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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Waste Heat Recovery  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DRAFT - PRE-DECISIONAL - DRAFT 1 Waste Heat Recovery 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the TechnologySystem ......

2

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Combined Heat and Power, Waste Heat, and District Energy Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership...

3

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation covers typical sources of waste heat from process heating equipment, characteristics of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power.

4

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(ex: organic Rankine cycle) High installed KW capital Low temperature waste heat (<100C) is not practicable Further efficiency loss in electrolytic conversion to...

5

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Skutterudite TE modules were...

6

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for...

7

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

electrolytic cell, designed to integrate waste heat recovery (i.e a microbial heat recovery cell or MHRC), can operate as a fuel cell and convert effluent streams into...

8

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste heat Pyroelectric energy3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Relaxor

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Survey of Climate Conditions for Demonstration of a Large Scale of Solar Energy Heating in Xi'an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scale solar energy heating applications in urban residential buildings. In this paper, Xi'an's geographical situation and climate conditions are fully analyzed. The survey on solar energy resources, and the feasibility of solar energy heating on a large scale...

Li, A.; Liu, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Waste Heat as Energy Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

References on waste heat utilization were compiled, covering citations from the NTIS data base for the period 1964 to March 1978. The bibliography contains 253 abstracts, 37 of which are new entries to the pre...

Prof. Dr. Anthony Delyannis; Dr. Euridike-Emmy Delyannis

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Waste Heat Recovery Opportunities for Thermoelectric Generators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Thermoelectrics have unique advantages for integration into selected waste heat recovery applications.

12

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Heat4 Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using RelaxorWaste heat Pyroelectric energy

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organic Rankine cycle waste heat power conversion system. Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat Recovery. Journal ofRankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing Processes.

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Process Heating Equipment - Cross-cutting Research and Development Priorities Speaker(s): Sachin Nimbalkar Date: January 17, 2013 - 11:00am Location: 90-2063 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Aimee McKane Waste heat is generated from several industrial systems used in manufacturing. The waste heat sources are distributed throughout a plant. The largest source for most industries is exhaust / flue gases or heated air from heating systems. This includes the high temperature gases from burners in process heating, lower temperature gases from heat treat, dryers, and heaters, heat from heat exchangers, cooling liquids and gases etc. The previous studies and direct contact with the industry as well as equipment suppliers have shown that a large amount of waste heat is not

15

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

itself * Waste heat recovery or auxiliary or adjoining systems within a plant * Waste heat to power conversion Recycle Copyrighted - E3M Inc. August 20, 2009 Arvind Thekdi, E3M...

16

Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of waste heat streams, and options for recovery including Combined Heat and Power. Waste Heat Management Options for Improving Industrial Process Heating Systems...

17

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

18

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

19

Characterization of industrial process waste heat and input heat streams  

SciTech Connect

The nature and extent of industrial waste heat associated with the manufacturing sector of the US economy are identified. Industry energy information is reviewed and the energy content in waste heat streams emanating from 108 energy-intensive industrial processes is estimated. Generic types of process equipment are identified and the energy content in gaseous, liquid, and steam waste streams emanating from this equipment is evaluated. Matchups between the energy content of waste heat streams and candidate uses are identified. The resultant matrix identifies 256 source/sink (waste heat/candidate input heat) temperature combinations. (MHR)

Wilfert, G.L.; Huber, H.B.; Dodge, R.E.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.; Griffin, E.A.; Brown, D.R.; Moore, N.L.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Waste Heat Management Options: Industrial Process Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Management Options Heat Management Options Industrial Process Heating Systems By Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi E-mail: athekdi@e3minc.com E3M, Inc. August 20, 2009 2 Source of Waste Heat in Industries * Steam Generation * Fluid Heating * Calcining * Drying * Heat Treating * Metal Heating * Metal and Non-metal Melting * Smelting, agglomeration etc. * Curing and Forming * Other Heating Waste heat is everywhere! Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc Arvind Thekdi, E3M Inc 3 Waste Heat Sources from Process Heating Equipment * Hot gases - combustion products - Temperature from 300 deg. F. to 3000 deg.F. * Radiation-Convection heat loss - From temperature source of 500 deg. F. to 2500 deg. F. * Sensible-latent heat in heated product - From temperature 400 deg. F. to 2200 deg. F. * Cooling water or other liquids - Temperature from 100 deg. F. to 180 deg. F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Waste Heat Recapture from Supermarket Refrigeration Systems  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to determine the potential energy savings associated with improved utilization of waste heat from supermarket refrigeration systems. Existing and advanced strategies for waste heat recovery in supermarkets were analyzed, including options from advanced sources such as combined heat and power (CHP), micro-turbines and fuel cells.

Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Industrial Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, some common and emerging techniques to better utilize energy in the chemical process industries are discussed. Temperature levels of waste heat available are pointed out. Emerging practices for further economical utilization of waste...

Altin, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Estimating heat of combustion for waste materials  

SciTech Connect

Describes a method of estimating the heat of combustion of hydrocarbon waste (containing S,N,Q,C1) in various physical forms (vapor, liquid, solid, or mixtures) when the composition of the waste stream is known or can be estimated. Presents an equation for predicting the heat of combustion of hydrocarbons containing some sulfur. Shows how the method is convenient for estimating the heat of combustion of a waste profile as shown in a sample calculation.

Chang, Y.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference (presentation) - "Status of a Cylindrical Waste Heat Power Generator for Vehicles Development Program", J. LaGrandeur, L. Bell, D. Crane *...

