuroscience with a frequent use of visual representations and an increasing need for visual analysis tools. Based on an in-depth literature review and interviews with neuroscientists, we explore ... Keywords: brain connectivity analysis, brain connectivity visualization, graph comparison

Basak Alper; Benjamin Bach; Nathalie Henry Riche; Tobias Isenberg; Jean-Daniel Fekete

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Degenerate flag varieties: moment graphs and Schröder numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study geometric and combinatorial properties of the degenerate flag varieties of type A. These varieties are acted upon by the automorphism group of a certain representation of a type A quiver, containing a maximal torus T. Using the group ... Keywords: Flag varieties, Moment graphs, Quiver Grassmannians, Schröder numbers

Giovanni Cerulli Irelli; Evgeny Feigin; Markus Reineke

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Arbitrary Orientations Of Hamilton Cycles In Oriented Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a randomised embedding method to prove that for all \\alpha>0 any sufficiently large oriented graph G with minimum in-degree and out-degree \\delta^+(G),\\delta^-(G)\\geq (3/8+\\alpha)|G| contains every possible orientation of a Hamilton cycle. This confirms a conjecture of H\\"aggkvist and Thomason.

Kelly, Luke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

More on graph theoretic software watermarks: Implementation, analysis, and attacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an implementation of the watermarking method proposed by Venkatesan et al. in their paper [R. Venkatesan, V. Vazirani, S. Sinha, A graph theoretic approach to software watermarking, in: Fourth International Information Hiding Workshop, ... Keywords: Software piracy protection, Software protection, Software watermarking, Surreptitious software

Christian Collberg; Andrew Huntwork; Edward Carter; Gregg Townsend; Michael Stepp

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Top-K nearest keyword search on large graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is quite common for networks emerging nowadays to have labels or textual contents on the nodes. On such networks, we study the problem of top-k nearest keyword (k-NK) search. In a network G modeled as an undirected graph, each node is ...

Miao Qiao, Lu Qin, Hong Cheng, Jeffrey Xu Yu, Wentao Tian

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Component supervision by sensor placement on bond-graph model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The component supervision procedure consists of the comparison of the actual behaviour with the reference behaviour which describes the normal mode. The analytical redundancy has to find relations between known variables of the system. These relations ... Keywords: bond graphs, causal paths, modelling, sensors placement, supervision

M. Khemliche; B. Ould Bouamama; A. Khellaf; M. Mostefaï

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

STRUCTURAL ANNOTATION OF EM IMAGES BY GRAPH CUT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biological images have the potential to reveal complex signatures that may not be amenable to morphological modeling in terms of shape, location, texture, and color. An effective analytical method is to characterize the composition of a specimen based on user-defined patterns of texture and contrast formation. However, such a simple requirement demands an improved model for stability and robustness. Here, an interactive computational model is introduced for learning patterns of interest by example. The learned patterns bound an active contour model in which the traditional gradient descent optimization is replaced by the more efficient optimization of the graph cut methods. First, the energy function is defined according to the curve evolution. Next, a graph is constructed with weighted edges on the energy function and is optimized with the graph cut algorithm. As a result, the method combines the advantages of the level set method and graph cut algorithm, i.e.,"topological" invariance and computational efficiency. The technique is extended to the multi-phase segmentation problem; the method is validated on synthetic images and then applied to specimens imaged by transmission electron microscopy(TEM).

Chang, Hang; Auer, Manfred; Parvin, Bahram

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

Efficient simulation of hybrid systems: A hybrid bond graph approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate and efficient simulations facilitate cost-effective design and analysis of large, complex, embedded systems, whose behaviors are typically hybrid, i.e. continuous behaviors interspersed with discrete mode changes. In this paper we present an ... Keywords: component-oriented modeling, dynamic causal assignment, hybrid bond graphs, modeling and simulation environments, simulation of hybrid systems

Indranil Roychoudhury; Matthew J Daigle; Gautam Biswas; Xenofon Koutsoukos

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Using graph-based program characterization for predictive modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using machine learning has proven effective at choosing the right set of optimizations for a particular program. For machine learning techniques to be most effective, compiler writers have to develop expressive means of characterizing the program being ... Keywords: compiler optimization, graph-based program characterization, iterative compilation, machine learning, support vector machine

Eunjung Park; John Cavazos; Marco A. Alvarez

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Teaching graph algorithms to children of all ages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on our experiences in teaching graph theory and algorithms to school children, aged 5 to 17. Our objectives were to demonstrate that children can discover quite complex mathematical concepts, and are able to work with abstractions and use computation ... Keywords: abstraction, computational thinking, k-12 education, modelling, problem based learning

J. Paul Gibson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

On-Line Construction of Compact Directed Acyclic Word Graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Compact Directed Acyclic Word Graph (CDAWG) is a space-efficient text indexing structure, that can be used in several different string algorithms, especially in the analysis of biological sequences. In this paper, we present a new on-line algorithm ...

Shunsuke Inenaga; Hiromasa Hoshino; Ayumi Shinohara; Masayuki Takeda; Setsuo Arikawa; Giancarlo Mauri; Giulio Pavesi

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Note: A note on power domination in grid graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of monitoring an electric power system by placing as few measurement devices in the system as possible is closely related to the well known vertex covering and dominating set problems in graphs (see [T.W. Haynes, S.M. Hedetniemi, S.T. Hedetniemi, ... Keywords: Grid, Power domination

Michael Dorfling; Michael A. Henning

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A note on power domination in grid graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of monitoring an electric power system by placing as few measurement devices in the system as possible is closely related to the well known vertex covering and dominating set problems in graphs (see [T.W. Haynes, S.M. Hedetniemi, S.T. Hedetniemi, ... Keywords: grid, power domination

Michael Dorfling; Michael A. Henning

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Graphical and incremental type inference: a graph transformation approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a graph grammar based type inference system for a totally graphic development language. NiMo (Nets in Motion) can be seen as a graphic equivalent to Haskell that acts as an on-line tracer and debugger. Programs are process networks that evolve ... Keywords: graphical language, process networks, type inference, type visualization

Silvia Clerici; Cristina Zoltan; Guillermo Prestigiacomo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An extension of secure group communication using key graph  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the continuously emerging of Internet applications based on secure group communication, the design of secure group communication becomes an important Internet design topic. Group key management is important for secure group communication. Previous ... Keywords: Batch rekey, Group security, Key graph, Rekey

Zhang Jun; Zhou Yu; Ma Fanyuan; Gu Dawu; Bai Yingcai

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Exponential random graph modeling of communication networks to understand organizational crisis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent social network studies, exponential random graph models have been used comprehensively to model global social network structure as a function of their local features. In this study, we describe the exponential random graph models and demonstrate ... Keywords: email communications, exponential random graph models, organizational disintegration, p* models, social networks, statistical models for social networks

Jafar Hamra; Shahadat Uddin; Liaquat Hossain

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Green-Marl: a DSL for easy and efficient graph analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing importance of graph-data based applications is fueling the need for highly efficient and parallel implementations of graph analysis software. In this paper we describe Green-Marl, a domain-specific language (DSL) whose high level language ... Keywords: domain-specific language, graph, parallel programming

Sungpack Hong; Hassan Chafi; Edic Sedlar; Kunle Olukotun

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A multiobjective evolutionary programming framework for graph-based data mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subgraph mining is the process of identifying concepts describing interesting and repetitive subgraphs within graph-based data. The exponential number of possible subgraphs makes the problem very challenging. Existing methods apply a single-objective ... Keywords: Evolutionary multiobjective optimization, Frequent subgraph mining, Graph-based data mining, Multiobjective evolutionary programming, Multiobjective graph-based data mining, Pareto optimality

Prakash Shelokar, Arnaud Quirin, íScar CordóN

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

On perturbation theory and an algorithm for maximal clique enumeration in uncertain and noisy graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximal clique enumeration (MCE) problem can be used to find very tightly-coupled collections of objects inside a network or graph of relationships. However, when such networks are based on noisy or uncertain data, the solutions to the MCE problem ... Keywords: biological applications, graph algorithms, graph perturbation theory, maximal clique enumeration

William Hendrix; Matthew C. Schmidt; Paul Breimyer; Nagiza F. Samatova

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An event-based framework for characterizing the evolutionary behavior of interaction graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interaction graphs are ubiquitous in many fields such as bioinformatics, sociology and physical sciences. There have been many studies in the literature targeted at studying and mining these graphs. However, almost all of them have studied these graphs ... Keywords: Dynamic interaction networks, diffusion of innovations, evolutionary analysis

Sitaram Asur; Srinivasan Parthasarathy; Duygu Ucar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Semi-automated derivation of conceptual neighborhood graphs of topological relations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptual neighborhood graphs are similarity-based schemata of spatial/temporal relations. This paper proposes a semi-automated method for deriving a conceptual neighborhood graph of topological relations, which shows all pairs of relations between ... Keywords: 9+-intersection, conceptual neighborhood graphs, conceptual neighbors, smooth transformation, topological relations

Yohei Kurata

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Cleaning random d-regular graphs with brushes using a degree-greedy algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the recently introduced model for cleaning a graph with brushes, we use a degree-greedy algorithm to clean a random d-regular graph on n vertices (with dn even). We then use a differential equations method to find the (asymptotic) ... Keywords: cleaning process, degree--greedy algorithm, differential equations method, random d-regular graphs

Margaret-Ellen Messinger; Pawe? Pra?at; Richard J. Nowakowski; Nicholas Wormald

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Distributed computation of the knn graph for large high-dimensional point sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-dimensional problems arising from robot motion planning, biology, data mining, and geographic information systems often require the computation of k nearest neighbor (knn) graphs. The knn graph of a data set is obtained by connecting each point ... Keywords: Approximate nearest neighbors, Distributed and parallel algorithms, Metric spaces, Nearest neighbors, Range queries, Robotics, knn graphs

Erion Plaku; Lydia E. Kavraki

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Shape prior model for media-adventitia border segmentation in IVUS using graph cut  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a shape prior based graph cut method which does not require user initialisation. The shape prior is generalised from multiple training shapes, rather than using singular templates as priors. Weighted directed graph construction is used to ... Keywords: IVUS, graph cut, image segmentation, shape prior

Ehab Essa; Xianghua Xie; Igor Sazonov; Perumal Nithiarasu; Dave Smith

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

CLAW-FREE 3-CONNECTED P11-FREE GRAPHS ARE HAMILTONIAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLAW-FREE 3-CONNECTED P11-FREE GRAPHS ARE HAMILTONIAN TOMASZ LUCZAK AND FLORIAN PFENDER Abstract. We show that every 3-connected claw-free graph which contains no induced copy of P11 is hamiltonian. Since there ex- ist non-hamiltonian 3-connected claw-free graphs without induced copies of P12

Pfender, Florian

270

Orientable embeddings and orientable cycle double covers of projective-planar graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a closed 2-cell embedding of a graph each face is homeomorphic to an open disk and is bounded by a cycle in the graph. The Orientable Strong Embedding Conjecture says that every 2-connected graph has a closed 2-cell embedding in some orientable surface. This implies both the Cycle Double Cover Conjecture and the Strong Embedding Conjecture. In this paper we prove that every 2-connected projective-planar cubic graph has a closed 2-cell embedding in some orientable surface. The three main ingredients of the proof are (1) a surgical method to convert nonorientable embeddings into orientable embeddings; (2) a reduction for 4-cycles for orientable closed 2-cell embeddings, or orientable cycle double covers, of cubic graphs; and (3) a structural result for projective-planar embeddings of cubic graphs. We deduce that every 2-edge-connected projective-planar graph (not necessarily cubic) has an orientable cycle double cover.

Ellingham, M N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Combinatorial Information Theoretical Measurement of the Semantic Significance of Semantic Graph Motifs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given an arbitrary semantic graph data set, perhaps one lacking in explicit ontological information, we wish to first identify its significant semantic structures, and then measure the extent of their significance. Casting a semantic graph dataset as an edge-labeled, directed graph, this task can be built on the ability to mine frequent {\\em labeled} subgraphs in edge-labeled, directed graphs. We begin by considering the fundamentals of the enumerative combinatorics of subgraph motif structures in edge-labeled directed graphs. We identify its frequent labeled, directed subgraph motif patterns, and measure the significance of the resulting motifs by the information gain relative to the expected value of the motif based on the empirical frequency distribution of the link types which compose them, assuming indpendence. We illustrate the method on a small test graph, and discuss results obtained for small linear motifs (link type bigrams and trigrams) in a larger graph structure.

Joslyn, Cliff A.; al-Saffar, Sinan; Haglin, David J.; Holder, Larry

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

LDRD final report : first application of geospatial semantic graphs to SAR image data.  

SciTech Connect

Modeling geospatial information with semantic graphs enables search for sites of interest based on relationships between features, without requiring strong a priori models of feature shape or other intrinsic properties. Geospatial semantic graphs can be constructed from raw sensor data with suitable preprocessing to obtain a discretized representation. This report describes initial work toward extending geospatial semantic graphs to include temporal information, and initial results applying semantic graph techniques to SAR image data. We describe an efficient graph structure that includes geospatial and temporal information, which is designed to support simultaneous spatial and temporal search queries. We also report a preliminary implementation of feature recognition, semantic graph modeling, and graph search based on input SAR data. The report concludes with lessons learned and suggestions for future improvements.

Brost, Randolph C.; McLendon, William Clarence,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Stochastic kinetic models: Dynamic independence, modularity and graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamic properties and independence structure of stochastic kinetic models (SKMs) are analyzed. An SKM is a highly multivariate jump process used to model chemical reaction networks, particularly those in biochemical and cellular systems. We identify SKM subprocesses with the corresponding counting processes and propose a directed, cyclic graph (the kinetic independence graph or KIG) that encodes the local independence structure of their conditional intensities. Given a partition $[A,D,B]$ of the vertices, the graphical separation $A\\perp B|D$ in the undirected KIG has an intuitive chemical interpretation and implies that $A$ is locally independent of $B$ given $A\\cup D$. It is proved that this separation also results in global independence of the internal histories of $A$ and $B$ conditional on a history of the jumps in $D$ which, under conditions we derive, corresponds to the internal history of $D$. The results enable mathematical definition of a modularization of an SKM using its implied dynamics. Gra...

Bowsher, Clive G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solving planning-graph by compiling it into CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although the deep affinity between Graphplan's backward search, and the process of solving constraint satisfaction problems has been noted earlier, these relations have hither-to been primarily used to adapt CSP search techniques into the backward search phase of Graphplan. This paper describes GP-CSP, a system that does planning by automatically converting Graphplan's planning graph into a CSP encoding, and solving the CSP encoding using standard CSP solvers. Our comprehensive empirical evaluation of GP-CSP demonstrates that it is quite competitive with both standard Graphplan and Blackbox system, which compiles planning graphs into SAT encodings. We discuss the many advantages offered by focusing on CSP encodings rather than SAT encodings, including the fact that by exploiting implicit constraint representations, GP-CSP tends to be less susceptible to memory blow-up associated with methods that compile planning problems into SAT encodings. Our work is inspired by t...

Minh Binh Do; Subbarao Kambhampati

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Every 2-choosable graph is circular consecutive 2-choosable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2008 Abstract Suppose G is a graph, r is a positive real number and S(r) is a circle of perimeter r. For a positive real number t r, a (t, r)- circular consecutive colour-list assignment L is a mapping that assigns to each vertex v of G an interval L(v) of S(r) of length t. A circular L-colouring of G

Zhu, Xuding

276

On a base exchange game on bispanning graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the following maker-breaker game on a graph G that has a partition of the edge set E into two spanning trees E1 and E2. Initially the edges of E1 are purple and the edges of E2 blue. Maker and breaker move alternately. In a move of the maker a blue edge is coloured purple. The breaker then has to recolour a different edge blue in such a way that the purple and the blue edges are spanning trees again. The goal of the maker is to exchange all colours, i.e. to make E1 blue and E2 purple. We prove that a sufficient but not necessary condition for the breaker to win is that the graph contains an induced K4. Furthermore we characterize the structure of a partition of a wheel into two spanning trees and show that the maker wins on wheels Wn with n ? 4 and provide an example of a graph where, for some partitions, the maker wins, for some others, the breaker wins.

Stephan Dominique Andres; Winfried Hochstättler; Markus Merkel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12113_sequoia 12113_sequoia 11/21/2013 High Resolution Image Lawrence Livermore's Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list. Sequoia retains top ranking on Graph 500 for third year running Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov High Resolution Image From left: LLNL's Adam Bertsch, Dona Crawford and Scott Futral with the certificate for No. 1 on the Graph 500 in the SC13 DOE booth. LLNL's 20 petaflops Sequoia supercomputer again retained its No. 1 ranking on the Graph 500 list, a measure of a system's ability to conduct analytic calculations -- finding the proverbial needle in the haystack. An IBM Blue Gene Q system, Sequoia was able to traverse 15,363 giga edges per second on a scale of 40 graph (a graph with 2^40 vertices). The new

278

Graphical rule of transforming continuous-variable graph states by local homodyne detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphical rule, describing that any single-mode homodyne detection turns a given continuous-variable (CV) graph state into a new one, is presented. Employing two simple graphical rules: local complement operation and vertex deletion (single quadrature-amplitude $\\hat{x}$ measurement), the graphical rule for any single-mode quadrature component measurement can be obtained. The shape of CV weighted graph state may be designed and constructed easily from a given larger graph state by applying this graphical rule.