25

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or otherwise restricted information Project ID ace47lagrandeur Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- 2009 Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

26

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Start Date: Oct '04 Program End date: Oct '10 Percent Complete: 80% 2 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program- Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review- June...

27

Vehicle Technologies Office: Waste Heat Recovery | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

28

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. - Allentown, PA A microbial reverse electrodialysis...

29

2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Development of a 100-Watt High...

30

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Presents successful...

31

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Development...

32

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-- Washington D.C. ace47lagrandeur.pdf More Documents & Publications Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program 2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery...

33

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

34

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An Overview of Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Activities in Europe An overview presentation of R&D...

35

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles Thermoelectric Waste Heat Recovery Program for Passenger Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

36

Sundstrand waste heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

The two programs discussed in this report deal with the use of organic Rankine cycle systems as a means of producing electrical or mechanical power from energy in industrial processes' exhaust. Both programs deal with the design, development, demonstration, and economic evaluation of a 600kWe organic Rankine cycle system designed to recover energy from the exhaust of industrial processes with exhaust gas temperatures of 600/sup 0/F or above. The work done has, through the successful operation of the units installed, demonstrated the technical feasibility of utilizing an organic Rankine cycle bottoming system as a means of conserving energy through waste heat utilization. Continued operation at several sites has also demonstrated the soundness of the design, overall system reliability, and low operating cost. In addition, the basis under which this technology is economically viable in industrial applications was established. As a result of market studies and experience gained from the application of the units addressed in this report, it is concluded that there is a significant market for the equipment at the installed cost level of $1200/kWe to $1500/kWe and that this goal is achievable in the proper manufacturing environment. 54 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on feedwater economizers for waste heat recovery provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Heat Recovery Power Generation with WOWGen? Business Overview WOW operates in the energy efficiency field - one of the fastest growing energy sectors in the world today. The two key products - WOWGen? and WOWClean? provide more... energy at cheaper cost and lower emissions. ? WOWGen? - Power Generation from Industrial Waste Heat ? WOWClean? - Multi Pollutant emission control system Current power generation technology uses only 35% of the energy in a fossil fuel...

Romero, M.

39

HEAT RECOVERY FROM WASTE WATER BY MEANS OF A RECUPERATIVE HEAT EXCHANGER AND A HEAT PUMP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The useful heat of warm waste water is generally transferred to cold water using a recuperative heat exchanger. Depending on its design, the heat exchanger is able to utilise up to 90% of the waste heat potential available. The electric energy needed to operate such a system is more than compensated for by an approximately 50-fold gain of useful heat. To increase substantially the waste heat potential available and the amount of heat recovered, the system for recuperative heat exchange can be complemented by a heat pump. Such a heat recovery system on the basis of waste water is being operated in a public indoor swimming pool. Here the recuperative heat exchanger accounts for about 60%, the heat pump for about 40% of the toal heat reclaimed. The system consumes only 1 kWh of electric energy to supply 8 kWh of useful heat. In this way the useful heat of 8 kWh is compensated for by the low consumption of primary energy of 2.8 kWh. Due to the installation of an automatic cleaning device, the heat transfer surfaces on the waste water side avoid deposits so that the troublesome maintenance work required in other cases on the heat exchangers is not required. KEYWORDS Shower drain water, recuperative heat recovery, heat recovery by means of a heat pump, combination of both types of heat recovery, automatic cleaning device for the heat exchangers, ratio of useful heat supply vs. electric energy consumption, economic consideration.

K. Biasin; F.D. Heidt

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Develop thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery with a 10% fuel economy improvement without increasing emissions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Utilization of waste heat stream in distillation  

SciTech Connect

Cost of separation can be reduced by utilizing all available energy streams at various temperature levels. In the simplest case a waste energy heat stream can be used to partially vaporize a liquid feed stream. A more beneficial process involves an entire evaporation of a portion of the feed and introducing it into a column below the liquid portion of the feed. One can also use the waste energy stream as a heating medium in an intermediate reboiler in the column. There is, however, a limit to the amount of the waste energy that can be utilized in each case, beyond which this approach is no longer beneficial. Detailed analysis of the waste heat utilization enables one to determine this limit and compare each of these flowsheet options.

Fidkowski, Z.T.; Agrawal, R. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thermoelectric recovery of waste heat -- Case studies  

SciTech Connect

The use of waste heat as an energy source for thermoelectric generation largely removes the constraint for the wide scale application of this technology imposed by its relatively low conversion efficiency (typically about 5%). Paradoxically, in some parasitic applications, a low conversion efficiency can be viewed as a distinct advantage. However, commercially available thermoelectric modules are designed primarily for refrigerating applications and are less reliable when operated at elevated temperatures. Consequently, a major factor which determines the economic competitiveness of thermoelectric recovery of waste heat is the cost per watt divided by the mean-time between module failures. In this paper is reported the development of a waste, warm water powered thermoelectric generator, one target in a NEDO sponsored project to economically recover waste heat. As an application of this technology case studies are considered in which thermoelectric generators are operated in both active and parasitic modes to generate electrical power for a central heating system. It is concluded that, in applications when the supply of heat essentially is free as with waste heat, thermoelectrics can compete economically with conventional methods of electrical power generation. Also, in this situation, and when the generating system is operated in a parasitic mode, conversion efficiency is not an important consideration.