Jing Zhang

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Variable neighborhood search for extremal graphs. 22. Extending bounds for independence to upper irredundance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of vertices S in a graph G is independent if no neighbor of a vertex of S belongs to S. A set of vertices U in a graph G is irredundant if each vertex v of U has a private neighbor, which may be v itself, i.e., a neighbor of v which is not a neighbor ... Keywords: AGX, Extremal graph, Invariant, Upper irredundance

Mustapha Aouchiche; Odile Favaron; Pierre Hansen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Graph-Theoretic Analysis of Discrete-Phase-Space States for ...  

Graph-Theoretic Analysis of Discrete-Phase-Space States for ... Data collected from devices and human condition may be used to forewarn of critical events such as

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281

VLSI floorplan generation and area optimization using AND-OR graph search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Floorplan design based on rectangular dualization is considered in two phases. First, given the adjacency graph and sets of aspect ratios of the blocks, a topology is generated which is likely to yield a minimum-area floorplan during the second phase ... Keywords: AND-OR graph search, VLSI, VLSI floorplan generation, adjacency graph, area optimization, aspect ratios, bottom-up polynomial-time algorithm, circuit layout CAD, circuit optimisation, graph theory, heuristic search method, integrated circuit interconnections, minimum-area floorplan, nonslicible floorplans, optimal sizing, rectangular dualization, search effort, top-down first phase

P. S. Dasgupta; S. Sur-Kolay; B. B. Bhattacharya

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

ParaGraph-RTS: A parallel reduction-based run-time system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are investigating the use of the functional programming paradigm on multiprocessor computers. We have developed a parallel graph reduction run-time system called ParaGraph-RTS (Parallel Graph Reduction) that provides both significant amounts of exploitable parallelism and the robustness to support development of large scientific codes. This system allows us to empirically investigate the functional programming paradigm within computationally intensive application domains. In this paper, we describe an implementation of ParaGraph-RTS on a shared-memory multiprocessor. The implementation strategy reflects insights gained through performance characterizations of the reduction process. Preliminary performance results and analyses are presented. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Yantis, B.; Rich, D.; Michelsen, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spectral dimension in graph models of causal quantum gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of scale dependent spectral dimension has attracted special interest in the quantum gravity community over the last eight years. It was first observed in computer simulations of the causal dynamical triangulation (CDT) approach to quantum gravity and refers to the reduction of the spectral dimension from 4 at classical scales to 2 at short distances. Thereafter several authors confirmed a similar result from different approaches to quantum gravity. Despite the contribution from different approaches, no analytical model was proposed to explain the numerical results as the continuum limit of CDT. In this thesis we introduce graph ensembles as toy models of CDT and show that both the continuum limit and a scale dependent spectral dimension can be defined rigorously. First we focus on a simple graph ensemble, the random comb. It does not have any dynamics from the gravity point of view, but serves as an instructive toy model to introduce the characteristic scale of the graph, study the continuum limit and define the scale dependent spectral dimension. Having defined the continuum limit, we study the reduction of the spectral dimension on more realistic toy models, the multigraph ensembles, which serve as a radial approximation of CDT. We focus on the (recurrent) multigraph approximation of the two-dimensional CDT whose ensemble measure is analytically controlled. The latter comes from the critical Galton-Watson process conditioned on non-extinction. Next we turn our attention to transient multigraph ensembles, corresponding to higher-dimensional CDT. Firstly we study their fractal properties and secondly calculate the scale dependent spectral dimension and compare it to computer simulations. We comment further on the relation between Horava-Lifshitz gravity, asymptotic safety, multifractional spacetimes and CDT-like models.

Georgios Giasemidis

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Improved Complexity Bound of Vertex Cover for Low degree Graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we use a new method to decrease the parameterized complexity bound for finding the minimum vertex cover of connected max-degree-3 undirected graphs. The key operation of this method is reduction of the size of a particular subset of edges which we introduce in this paper and is called as "real-cycle" subset. Using "real-cycle" reductions alone we compute a complexity bound $O(1.15855^k)$ where $k$ is size of the optimal vertex cover. Combined with other techniques, the complexity bound can be further improved to be $O(1.1504^k)$. This is currently the best complexity bound.

Yue, Weiya; Cao, Weiwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

VSC's.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

e e Description of Organization VSC name VSC e-mail Phone # DOE - Bonneville Power Administration Carolyn Stokke ccstokke@bpa.gov 360-418-2330 DOE - Southeastern Power Administration Carol Rice carolr@sepa.doe.gov 706-213-3822 DOE - Southwestern Power Administration Cheryl Crosswell & Shirley Shumate cheryl.crosswell@swpa.gov; shirley.shumate@swpa.gov 918/595-6616; 918/595-6686 DOE - Western Area Power Administration Frances Hamada hamada@wapa.gov 801/524-6379 DOE - Office of the CFO Teresa Collins Teresa.Collins@hq.doe.gov 202/586-4459 DOE - Congressional and Intergovernmental Affairs Liz Renner elizabeth.renner@hq.doe.gov 202/586-5450 DOE - Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Dan Broehl daniel.broehl@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0696 DOE - Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Nicole McGowan

286

b12.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 9,874 1,255 1,654 1,905 1,258 5,096 4,317 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 409 409 544 N 165 99 638 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 399 356 442 N 280 160 725 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 931 Q 345 Q 312 631 1,284 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,756 Q Q Q Q 803 578 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 2,690 Q Q Q 206 841 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 2,167 Q N Q Q 930 524 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 1,420 N Q 467 Q 1,185 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q N N 973 N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 3,769 410 Q 281 Q Q Q 220 1920 to 1945 .....................................

287

eia176.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 7 6 EIA-176 Ben Franklin Station Address 2: City: State: Zip: - Distribution company - investor owned Storage operator Distribution company - municipally owned Synthetic natural gas (SNG) plant operator Distribution company - privately owned Producer Distribution company - cooperative Distribution company - other ownership Interstate pipeline (FERC regulated) Intrastate pipeline B. Vehicles Powered by Alternative Fuels Does your company's vehicle fleet include vehicles powered by alternative fuels? No D. Sales/Acquisitions No or sale this year? If Yes, please describe the sale or acquisition in the Comments box below. Page 1 C. Customer Choice Program Participating Eligible If there is a Customer Choice program available in your service territory, enter the number

288

Table 2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Project-level Reductions and Sequestration Reported, Data Year 2005 Project-level Reductions and Sequestration Reported, Data Year 2005 (Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Indirect 1 85 621 699 3,129 3,411 4,120 3,850 5,988 4,211 6,193 4,890 4,102 6,243 Sequestration 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 1,540,000 Direct 16 Indirect 16,191 14,656 17,745 17,748 17,859 19,897 18,925 21,070 85,711 118,115 156,534 236,368 215,033 214,678 220,420 Sequestration 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 4,150,000 Sequestration 550,000 70,000 290,000 370,000 480,000 440,000 440,000 590,000 530,000 370,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 410,000 Direct 1,091 38,702 44,227

289

schedule_2006.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Long Range Operations Schedule 6 Long Range Operations Schedule (October 2005 - September 2006) 1 1 1 1 → 1 1 1 4 → 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 4 → 2 1 → 2 2 2 4 2 2 2 2 2 1 → 2 3 3 4 3 1 → 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 1 → 3 4 4 4 4 1 → 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 → 4 5 5 4 5 1 → 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 5 1 → 5 6 6 4 6 1 6 6 6 4 6 6 6 6 6 1 → 6 7 7 4 7 1 → 7 7 7 4 7 7 7 7 7 1 → 7 8 8 4 8 1 → 8 8 8 4 → 8 8 8 8 8 1 8 9 9 9 1 → 9 9 9 4 9 9 9 9 9 1 → 9 10 10 10 1 → 10 10 10 4 10 10 10 10 10 1 → 10 11 11 11 1 → 11 11 11 4 11 11 11 11 11 1 → 11 12 12 12 1 → 12 12 12 4 12 1 → 12 12 12 4 → 12 1 → 12 13 13 13 1 13 13 13 4 13 1 → 13 13 13 4 13 1 → 13 14 14 14 5 → 14 14 14 14 1 → 14 14 14 4 14 1 → 14 15 15 15 5 15 15 15 15 1 → 15 15 15 4 15 1 15 16 16 16 5 16 16 16 16 1

290

table14.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Reference Case Projections Table 14. Natural Gas Wellhead Prices, Actual vs. Reference Case Projections (current dollars per thousand cubic feet) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 AEO 1982 4.32 5.47 6.67 7.51 8.04 8.57 AEO 1983 2.93 3.11 3.46 3.93 4.56 5.26 12.74 AEO 1984 2.77 2.90 3.21 3.63 4.13 4.79 9.33 AEO 1985 2.60 2.61 2.66 2.71 2.94 3.35 3.85 4.46 5.10 5.83 6.67 AEO 1986 1.73 1.96 2.29 2.54 2.81 3.15 3.73 4.34 5.06 5.90 6.79 7.70 8.62 9.68 10.80 AEO 1987 1.83 1.95 2.11 2.28 2.49 2.72 3.08 3.51 4.07 7.54 AEO 1989* 1.62 1.70 1.91 2.13 2.58 3.04 3.48 3.93 4.76 5.23 5.80 6.43 6.98 AEO 1990 1.78 1.88 2.93 5.36 AEO 1991 1.77 1.90 2.11 2.30 2.42 2.51 2.60 2.74 2.91 3.29 3.75 4.31 5.07 5.77 6.45 AEO 1992 1.69 1.85 2.03 2.15 2.35 2.51 2.74 3.01 3.40 3.81 4.24 4.74 5.25 5.78 AEO 1993 1.85 1.94 2.09 2.30 2.44 2.60 2.85 3.12 3.47 3.84 4.31 4.81 5.28

291

crib.xls  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

August 2003 August 2003 D I S C L A I M E R This document was designed for the internal use of the United States Department of Energy. This document will be occasionally updated and, therefore, this copy may not reflect the most current version. This document was prepared as account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

292

recommendations.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2003 Electric System Working Group Technical Conference, Philadelphia PA 6, 2003 Electric System Working Group Technical Conference, Philadelphia PA Rec Type Recommendations/Comments Name Organization Communication The reliability coordinator needs an understanding from others, from a broad perspective, what's going on. Sometimes you may not have all the information, and this is what happens most times in blackout situations. Michael Calimano New York ISO System Operations Reliability coordination needs to have authority in real time to order actions to be taken by control areas or operators under emergency conditions. Authorities and procedures have to be spelled out well beforehand. Michael Calimano New York ISO Emergency Response We have to look at how we can do this better, how we can let other people know better and faster. In our shop, when there is an emergency going, everybody's involved in

293

c15.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 216 375 152 12,809 16,701 22,766 11,030 11.5 12.9 16.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 13 30 50 19 997 1,729 2,324 1,295 13.4 17.5 21.7 14.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 10 15 33 19 1,083 1,447 2,454 1,214 9.0 10.7 13.4 15.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 19 29 49 22 1,944 3,098 4,266 2,063 9.6 9.3 11.6 10.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 12 31 41 19 1,292 2,483 3,012 1,599 9.0 12.6 13.7 11.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 22 29 50 17 2,040 2,260 3,435 1,296 11.0 12.9 14.6 13.1 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 25 33 66 18 2,117 2,285 3,439 1,177 11.6 14.6 19.1 15.0 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 24 28 38 16 1,781 2,196 1,909 1,166 13.3 12.7 20.1 13.7 Over 500,000 ....................................

294

oil1987.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.4 7.4 14.0 33.3 87 37 70.3 27 513 0.22 414 156 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.1 6.3 17.8 140 49 96.0 37 808 0.28 556 212 New England 2.6 2.0 5.8 130 46 102.1 39 770 0.27 604 233 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.2 12.1 144 51 93.6 36 826 0.29 537 204 Midwest 3.1 3.0 7.1 53 23 51.8 19 318 0.13 309 113 East North Central 2.5 2.4 5.9 56 23 54.2 19 334 0.14 326 116 West North Central 0.6 0.6 1.2 43 21 41.6 17 250 0.12 239 96 South 4.6 4.2 7.0 41 24 37.0 14 257 0.15 233 87 South Atlantic 3.6 3.2 5.3 46 27 41.1 15 285 0.17 256 95 East South Central 1.0 0.9 1.5 27 16 25.8 10 175 0.11 168 63 West South Central Q Q Q 10 4 6.9 4 73 0.03 49 26 West 0.6 0.6 1.4 32 13 31.1 12 195 0.08 190 76 Mountain 0.2 0.2 0.3 26 12 26.1 11 144 0.07 144 62 Pacific 0.4 0.4 1.1 34 14 32.9 13 213 0.08 207 81 Metropolitan Statistical Area Urban 12.6 9.4 24.6 102 39 75.9 29 596 0.23 444 167 Central City 5.0 2.8 7.2 119 47 66.9 29 664 0.26 372 160 Suburban 7.6 6.6 17.4 94 36

295

c8.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

436 436 1,064 309 5,485 12,258 3,393 79.5 86.8 91.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 60 116 36 922 1,207 538 64.9 96.5 67.8 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 44 103 Q 722 1,387 393 60.5 74.0 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 65 126 Q 1,164 2,240 810 55.9 56.4 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 107 112 Q 949 1,672 498 112.5 67.3 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 64 123 59 642 1,470 650 99.0 83.4 91.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 49 237 Q 614 2,087 Q 79.8 113.5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 110 Q 395 1,072 Q Q 102.2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 137 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 122.1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 45 198 Q 552 2,445

296

c30.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

418 418 659 327 347 119 7,645 12,850 8,113 10,509 4,350 54.7 51.3 40.3 33.0 27.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 56 81 35 55 16 660 979 421 789 234 85.0 82.9 82.5 69.8 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 47 53 27 59 16 644 944 526 1,212 367 72.5 56.5 51.2 49.0 43.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 88 103 50 47 13 1,679 2,134 958 1,781 501 52.4 48.0 51.7 26.4 25.9 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 59 87 52 34 18 1,251 1,839 1,031 1,441 463 47.2 47.2 50.4 23.7 38.6 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 55 88 42 41 11 1,043 2,129 1,300 1,569 642 52.4 41.5 32.3 26.0 16.5 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 35 114 31 Q 9 970 2,090 1,320 1,550 714 36.2 54.5 23.4 34.0 12.4 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 54 61 38 31 15 1,001 1,471 1,380 1,161 666 53.6 41.7 27.3

297

wf01.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-00 -00 00-01 01-02 02-03 03-04 Average 99-04 04-05 Warm Base Cold Warm Base Cold Natural Gas Northeast Consumption (mcf**) 81.7 87.3 67.7 87.4 79.9 80.8 79.8 71.9 78.8 85.7 -9.9 -1.3 7.4 Price ($/mcf) 8.39 10.01 9.41 9.74 11.47 9.81 12.90 16.82 17.18 17.73 30.4 33.2 37.4 Expenditures ($) 685 874 637 851 917 793 1,029 1,208 1,353 1,518 17.5 31.6 47.6 Natural Gas (Midwest) Consumption (mcf) 88.3 99.1 78.2 92.3 85.7 88.7 85.3 81.1 88.9 96.7 -4.9 4.2 13.3 Price ($/mcf) 5.74 8.77 6.26 7.61 8.76 7.48 10.01 14.71 15.48 16.36 46.9 54.6 63.4 Expenditures ($) 507 869 490 702 751 664 855 1,194 1,377 1,583 39.7 61.1 85.2 South Consumption (mcf) 55.6 67.1 52.7 60.3 55.4 58.2 53.8 52.1 56.6 61.2 -3.2 5.3 13.7 Price ($/mcf) 7.65 10.22 8.17 9.02 10.67 9.19 12.35 17.53 18.33 19.24 41.9 48.4 55.8 Expenditures ($) 425 685 431 543 591 535 664 913 1,038

298

LNG 2005.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Algeria 6.0 11.3 2.8 9.0 11.4 12.0 6.0 3.2 6.0 11.8 9.0 8.6 97.2 Malaysia 3.0 0.0 2.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.1 0.0 0.0 8.7 Nigeria 2.7 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.6 0.0 2.9 0.0 0.0 8.1 Oman 2.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.5 Trinidad 43.7 39.2 40.4 35.7 41.2 41.5 41.2 26.8 34.8 33.2 30.1 31.4 439.2 Egypt 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.9 0.0 2.9 5.9 11.1 11.0 8.5 18.9 11.3 72.5 Qatar 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 TOTAL 57.8 53.5 45.9 47.6 52.6 56.4 53.1 43.6 51.8 59.6 58.0 51.3 631.3 LNG Imports by Receiving Terminal (Bcf) 2005 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Cove Point, MD 18.3 20.6 18.7 17.1 23.5 20.7 20.4 8.3 17.3 17.6 18.8 20.5 221.7 Elba Island, GA 7.9 10.6 7.9 7.8 7.9 13.3 13.1 11.1 15.6 13.6 12.5 10.7 132.1 Everett, MA 18.0 13.8 16.7 13.6 12.8 13.4 13.6 13.3 10.4 16.5 12.3 14.3 168.5 Lake Charles, LA 13.7

299

longterm.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Schedule Operations Schedule Run 2008-3 Run 2009-1 Run 2009-2 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 1 1 2 2 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 4 2 2 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 1 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 1 1 5 5 5 5 1 1 1 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 1 1 1 6 6 6 6 1 1 6 6 7 7 1 1 1 7 7 7 7 1 1 1 7 7 7 7 1 1 1 7 7 8 8 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 1 1 1 8 8 8 8 1 1 1 8 8 9 9 1 1 1 9 9 9 9 1 1 1 9 9 9 9 1 1 1 9 9 10 10 1 1 1 10 4 4 10 10 10 1 10 10 10 10 1 1 1 10 10 11 11 1 11 4 4 4 11 11 11 4 4 11 11 11 11 1 1 1 11 11 12 12 1 1 12 4 4 4 12 12 12 4 4 4 12 12 12 12 1 1 1 12 4 4 12 13 13 1 1 1 13 4 4 4 13 13 13 4 4 4 13 13 13 13 1 1 1 13

300

b11.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food Service Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables Revised June 2006 81 Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Inpatient Outpatient All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 386 226 297 8 121 142 443 Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food Service Lodging

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

b20.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 45,144 10,960 1,958 1,951 2,609 2,161 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,613 916 Q Q N 223 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,304 1,031 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,098 1,732 383 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 5,807 1,837 355 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 6,218 1,739 273 337 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 6,102 1,545 539 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 4,246 1,361 Q 389 531 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 2,756 800 Q Q 1,522 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 8,714 946 Q N N N Food Sales .......................................

302

b38.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 194 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,982 476 1,864 819 65 579 953 205 Table B38. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Heated Buildings Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 2,566 334 1,193 550 14 190 682 140 Two ................................................... 1,031 960 97 487 174 19 194 207 50 Three ................................................ 339 319 31 155 68 10 119 41 Q Four to Nine ...................................... 128 125 11 28 25 19 69 20 4 Ten or More ......................................

303

b37.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floor- Floor- space a Heated Floor- space b Total Floor- space a Cooled Floor- space b Total Floor- space a Lit Floor- space b All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 60,028 53,473 56,940 41,788 62,060 51,342 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,668 4,988 5,007 4,017 6,038 4,826 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,786 5,010 5,408 3,978 6,090 4,974 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 10,387 8,865 9,922 6,927 11,229 8,618 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,060 7,260 7,776 5,663 8,297 6,544 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,718 7,815 8,331 5,665 8,912 7,548 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,710 8,012 8,339 6,462 8,732 7,470 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

304

b2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Worker Median Hours per Week Median Age of Buildings (years) All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 72,807 4.6 1,000 50 30.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 9,936 2.4 750 48 30.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7,512 7.2 1,300 50 30.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 10,787 15.0 1,611 55 28.5 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 8,881 35.0 1,364 60 30.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 8,432 67.0 1,500 60 25.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 11,632 130.0 1,457 75 24.5 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

305

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Table B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 10,305 12.4 1,031 60 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 17,340 14.8 1,000 63 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 14,007 17.1 821 66 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276 15,739 17,178 12.3 916 57 2,000 CDD or More and -- Fewer than 4,000 HDD ...................

306

a5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 4,859 2,586 948 810 261 147 74 26 8 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 162 56 60 48 39 16 5 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 164 44 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 297 202 65 23 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 129 56 38 19 5 5 3 2 1 Inpatient .......................................... 8 N N Q Q Q Q 2 1 Outpatient ....................................... 121 56 38 19 Q 3 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 142 38 21 38 23 11 7 4 Q Mercantile ......................................... 657 275 156 155 34 21 12 2 2 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 443 241 97 83 14 Q 4 Q Q Enclosed and Strip Malls ................ 213 Q 59 72 20 18 8 Q 2 Office ................................................

307

b6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 2,552 889 738 241 129 65 25 7 Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Building Size Elevators and Escalators (more than one may apply) Any Elevators .................................... 309 Q 29 61 81 57 41 19 5 Number of Elevators One ................................................. 208 Q 29 57 62 29 11 4 Q Two to Five ..................................... 88 N N Q 19 28 29 9 Q Six or More .....................................

308

suptab_1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New England 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Energy Consumption Residential Distillate Fuel 0.349 0.344 0.362 0.371 0.371 0.372 0.370 0.369 0.366 0.364 0.362 0.360 0.357 Kerosene 0.031 0.017 0.023 0.031 0.031 0.031 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.030 0.029 0.029 0.029 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 0.032 0.032 0.031 0.031 0.032 0.032 0.033 0.033 0.033 0.033 0.034 0.034 0.034 Petroleum Subtotal 0.412 0.393 0.417 0.434 0.434 0.435 0.433 0.432 0.429 0.427 0.425 0.423 0.419 Natural Gas 0.181 0.182 0.199 0.197 0.197 0.200 0.202 0.204 0.205 0.207 0.208 0.209 0.209 Coal 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Renewable Energy 1/ 0.026 0.024 0.028 0.026 0.026 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.025 Electricity 0.147 0.153 0.157 0.158 0.161 0.164 0.167 0.169 0.170 0.172 0.173 0.175 0.175

309

sup_rci.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Residential Sector Equipment Stock and Efficiency (1 of 2) 2000- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2020 Equipment Stock (million units) Main Space Heaters Electric Heat Pumps 10.23 10.58 10.86 11.14 11.44 11.72 11.93 12.14 12.36 12.57 12.77 12.98 13.18 13.37 13.56 13.76 13.96 14.17 14.38 14.59 14.78 1.9% Electric Other 20.12 20.18 20.20 20.24 20.29 20.33 20.39 20.46 20.53 20.60 20.67 20.73 20.79 20.84 20.89 20.95 21.00 21.07 21.14 21.22 21.29 0.3% Natural Gas Heat Pumps 0.02 0.02 0.03 0.03 0.04 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.06 0.06 0.07 0.07 0.07 0.08 0.08 0.09 0.09 0.10 0.10 0.11 0.11 10.2% Natural Gas Other 55.78 56.39 57.14 57.85 58.57 59.32 60.12 60.93 61.74 62.57 63.42 64.28 65.11 65.91 66.71 67.52 68.34 69.17 70.02 70.87 71.74 1.3% Distillate 9.41 9.38 9.35 9.33 9.31 9.29 9.27 9.25 9.23 9.21 9.19 9.17 9.15 9.12 9.10 9.07 9.04 9.02 8.99

310

oil1997.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total per Floor- per Square per per per Total Total space (1) Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.2 11.0 23.2 97 46 81.1 31 694 0.33 578 224 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.2 6.2 14.5 136 57 101.3 40 950 0.40 710 282 New England 3.1 2.7 5.8 126 60 111.5 45 902 0.43 797 321 Middle Atlantic 5.2 3.4 8.8 143 56 95.1 38 988 0.39 657 260 Midwest 1.5 1.4 3.0 75 36 72.6 26 522 0.25 504 184 East North Central 1.0 1.0 1.9 71 35 67.3 23 509 0.25 482 165 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.1 83 38 83.5 35 548 0.25 548 232 South 2.9 2.9 4.6 34 21 33.7 13 279 0.17 275 105 South Atlantic

311

c14.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 202 14.1 12.2 3.6 8.2 17.1 15.7 1.09 0.078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 47 17.8 11.4 3.8 8.9 20.3 4.3 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 92 12.4 10.3 3.8 7.4 14.5 8.7 1.18 0.095 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 164 10.5 11.1 2.9 6.3 13.4 13.8 0.88 0.084 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 439 12.2 11.6 3.8 8.8 16.2 33.6 0.94 0.077 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 927 13.1 14.1 4.5 9.9 17.0 68.0 0.97 0.073 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 2,181 15.7 12.2 5.3 13.0 23.4 146.4 1.05 0.067 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 4,347 15.0 15.4 5.8 12.1 20.7 301.0 1.04 0.069 Over 500,000 .................................... 17,034 19.0 12.8 10.0

312

august2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In June 2010, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were significantly above average. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 31.0 percent above the June normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 8.0 percent compared to June 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity remained relatively unchanged. For the 12-month period ending June 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased by 1.9 percent over the previous 12-month period ending June 2009. Total electric power generation in the United States increased 7.9 percent compared to June 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.2 percent, and natural gas generation increased 8.7 percent. Petroleum liquids

313

oil1982.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Member Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 15.5 12.2 30.0 98 40 77.1 27 829 0.34 650 231 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.8 6.0 17.4 138 48 94.5 34 1,163 0.40 796 283 New England 2.5 1.9 5.9 131 43 101.9 36 1,106 0.36 863 309 Middle Atlantic 6.3 4.1 11.5 142 50 91.5 32 1,191 0.42 769 272 Midwest 2.4 2.1 4.8 74 33 66.2 24 609 0.27 548 202 East North Central 1.8 1.7 3.8 80 35 71.6 25 666 0.29 595 212 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.0 51 24 46.6 20 410 0.20 377 160 South 3.7 3.4 6.7 52 27 48.1 17 446 0.23 409 144 South Atlantic 3.2 2.9 5.8 58 29 52.6 19 492 0.25 447 163 East South Central 0.4 0.4 0.8 22 10 21.2 6 183 0.08 179 52 West South Central Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q West 0.6 0.6 1.2 48 25 46.8 16 412 0.22 402 138 Mountain 0.2 0.2 0.3 48 24

314

november2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data September 2007 was the eighth warmest September on record for the contiguous United States as reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the month were 24.4 percent above the average for the month of September, and 44.2 percent higher than September 2006. Retail sales of electricity and electricity generation were both higher when compared to September 2006. Electricity generation increased by 6.9 percent, while retail sales of electricity for September 2007 increased by 6.2 percent when compared to September 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for September 2007 was 1.3 percent higher than September 2006 and 2.5 percent lower than the previous month, reflecting the reduced demand for electricity following the

315

may2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: March 2006 The weather through March 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. Year-to-date heating degree days were down almost 9 percent through March. For March alone heating degree days were down 7.8 percent from last year and were 2.2 percent lower than normal. Because of the warmer weather, year-to-date net generation through March was 1.3 percent less than in 2005, and

316

oil2001.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total per Square per per per Total Total Floorspace Building Foot per Household per Square per Household Households Number (billion (million (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 11.2 9.4 26.0 80 29 67.1 26 723 0.26 607 236 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.1 5.4 16.8 111 36 84.7 33 992 0.32 757 297 New England 2.9 2.5 8.0 110 35 96.3 39 1,001 0.32 875 350 Middle Atlantic 4.2 2.8 8.8 112 36 76.6 30 984 0.32 675 260 Midwest 1.3 1.3 3.5 48 18 48.1 18 434 0.16 431 162 East North Central 0.9 0.9 2.3 41 15 40.3 15 364 0.13 360 137 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.2 63 25 62.9 23 565 0.23 565 208 South 2.3 2.2 4.5 34 17 32.4 12 338 0.16 320 120 South Atlantic 1.8 1.7 3.5 40 19 37.2

317

c36.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,393 ,393 176 125 81 1.10 1.03 1.21 1.28 0.23 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ................................. 460 Q Q Q 1.21 Q Q Q 0.61 Q Q Q 10,001 to 100,000 ............................. 408 70 Q Q 1.09 1.12 1.29 1.31 0.24 0.11 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................... 524 21 47 Q 1.03 1.05 1.07 1.26 0.14 0.01 0.02 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 293 Q Q Q 1.04 Q Q Q 0.31 Q Q Q Health Care........................................ Q Q 19 8 Q 1.06 1.08 1.16 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office ................................................ 122 8 18 Q 1.16 1.32 1.26 1.44 0.09 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others .......................................... 936 Q 59 50 1.12 1.01 1.34 1.26 0.27 0.11 0.04 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before .................................. 612 Q Q Q 1.10 Q Q Q 0.29

318

december2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data

319

december2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In the contiguous United States, October 2007 was the ninth warmest October on record as reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Accordingly, heating degree days were 32.3 percent below the average for the month of October, and 37.2 percent lower than what was recorded in October 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the United States, cooling degree days were 55.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 89.1 percent higher than October 2006. In October 2007, electricity generation was 3.4 percent higher than what was observed in October 2006, while retail sales of electricity increased 5.0 percent when compared to October 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to

320

c26.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,553 3,553 4,844 3,866 2,261 8.56 7.09 8.40 7.28 0.39 0.37 0.29 0.29 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 456 782 599 317 9.84 8.57 9.21 7.94 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 348 427 582 332 9.15 7.54 9.08 7.60 0.56 0.45 0.43 0.44 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 502 945 656 422 9.74 7.96 9.41 7.02 0.43 0.39 0.32 0.31 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 408 738 402 317 9.14 6.44 8.60 7.24 0.42 0.33 0.25 0.27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 531 662 493 182 9.08 7.04 8.39 7.26 0.32 0.34 0.23 0.19 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 454 573 555 156 6.94 6.66 Q 6.59 0.27 0.32 0.25 0.17 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 457 423 286 178 7.64 5.97 7.05 6.46 0.29 0.25 0.20 0.18 Over 500,000 ....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

oil1980.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.4 5.4 11.6 29.7 131 51 99.0 36 1,053 0.41 795 287 Census Region and Division Northeast 9.2 6.0 18.2 176 59 116.2 42 1,419 0.47 934 335 New England 2.7 2.0 6.0 161 53 118.3 42 1,297 0.43 954 336 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.2 184 61 115.3 42 1,478 0.49 926 335 Midwest 2.0 1.9 4.4 92 39 84.5 28 728 0.31 669 220 East North Central 1.5 1.4 3.3 92 39 84.4 28 731 0.31 673 220 West North Central 0.5 0.5 1.1 93 40 85.0 29 720 0.31 657 220 South 3.6 3.2 6.0 79 42 68.8 26 637 0.34 558 214 South Atlantic 3.5 3.0 5.6 80 43 70.0 27 651 0.35 568 218 East South Central 0.1 0.1 0.3 45 23 45.3 15 365 0.18 365 123 West South Central Q Q Q 68 50 41.1 41 521 0.39 317 317 West 0.6 0.5 1.2 67 30 64.0 24 522 0.24 501 187 Mountain 0.1 0.1 0.2 70 30 64.7 24 534 0.23 494 185 Pacific 0.5 0.5 1.0 66 30 63.8 24 519 0.24 503 187 Metropolitan Statistical Area Urban 9.5 6.0 17.2 170 60 107.5 40 1,372 0.48 865 324 Central City 4.8 2.1 6.8 249 77 109.3 41 2,014 0.62

322

oil1981.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4.6 4.6 11.0 28.9 116 44 87.9 32 1,032 0.39 781 283 Census Region and Division Northeast 8.9 5.9 18.0 158 51 103.5 36 1,405 0.46 923 323 New England 2.4 1.7 5.1 148 50 105.3 36 1,332 0.45 946 327 Middle Atlantic 6.5 4.1 12.8 161 52 102.9 36 1,435 0.46 915 322 Midwest 2.3 2.2 5.1 86 37 79.5 29 751 0.32 693 254 East North Central 1.7 1.7 3.8 79 35 76.8 28 688 0.31 672 243 West North Central 0.6 0.4 1.3 115 40 87.7 33 993 0.35 759 286 South 2.8 2.5 4.7 56 30 50.2 20 497 0.27 448 180 South Atlantic 2.5 2.2 4.2 56 30 49.7 20 500 0.27 445 182 East South Central 0.3 0.3 0.5 55 31 55.4 20 482 0.27 482 171 West South Central Q Q Q 48 56 48.0 11 425 0.49 425 99 West 0.5 0.5 1.2 63 27 58.4 23 548 0.24 511 197 Mountain 0.1 0.1 0.2 45 24 44.6 18 384 0.20 384 153 Pacific 0.5 0.4 1.0 66 27 60.9 23 580 0.24 534 205 Metropolitan Statistical Area Urban 8.9 5.5 16.3 157 53 97.4 37 1,402 0.47 868 331 Central City 4.2 1.8 5.9 229 70 98.5 39 2,051 0.62

323

c22.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 155 447 288 17,163 28,766 17,378 9.0 15.5 16.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 23 52 37 2,049 2,668 1,628 11.3 19.6 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 15 35 27 1,859 2,854 1,484 8.1 12.2 18.1 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 27 55 37 3,141 4,907 3,322 8.5 11.3 11.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 16 56 31 2,344 3,994 2,047 6.7 13.9 15.3 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 15 58 46 2,060 4,018 2,953 7.5 14.3 15.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 19 69 53 2,113 3,911 2,993 9.2 17.7 17.7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 21 57 27 2,030 3,427 1,593 10.5 16.6 17.2 Over 500,000 .................................... 18 65 29 1,566 2,986 1,357 11.4 21.9

324

december2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: October 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data As the transition from the summer into the fall season continues, October 2006 total net generation declined 2.9 percent from September 2006 due to declining cooling needs. Similarly, October 2006 retail sales of electricity were down 8.4 percent from September 2006. Comparing October 2006 to October 2005, however, net generation increased by 1.8 percent, due to a cooler October in 2006, leading to higher heating demand. October 2006 heating degree days were up 27.4 percent from October 2005. Year-to-date, through October 2006, both total net generation and retail sales of electricity were up 0.3 percent, compared to the first

325

October 2013.XLS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Laboratory Area IV, CA (DOEEIS-0402) 9. Storage and Management of Elemental Mercury (DOEEIS-0423) 10. Supplemental EIS for the Storage and Management of Elemental...

326

c26.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ... 456 782 599 317 9.84 8.57 9.21 7.94 0.89 0.73 0.69 0.51 5,001 to 10,000...

327

manndata.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.24 4.88 2.76 60 ANDERSON 1949 3 ALBOLL 0 15 8.03 5.40 5.03 2.87 30 THOMPSON ET AL 1954 4 ALBOLL 0 15 6.26 4.31 3.50 2.16 30 THOMPSON ET AL 1954 5 ANDEPT 0 15 12.30 10.93...

328

b29.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* ... 64,783 60,028 15,996...

329

b27.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Propane Other a All Buildings* ... 64,783...

330

c13.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 1,435 18.0 9.5 4.9 12.6 20.7 93.3 1.17 0.065 Boilers ... 511 14.5 12.6 3.4 7.9 16.6 38.1 1.08...

331

b3.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat ... 65 17 13 20 15 5,166 1,245 1,623 1,683 615 Boilers ... 579 227 175 88 89 20,423 6,228 6,141...