Rowe, M.D.; Min, G.; Williams, S.G.K.; Aoune, A. [Cardiff School of Engineering (United Kingdom). Div. of Electronic Engineering; Matsuura, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Kuznetsov, V.L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Fu, L.W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Microelectronics Inst.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

[Waste water heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

Not Available

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

Waste-heat recovery in batch processes using heat storage  

SciTech Connect

The waste-heat recovery in batch processes has been studied using the pinch-point method. The aim of the work has been to investigate theoretical and practical approaches to the design of heat-exchanger networks, including heat storage, for waste-heat recovery in batch processes. The study is limited to the incorporation of energy-storage systems based on fixed-temperature variable-mass stores. The background for preferring this to the alternatives (variable-temperature fixed-mass and constant-mass constant-temperature (latent-heat) stores) is given. It is shown that the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method (time average model, TAM) can be achieved by locating energy stores at either end of each process stream. This theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. A simple procedure for determining a number of heat-storage tanks sufficient to achieve the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method is described. This procedure relies on combinatorial considerations, and could therefore be labeled the combinatorial method for incorporation of heat storage in heat-exchanger networks. Qualitative arguments justifying the procedure are presented. For simple systems, waste-heat recovery systems with only three heat-storage temperatures (a hot storage, a cold storage, and a heat store at the pinch temperature) often can achieve the maximum energy-saving targets. Through case studies, six of which are presented, it is found that a theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. The description of these six cases is intended to be sufficiently detailed to serve as benchmark cases for development of alternative methods.

Stoltze, S.; Mikkelsen, J.; Lorentzen, B.; Petersen, P.M.; Qvale, B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. for Energetics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Harvesting Electricity From Wasted Heat  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientists as SLAC National Laboratory explain the concept, Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE), and how this process can capture more energy from photovoltaic panels by harnessing heat energy from sunlight.

Schwede, Jared

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery from refrigeration machines is a concept which has great potential for implementation in many businesses. If a parallel requirement for refrigeration and hot water exists, the installation of a system to provide hot water as a by...

Jackson, H. Z.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Harvesting Electricity From Wasted Heat  

SciTech Connect

Scientists as SLAC National Laboratory explain the concept, Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE), and how this process can capture more energy from photovoltaic panels by harnessing heat energy from sunlight.

Schwede, Jared

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

6th International Symposium on Multiphase Flow, Heat Mass Transfer and Energy Conversion Xi'an, China, 11-15 July 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6th International Symposium on Multiphase Flow, Heat Mass Transfer and Energy Conversion Xi in pipeline transportation, where it is important to identify and control bottlenecks influence on production be viewed as the hydrodynamic equivalent of the Mach number for gas flows. Simplified hydraulic theories

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

49

6th International Symposium on Multiphase Flow, Heat Mass Transfer and Energy Conversion Xi'an, China, 11-15 July 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6th International Symposium on Multiphase Flow, Heat Mass Transfer and Energy Conversion Xi, hydrogen fuel, obtained from ethanol, is a potentially strong contender as an energy carrier based for more secure and cleaner energy carrier (Barreto, Makihira, and Riahi 2003). Hydrogen can be produced

Khandekar, Sameer

50

Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and to a system and method for regulation of a fluid inventory in a condenser and a receiver of a Rankine cycle WHR system. Such regulation includes the ability to regulate the pressure in a WHR system to control cavitation and energy conversion.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet recommends installing waste heat recovery systems for fuel-fired furnaces to increase the energy efficiency of process heating systems.

52

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites, TAGS, PbTe and Bi2Te3 Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Electric Power using Skutterudites, TAGS, PbTe and Bi2Te3...

53

Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generator (Waste Heat 1) - TEG 1 (preliminary assembly and testing) - TEG 2 (Bi-Te modules) - TEG 3 (Skutterudite and Bi-Te modules) * Develop Cost-Effective TEG (Waste Heat...

54

Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle Thermoelectrici Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine-Powered Vehicle 2005...

55

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

141 Open ORC Systemfor Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorof an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System for Waste Heat

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Resource recovery waste heat boiler upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The waste heat boilers installed in a 360 TPD waste to energy plant were identified as the bottle neck for an effort to increase plant capacity. These boilers were successfully modified to accommodate the increase of plant capacity to 408 TPD, improve steam cycle performance and reduce boiler tube failures. The project demonstrated how engineering and operation can work together to identify problems and develop solutions that satisfy engineering, operation, and financial objectives. Plant checking and testing, design review and specification development, installation and operation results are presented.

Kuten, P.; McClanahan, D.E. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Gehring, P.R.; Toto, M.L. [SRRI, Springfield, MA (United States); Davis, J.J. [Deltak, Minon, MN (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Energy Efficient Design of a Waste Heat Rejection System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and oil preheaters. The heating requirements for these heat sinks are generally met by burning fossil fuels or even by using electric heaters while available waste heat is rejected to the surrounding environment using devices such as cooling towers...

Mehta, P.

58

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-L. Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heatNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste Heat to Electricity in an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

truck system. schock.pdf More Documents & Publications Thermoelectric Conversion of Wate Heat to Electricity in an IC Engine Powered Vehicle Thermoelectric Conversion of Waste...

60

New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Water Reuse ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE New Advanced System Utilizes Industrial Waste Heat to Power Water Purification Introduction As population growth and associated factors...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling, Estimation, and Control of Waste Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Open Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC)138 Evaporatorand Simulation of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) System forControl of Organic Rankine Cycles in Waste Heat Uti- lizing

Luong, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Industrial waste heat recovery and cogeneration involving organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper proposes a systematic approach for energy integration involving waste heat recovery through an organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The proposed approach is based...

Csar Giovani Gutirrez-Arriaga

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging,...

64

Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Recovery Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Electrical and Thermal Transport Optimization of High Efficient n-type Skutterudites...

65

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview and status of project to develop thermoelectric generator for automotive waste heat recovery and achieve at least 10% fuel economy improvement.

66

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

Xu, Xianfan

67

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling telluride TEMs. Key words: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from

Xu, Xianfan

68

Waste Heat Energy Harvesting Using Olsen Cycle on PZN-5.5PT Single Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy converter for waste heat energy harvesting using co-Pilon, L. Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting usingNo.3, pp.035015, 2012. WASTE HEAT ENERGY HARVESTING USING

McKinley, Ian Meeker; Kandilian, Razmig; Pilon, Laurent

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on Combustion Engines High-Temperature Components for Rankine-Cycle-Based Waste Heat Recovery Systems on...

70

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program...

71

High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation High-Efficiency Quantum-Well Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Power Generation 2005 Diesel Engine...

72

Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future, Vol.VIII-8-1 Economic Analysis and Comparison of Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Heating and Air-conditioning System Chunlei Zhang Suilin Wang Hongbing Chen...

Zhang, C.; Wang, S.; Chen, H.; Shi, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Waste Heat Boilers for Incineration Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Incineration is a widely used process for disposing of solid, liquid and gaseous wastes generated in various types of industries. In addition to destroying pollutants, energy may also be recovered from the waste gas streams in the form of steam...

Ganapathy, V.

74

Power Generation From Waste Heat Using Organic Rankine Cycle Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many efforts are currently being pursued to develop and implement new energy technologies aimed at meeting our national energy goals The use of organic Rankine cycle engines to generate power from waste heat provides a near term means to greatly...

Prasad, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Waste-heat-driven refrigeration plants for freezer trawlers  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is made of the possibility of utilizing waste heat from a proposed gas-turbine fishing-vessel propulsion engine to power a refrigeration plant. On the basis of superior volume, maintenance and reliability, and cost and availability, the ammonia-water absorption system is chosen over the other waste-heat-driven option considered. It is found to be comparable in volume and in maintenance and reliability to the conventional vapor-compression system.

Kellen, A.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Model developed provides effective guidelines to designing thermoelectric generation systems for automotive waste heat recovery applications

77

Economic Analysis of a Waste Water Resource Heat Pump Air-Conditioning System in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the situation of waste water resource in north China and the characteristics and styles of a waste water resource heat pump system, and analyzes the economic feasibility of a waste water resource heat pump air...

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Dai, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A review of different heat exchangers designs for increasing the diesel exhaust waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, after a short review of waste heat recovery technologies from diesel engines, the heat exchangers (HEXs) used in exhaust of engines is introduced as the most common way. So, a short review of the technologies that increase the heat transfer in \\{HEXs\\} is introduced and the availability of using them in the exhaust of engines is evaluated and finally a complete review of different \\{HEXs\\} which previously were designed for increasing the exhaust waste heat recovery is presented. Also, future view points for next \\{HEXs\\} designs are proposed to increase heat recovery from the exhaust of diesel engines.

M. Hatami; D.D. Ganji; M. Gorji-Bandpy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Waste Heat Recovery from Refrigeration in a Meat Processing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A case study is reviewed on a heat recovery system installed in a meat processing facility to preheat water for the plant hot water supply. The system utilizes waste superheat from the facility's 1,350-ton ammonia refrigeration system. The heat...

Murphy, W. T.; Woods, B. E.; Gerdes, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Heat-Exchanger Network Synthesis Involving Organic Rankine Cycle for Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article aims to present a mathematical model for the synthesis of a heat-exchanger network (HEN) which can be integrated with an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for the recovery of low-grade waste heat from the heat surplus zone of the background ...

Cheng-Liang Chen; Feng-Yi Chang; Tzu-Hsiang Chao; Hui-Chu Chen; Jui-Yuan Lee

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Water recovery using waste heat from coal fired power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The potential to treat non-traditional water sources using power plant waste heat in conjunction with membrane distillation is assessed. Researchers and power plant designers continue to search for ways to use that waste heat from Rankine cycle power plants to recover water thereby reducing water net water consumption. Unfortunately, waste heat from a power plant is of poor quality. Membrane distillation (MD) systems may be a technology that can use the low temperature waste heat (<100 F) to treat water. By their nature, they operate at low temperature and usually low pressure. This study investigates the use of MD to recover water from typical power plants. It looks at recovery from three heat producing locations (boiler blow down, steam diverted from bleed streams, and the cooling water system) within a power plant, providing process sketches, heat and material balances and equipment sizing for recovery schemes using MD for each of these locations. It also provides insight into life cycle cost tradeoffs between power production and incremental capital costs.

Webb, Stephen W.; Morrow, Charles W.; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Dwyer, Brian P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

Lee, S.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

An Introduction to Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

our dependence on petroleum-based fuels, paper, glass, and agricultural and automotive and hence improve our merchandise .trade balance. equipment industries have all had proven success with heat recovery projects. Solar, wind, geothermal, oil shale...

Darby, D. F.