332

c1.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

District Heat ... 65 5,166 13,505 6,051 269 8 7,177 Boilers ... 579 20,423 31,052 22,045 7,418 1,337 Q...

333

b15.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

102 86 22 14 5 District Heat ... 65 Q Q Q 16 7 9 5 Boilers ... 579 216 88 81 94 51 34 15 Packaged...

334

c23.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat ... 1,582 16.6 5.7 1.1 2.8 9.7 11.2 0.12 7.08 Boilers ... 2,334 55.5 47.6 29.7 54.4 91.5 17.2...

335

table5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

215 215 1,353 1,511 1,602 1,793 2,287 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 227 248 274 295 299 378 New England........................................................ 64 64 67 75 84 122 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 164 184 208 221 215 256 Midwest ................................................................. 298 327 379 403 479 560 East North Central............................................... 198 216 263 296 335 385 West North Central ............................................. 99 111 115 108 144 175 South..................................................................... 436 486 534 571 655 871 South Atlantic.......................................................

336

b22.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 144 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 4,414 4,404 2,391 451 67 33 502 132 Table B22. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Number of Workers (main shift) Fewer than 5 ..................................... 2,653 2,425 2,415 1,082 252 20 Q 318 84 5 to 9 ................................................ 778 775 775 474 67 Q Q 75 Q 10 to 19 ............................................. 563 563 563 359 38 Q Q 59 Q 20 to 49 ............................................. 398 397 397

337

table12.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 5.1 99.1 81.1 98.2 104.7 150.3 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 17.5 17.6 14.2 17.8 17.2 24.3 New England........................................................ 4.7 4.4 3.5 4.5 4.8 8.1 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 12.8 13.2 10.7 13.3 12.4 16.2 Midwest ................................................................. 24.0 24.7 20.4 25.0 26.5 37.4 East North Central............................................... 16.0 16.1 14.0 17.9 18.5 25.7 West North Central ............................................. 8.0 8.7 6.3 7.1 8.0 11.7 South..................................................................... 34.2 35.7 29.1 34.9 37.7 54.4 South Atlantic.......................................................

338

b10.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

One One Floor Two Floors Three Floors Four to Nine Floors Ten or More Floors All Build- ings* One Floor Two Floors Three Floors Four to Nine Floors Ten or More Floors All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,136 1,031 339 128 12 64,783 25,981 16,270 7,501 10,085 4,947 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,014 411 115 Q N 6,789 5,192 1,217 343 Q N 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 564 239 70 Q N 6,585 4,150 1,814 504 Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 399 248 74 18 Q 11,535 6,160 3,966 1,115 292 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 92 77 46 26 Q 8,668 3,296 2,772 1,631 964 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 46 35 21 25 Q 9,057 3,187 2,456 1,481 1,822 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 16 13

339

table4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.8 .8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.9 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8 New England........................................................ 1.8 1.6 1.8 1.7 1.9 1.9 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8 Midwest ................................................................. 1.8 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0 East North Central............................................... 1.7 1.7 1.8 1.8 1.9 2.0 West North Central ............................................. 1.9 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.9 2.0 South..................................................................... 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.9 1.9 South Atlantic.......................................................

340

b5.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

West West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 2,964 9,941 11,595 5,485 12,258 3,393 7,837 3,675 7,635 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 360 666 974 922 1,207 538 788 464 871 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 359 764 843 722 1,387 393 879 418 820 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 553 1,419 1,934 1,164 2,240 810 1,329 831 1,256 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 347 944 1,618 949 1,672 498 998 511 1,132 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 516 1,524 1,618 642 1,470 650 1,314 374 948 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 414 1,703 1,682 614 2,087 Q 1,131 Q 895 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q 1,673 1,801 395 1,072

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

b17.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 4,011 1,841 2,029 141 635 46 164 425 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,272 980 1,205 87 280 Q 77 183 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 783 384 375 Q 106 Q Q 87 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 625 320 293 Q 113 Q 40 64 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 185 91 86 Q 56 Q 16 36 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 82 35 40 Q 47 Q 9 37 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 43 21 20 Q 22 Q 8 12 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 16 7 8 Q 9 2 1 5 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 5 2 3 N 2 1 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 141 83 58 N 245 Q 59 175 Food Sales ....................................... 226 224 94 130 N Q N

342

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

October 2006 October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Square Feet per Building (thousand) All Buildings .................................... 4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 882 11,529 13.1 4.8 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,229 18,808 15.3 5.0 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 701 12,503 17.8 4.8 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,336 17,630 13.2 4.5 2,000 CDD or More and -- Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 711 11,189 15.7 5.0 Number of Establishments One ...................................................

343

table11.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 5.1 16.1 18.3 19.3 19.8 20.2 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 15.6 NA 19.6 20.9 20.7 20.9 New England........................................................ 16.5 NA 19.7 21.1 20.4 21.0 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 15.3 NA 19.6 20.8 20.8 20.8 Midwest ................................................................. 14.8 NA 18.2 19.0 20.1 20.2 East North Central............................................... 14.9 NA 18.4 19.4 20.1 20.3 West North Central ............................................. 14.5 NA 17.8 17.9 20.0 20.0 South..................................................................... 15.0 NA 18.0 19.2 19.6 20.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

344

b22.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Elec- tricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat District Chilled Water Propane Other a All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 4,414 4,404 2,391 451 67 33 502 132 Table B22. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply) All Buildings* Buildings Using Any Energy Source Number of Workers (main shift) Fewer than 5 ..................................... 2,653 2,425 2,415 1,082 252 20 Q 318 84 5 to 9 ................................................ 778 775 775 474 67 Q Q 75 Q 10 to 19 ............................................. 563 563 563 359 38 Q Q 59 Q 20 to 49 ............................................. 398 397 397 289 36 16 6 30 13 50 to 99 .............................................

345

Table1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reporting Entities, Data Year 2005 Reporting Entities, Data Year 2005 Reporter Name Sector Type of Form Number of Projects Reported (Schedule II) Entity-Wide Report (Schedule III) Commitments (Schedule IV) A&N Electric Cooperative Electric Providers 1605 2 No Yes Abe Krasne Home Furnishings, Inc. Services and Retail 1605 0 Yes No AES Hawaii, Inc. Electric Providers 1605 1 Yes No AES SeaWest, Inc. Electric Providers 1605 11 No No AES Shady Point, LLC Electric Providers 1605 1 Yes No AES Thames, LLC Electric Providers 1605 1 Yes Yes AES Warrior Run, LLC Electric Providers 1605 2 Yes No Alabama Biomass Partners, Ltd Alternative Energy 1605EZ 1 No No Alcan Primary Products Corporation, Sebree Works Industrial 1605 1 Yes Yes Algonquin Power - Cambrian Pacific Genco LLC Alternative Energy 1605 9 No No Allegheny Energy, Inc. Electric Providers

346

b45.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,176 1,007 666 308 696 2,370 996 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,591 486 332 142 353 1,159 268 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 642 188 124 65 117 494 181 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 548 138 75 40 103 427 250 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 196 78 44 19 53 148 134 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 114 60 44 19 34 81 89 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 58 36 29 13 23 41 48 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 21 16 14 7 9 16 19 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 5 5 3 3 4 6 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 254 93 59 31 54 203 113 Food Sales ....................................... 226 212

347

b9.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 3,769 6,871 7,045 8,101 10,772 10,332 12,360 5,533 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 490 796 860 690 966 1,149 1,324 515 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 502 827 643 865 1,332 721 1,209 486 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 804 988 1,421 1,460 1,869 1,647 2,388 958 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 677 838 935 1,234 1,720 1,174 1,352 739 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 491 641 927 1,483 1,146 1,390 2,058 921 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 Q 704 1,148 1,039 1,411 1,496 1,934 1,060 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q 1,288 569 947 1,243 1,237 984 609 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q 790 541 382 1,085 1,518 1,111 Q Principal Building Activity

348

Summer Tables.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 1 September 2008 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 9, 2008 Release Highlights The monthly average price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased from over $133 per barrel in June and July to about $117 per barrel in August, reflecting expectations of a slowdown in world petroleum demand growth. WTI, which averaged $72 per barrel in 2007, is projected to average $116 per barrel in 2008. Projected stronger growth in world petroleum demand is expected to increase the annual average WTI price to $126 per barrel in 2009. The weekly price of regular-grade gasoline, which peaked at $4.11 per gallon on July 14, averaged $3.65 per gallon on September 8. Annual average retail

349

july2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the contiguous U.S., the overall temperature for May 2007 was 2.1ºF (1.2ºC) above the average temperature observed for the month of May over the 1971-2000 time period. This was the 11th warmest May on record, with most of the contiguous U.S. observing warmer-than-normal temperatures except for Texas and South Carolina. Heating degree days for May 2007 were 32.7 percent below the normal observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 21.9 percent lower than what was recorded in May 2006. As a further indicator of the warmer-than-normal temperatures observed across the U.S., cooling degree days for May 2007 were 7.7 percent above the 1971-2000 normal, and 2.8 percent higher than what was recorded in May 2006.

350

web_comments.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rec Type Rec Type Recommendations/ Comments Name Organization 1/9/2004 Reliability Standards Future reliability standards must strike a balance between detailed, rigid requirements, which provide little or no latitude for deviation, and standards, which are objective-based and allow for innovation and invention to achieve intended goals. Each standard should identify its importance on the BPS reliability in terms of the potential short-term (operating time horizon) vs. long-term (planning time horizon) impacts of non-compliance. Ajay Garg, Mike Penstone Hydro One Networks Inc. 1/9/2004 Reliability Standards Core Reliability Standards: comprising a small number of technical standards designed to enable the BPS to withstand and recover from unexpected contingencies. Core Reliability

351

January 2014.XLS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 - 2012 5 - 2012 2013 2014 2015 ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY - ENERGY Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1. Engineered High Energy Crops Programmatic EIS (DOE/EIS-0481) ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY 2. Presidential Permit Application, Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Line (DOE/EIS-0447) 3. Presidential Permit Application, Northern Pass Transmission LLC, NH (DOE/EIS-0463) 4. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (DOE/EIS-0486) 5. Hawaii Clean Energy Programmatic EIS (DOE/EIS-0459) ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 6. Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste

352

b14.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 12,208 3,939 1,090 3,754 4,050 10,078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 1,382 336 122 416 1,034 895 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 938 518 Q 744 722 868 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 1,887 1,077 Q 1,235 1,021 2,064 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,506 301 Q 930 560 1,043 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 1,209 474 Q Q Q 1,494 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 1,428 868 Q Q Q 1,162 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 1,493 Q Q Q Q 1,322 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 2,365 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 3,769 749 323 Q 586 Q 254 1920 to 1945 .....................................

353

b26.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,766 2,165 360 65 372 113 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 888 1,013 196 Q 243 72 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 349 450 86 Q 72 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 311 409 46 18 38 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 114 151 11 9 11 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 60 84 8 8 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 29 39 9 9 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 11 15 4 4 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 3 4 1 2 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 180 186 21 25 36 Q Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 98 79 Q N Q Q Food Service .....................................

354

table2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 89 89 89 87 92 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 77 NA 79 83 75 85 New England........................................................ 88 NA 82 83 82 89 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 74 NA 78 82 74 84 Midwest ................................................................. 86 NA 91 90 92 91 East North Central............................................... 82 NA 89 90 92 91 West North Central ............................................. 94 NA 95 91 94 94 South..................................................................... 87 NA 91 91 89 96 South Atlantic....................................................... 87 NA 89 90 88 94 East South Central...............................................

355

Table 4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Emission Reductions and Sequestration Reported at Project and Entity Levels, Data Year 2005 Emission Reductions and Sequestration Reported at Project and Entity Levels, Data Year 2005 (Metric Tons Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Report Name Sector Reduction Type Project Level Entity Level A&N Electric Cooperative Electric Providers Indirect 6,243 AES Hawaii, Inc. Electric Providers Sequestration 1,540,000 1,540,000 AES SeaWest, Inc. Electric Providers Direct 16 Indirect 220,420 AES Shady Point, LLC Electric Providers Sequestration 4,150,000 4,150,000 AES Thames, LLC Electric Providers Sequestration 410,000 410,000 AES Warrior Run, LLC Electric Providers Direct 41,386 41,386 Alabama Biomass Partners, Ltd Alternative Energy Unspecified (EZ) 77,012 Alcan Primary Products Corporation, Sebree Works Industrial Direct 457,800 457,800 Algonquin Power - Cambrian Pacific Genco LLC Alternative Energy

356

eia857.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

operational sendout to consumers of gas owned and not owned operational sendout to consumers of gas owned and not owned Residential Industrial Electric Power Other (not included in above categories) Residential Commercial (excluding vehicle fuel) Vehicle Fuel Industrial Electric Power Other (not included in above categories) Total of all deliveries (Lines 3.0 through 12.0) Heat content of gas delivered to consumers (Btu/cubic ft.): 6.0 4.1 (Specify Type) ................................................................... Deliveries of natural gas that you do not own to consumers within the report State U. S. Department of Energy Oil & Gas Survey Ben Franklin Station P.O. Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 12.0 Revenue (Mcf @ 14.73 psia-60 o F) (Including taxes) Call: (Mcf @ 14.73 psia-60 o F) (877) 800-5261 Cost Questions? Volume (Including taxes)

357

b6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 49 Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet 5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,000 to 25,000 Square Feet 25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 2,552 889 738 241 129 65 25 7 Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Building Size Elevators and Escalators (more than one may apply) Any Elevators .................................... 309 Q 29 61 81 57 41 19 5 Number of Elevators One ................................................. 208 Q 29 57 62 29 11 4 Q Two to Five .....................................

358

table1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.2 2.2 77.7 81.3 84.6 84.9 98.9 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 13.9 15.0 15.2 16.0 14.7 17.7 New England........................................................ 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.9 4.1 5.4 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 10.1 11.3 11.6 12.1 10.7 12.3 Midwest ................................................................. 18.3 19.5 20.4 21.1 21.6 23.6 East North Central............................................... 12.3 13.2 14.3 15.1 15.1 16.3 West North Central ............................................. 6.0 6.4 6.1 6.0 6.5 7.3 South..................................................................... 24.7 27.0 28.3 29.5 30.2 36.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

359

b38.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Heat Pumps Furnaces Individual Space Heaters District Heat Boilers Packaged Heating Units Other All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,982 476 1,864 819 65 579 953 205 Table B38. Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Heating Equipment (more than one may apply) Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings* Heated Buildings Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 2,566 334 1,193 550 14 190 682 140 Two ................................................... 1,031 960 97 487 174 19 194 207 50 Three ................................................ 339 319 31 155 68 10 119 41 Q Four to Nine ...................................... 128 125 11 28 25 19 69 20 4 Ten or More ......................................

360

b43.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 4,248 2,184 3,943 941 455 565 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,261 1,070 2,068 382 101 205 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 821 416 772 148 88 107 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 716 412 665 189 105 123 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 231 145 223 102 60 55 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 126 75 123 60 51 37 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 63 43 62 38 32 25 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 17 24 16 13 10 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 5 6 5 4 4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 384 132 368 97 59 39 Food Sales ....................................... 226 221 78 217 35 Q Q Food Service .....................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

table8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

80.3 80.3 83.9 82.4 82.8 90.6 113.1 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 14.5 14.6 14.0 14.1 14.5 18.1 New England........................................................ 3.9 3.6 3.4 3.5 4.1 5.8 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 10.7 11.0 10.6 10.6 10.4 12.3 Midwest ................................................................. 20.2 20.9 20.8 21.3 23.8 27.8 East North Central............................................... 13.3 13.5 14.3 15.2 16.7 19.1 West North Central ............................................. 6.8 7.4 6.5 6.0 7.2 8.7 South..................................................................... 29.1 30.7 29.6 29.8 33.5 43.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

362

b40.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,841 581 260 383 Q Q 678 58 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 732 207 78 134 Q Q 367 26 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 629 140 87 114 Q 26 332 26 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 216 47 33 62 6 19 119 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 118 19 20 27 5 24 67 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 8 8 16 6 17 32 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 4 4 4 2 10 13 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 1 1 1 3 3 Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 352 59 63 87 14 36 139 Q Q Food Sales .......................................

363

a3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 252 509 728 577 926 360 587 316 603 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 134 240 372 356 474 217 294 166 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 49 106 128 100 200 59 127 62 117 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 46 92 133 78 151 54 103 61 91 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 10 29 48 27 52 16 28 16 34 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 8 23 25 10 26 11 21 7 15 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 3 12 14 5 18 Q 10 3 7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 3 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 8 Q 2 1 Q 2 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 Q 21 34 29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales .......................................

364

b31.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,472 1,910 1,445 94 27 128 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,715 1,020 617 41 N 66 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 725 386 307 Q Q 27 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 607 301 285 16 Q 27 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 217 110 114 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 119 53 70 Q 5 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 27 35 Q 5 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 9 14 Q 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 3 3 Q 1 N Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 298 144 149 10 6 15 Food Sales ....................................... 226 186 109 68 Q N Q Food Service .....................................

365

b7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Square Square Feet 50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet 100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet 200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet Over 500,000 Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 6,789 6,585 11,535 8,668 9,057 9,064 7,176 5,908 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ....................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 3,163 165 280 313 157 364 395 514 973 Inpatient .......................................... 1,905 N N Q Q Q Q 467 973 Outpatient ....................................... 1,258 165 280 312 Q 206 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 5,096 99

366

table10.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,112 1,079 1,014 979 1,067 1,143 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast........................... 1,044 972 917 886 982 1,027 New England....................... 1,019 972 942 911 1,006 1,086 Middle Atlantic .................. 1,054 971 909 877 973 1,001 Midwest ............................ 1,104 1,070 1,016 1,008 1,104 1,176 East North Central................ 1,082 1,025 996 1,008 1,102 1,164 West North Central ............... 1,149 1,163 1,062 1,008 1,110 1,205 South............................... 1,178 1,137 1,046 1,008 1,109 1,193 South Atlantic.................... 1,177 1,099 1,028 963 1,111 1,146 East South Central................ 1,160 1,164 1,036 1,083 1,167 1,273 West South Central................ 1,192 1,185 1,081 1,033 1,073 1,244 West................................