84

Author's personal copy Pyroelectric waste heat energy harvesting using heat conduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pump, cryogenic refrigeration, and air liquefaction applications [3]. Organic Rankine cycles use heat harvesting Olsen cycle a b s t r a c t Waste heat can be directly converted into electrical energy by performing the Olsen cycle on pyroelectric materials. The Olsen cycle consists of two isothermal and two

Pilon, Laurent

85

Heat Integration Strategy for Economic Production of Combined Heat and Power from Biomass Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat Integration Strategy for Economic Production of Combined Heat and Power from Biomass Waste ... Dilution of hydrogen rich fuels resulting from coal or heavy hydrocarbon gasification processes with nitrogen prior to the entrance of the gas turbines may be desirable in precombustion carbon capture and storage (CCS) routes, in order to ensure safe operations of gas turbines. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; Kok Siew Ng; Nilay Shah; Howard J. Simons

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Increase of unit efficiency by improved waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

For coal-fired power plants with flue gas desulfurization by wet scrubbing and desulfurized exhaust gas discharge via cooling tower, a further improvement of new power plant efficiency is possible by exhaust gas heat recovery. The waste heat of exhaust gas is extracted in a flue gas cooler before the wet scrubber and recovered for combustion air and/or feedwater heating by either direct or indirect coupling of heat transfer. Different process configurations for heat recovery system are described and evaluated with regard to net unit improvement. For unite firing bituminous coal an increase of net unit efficiency of 0.25 to 0.7 percentage points and for lignite 0.7 to 1.6 percentage points can be realized depending on the process configurations of the heat recovery systems.

Bauer, G.; Lankes, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A ground-coupled storage heat pump system with waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an experimental single-family residence that was constructed to demonstrate integration of waste heat recovery and seasonal energy storage using both a ventilating and a ground-coupled heat pump. Called the Idaho energy Conservation Technology House, it combines superinsulated home construction with a ventilating hot water heater and a ground coupled water-to-water heat pump system. The ground heat exchangers are designed to economically promote seasonal and waste heat storage. Construction of the house was completed in the spring of 1989. Located in Moscow, Idaho, the house is occupied by a family of three. The 3,500 ft{sup 2} (325 m{sup 2}) two-story house combines several unique sub-systems that all interact to minimize energy consumption for space heating and cooling, and domestic hot water.

Drown, D.C.; Braven, K.R.D. (Univ. of Idaho, ID (US)); Kast, T.P. (Thermal Dynamic Towers, Boulder, CO (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Waste Heat Recovery Using a Circulating Heat Medium Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thing of the past. This paper presents results of a refinery-wide survey to identify potential high temperature heat sources that are not being recovered and low temperature systems that consume fuel. The best candidates in each category were connected...

Manning, E., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Waste Heat Recovery in Cement Plants By Fluidized Beds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is particularly true in the cement industry. Cement manufacture consists of mining and grinding rocks, melting them to form clinkers, then grinding those clinkers to a powder. Through recovery of waste heat and inclusion of technology such as flash calciners...

Fraley, L. D.; Ksiao, H. K.; Thunem, C. B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Waste Heat Recovery Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btus required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified...

O'Brien, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic...

92

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief  

SciTech Connect

This technical brief is a guide to help plant operators reduce waste heat losses associated with process heating equipment.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Finding More Free Steam From Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corning & Midland Plant Thermal Heat Recovery Oxidation Process Opportunities Implementing Improvements Demonstrating Success Questions About me Mike Stremlow Midland Site Energy Leader Senior mechanical engineer at Dow Corning charged...-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 Questions Mike Stremlow, Midland Site Energy Leader Dow Corning Corporation PO Box 994 Midland, MI 48686 mike.stremlow@dowcorning.com (989)496-5662 18 ESL-IE-14-05-01 Proceedings...

Stremlow, M. D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NSF/DOE Thermoelectrics Partnership: Purdue ? GM Partnership on Thermoelectrics for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reviews results in developing commercially viable thermoelectric generators for efficient conversion of automotive exhaust waste heat to electricity

97

Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery System for Light-Duty Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Developing a low and high temperature dual thermoelectric generation waste heat recovery system for light-duty vehicles.

98

Using ''waste'' heat to conserve energy  

SciTech Connect

The organic Rankine cycle diesel bottoming system (DRCDBS) is being tested at the Naval Air Station in Bermuda for viability in operational use. The system uses heat recovered from the exhaust gases of diesel/generator sets to power a turbine/generator unit. The system will be demonstrated for three years before operational use. A schematic for the system is given. Its daily KWh hours performance is calculated. Logistic support--maintainence and training--are also treated. Potential sites are being studied.

Cooper, E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

CHP, Waste Heat & District Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHP Technologies and Applications CHP Technologies and Applications 25 Oct 11 Today's Electric Grid What is CHP * ASHRAE Handbook: "Combined heat and power (CHP). Simultaneous production of electrical or mechanical energy and useful thermal energy from a single energy stream." * CHP is not a single technology but a suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use. * CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few geographic limitations. 11/1/2011 Slide 6 5/20/11 Slide 7 What is CHP? * On-site generation of Power and Thermal Energy from a single fuel source * 'Conventional' grid based generators are located remote from thermal applications while CHP plants are located close to thermal applications

100

Cogeneration from glass furnace waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

In glass manufacturing 70% of the total energy utilized is consumed in the melting process. Three basic furnaces are in use: regenerative, recuperative, and direct fired design. The present paper focuses on secondary heat recovery from regenerative furnaces. A diagram of a typical regenerative furnace is given. Three recovery bottoming cycles were evaluated as part of a comparative systems analysis: steam Rankine Cycle (SRC), Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and pressurized Brayton cycle. Each cycle is defined and schematicized. The net power capabilities of the three different systems are summarized. Cost comparisons and payback period comparisons are made. Organic Rankine cycle provides the best opportunity for cogeneration for all the flue gas mass flow rates considered. With high temperatures, the Brayton cycle has the shortest payback period potential, but site-specific economics need to be considered.

Hnat, J.G.; Cutting, J.C.; Patten, J.S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Waste heat recovery steam curves with unfired HRSGs  

SciTech Connect

A compilation of waste heat recovery steam curves for a sampling of gas turbines ranging in output from around 1 MW to more than 200 MW is presented. The gas turbine output data shown with each set of curves differs from the values given in the Performance Specifications section of the Handbook. That's because the values have been calculated to reflect the effects of a 4 inch inlet and 10 inch outlet pressure drop on power output (lower), heat rate (higher), mass flow (higher), and exhaust temperature (higher).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Waste heat boiler optimization by entropy minimization principle  

SciTech Connect

A second law analysis has been undertaken for a waste heat boiler having an economizer, evaporator and superheater. Following the principle of minimization of entropy generation, a general equation for entropy generation number is derived, which incorporates all the operating variables. By differentiating the entropy generation number equation with respect to the operating parameters, various optimization parameters can be obtained. Few illustrations have been made to see the effect of various parameters on entropy generation number.

Reddy, B.V.; Murali, J.; Satheesh, V.S. [Vellore Engineering Coll. (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Nag, P.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kharagpur (India). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Waste Heat Powered Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit for LPG Recovery  

SciTech Connect

An emerging DOE-sponsored technology has been deployed. The technology recovers light ends from a catalytic reformer plant using waste heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration. It is deployed at the 17,000 bpd Bloomfield, New Mexico refinery of Western Refining Company. The technology recovers approximately 50,000 barrels per year of liquefied petroleum gas that was formerly being flared. The elimination of the flare also reduces CO2 emissions by 17,000 tons per year, plus tons per year reductions in NOx, CO, and VOCs. The waste heat is supplied directly to the absorption unit from the Unifiner effluent. The added cooling of that stream relieves a bottleneck formerly present due to restricted availability of cooling water. The 350oF Unifiner effluent is cooled to 260oF. The catalytic reformer vent gas is directly chilled to minus 25oF, and the FCC column overhead reflux is chilled by 25oF glycol. Notwithstanding a substantial cost overrun and schedule slippage, this project can now be considered a success: it is both profitable and highly beneficial to the environment. The capabilities of directly-integrated waste-heat powered ammonia absorption refrigeration and their benefits to the refining industry have been demonstrated.

Donald C, Energy Concepts Co.; Lauber, Eric, Western Refining Co.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Analysis of recoverable waste heat of circulating cooling water in hot-stamping power system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article studies the possibility of using heat pump instead of cooling tower to decrease temperature and recover waste heat of circulating cooling water of power system. Making use of heat transfer theory ......

Panpan Qin; Hui Chen; Lili Chen; Chong Wang

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

In order to achieve proposed fuel economy requirements, engines must make better use of the available fuel energy. Regardless of how efficient the engine is, there will still be a significant fraction of the fuel energy that is rejected in the exhaust and coolant streams. One viable technology for recovering this waste heat is an Organic Rankine Cycle. This cycle heats a working fluid using these heat streams and expands the fluid through a turbine to produce shaft power. The present work was the development of such a system applied to a light duty diesel engine. This lab demonstration was designed to maximize the peak brake thermal efficiency of the engine, and the combined system achieved an efficiency of 44.4%. The design of the system is discussed, as are the experimental performance results. The system potential at typical operating conditions was evaluated to determine the practicality of installing such a system in a vehicle.

Briggs, Thomas E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Study on the Application of High Temperature Heat Pump to Recover Waste Heat of Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Being an energy-saving equipment with great development potential, high temperature heat pump is becoming one of the research hotspots in recent years. However, there is little research about the application of high temperature heat pump on ships as ... Keywords: marine diesel engine, cooling water, waste heat recovery, high temperature heat pump

Shi-jie Liu; Wu Chen; Zhen-xiong Cai; Chao-yu Zheng

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Seismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was heated to replicate the effects of long-term storage of decaying nuclear waste and to study the effects for the long- term storage of high-level nuclear waste from reactors and decom- missioned atomic weaponsSeismic modeling and analysis of a prototype heated nuclear waste storage tunnel, Yucca Mountain

Snieder, Roel

108

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Energy recovery from waste incineration: Assessing the importance of district heating networks  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste incineration contributes with 20% of the heat supplied to the more than 400 district heating networks in Denmark. In evaluation of the environmental consequences of this heat production, the typical approach has been to assume that other (fossil) fuels could be saved on a 1:1 basis (e.g. 1 GJ of waste heat delivered substitutes for 1 GJ of coal-based heat). This paper investigates consequences of waste-based heat substitution in two specific Danish district heating networks and the energy-associated interactions between the plants connected to these networks. Despite almost equal electricity and heat efficiencies at the waste incinerators connected to the two district heating networks, the energy and CO{sub 2} accounts showed significantly different results: waste incineration in one network caused a CO{sub 2} saving of 48 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ energy input while in the other network a load of 43 kg CO{sub 2}/GJ. This was caused mainly by differences in operation mode and fuel types of the other heat producing plants attached to the networks. The paper clearly indicates that simple evaluations of waste-to-energy efficiencies at the incinerator are insufficient for assessing the consequences of heat substitution in district heating network systems. The paper also shows that using national averages for heat substitution will not provide a correct answer: local conditions need to be addressed thoroughly otherwise we may fail to assess correctly the heat recovery from waste incineration.