367

b28.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,982 1,258 1,999 282 63 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,100 699 955 171 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 782 233 409 58 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 659 211 372 32 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 225 63 140 8 9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 123 32 73 6 8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 62 15 33 Q 9 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 24 5 13 Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 6 1 3 Q 2 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 382 141 172 14 24 Food Sales ....................................... 226 188 94 68 Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 282

368

b16.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 15,492 6,166 7,803 10,989 7,934 6,871 9,528 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,659 1,264 689 155 Q Q N 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 3,323 1,373 1,109 689 Q Q N 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 4,006 2,075 2,456 2,113 692 Q N 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 1,222 836 1,327 2,920 1,648 667 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 704 291 1,157 2,865 2,151 1,518 371 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 804 Q Q 1,558 2,014 2,455 1,452 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 Q Q Q 533 1,077 1,706 2,571 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 Q N N Q Q Q 5,087 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

369

b4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 233 493 696 571 874 348 553 299 580 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 127 237 369 356 457 215 294 165 333 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 48 101 117 97 189 56 116 56 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 37 90 122 75 139 51 88 54 81 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 10 26 44 27 47 15 26 14 32 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 21 24 10 21 10 18 5 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 3 12 12 5 16 Q 8 Q 6 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 6 6 1 4 Q 2 1 3 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 Q 1 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

370

table13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

736 736 722 550 650 668 787 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 731 NA 532 660 647 766 New England........................................................ 706 NA 526 687 637 810 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 740 NA 534 651 651 746 Midwest ................................................................. 738 NA 539 651 644 793 East North Central............................................... 751 NA 539 650 639 792 West North Central ............................................. 714 NA 538 654 656 793 South..................................................................... 758 NA 575 663 673 776 South Atlantic.......................................................

371

b23.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 63,343 63,307 43,468 15,157 5,443 2,853 7,076 1,401 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 6,362 6,346 3,084 600 Q Q 806 199 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 6,212 6,197 3,692 716 Q Q 725 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 11,370 11,370 7,053 966 289 Q 1,014 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,385 8,385 6,025 825 369 240 638 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 9,031 9,031 6,683 1,740 574 332 925 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 9,018 9,018 6,645 2,927 1,399 793 989 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 7,056 7,051 5,679 3,400 1,018 495 1,165 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,908 5,908 4,606 3,981 1,693 822 Q Q Principal Building Activity

372

b41.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 56,940 11,035 9,041 12,558 2,853 11,636 29,969 1,561 1,232 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,007 1,568 675 972 Q Q 1,957 179 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,408 1,523 563 1,012 Q Q 2,741 207 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,922 2,173 1,441 1,740 Q 456 5,260 378 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,776 1,683 1,155 2,301 240 729 4,264 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,331 1,388 1,440 1,958 332 1,722 4,732 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,339 993 1,158 2,259 793 2,366 4,504 Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,565 1,136 1,273 1,223 495 3,023 3,834 Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,591 569 1,334 1,095

373

a2.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North North east Mid- west South West All Buildings North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .................................... 4,859 761 1,305 1,873 920 71,658 13,995 18,103 26,739 12,820 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 374 728 985 499 6,922 1,059 1,908 2,618 1,337 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 155 228 386 179 7,033 1,169 1,676 2,844 1,343 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 138 211 308 152 12,659 2,122 3,317 4,859 2,361 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 39 75 96 50 9,382 1,388 2,712 3,474 1,808 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 31 35 58 22 10,291 2,272 2,376 4,059 1,584 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 15 18 30 10 10,217 2,238 2,486 4,140 1,353 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

374

table6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 .4 9.9 10.2 10.6 11.4 12.0 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 9.5 NA 10.3 10.9 11.3 11.9 New England........................................................ 9.6 NA 10.2 11.4 11.1 12.3 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 9.5 NA 10.3 10.8 11.3 11.7 Midwest ................................................................. 9.2 NA 10.0 10.5 11.6 11.9 East North Central............................................... 9.3 NA 10.1 10.7 11.6 11.9 West North Central ............................................. 8.8 NA 9.8 10.0 11.8 11.9 South..................................................................... 9.7 NA 10.6 10.8 11.7 12.4 South Atlantic.......................................................

375

b11.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lodging Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food Service Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables Released: June 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Inpatient Outpatient All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 386 226 297 8 121 142 443 Lodging Retail (Other Than Mall) Table B11. Selected Principal Building Activity: Part 1, Number of Buildings for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Principal Building Activity Number of Buildings (thousand) Health Care All Buildings* Education Food Sales Food

376

a6.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

71,658 71,658 6,922 7,033 12,659 9,382 10,291 10,217 7,494 7,660 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 409 399 931 1,756 2,690 2,167 1,420 Q Food Sales ....................................... 1,255 409 356 Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ..................................... 1,654 544 442 345 Q Q N Q N Health Care ....................................... 3,163 165 280 313 157 364 395 514 973 Inpatient .......................................... 1,905 N N Q Q Q Q 467 973 Outpatient ....................................... 1,258 165 280 312 Q 206 Q Q N Lodging ............................................. 5,096 99 160 631 803 841 930 1,185 Q Mercantile ......................................... 11,192 771 1,173 2,409 1,291 1,505 1,677 462 1,905 Retail (Other Than Mall) .................. 4,317 638

377

b34.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revised June 2006 Revised June 2006 178 Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Build- ings* Not Heated 1 to 50 Percent Heated 51 to 99 Percent Heated 100 Percent Heated All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 663 523 498 2,962 64,783 4,756 6,850 8,107 45,071 Table B34. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for Non- Mall Buildings, 2003 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Floors One ................................................... 3,136 570 353 292 1,921 25,981 3,237 3,336 2,534 16,875 Two ................................................... 1,031 70 135 111 714 16,270 862 2,027 1,643 11,739 Three ................................................

378

c5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

71 71 1,690 1,948 911 12,905 17,080 23,489 11,310 98.5 98.9 82.9 80.6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 118 206 240 108 1,025 1,895 2,533 1,336 115.1 108.5 94.9 80.6 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 102 117 185 112 1,123 1,565 2,658 1,239 90.7 74.7 69.5 90.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 148 228 250 150 1,972 3,098 4,378 2,087 75.3 73.6 57.2 71.7 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 106 247 205 114 1,292 2,567 3,168 1,643 82.4 96.3 64.8 69.4 50,001 to 100,000 ........................... 203 212 255 89 2,040 2,260 3,435 1,322 99.4 93.6 74.3 67.6 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 209 252 375 97 2,117 2,296 3,475 1,177 98.8 109.8 107.9 82.7 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 189 244 191 100 1,781 2,196 1,914 1,286 106.3 111.1 99.9 78.1 Over 500,000 ..................................

379

c32.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

571 571 871 427 12,097 19,763 11,608 47.2 44.1 36.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .................................. 85 98 59 1,222 1,214 648 69.5 81.0 91.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................ 56 90 56 1,131 1,733 828 49.8 51.9 67.7 10,001 to 25,000 .............................. 103 141 57 2,392 2,909 1,752 42.9 48.4 32.3 25,001 to 50,000 .............................. 90 102 58 1,827 2,700 1,498 49.3 37.7 38.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 68 112 57 1,636 3,178 1,869 41.4 35.1 30.5 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 63 120 59 1,501 2,745 2,399 42.0 43.6 24.5 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 45 104 50 1,496 2,748 1,435 30.1 37.8 34.8 Over 500,000 ................................... 62 105 Q 893 2,535 Q 69.1 41.4 Q Principal Building Activity Education .........................................

380

january2008.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, November 2007 was the twenty-fifth warmest November over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 3.3 percent below the average for the month of November, but 11.6 percent higher than what was recorded in a fairly mild November 2006. In November 2007, electricity generation was 1.4 percent higher than what was observed in November 2006, while retail sales of electricity increased 2.6 percent when compared to November 2006. The higher growth rate for sales of electricity relative to generation is influenced by the fact that the utility billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas.

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381

natgas1980.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Household Member Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 51.6 39.7 88.5 125 56 96.2 34 497 0.22 383 137 Census Region and Division Northeast 10.9 6.5 18.8 144 50 86.6 31 771 0.27 463 168 New England 1.9 0.9 3.1 162 47 78.9 28 971 0.28 472 169 Middle Atlantic 9.0 5.6 15.7 141 51 88.1 32 739 0.27 461 168 Midwest 15.5 12.4 29.4 164 70 131.6 46 586 0.25 470 165 East North Central 10.9 8.5 20.0 175 75 136.5 47 646 0.28 503 174 West North Central 4.6 3.9 9.4 141 59 120.0 44 456 0.19 389 143 South 13.3 11.4 21.1 99 53 84.4 30 389 0.21 333 118 South Atlantic 4.9 3.8 8.3 111 51 87.5 30 519 0.24 408 140 East South Central 2.3 2.0 3.7 102 55 86.4 33 371 0.2 314 119 West South Central 6.1 5.5 9.1 89 54 81.1 29 306 0.19 279 99 West 11.9 9.4 19.3 91 44 71.9 26

382

sup_rci.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Equipment Stock (million units) Main Space Heaters Electric Heat Pumps 10.38 10.71 11.03 11.32 11.60 11.83 12.09 12.35 12.60 12.86 13.13 13.39 13.64 Electric Other 21.53 21.59 21.64 21.69 21.72 21.78 21.87 21.96 22.07 22.18 22.30 22.41 22.53 Natural Gas Heat Pumps 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Natural Gas Other 59.99 60.71 61.44 62.11 62.81 63.56 64.34 65.12 65.90 66.68 67.46 68.22 68.97 Distillate 8.02 8.02 8.03 8.04 8.04 8.05 8.06 8.07 8.07 8.08 8.09 8.10 8.11 Liquefied Petroleum Gas 4.95 5.00 5.03 5.05 5.08 5.12 5.17 5.21 5.26 5.31 5.36 5.41 5.45 Kerosene 0.82 0.81 0.80 0.79 0.78 0.77 0.76 0.75 0.75 0.74 0.74 0.74 0.73 Wood Stoves 2.05 2.05 2.04 2.03 2.02 2.00 1.99 1.98 1.97 1.96 1.95 1.94 1.94 Geothermal Heat Pumps 0.06 0.07 0.09 0.10 0.12 0.13 0.15

383

november2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: September 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data September is a transitional month between summer and fall, when decreased electricity use coincides with a decline in cooling demand. In contrast to recent Septembers, which have been warmer than normal, cooling and heating degree days for September 2006 were each within 10 percent of the norm. In September 2006, cooling degree days were 35.0 percent lower than September 2005 and 57.1 percent lower than August 2006. The changes in temperature translated into a 5.2 percent decline in September 2006 net electricity generation when compared to September 2005, and an 18.2 percent decline when compared to August 2006. Similarly, September 2006 retail sales of electricity

384

P4.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P4. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, Ranked by State, 2011 P4. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, Ranked by State, 2011 United States 1,095,628 United States e 24,036,351 United States f 2,062,932 United States 331,646 1 Wyoming 438,673 Texas 7,112,863 Texas 531,524 Iowa 87,314 2 West Virginia 134,785 Louisiana 3,029,206 Alaska 204,829 Nebraska 47,120 3 Kentucky 108,971 Wyoming 2,159,422 California 193,691 Illinois 30,068 4 Pennsylvania 59,899 Oklahoma 1,888,870 North Dakota 152,985 Minnesota 27,536 5 Texas 45,904 Colorado 1,637,576 Oklahoma 76,681 South Dakota 24,850 6 Montana 42,008 Pennsylvania 1,310,592 New Mexico 71,274 Indiana 22,547 7 Illinois 37,938 New Mexico 1,237,303 Louisiana 68,984 Wisconsin 12,278 8 Indiana 37,544 Arkansas 1,072,212 Wyoming 54,710 Ohio 10,811 9 North Dakota 28,231 Utah 457,525 Kansas 41,503 Kansas 10,676 10 Ohio 28,175 West Virginia 394,125 Colorado

385

october2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: August 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Year-to-date net electric generation through August 2006 was 0.8 percent higher compared to year-to-date generation through August 2005. Comparing month-to-month, August 2006 net generation was 0.1 percent higher than August 2005, and 2.4 percent lower than July 2006. The higher net generation above last year was influenced by a continued strong economy and warmer than normal August weather. The index of industrial production was 4.7 percent higher comparing August 2006 to August 2005, but eased down, by 0.2 percent, between July 2006 and August 2006. Setting a new high, the national average retail price of electricity for August 2006 was 9.52 cents per kilowatthour. Comparing year-to-

386

september2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: July 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Climatic Data Center, the United States had its second hottest July on record due to a blistering heat wave throughout the country. The first seven months of 2006 was also the warmest on record in the Nation since recordkeeping began in 1895. July 2006 cooling degree days were near their historical high and more than 21 percent above normal. Year-to-date cooling degree days through July 2006 were 9.1 percent higher than in 2005. In July 2006 net generation, retail sales and retail prices of electricity all reached new highs. Year-to-date net generation for July 2006 was up 1.3

387

july2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The weather through May 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. According to the National Climatic Data Center, the first half of 2006 was the warmest on record in the U.S. since record keeping began in 1895. Year-to-date, heating degree days were down 10.2 percent and cooling degree days were up 44.7 percent through May. For May alone heating degree days were down 22.5 percent, and cooling degree days were 38.5 percent higher than last May. Year-to-date net generation through May was 0.7 percent higher than in 2005. Because of the advent of the summer cooling season and strong seasonal economic activity, May 2006 generation was up 5.1 percent compared to May 2005, and up 11.5 percent

388

august2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports that warmer- and drier-than-average conditions dominated much of the United States during the first half of 2007. June 2007 was the 23rd warmest June on record, increasing the cooling needs of the residential and commercial customers in the Nation. Cooling degree days for June 2007 were 9.3 percent above the average, but unchanged from June 2006. June 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were little changed from June 2006. Retail sales of electricity for the month of June 2007 increased only 0.2 percent compared to June 2006, while June 2007 generation for electric power was down 0.4 percent. The average U.S. retail price of electricity (all sectors) for June 2007 showed a 2.4-percent increase from

389

09 budget.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Budget Information Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Budget Information FY 2007 FY 2009 Operating Plan Request Appropriation Request Research and Development High Temperature Superconductivity 45,750 28,186 27,930 28,186 Visualization and Controls 24,388 25,305 25,075 25,305 Energy Storage and Power Electronics 2,823 6,803 6,741 13,403 Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration 23,546 25,700 25,466 33,306 Congressionally Directed Activities - - 24,290 - SUBTOTAL, Research and Development

390

july2009.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In May 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above the monthly average. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the West, Southwest, and Northwest all experienced above normal temperatures while the rest of the United States experienced near normal temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States were 20.8 percent below the average for the month of May and 31.1 percent below a much colder May 2008. Likewise, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 12.4 percent above the average for the month of May and 19.8 percent above May 2008. Retail sales of electricity decreased 5.0 percent in May 2009 compared to May 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused mainly

391

october2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second month in a row, record warmth was observed throughout a majority of the country while the heavily populated Northeast experienced near average temperatures. Accordingly, cooling degree days for August 2007 were 26.0 percent above the average for the month of August, and 9.2 percent higher than August 2006. August 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were both up when compared to August 2006. Retail sales of electricity were 1.2 percent higher when compared to August 2006. However, residential retail sales of electricity decreased by 0.1 percent compared to August 2006. Generation for electric power was 3.8 percent higher than what was recorded in August

392

c1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Number of Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 13,391 9,500 1,737 272 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 10,347

393

sup_tran.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Trillion Btu) 2000- 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2020 Energy Use by Mode Highway Light-Duty Vehicles 14970.8 15191.3 15547.6 16054.3 16397.0 16743.0 17049.5 17379.1 17749.7 18129.3 18485.4 18843.9 19193.1 19518.8 19800.2 20071.6 20352.6 20620.8 20874.5 21140.7 21367.4 1.8% Automobiles 8641.2 8557.7 8554.5 8628.8 8632.3 8639.0 8622.6 8629.9 8669.2 8715.0 8763.0 8824.1 8891.3 8958.2 9010.9 9065.1 9131.3 9196.1 9258.6 9330.1 9387.4 0.4% Light Trucks 6304.8 6609.0 6968.5 7400.7 7739.9 8079.1 8402.1 8724.4 9055.5 9389.2 9697.2 9994.5 10276.3 10534.9 10763.4 10980.5 11195.1 11398.3 11589.2 11783.8 11953.0 3.3% Motorcycles 24.8 24.6 24.6 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.8 24.9 25.0 25.2 25.3 25.5 25.7 25.9 26.0 26.2 26.4 26.6 26.8 27.0 0.4% Commercial Light Trucks 1/ 637.6 624.1

394

c13.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25th 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 202 14.1 12.2 3.6 8.2 17.1 15.7 1.09 0.078 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 47 17.8 11.4 3.8 8.9 20.3 4.3 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 92 12.4 10.3 3.8 7.4 14.5 8.7 1.18 0.095 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 164 10.5 11.1 2.9 6.3 13.4 13.8 0.88 0.084 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 439 12.2 11.6 3.8 8.8 16.2 33.6 0.94 0.077 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 927 13.1 14.1 4.5 9.9 17.0 68.0 0.97 0.073 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 2,181 15.7 12.2 5.3 13.0 23.4 146.4 1.05 0.067 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

395

c16.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,262 ,262 14,172 25,540 15,057 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 1.11 0.85 1.12 1.37 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 1,617 2,401 4,142 2,188 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.62 1.39 1.78 1.69 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 1,202 1,212 2,721 2,160 0.12 0.08 0.08 0.12 1.11 0.84 1.11 1.78 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 1,795 2,145 3,763 2,299 0.10 0.07 0.08 0.10 0.92 0.69 0.88 1.11 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 1,168 2,042 2,864 1,797 0.10 0.07 0.07 0.10 0.90 0.82 0.95 1.12 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 2,130 1,777 3,190 1,620 0.09 0.06 0.06 0.10 1.04 0.79 0.93 1.25 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 2,286 1,963 3,810 1,440 0.09 0.06 0.06 0.08 1.08 0.86 1.11 1.22 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 1,985 1,497 2,312 1,530

396

c21.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Square Square Feet All Buildings* .................................. 190 341 360 12,543 28,786 21,977 15.1 11.8 16.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ....................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q Food Service ..................................... 47 16 Q 986 664 Q 47.8 24.5 Q Health Care ....................................... 6 17 50 445 835 1,883 13.1 20.5 26.3 Inpatient .......................................... N Q 47 N Q 1,723 N Q 27.0 Outpatient ....................................... 6 11 Q 445 652 Q 13.1 17.4 Q Lodging ............................................. 4 31 34 260 2,274 2,563 14.0 13.5 13.5 Retail (Other Than Mall)..................... 17 28 18 1,363 2,133 821 12.2 12.9 21.5 Office ................................................