Fruergaard, T.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Astrup, T., E-mail: tha@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Including radiative heat transfer and reaction quenching in modeling a Claus plant waste heat boiler  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasingly stringent sulfur emission regulations, improvements are necessary in the modified Claus process. A recently proposed model by Nasato et al. for the Claus plant waste heat boiler (WHB) is improved by including radiative heat transfer, which yields significant changes in the predicted heat flux and the temperature profile along the WHB tube, leading to a faster quenching of chemical reactions. For the WHB considered, radiation accounts for approximately 20% of the heat transferred by convection alone. More importantly, operating the WHB at a higher gas mass flux is shown to enhance reaction quenching, resulting in a doubling of the predicted hydrogen flow rate. This increase in hydrogen flow rate is sufficient to completely meet the hydrogen requirement of the H[sub 2]S recovery process considered, which would eliminate the need for a hydrogen plant.

Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste heat utilization. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recovery and use of waste heat in power plants, industrial processes, and commercial buildings. Topics include the use of industrial process heat in district heating studies, greenhouse heating with power plant waste heat, and materials considerations for heat exchange equipment. The use of heat pumps in the recovery of low-grade industrial heat is discussed. Citations pertaining specifically to government policies and total energy systems in commercial buildings are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed

114

Cylinder wall waste heat recovery from liquid-cooled internal combustion engines utilizing thermoelectric generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This report is a dissertation proposal that focuses on the energy balance within an internal combustion engine with a unique coolant-based waste heat recovery (more)

Armstead, John Randall

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling water seepage into heated waste emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into drifts at Yucca Mountain, Journal of ContaminantEMPLACEMENT DRIFTS AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN Jens Birkholzer, Sumitfor nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Heating of rock

Birkholzer, Jens; Mukhopadhyay, Sumitra; Tsang, Yvonne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle Development of an Efficient, Cost- Effective System to Recover Medium- Grade...

117

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery by Use of Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The project is a combined analytical and experimental programme to investigate the feasibility of the Organic Rankine Cycle principle for waste heat recovery in industry....

Dipl.-Phys. G. Huppmann

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of design, fabrication, integration, and test of working prototype TEG for engine waste heat recovery on Suburban test vehicle, and continuing investigation of skutterudite materials systems

119

Renewable energy of waste heat recovery system for automobiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A system to recover waste heat comprised of eight thermoelectric generators (TEGs) to convert heat from the exhaust pipe of an automobile to electrical energy has been constructed. Simulations and experiments for the thermoelectric module in this system are undertaken to assess the feasibility of these applications. In order to estimate the temperature difference between thermoelectric elements a network of thermal resistors is constructed. The results assist in predicting power output of TEG module more precisely. Three configurations of heat sinks which are comprised of 10 22 and 44 fins are applied in this simulation. The results of the simulations show the average thermal resistance of these heat sinks in each section of the system with varied velocity of external flow. As the performance of a TEG module is influenced by an applied pressure through the effect of the thermal contact resistance we clamp the TE module to our experimental apparatus; the relation between power output and pressure applied in this case is presented. Besides simulations the system is designed and assembled. Measurements followed the connection of the system to the middle of an exhaust pipe. Through these simulations and experiments the power generated with a commercial TEG is presented. The results establish the fundamental development of materials that enhance the TEG efficiency for vehicles.

Cheng-Ting Hsu; Da-Jeng Yao; Ke-Jyun Ye; Ben Yu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Process Waste Heat Recovery in the Food Industry - A System Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis of an industrial waste heat recovery system concept is discussed. For example purposes, a food processing plant operating an ammonia refrigeration system for storage and blast freezing is considered. Heat is withdrawn from...

Lundberg, W. L.; Mutone, G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Heat strain and heat stress for workers wearing protective suits at a hazardous waste site  

SciTech Connect

In order to evaluate the effects of heat stress when full body protective suits are worn, heart rates, oral temperatures and environmental parameters were measured for five unacclimatized male workers (25-33 years of age) who performed sampling activities during hazardous waste clean-up operations. The protective ensembles included laminated PVC-Tyvec chemical resistant hood suits with rubber boots, gloves, full facepiece dual cartridge respirators and hard hats. For comparison, measurements also were performed when the men worked at a similar level of activity while they wore ordinary work clothes. A comparison of the heart rates for the men working with and without suits indicated that wearing the suits imposed a heat stress equivalent to adding 6/sup 0/ to 11/sup 0/C (11/sup 0/ to 20/sup 0/F) to the ambient WBGT index. A similar result was obtained by calculating the WBGT in the microclimate inside the suits and comparing it to the ambient WBGT. These results indicate the following: 1) there exists a significant risk of heat injury during hazardous waste work when full body protective clothing is worn, and 2) threshold limit values for heat stress established by the ACGIH must be lowered substantially before extending them to cover workers under these conditions.