397

Fig1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 2009 December 2009 1 December 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 8, 2009 Release Highlights  EIA expects the price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil will average about $76 per barrel this winter (October-March). The forecast for the monthly average WTI price dips to $75 early next year then rises to $82 per barrel by December 2010, assuming U.S. and world economic conditions continue to improve. EIA's forecast assumes that U.S. real gross domestic product (GDP) grows by 1.9 percent in 2010 and world oil-consumption-weighted real GDP grows by 2.6 percent.  Rising crude oil prices contribute to an increase in the annual average regular-

398

sup_tran.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Type Type (Trillion Btu) 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Energy Use by Mode Highway Light-Duty Vehicles 15161.1 15575.7 15906.8 16472.8 16956.1 17383.6 17761.0 18145.3 18523.6 18909.9 19286.4 19680.7 20088.4 Automobiles 8876.0 8832.9 8766.0 8824.8 8847.8 8851.9 8868.7 8891.4 8906.8 8939.0 8971.8 9011.9 9058.7 Light Trucks 6259.5 6717.3 7115.4 7622.5 8082.6 8506.0 8866.5 9228.1 9591.0 9945.0 10288.6 10642.6 11003.3 Motorcycles 25.6 25.5 25.4 25.6 25.7 25.7 25.8 25.8 25.9 26.0 26.0 26.2 26.3 Commercial Light Trucks 1/ 583.8 586.5 584.4 605.0 624.7 637.7 648.0 658.6 670.4 683.6 696.8 709.8 724.5 Buses 251.1 238.9 239.8 242.3 244.6 246.6 248.7 250.7 252.8 254.8 256.6 258.2 259.4 Transit 98.9 94.1 94.5 95.5 96.4 97.2 98.0 98.8 99.6 100.4 101.1 101.7 102.2 Intercity 36.6 34.7 34.8 35.2 35.5 35.8 36.1 36.4 36.7

399

c23.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

25th 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Cubic Feet (dollars) All Buildings* ................................. 782 43.0 36.0 17.6 37.1 70.9 6.1 0.33 7.77 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 219 78.7 42.6 23.7 46.3 92.0 1.9 0.70 8.88 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 408 54.8 42.5 13.9 28.8 65.7 3.4 0.46 8.34 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 667 42.5 40.8 14.4 29.2 52.1 5.6 0.36 8.41 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 1,483 41.5 39.1 16.0 31.5 55.3 11.1 0.31 7.46 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 2,498 35.4 39.1 10.1 27.6 48.8 19.7 0.28 7.90 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 5,029 36.3 26.1 6.1 23.6 55.2 36.2 0.26 7.19 200,001 to 500,000 ..........................

400

february2008.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data While average temperatures prevailed across the majority of the Nation in December 2007, warmer-than-average temperatures in the more heavily populated eastern United States led to a decrease in total heating degree-days for the contiguous U.S. of 3.3 percent below the average for the month of December. However, heating degree days were still 14.5 percent above the level from December 2006, leading to an increase in electricity demand from a year ago. Retail sales of electricity for the month of December 2007 increased 2.1 percent compared to December 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for December 2007 showed a 4.2-percent increase from December 2006 and a 0.8-percent decrease from

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401

Attachment B.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Sourcing Studies, 2002-2003 Competitive Sourcing Studies, 2002-2003 (Full-Time Equivalent Positions Under Review) DOE Organization State(s) I n f o r m a t i o n T e c h n o l o g y H u m a n R e s o u r c e s F i n a n c i a l S e r v i c e s P e r s o n n e l S e c u r i t y I n v e s t i g a t i o n s L o g i s t i c s G r a p h i c s C i v i l R i g h t s R e v i e w s P a r a l e g a l S u p p o r t T O T A L Headquarters Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO MD, DC 6 15 60 86 13 180 Chief Information Officer MD, DC 113 113 Economic Impact and Diversity MD, DC 2 2 8 2 14 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy MD, DC 7 1 8 Environment, Safety, and Health MD, DC 7 4 11 Energy Information Administration MD, DC 28 28 Environmental Management MD, DC 22 5 27 General Counsel MD, DC 7 7 Fossil Energy MD, DC 6 2 8 Hearings and Appeals MD, DC 7 7 Inspector General MD, DC 2 1 3 Nuclear Energy Science and Technology MD, DC 1 1 Oversight and Performance Assurance

402

b35.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooled Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Build- ings* Not Cooled 1 to 50 Percent Cooled 51 to 99 Percent Cooled 100 Percent Cooled All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 1,020 985 629 2,011 64,783 7,843 16,598 13,211 27,132 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 710 407 279 1,155 6,789 1,782 1,206 781 3,021 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 157 226 133 374 6,585 1,177 1,704 995 2,710 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 109 225 126 277 11,535 1,612 3,517 2,034 4,372 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 25 64 43 109 8,668 893 2,369 1,479 3,928 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 11 41 25 52 9,057 726 2,926 1,751 3,654 100,001 to 200,000 ...........................

403

eia912.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Month Month 2 0 Address 2: City: State: Zip: - to meet the due date.) (Volume of gas in the reservoir that is in addition to the base gas.) Working Gas as of Friday 9:00 AM (Million Cubic Feet) Producing Region Complete and return form no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Monday. If this is a resubmission, enter an "X" in the box: EIA ID NUMBER: ATTN: EIA-912 Energy Information Administration, EI-45 U. S. Department of Energy (202) 586-2849 912 Company Name: oog.eia912@eia.gov Fax No.: Email: Ext: Form may be submitted using one of the following methods: Fax to: Address 1: Secure File Transfer: https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/notice912.jsp Questions? Email address: Comments: Please explain in this section any unusual data reports. For example, explain any change in working gas as a result of changes in the number or capacity

404

b1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand) Mean Square Feet per Worker Mean Hours per Week All Buildings*................................... 4,645 64,783 72,807 13.9 890 61 Table B1. Summary Table: Total and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 10,305 12.4 1,031 60 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 17,340 14.8 1,000 63 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 14,007 17.1 821 66 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276

405

a7.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings .................................... Buildings .................................... 4,859 3,754 762 117 47 22 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,586 2,131 338 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 948 720 182 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 810 590 140 51 13 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 261 163 54 19 12 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 147 87 29 8 13 4 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 74 43 13 6 5 4 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 26 15 5 Q 1 3 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 8 3 1 Q Q 3 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service .....................................

406

eia910.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Address 2: Address 2: City: State: Zip: - 1. Report State (Enter one of the following States in the box): Georgia, New York, 2. To how many end-use customers did you sell natural gas? 3. 4. For companies reporting sales in all States except Georgia: 5. For companies reporting sales in Georgia: PART 2. SUBMISSION INFORMATION (Dollars) Do not report negative numbers or decimals. You may report in either Thousand cubic feet (Mcf) or in Therms. Indicate unit of measure by placing an "X" in the appropriate box. Commercial Residential Commercial Residential Form may be submitted using one of the following methods: Mail to: ATTN: EIA-910 (Dollars) Commercial Residential Mcf Call: Email address: (877) 800 - 5261 Secure File Transfer: https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp

407

b46.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 52,974 26,768 20,254 10,425 17,218 38,884 35,335 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,333 1,310 916 366 935 3,174 830 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 4,738 1,406 909 497 894 3,609 1,407 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 8,646 2,230 1,188 614 1,665 6,725 4,072 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,068 2,829 1,626 676 1,933 5,289 4,910 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,038 4,291 3,124 1,354 2,438 5,760 6,342 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,096 5,116 4,148 1,926 3,302 5,667 6,578 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,238 4,606 4,199 2,034 2,685 4,524 5,691 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,816 4,979 4,146 2,958

408

c37.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 9,475 116.44 62.2 108.3 1.33 11.43 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 34,658 121.16 143.2 Q Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 85,182 99.92 52.4 911.2 1.07 10.70 Principal Building Activity

409

c28.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

171 171 210 99 3,593 6,326 2,281 47.6 33.2 43.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 23 25 11 346 325 209 66.6 75.3 53.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 13 34 Q 305 620 Q 44.0 54.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 29 28 Q 756 987 565 37.9 28.6 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 44 17 12 840 714 363 52.6 24.4 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 27 Q Q 806 Q Q 33.1 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 19 Q Q 512 1,238 Q 37.8 30.8 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 23 Q Q 786 Q Q 28.9 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 18 Q Q Q Q Q 21.6 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 14 25 Q 380 1,274 Q 38.1 19.6 Q Food Sales .......................................

410

c18.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

62 62 210 50 5,328 12,097 3,220 11.7 17.4 15.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 10 26 7 821 1,157 472 12.4 22.9 15.5 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7 18 4 666 1,308 359 10.7 13.9 12.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 8 27 11 1,164 2,207 791 7.3 12.2 14.2 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 15 24 5 949 1,672 442 16.1 14.4 10.9 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 8 25 10 642 1,470 650 12.8 16.7 14.8 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 8 39 Q 614 2,087 Q 12.3 18.9 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 Q Q 1,072 Q Q 20.4 Q Over 500,000 .................................... Q 29 Q Q 1,123 Q Q 25.6 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 5 39 Q 549 2,445 Q 8.8 16.0 Q Food Sales .......................................

411

Fig1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2010 June 2010 1 June 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 8, 2010 Release Highlights  Crude oil prices fluctuated considerably last month, with the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot price ranging from a high of $86 per barrel on May 3 to a low of $65 on May 25, before ending the month at $74. According to some market analysts, uncertainty over the global economic recovery, particularly with respect to Europe's debt crisis and the tightening of credit by China, and liquidation of futures contracts contributed to the crude price decline. Moreover, WTI prices fell further than most other crudes because of record high inventories in Cushing, Oklahoma. EIA projects WTI crude oil spot prices

412

Grantsdown.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funding Opportunity Announcement Table TITLE FOA # Demonstration of Integrated Biorefinery Operations DE-FOA-0000096 Expansion of Infrastructure for Ethanol Blends DE-FOA-0000125 Development of Algal / Advanced Biofuels Consortia DE-FOA-0000123 Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps DE-FOA-0000116 Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis DE-FOA-0000075 Geothermal Technologies Program: Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies; Geothermal Energy Production; Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance DE-FOA-0000109 Enhanced Geothermal Systems Demonstrations DE-FOA-0000092 Hydroelectric Facility Modernization DE-FOA-0000120

413

september2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), July 2007 brought record warmth to many of the states in the western U.S. However, cooler than average temperatures observed in the heavily populated eastern half of the country kept residential energy demand in the contiguous United States close to normal, with cooling degree days 1.2 percent below the average for the month of July. Due to the below normal temperatures observed in the heavily populated eastern United States, July 2007 electricity generation and retail sales of electricity were down when compared to July 2006. Retail sales of electricity was 1.6 percent lower when compared to July 2006, with residential retail sales decreasing the most at 4.9 percent. Furthermore, generation for electric

414

a1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2003 Commercial Buildings 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables October 2006 Energy Information Administration 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables Introduction................................................................................................................................ vii Change in Data Collection Procedures in Malls ........................................................................ viii Guide to the 2003 CBECS Detailed Tables............................................................................... ix Building Characteristics Tables All Buildings (Including Malls) Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls) ............................................... 1 Table A2. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace for All Buildings

415

c19.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 14 56 96 7,449 3,633 7,397 15.3 15.4 13.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 17 7 12 696 437 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 11 5 14 787 404 810 13.4 12.0 16.9 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11 10 13 1,267 831 1,232 8.9 11.7 10.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 12 7 12 897 511 1,088 13.6 13.2 11.0 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 16 5 12 1,314 374 922 12.1 12.7 13.3 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 20 Q 13 1,096 Q 895 18.2 Q 14.5 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 12 5 11 659 Q 827 18.4 14.3 13.5 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q 9 Q Q 766 Q Q 12.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 15 6 11 1,198 640 1,027 12.8 9.4

416

P3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P3. Energy Production and Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 P3. Energy Production and Consumption Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 Alabama 1,401 1,931 530 Alaska 1,642 638 -1,004 Arizona 618 1,431 814 Arkansas 1,390 1,117 -273 California 2,625 7,858 5,234 Colorado 2,747 1,481 -1,266 Connecticut 197 742 545 Delaware 4 272 268 District of Columbia 0 180 180 Florida 524 4,217 3,693 Georgia 544 3,002 2,458 Hawaii 19 286 267 Idaho 180 526 345 Illinois 2,200 3,978 1,777 Indiana 1,063 2,869 1,806 Iowa 701 1,513 812 Kansas 780 1,162 382 Kentucky 2,841 1,911 -929 Louisiana 3,976 4,055 79 Maine 154 413 258 Maryland 273 1,426 1,153 Massachusetts 101 1,395 1,294 Michigan 673 2,803 2,130 Minnesota 429 1,867 1,438 Mississippi 441 1,163 723 Missouri 200 1,878 1,678 Montana 1,105 398 -707 Nebraska 397 871 475 Nevada 54 633 579 New Hampshire 130 292 162 New Jersey 387 2,438 2,052 New Mexico 2,261 688 -1,573 New York 873 3,615 2,742 North Carolina

417

c3.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

trillion trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 70.4 759 5,901 83.8 90.0 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 138.8 934 14,300 103.0 80.3 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 289.0 725 29,189 101.0 105.3 Over 500,000 ....................................

418

september2010.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2010 July 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States, as a whole, experienced temperatures that were significantly above average in July 2010. Accordingly, the total population-weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 19.9 percent above the July normal. Retail sales of electricity increased 9.5 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, the average U.S. retail price of electricity increased 1.3 percent. For the 12-month period ending July 2010, the U.S. average retail price of electricity decreased 1.4 percent over the previous 12-month period ending July 2009. In July 2010, total electric power generation in the United States increased 9.2 percent compared to July 2009. Over the same period, coal generation increased 12.4 percent, and natural gas generation increased 11.4 percent. Petroleum

419

february2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: December 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov.

420

c1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2006 October 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Primary Site All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 5,820 9,168 3,037 1,928 222 634 District Heat Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD ..................... 855 10,622 990 1,232 408 431 63 88 5,500-7,000 HDD ............................ 1,173 17,335 1,761 2,305 763 679 63 255 4,000-5,499 HDD ............................ 673 11,504 1,134 1,713 567 337 90 140 Fewer than 4,000 HDD ................... 1,276 15,739 1,213 2,259 748 358 6 101 2,000 CDD or More and --

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

february2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: December 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climatic Data Center reports 2006 as the warmest year on record for the contiguous United States, with El Niño contributing to milder winter temperatures. NOAA also reports that December 2006 was the fourth warmest December since 1895. (For more information see http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2007/s2772.htm.) As a consequence of the warmer weather, December 2006 generation lagged behind the December 2005 generation by 3.6 percent, although it increased 8.7 percent from November 2006. Mirroring generation, December 2006 retail sales of electricity were up 8.4

422

c29.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 162 149 4,704 2,797 5,016 32.2 57.9 29.7 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 29 18 Q 334 265 363 87.9 68.4 60.2 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 23 Q Q 519 Q 496 44.2 Q 53.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 14 38 22 514 630 748 28.1 61.1 29.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 17 23 21 512 464 733 33.5 49.1 28.7 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 18 Q 18 888 Q 730 20.5 Q 24.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 16 Q 12 760 Q 651 21.5 Q 17.8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q Q 14 470 Q 675 Q Q 20.8 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 16 21 28 797 420 802 20.6 48.8 34.8 Food Sales .......................................

423

P5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P5. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ranked by State, 2011 P5. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank State State State State United States 22,057.2 United States d 26,489.9 United States e 11,965.0 United States 8,268.7 1 Wyoming 7,591.7 Texas 8,047.4 Texas 3,082.8 Illinois 1,002.7 2 West Virginia 3,321.1 Louisiana 3,240.2 Alaska 1,188.0 Pennsylvania 796.8 3 Kentucky 2,623.8 Wyoming 2,384.4 California 1,123.4 South Carolina 553.6 4 Pennsylvania 1,511.5 Oklahoma 2,163.4 North Dakota 887.3 New York 446.8 5 Illinois 864.2 Colorado 1,831.2 Oklahoma 444.8 North Carolina 424.1 6 Indiana 841.0 New Mexico 1,405.2 New Mexico 413.4 Texas 414.9 7 Montana 746.7 Pennsylvania 1,375.6 Louisiana 400.1 Alabama 411.8 8 Ohio 679.2 Arkansas 1,090.9 Wyoming 317.3 California 383.6 9 Texas 605.3 Utah 498.0 Kansas 240.7 New Jersey 351.7 10 Colorado 586.8 West Virginia 442.4 Colorado 226.9

424

june2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The overall temperature for the contiguous U.S. during April 2007 was 0.3ºF (0.2ºC) below the average temperature observed for the month of April over the 1971-2000 time period. A record cold outbreak was observed from April 4th to April 10th as record low temperatures were set in 1,200 locations across the contiguous U.S. before warmer weather returned later in the month. This cold snap was evident in the fact that heating degree days were 10.7 percent higher than normal as observed over the 1971-2000 time period, and 44.7 percent higher than what was recorded in April 2006. Consequently, retail sales of electricity for the month of April 2007 increased 2.7 percent compared to April 2006, while April 2007

425

b25.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Space Space Heating Cooling Water Heating Cooking Manu- facturing All Buildings* .................................. 64,783 60,028 56,940 56,478 22,237 3,138 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,668 5,007 4,759 997 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,786 5,408 5,348 1,136 214 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 10,387 9,922 9,562 1,954 472 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,060 7,776 7,734 2,511 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,718 8,331 8,412 3,575 540 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,710 8,339 8,300 3,991 473 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,907 6,565 6,680 4,047 605 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,792

426

b13.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 824 277 71 370 622 597 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 503 119 37 152 434 294 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 127 67 Q 104 100 110 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 116 69 Q 83 66 130 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 43 9 Q 27 17 27 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 17 7 Q Q Q 21 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 11 6 Q Q Q 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 5 Q Q Q Q 4 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 2 Q Q N Q Q Year Constructed Before 1920 ...................................... 330 70 31 Q 65 Q 20 1920 to 1945 ..................................... 527 85 36 Q 52 90 39 1946 to 1959 ..................................... 562 75 45 Q 58 59 44 1960 to 1969 .....................................

427

b19.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 3,754 643 55 23 14 157 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 2,131 311 Q Q N 100 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 720 136 Q N Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 590 104 22 Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 163 50 11 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 87 25 4 5 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 43 11 4 Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 15 5 Q 1 2 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 3 1 Q Q 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 360 21 Q N N N Food Sales ....................................... 226 203 Q N N Q N Food Service ..................................... 297 270 26 Q N N N Health Care .......................................

428

b32.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 56,478 27,490 28,820 1,880 3,088 1,422 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 4,759 2,847 1,699 116 N 169 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,348 2,821 2,296 Q Q 205 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,562 4,809 4,470 265 Q 430 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,734 3,924 4,055 Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,412 3,659 5,005 Q 303 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,300 3,884 4,754 Q 822 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,680 2,722 4,076 Q 621 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,683 2,824 2,467 Q 1,064 N Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 9,874 9,481 3,829

429

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Buildings RSEs for Total Floorspace RSEs for Mean Square Feet per Building RSEs Not Available for Medians All Buildings .................................... 3.8 3.1 4.0 _ Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 5.7 5.6 1.3 _ 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 5.6 5.5 0.8 _ 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 4.9 4.9 0.9 _ 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 5.5 5.8 1.2 _ 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 6.1 6.0 1.0 _ 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9.9 10.0 1.5 _ 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 9.8 10.2 1.8 _ Over 500,000 .................................... 12.6 12.8 4.2 _ Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 7.1

430

b8.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,645 4,645 330 527 562 579 731 707 876 334 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 174 315 331 298 350 438 481 165 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 71 107 90 120 180 98 158 66 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 55 64 90 95 122 103 151 58 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 19 23 26 33 48 32 39 21 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 7 9 14 22 16 20 28 13 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 Q 5 8 8 10 10 15 8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 Q 4 2 3 4 4 4 2 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 Q 1 1 0 1 2 1 Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... 386 12 26 78 60 58 44 75 32 Food Sales ....................................... 226 Q Q Q Q Q 33 56 Q Food Service .....................................

431

b30.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District Chilled Water Elec- tricity Natural Gas District Chilled Water All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 3,625 3,589 17 33 64,783 56,940 54,321 1,018 2,853 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 1,841 1,838 Q Q 6,789 5,007 4,994 Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 732 727 Q Q 6,585 5,408 5,367 Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 629 618 Q Q 11,535 9,922 9,743 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 216 211 Q 6 8,668 7,776 7,557 Q 240 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 118 114 Q 5 9,057 8,331 8,086 Q 332 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 60 55 Q 6 9,064 8,339 7,657 Q 793 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 23 21 Q 2 7,176 6,565 6,112 Q 495 Over 500,000 ....................................

432

a4.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

East East South Central West South Central Mountain Pacific All Buildings .................................... 71,658 3,452 10,543 12,424 5,680 13,999 3,719 9,022 4,207 8,613 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,922 383 676 986 922 1,283 547 788 466 871 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 7,033 369 800 939 738 1,468 420 957 465 878 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 12,659 674 1,448 2,113 1,204 2,443 861 1,555 933 1,429 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 9,382 366 1,022 1,763 949 1,867 545 1,062 568 1,239 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 10,291 590 1,682 1,712 664 1,797 749 1,514 492 1,092 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 10,217 448 1,790 1,872 614 2,422 Q 1,426 346 1,007 200,001 to 500,000 ...........................

433

table3.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

29.3 29.3 137.3 147.5 151.2 156.8 191.0 Household Characteristics Census Region and Division Northeast............................................................... 23.9 NA 26.6 27.0 26.6 31.7 New England........................................................ 6.6 NA 6.6 6.5 7.6 10.0 Middle Atlantic ..................................................... 17.3 NA 20.1 20.5 19.0 21.7 Midwest ................................................................. 32.5 NA 37.8 38.4 41.1 47.1 East North Central............................................... 21.3 NA 26.0 27.6 29.0 32.4 West North Central ............................................. 11.3 NA 11.8 10.8 12.1 14.7 South..................................................................... 45.1 NA 50.6 52.7 56.0 70.2 South Atlantic.......................................................

434

b44.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 62,060 38,528 59,688 27,571 20,643 17,703 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 6,038 2,918 5,579 1,123 312 604 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 6,090 3,061 5,726 1,109 686 781 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 11,229 6,424 10,458 2,944 1,721 1,973 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,297 5,176 8,001 3,662 2,191 2,013 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,912 5,296 8,667 4,330 3,646 2,599 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,732 6,042 8,612 5,268 4,349 3,473 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,946 4,913 6,839 4,610 3,918 2,775 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,816 4,698 5,806 4,526 3,819 3,485 Principal Building Activity

435

b21.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings With Central Physical Plant All Buildings* .................................. 4,645 1,477 116 64,783 24,735 6,604 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 771 Q 6,789 2,009 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 259 Q 6,585 1,912 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 263 33 11,535 4,158 520 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 92 18 8,668 3,277 630 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 49 13 9,057 3,381 911 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 28 12 9,064 3,935 1,723 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 13 5 7,176 3,568 1,438 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 3 2 5,908 2,494 1,235 Principal Building Activity

436

b39.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64,783 64,783 60,028 8,814 19,615 12,545 5,166 20,423 18,021 3,262 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,668 685 2,902 1,047 Q 461 1,159 330 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,786 462 2,891 1,282 Q 773 1,599 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 10,387 1,400 4,653 2,129 289 2,164 2,765 456 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 8,060 1,150 2,761 1,748 325 2,829 2,449 419 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 9,057 8,718 1,524 2,086 1,819 549 3,497 3,328 450 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 9,064 8,710 1,245 1,974 1,625 1,365 4,283 2,797 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 7,176 6,907 1,295 1,456 1,313 1,010 3,844 2,156 514 Over 500,000 .................................... 5,908 5,792

437

June2010.XLS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-2008 -2008 2009 2010 2011 CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun July Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1. Federal Loan Guarantee for Mississippi Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Moss Point, MS (DOE/EIS-0428) 2. Federal Loan Guarantee for Indiana Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, Rockport, IN (DOE/EIS-0429) 3. Federal Loan Guarantee to Support Construction of the Taylorville Energy Center, Taylorville, IL (DOE/EIS-0430) 4. Federal Loan Guarantee for the Medicine Bow Fuel and Power Coal-to-Liquid Facility, Carbon County, WY (DOE/EIS-0432) ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY 5. Presidential Permit Application, Energia Sierra Juarez

438

july2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2006 The weather through April 2006 continued to be warmer than in 2005. Year-to-date heating degree days were down almost 9.3 percent through April. For April alone heating degree days were down 13.8 percent from last year and were 24.0 percent lower than normal. Cooling degree days for April 2006 were 97 percent higher than last year, although April is not a significant month for space heating.

439

c12.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,488 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 172 328 173 2,449 4,128 2,091 70.4 79.4 82.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 150 380 228 2,060 4,018 2,979 73.0 94.6 76.7 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 214 438 281 2,124 3,947 2,993 100.7 111.1 94.0 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 219 354 152 2,155 3,427 1,593 101.7 103.2 95.3 Over 500,000 ................................... 176 421 Q 1,566 2,986 1,357 112.1 141.2 Q Principal Building Activity

440

c2.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 92,577 69,032 14,525 1,776 7,245 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 12,812 10,348 2,155 292 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 9,398 7,296 1,689 307 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 13,140 10,001 2,524 232 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 10,392 7,871 1,865 127 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 11,897 8,717 1,868 203 Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 13,391 9,500 1,737 272 Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 10,347 7,323 1,343 272 Q Over 500,000 .................................... 7 5,908 11,201 7,977 1,344 71 1,810 Principal Building Activity

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441

c11.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* ................................. Buildings* ................................. 1,188 2,208 2,425 13,374 29,260 22,149 88.8 75.5 109.5 Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 63 423 334 808 5,378 3,687 78.3 78.6 90.7 Food Sales ...................................... 144 Q Q 765 467 Q 188.5 Q Q Food Service ................................... 318 108 Q 986 664 Q 322.9 163.2 Q Health Care ..................................... 32 104 457 445 835 1,883 71.8 125.1 242.9 Inpatient ........................................ N Q 436 N 182 1,723 N Q 252.9 Outpatient ...................................... 32 66 Q 445 652 160 71.8 100.5 Q Lodging ........................................... 29 207 273 260 2,274 2,563 111.0 91.2 106.7 Retail (Other Than Mall)................... 110 137 72 1,363 2,133 821 80.9 64.1 87.8 Office ...............................................

442

c17.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

32 32 116 153 2,942 9,867 11,373 10.8 11.7 13.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 4 9 20 345 652 908 12.7 13.8 22.0 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 3 7 8 350 732 781 7.7 9.6 10.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 16 20 Q 1,390 1,934 Q 11.2 10.5 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 8 16 Q 944 1,534 Q 8.5 10.4 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 15 21 Q 1,524 1,618 Q 10.2 12.9 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 17 26 Q 1,703 1,671 Q 10.1 15.5 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 22 24 Q 1,673 1,801 Q 13.1 13.1 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 22 18 Q 1,248 1,126 Q 17.3 16.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 12 16 Q 1,384 1,990 Q 8.4 7.9 Food Sales .......................................

443

march2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: January 2007 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climatic Data Center, after "the 11th record warmest December on record in 2006", more typical winter conditions returned, particularly in the Eastern United States, in the latter part of January 2007. For the month, heating degree days were 26.1 percent higher than January 2006, but still 8.9 percent lower than normal. In January 2007, increased demand for winter heating, coupled with economic strength, as observed by growth in industrial production, resulted in a 7.7 percent growth in electricity generation compared to January 2006. (Industrial production increased 1.92

444

c38.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Worker Worker (million Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 9,475 116.44 62.2 108.3 1.33 11.43 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q Q 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 34,658 121.16 143.2 Q Q Q Over 500,000 .................................... 85,182 99.92 52.4 911.2 1.07 10.70 Principal Building Activity Education ..........................................

445

c6.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,344 21,521 31,595 18,118 16.79 12.74 16.22 19.88 1.65 1.26 1.35 1.60 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,298 3,235 4,752 2,526 19.47 15.74 19.77 23.48 2.24 1.71 1.88 1.89 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 1,806 1,694 3,368 2,529 17.72 14.50 18.24 22.49 1.61 1.08 1.27 2.04 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 2,606 3,157 4,530 2,846 17.56 13.85 18.09 19.03 1.32 1.02 1.03 1.36 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 1,768 3,033 3,422 2,170 16.61 12.27 16.67 19.02 1.37 1.18 1.08 1.32 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 3,479 2,592 3,959 1,866 17.16 12.25 15.52 20.88 1.71 1.15 1.15 1.41 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 3,292 3,029 5,328 1,743 15.74 12.02 14.20 17.92 1.55 1.32 1.53 1.48 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 2,877 2,798

446

august2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: June 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data According to the National Climatic Data Center, the first half of 2006 was the warmest on record in the U.S. since recordkeeping began in 1895. Year-to-date cooling degree days through June 2006 were 11.7% higher than in 2005, and June cooling degree days were 12.7 percent higher than normal. As a result, retail sales of electricity through June were up 1.0 percent year-to-date, and increased 1.1 percent compared to June 2005. The average retail price of electricity was up 11.3 percent year-to-date, largely due to higher fuel prices. Year-to-date net generation through June was 0.7 percent higher than in 2005. June 2006 generation was up 0.5 percent compared

447

P1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2011 P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2011 Alabama 19,381 195,581 8,374 0 Alaska 2,149 356,225 204,829 0 Arizona 8,111 168 37 1,345 Arkansas 133 1,072,212 5,877 0 California 0 250,177 193,691 4,321 Colorado 26,890 1,637,576 39,125 3,057 Connecticut 0 0 0 0 Delaware 0 0 0 0 District of Columbia 0 0 0 0 Florida 0 15,125 2,023 0 Georgia 0 0 0 2,456 Hawaii 0 0 0 0 Idaho 0 0 0 1,321 Illinois 37,938 2,121 9,234 30,068 Indiana 37,544 9,075 1,987 22,547 Iowa 0 0 0 87,314 Kansas 37 309,124 41,503 10,676 Kentucky 108,971 124,243 2,326 866 Louisiana 3,865 3,029,206 68,984 37 Maine 0 0 0 0 Maryland 2,937 34 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 0 0 Michigan 0 138,162 6,977 6,543 Minnesota 0 0 0 27,536 Mississippi 2,747 81,487 24,216 1,321 Missouri 465 0 118 6,261 Montana 42,008 74,624 24,151 0 Nebraska 0 1,959 2,542 47,120 Nevada 0 3 408 0 New Hampshire 0 0 0 0 New Jersey 0 0 0 0 New Mexico 21,922 1,237,303 71,274

448

january2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: November 2006 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data November is typically the month when generation reaches a trough before the winter season heating demand picks up in December. November 2006 was also warmer than normal and the heating degree days were 12.9 percent lower than normal. Consequently, total net generation in November 2006 was down 3.9 percent from October 2006, but was up 0.8 percent from November 2005. Similarly, retail sales of electricity in November 2006 were down 4.8 percent from October 2006, but were up 0.8 percent from November 2005. Year-to-date, through November 2006, total net generation rose 0.3 percent and retail sales of electricity were up 0.4 percent,

449

c20.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 224 166 219 161 10,393 17,076 11,375 15,172 9,290 11.5 13.1 14.6 14.5 17.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 19 26 14 31 23 1,204 1,595 918 1,759 871 15.7 16.5 14.9 17.8 26.3 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 11 17 12 24 13 1,124 1,547 950 1,738 839 9.9 10.9 12.8 13.7 15.3 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 29 23 25 24 2,183 3,140 1,402 2,822 1,823 8.3 9.2 16.1 9.0 13.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 18 24 15 25 22 1,451 2,199 1,272 2,027 1,435 12.2 10.8 11.6 12.3 15.1 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 15 32 24 28 19 1,295 2,549 1,823 2,037 1,327 11.8 12.6 13.2 13.8 14.3 100,001 to 200,000 ......................... 15 40 24 41 22 1,206 2,641 1,752 2,259 1,160 12.4 15.3 13.5 17.9 18.8 200,001 to 500,000 ......................... 14 27 21 25 19 1,115 1,943 1,619

450

november2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data

451

april2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February February 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Stan Kaplan at 202-287-1803, or at stan.kaplan@eia.doe.gov. * Change in total consumption or generation for the latest 12 month period (March 2004 to February 2005) compared to the prior 12 month period ( March 2003 to February 2004). Latest 12 Month Period* 6.0% 0.8% n/a Year to Date: -2.9% -1.4% n/a February 2004 -11.9% -2.7% -8.4% January 2005

452

c7.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

294 294 978 1,254 2,964 9,941 11,595 99.0 98.3 108.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 33 85 146 360 666 974 91.2 128.1 149.7 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 64 73 359 764 843 Q 83.7 86.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 115 163 553 1,419 1,934 Q 81.2 84.3 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 74 140 347 944 1,618 Q 78.7 86.8 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 134 148 516 1,524 1,618 Q 87.8 91.5 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 150 203 414 1,703 1,682 Q 87.9 120.8 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 177 214 Q 1,673 1,801 Q 105.8 118.8 Over 500,000 .................................... Q Q Q Q 1,248 1,126 Q Q Q Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 143

453

c35.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 65 170 104 63 6,080 2,832 4,122 2,123 0.21 0.06 0.03 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................... 381 Q Q Q 757 Q 255 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................... 375 63 Q Q 1,704 643 833 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 .................................. 509 20 44 Q 3,618 1,983 3,034 1,673 0.14 0.01 0.01 Q Principal Building Activity Education ........................................ 282 Q Q Q 933 Q Q Q 0.30 Q Q Q Health Care...................................... Q Q 17 7 Q 492 786 262 Q Q 0.02 0.03 Office .............................................. 105 6 14 1 1,379 714 1,235 748 0.08 0.01 0.01 0.00 All Others ........................................ 837 Q 44 40 3,426 1,281 1,644 984 0.24 Q 0.03 Q Year Constructed 1945 or Before ................................ 555 Q Q Q 2,126 Q Q Q 0.26 Q Q Q 1946 to 1959 ...................................

454

c24.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* ................................. Buildings* ................................. 782 43.0 36.0 17.6 37.1 70.9 6.1 0.33 7.77 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................. 219 78.7 42.6 23.7 46.3 92.0 1.9 0.70 8.88 5,001 to 10,000 ............................... 408 54.8 42.5 13.9 28.8 65.7 3.4 0.46 8.34 10,001 to 25,000 ............................. 667 42.5 40.8 14.4 29.2 52.1 5.6 0.36 8.41 25,001 to 50,000 ............................. 1,483 41.5 39.1 16.0 31.5 55.3 11.1 0.31 7.46 50,001 to 100,000 ............................ 2,498 35.4 39.1 10.1 27.6 48.8 19.7 0.28 7.90 100,001 to 200,000 .......................... 5,029 36.3 26.1 6.1 23.6 55.2 36.2 0.26 7.19 200,001 to 500,000 .......................... 10,234 35.0 35.5 10.0 22.7 47.2 69.2 0.24 6.76 Over 500,000 ................................... 39,551 43.0 28.8 2.8 20.0

455

c27.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73 73 343 512 1,465 7,716 9,570 49.5 44.4 53.5 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... Q 41 68 Q 417 729 Q 99.5 93.6 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. Q 31 43 Q 482 654 Q 64.8 66.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... Q 45 90 Q 931 1,681 Q 47.9 53.6 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... Q 39 70 Q 829 1,422 Q 47.4 49.5 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. Q 43 73 Q 1,263 1,554 Q 34.1 47.2 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... Q 41 67 Q 1,445 1,264 Q 28.3 52.7 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... Q 55 56 Q 1,484 1,277 Q 37.3 44.1 Over 500,000 .................................... Q 47 44 Q 865 989 Q 54.0 44.4 Principal Building Activity Education .......................................... Q 49 99 Q 1,247 1,804 Q 39.5 54.6 Food Sales .......................................

456

c4.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings* .................................. Buildings* .................................. 4,645 64,783 13.9 92,577 19.9 1.43 15.91 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 2,552 6,789 2.7 12,812 5.0 1.89 19.08 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 889 6,585 7.4 9,398 10.6 1.43 18.22 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 738 11,535 15.6 13,140 17.8 1.14 16.93 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 241 8,668 35.9 10,392 43.1 1.20 15.44 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 129 9,057 70.4 11,897 92.5 1.31 15.68 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 65 9,064 138.8 13,391 205.1 1.48 14.34 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 25 7,176 289.0 10,347 416.7 1.44 14.28 Over 500,000 .................................... 7 5,908 896.1 11,201 1698.8 1.90 14.62 Principal Building Activity

457

c33.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

per per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Worker (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings* .................................. 3,555 0.11 81.6 3.9 0.12 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 1,187 0.41 315.2 1.4 0.49 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 2,639 0.37 456.4 3.1 0.43 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 3,238 0.20 218.5 3.8 0.24 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 5,383 0.14 109.4 5.8 0.15 1.08 50,001 to 100,000 ............................. 8,163 0.11 78.4 8.8 0.12 1.08 100,001 to 200,000 ........................... 12,681 0.09 80.6 13.1 0.09 1.03 200,001 to 500,000 ........................... 22,353 0.08 62.1 23.6 0.08

458

october2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: August 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov.

459

P2.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 Alabama 468.7 226.8 48.6 411.8 0.0 245.3 245.3 1,401.2 Alaska 33.5 404.7 1,188.0 0.0 0.0 15.7 15.7 1,641.9 Arizona 174.8 0.2 0.2 327.3 7.8 107.4 115.2 617.7 Arkansas 3.0 1,090.9 34.1 148.5 0.0 113.5 113.5 1,390.0 California 0.0 279.7 1,123.4 383.6 25.0 812.8 837.8 2,624.6 Colorado 586.8 1,831.2 226.9 0.0 17.7 84.0 101.7 2,746.7 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 166.7 0.0 29.9 29.9 196.5 Delaware 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.8 3.8 3.8 District of Columbia 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 0.1 0.1 Florida 0.0 15.4 11.7 230.4 0.0 266.7 266.7 524.2 Georgia 0.0 0.0 0.0 338.1 14.2 192.1 206.3 544.4 Hawaii 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 19.1 19.1 19.1 Idaho 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 7.6 172.8 180.4 180.4 Illinois 864.2 3.7 53.6 1,002.7 174.0 102.3 276.3 2,200.5 Indiana 841.0 9.2 11.5 0.0 130.5 71.2 201.7 1,063.4 Iowa 0.0 0.0 0.0 54.6 505.3 140.7 645.9 700.5 Kansas 0.8 356.8 240.7 76.6 61.8

460

june2005.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Stock Trends and Stock Trends Page 5 6. Month-to-Month Comparisons: Electric Power Retail Sales and Average Prices Page 6 7. Retail Sales Trends Page 7 8. Average Retail Price Trends Page 8 9. Heating and Cooling Degree Days Page 9 10. Documentation Page 10 Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: April 2005 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

oil1993.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(thousand Household Member (thousand Household Member Building Foot Household Member Characteristics (million) (million) sq. ft.) Btu) Btu) (million Btu) (million Btu) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) (dollars) Total U.S. Households 13.8 11.6 29.8 92 36 77.5 28 604 0.23 506 186 Census Region and Division Northeast 7.9 5.9 17.2 133 45 98.7 36 854 0.29 636 234 New England 2.8 2.4 6.6 125 45 105.6 40 819 0.30 691 262 Middle Atlantic 5.0 3.5 10.6 138 45 94.8 34 878 0.29 605 219 Midwest 2.3 2.2 6.0 60 22 58.4 21 378 0.14 370 132 East North Central 1.5 1.5 4.1 51 19 49.3 18 328 0.12 318 116 West North Central 0.7 0.7 2.0 78 29 77.8 27 481 0.18 481 165 South 3.1 2.9 5.4 43 24 41.0 15 306 0.17 292 108 South Atlantic 2.6 2.5 4.6 47 26 44.4 16 334 0.18 316 116 East South Central 0.4 0.4 0.6 24 14 23.8 9 168 0.10 168 65 West South Central Q Q Q 5 2 4.8 2 47 0.02 47 18 West 0.6 0.5 1.2 61 27 58.8 23 444 0.20 427 164 Mountain

462

april2006.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Monthly Flash Estimates of Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: February 2006 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Orhan Yildiz at 202-287-1586, or at Orhan.Yildiz@eia.doe.gov. Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data After an unusually warm January, February weather reverted to a historically more normal seasonal pattern. February 2006 heating degree days were, however, still 8 percent higher than in February 2005, which had been warmer than normal.

463

sup_elec.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Electric Power Projections for EMM Region 0. Electric Power Projections for EMM Region East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Electricity Generating Capacity 1/ (gigawatts) Coal Steam 84.34 84.34 84.33 84.17 83.59 82.17 81.85 81.85 81.32 81.32 81.32 81.32 81.32 Other Fossil Steam 2/ 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.83 3.81 3.81 3.81 3.81 3.81 Combined Cycle 4.24 8.72 11.97 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.91 12.91 13.96 14.60 15.67 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 13.84 19.59 21.22 21.22 21.14 21.14 21.11 21.08 18.97 19.21 19.83 19.93 20.20 Nuclear Power 7.68 7.69 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 7.72 Pumped Storage/Other 3/ 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 3.36 Fuel Cells 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Renewable Sources 4/ 1.72

464

march2007.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data During March 2007, the contiguous U.S. experienced the second warmest March over the 1895-2007 time period. Heating degree days were 15.7 percent lower than normal, as measured over the 1971-2000 time period, and 16.7 percent lower than March 2006. Despite the unseasonably warm March, retail sales of electricity increased 0.8 percent compared to March 2006, while March 2007 generation of electric power increased 0.9 percent over March 2006. These increases were primarily due to economic growth, evident by a 2.1-percent increase in the real gross domestic product for the U.S. in the first quarter of 2007 over the first quarter of 2006. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for March 2007 showed a 5.0-percent

465

2010 APS.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Allison to Marcinowski SUBJECT: NEPA 2010 APS for DOE-SRS Allison to Marcinowski SUBJECT: NEPA 2010 APS for DOE-SRS *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain tbd FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost tbd Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-10 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) DOE SRS expects to initiate one or more new EAs over the next 12 months. * Please include projected NEPA milestones, if planned. 1 of 6 Annual NEPA Planning Summary (2010) DOE Savannah River Site Attachment: Memo, Allison to Marcinowski SUBJECT: NEPA 2010 APS for DOE-SRS *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:

466

LNG 2006.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Algeria 3.0 2.8 3.0 2.8 0.0 2.8 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 17.4 Malaysia 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Nigeria 3.0 3.1 0.0 6.0 3.1 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.0 9.0 5.7 3.1 57.3 Oman 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Trinidad 30.5 27.6 30.2 36.4 44.3 38.6 33.4 37.0 25.2 24.7 24.6 36.7 389.3 Egypt 3.0 5.3 0.0 13.6 19.8 14.3 15.0 8.9 8.8 2.6 16.9 11.4 119.5 Qatar 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 TOTAL 39.5 38.7 33.2 58.8 67.3 61.7 57.6 52.1 40.0 36.2 47.2 51.2 583.5 LNG Imports by Receiving Terminal (Bcf) 2006 Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec TOTAL Cove Point, MD 11.9 11.0 8.9 14.4 11.6 14.6 12.0 11.8 5.4 3.0 3.0 9.0 116.6 Elba Island, GA 7.9 7.9 7.9 13.4 13.7 13.8 13.6 16.8 13.9 10.4 13.5 14.0 146.8 Everett, MA 16.6 16.8 16.4 13.9 16.6 13.6 14.3 14.2 9.1 13.9 14.0 16.6 176.1 Lake Charles, LA 3.0 3.1

467

Webinar Schedule.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Session Session Date Time Conference Number iPortal Web Conference ID Session 1 Monday, September 14 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259443 Session 2 Monday, September 14 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259451 Session 3 Tuesday, September 15 12:00 PM ET 202-586-9248 259463 Session 4 Tuesday, September 15 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259476 Session 5 Wednesday, September 16 12:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259481 Session 6 Wednesday, September 16 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259491 Session 7 Thursday, September 17 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259505 Session 8 Thursday, September 17 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259519 Session 9 Friday, September 18 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259522 Session 10 Friday, September 18 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073 259540 Session 11 Monday, September 21 12:00 PM ET 202-287-5293 259557 Session 12 Monday, September 21 03:00 PM ET 301-903-7073

468

b36.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 386 Q 28 107 248 9,874 Q 332 4,202 5,299 Food Sales ... 226 Q Q 45 142 1,255 Q Q 317 812 Food...

469

b42.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... 386 298 184 81 34 9,874 9,481 5,343 1,766 2,372 Food Sales ... 226 186 148 Q Q 1,255 1,130 844 Q Q Food...

470

c11.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 109 287 515 1,181 3,222 4,115 92.2 89.1 125.2 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 114 431 611 1,175 4,662 4,931 97.4 92.5 123.9 Lighting...

471

c10.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

219 285 224 125 58 1,983 2,300 2,297 1,388 550 110.4 124.1 97.4 89.8 106.2 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 262 345 292 187 72 2,415 3,076 2,660 1,879 738 108.4 112.0...

472

c5.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 265 294 201 151 2,489 2,586 1,936 1,507 106.5 113.9 103.7 100.0 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 338 369 278 172 3,027 3,332 2,584 1,825 111.7 110.8 107.4...

473

c9.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wall Re-Configuration ... 46 83 68 566 637 870 81.3 129.9 78.1 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 54 92 79 561 776 1,049 96.3 118.9 75.6 Lighting Upgrade...

474

c4.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wall Re-Configuration ... 411 8,518 20.7 13,131 32.0 1.54 14.41 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 442 10,768 24.4 16,899 38.3 1.57 14.61 Lighting Upgrade...

475

c3.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wall Re-Configuration ... 411 8,518 20.7 911 2,218 107.0 81.4 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 442 10,768 24.4 1,156 2,619 107.4 83.5 Lighting Upgrade...

476

c12.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wall Re-Configuration ... 378 534 N 4,191 4,327 N 90.1 123.3 N HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 510 646 N 5,436 5,332 N 93.9 121.2 N Lighting Upgrade...

477

c7.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 73 192 220 639 1,850 1,709 114.9 103.6 128.7 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 75 263 257 739 2,287 2,136 101.7 115.0 120.6 Lighting...

478

c30.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

98 122 57 38 17 1,605 1,958 1,881 1,162 413 61.0 62.2 30.2 33.0 40.1 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 123 154 88 68 20 1,956 2,537 1,996 1,488 506 62.7 60.7...

479

c8.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wall Re-Configuration ... 75 107 Q 877 1,036 334 85.0 103.7 Q HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 112 161 63 1,197 1,559 464 93.3 103.1 135.6 Lighting...

480

c31.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Re-Configuration ... 46 108 178 770 2,479 3,769 59.7 43.5 47.1 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 51 181 220 769 3,566 4,148 66.8 50.8 53.1 Lighting...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xls csv graph" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

c25.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 87 134 54 56 2,005 2,347 1,417 1,250 43.6 56.9 38.2 45.0 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 114 188 88 63 2,265 3,003 1,713 1,501 50.2 62.8 51.3...

482

c6.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,296 3,448 2,812 2,575 16.20 11.71 14.00 17.09 1.73 1.33 1.45 1.71 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 5,929 4,223 3,914 2,832 17.53 11.44 14.10 16.51 1.96 1.27...

483

c24.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Re-Configuration ... 1,191 47.2 36.1 21.6 39.7 71.1 8.7 0.35 7.33 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 1,480 53.4 40.5 19.2 40.9 74.1 10.7 0.39 7.24 Lighting...

484

c20.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

26 34 27 20 11 1,983 2,300 2,282 1,388 548 13.1 14.8 11.9 14.1 19.9 HVAC Equipment Upgrade ... 31 43 39 28 14 2,415 3,076 2,660 1,879 736 12.7 14.0 14.8...

485

a1.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4,859 71,658 14.7 5.0 Table A1. Summary Table for All Buildings (Including Malls), 2003 Climate Zone: 30-Year Average Under 2,000 CDD and -- More than 7,000 HDD...

486

oil1984.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5.7 13.9 93 38 81.9 30 732 0.30 642 233 Rural 6.2 5.7 11.4 61 30 55.9 20 476 0.24 438 155 Climate Zone (1) Fewer than 2,000 CDD and-- More than 7,000 HDD 2.1 1.8 4.4 95 38 80.5 30...

487

oil1990.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17.2 83 32 73.2 26 669 0.26 588 208 Suburban 4.8 4.5 9.2 58 28 54.6 19 463 0.23 439 156 Climate Zone (1) Fewer than 2,000 CDD and-- More than 7,000 HDD 2.7 2.5 6.5 90 34 81.6 30...

488

sup_elec.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

gas, and blast furnace gas for utilities; and hydrogen, sulfur, batteries, chemicals, fish oil, and spent sulfite liquor. 4 Includes conventional hydroelectric, geothermal,...

489

OMBDOEFAIR2005.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 WAPA CO Loveland US 1 Q560 C A 1999 9976 019 50 WAPA CO Loveland US 1 Q560 C A 1999 9977 019 50 WAPA CO Loveland US 1 Q560 I 1999 9978 019 50 WAPA CO Loveland US 1 Q560 C A...

490

february2010.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of electricity remained relatively unchanged from December 2008. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.0 percent in December 2009 compared to the previous year....

491

april2007.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

billing cycles tend to lag electricity production in many areas. The average U.S. retail price of electricity in February 2007 showed a 3.7-percent jump from February 2006, and a...

492

c33.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons)...

493

b1.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ... 2,581 51,163 63,597 19.8 804 66 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 252 15,630 21,642 62.0 722 69 Window...

494

c34.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ... 4,342 0.10 74.7 4.8 0.11 1.11 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 6,819 0.03 21.4 7.4 0.04 1.09...

495

c29.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 131 138 138 3,866 2,404 4,522 33.9 57.5 30.6 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 39 44 37 1,448 680 1,657 26.8 64.0...

496

c27.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 62 303 439 1,221 6,927 8,008 51.0 43.8 54.9 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... Q 90 141 Q 1,961 2,522 Q 45.8 55.9...

497

c35.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,156 110 98 49 5,602 2,638 3,898 2,015 0.21 0.04 0.03 Q Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 156 13 39 Q 1,798 1,395 1,996 1,173 0.09...

498

c33.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

HVAC Maintenance ... 4,342 0.10 74.7 4.8 0.11 1.11 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 6,819 0.03 21.4 7.4 0.04 1.09...

499

c38.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Maintenance ... 10,171 118.71 60.9 116.2 1.36 11.42 Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 18,226 115.02 76.7 207.1 1.31 11.36...

500

c36.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 1,261 123 117 Q 1.09 1.12 1.20 1.30 0.23 0.05 0.03 Q Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) ... 166 14 42 Q 1.06 1.12 1.08 1.31 0.09...