Paull, J.M.; Rosenthal, F.S.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Waste heat recovery: Textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning descriptions and evaluations of waste heat recovery operations used in the textile industry. Heat recovery and utilization from wastewater streams, flue gas, finishing processes, dyeing operations, and air jet systems are presented. The use of waste heat for space heating and process preheating is considered. (Contains a minimum of 162 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Waste-heat utilization. (Latest citations from the U. S. Patent data base). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning processes employed for the recovery of useful heat from the environment, or from equipment which generates waste heat. Heat pump systems, furnaces, industrial boilers, and systems employed in the recovery of heat from internal combustion engines are discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

Meisner, Gregory P

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

Using Waste Heat for External Processes (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of the Using Waste Heat for External Processes fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to use waste heat in industrial applications. The temperature of exhaust gases from fuel-fired industrial processes depends mainly on the process temperature and the waste heat recovery method. Figure 1 shows the heat lost in exhaust gases at various exhaust gas temperatures and percentages of excess air. Energy from gases exhausted from higher temperature processes (primary processes) can be recovered and used for lower temperature processes (secondary processes). One example is to generate steam using waste heat boilers for the fluid heaters used in petroleum crude processing. In addition, many companies install heat exchangers on the exhaust stacks of furnaces and ovens to produce hot water or to generate hot air for space heating.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices.

Saeid Ghamaty; Sal Marchetti

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Geek-Up[5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight 5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight Geek-Up[5.20.2011]: Electricity from Waste Heat, Fuel from Sunlight May 20, 2011 - 5:53pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? 50 percent of the energy generated annually from all sources is lost as waste heat. Scientists have developed a high-efficiency thermal waste heat energy converter that actively cools electronic devices, photovoltaic cells, computers and other large industrial systems while generating electricity. Scientists have linked platinum nanoparticles with algae proteins, commandeering photosynthesis to produce hydrogen -- research that will help scientists harvest light with solar fuels. Thanks to scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the billions

129

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae, Calvin Ng, Joseph Pateman University of British Investigation into the Viability of a Waste Heat Powered Greenhouse Do Youl Bae Calvin Ng Joseph Pateman March. This investigation deals with the viability of building a waste heat powered greenhouse on the roof of the new SUB

130

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt This report summarizes efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a generic hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt; chemical processes of the system allow precipitation and dissolution of salt with elevated temperatures that drive water and water vapor flow around hot waste packages. Characterizing salt backfill processes is an important objective of the exercise. An evidence-based algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal,

131

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in Salt Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in Salt The report summarizes available historic tests and the developed technical basis for disposal of heat-generating waste in salt, and the means by which a safety case for disposal of heat generating waste at a generic salt site can be initiated from the existing technical basis. Though the basis for a salt safety case is strong and has been made by the German repository program, RD&D programs continue in order to help reduce uncertainty, to improve understanding of certain complex processes, to demonstrate operational concepts, to confirm performance expectations, and to improve modeling capabilities utilizing the latest software platforms.

133

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

QUANTUM WELL THERMOELECTRICS FOR CONVERTING WASTE HEAT TO ELECTRICITY  

SciTech Connect

New thermoelectric materials using Quantum Well (QW) technology are expected to increase the energy conversion efficiency to more than 25% from the present 5%, which will allow for the low cost conversion of waste heat into electricity. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. has been developing QW technology over the past six years. It will use Caterpillar, Inc., a leader in the manufacture of large scale industrial equipment, for verification and life testing of the QW films and modules. Other members of the team are Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who will sputter large area QW films. The Scope of Work is to develop QW materials from their present proof-of-principle technology status to a pre-production level over a proposed three year period. This work will entail fabricating the QW films through a sputtering process of 50 {micro}m thick multi layered films and depositing them on 12 inch diameter, 5 {micro}m thick Si substrates. The goal in this project is to produce the technology for fabricating a basic 10-20 watt module that can be used to build up any size generator such as: a 5-10 kW Auxiliary Power Unit (APU), a multi kW Waste Heat Recovery Generator (WHRG) for a class 8 truck or as small as a 10-20 watt unit that would fit on a daily used wood fired stove and allow some of the estimated 2-3 billion people on earth, who have no electricity, to recharge batteries (such as a cell phone) or directly power radios, TVs, computers and other low powered devices. In this quarter Hi-Z has continued fabrication of the QW films and also continued development of joining techniques for fabricating the N and P legs into a couple. The upper operating temperature limit for these films is unknown and will be determined via the isothermal aging studies that are in progress. We are reporting on these studies in this report. The properties of the QW films that are being evaluated are Seebeck, thermal conductivity and thermal-to-electricity conversion efficiency.

Saeid Ghamaty

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

xi-scaling  

SciTech Connect

A class of purely kinematical corrections to xi-scaling is exposed. These corrections are inevitably present in any realistic hadron model with spin and gauge invariance and lead to phenomenologically important M/sub hadron//sup 2//Q/sup 2/ corrections to Nachtmann moments.

Gunion, J.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ect of working ?uids on organic Rankine cycle for waste heatof such devices. Organic Rankine cycles and Stirling engines

Lee, Felix

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Overview of Fords Thermoelectric Programs: Waste Heat Recovery and Climate Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Overview of progress in TE waste heat recovery from sedan gasoline-engine exhaust, TE HVAC system in hybrid sedan, and establishing targets for cost, power density, packaging, durability, and systems integration

138

High-Performance Thermoelectric Devices Based on Abundant Silicide Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Development of high-performance thermoelectric devices for vehicle waste heat recovery will include fundamental research to use abundant promising low-cost thermoelectric materials, thermal management and interfaces design, and metrology

139

Water distillation using waste engine heat from an internal combustion engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To meet the needs of forward deployed soldiers and disaster relief personnel, a mobile water distillation system was designed and tested. This system uses waste engine heat from the exhaust flow of an internal combustion ...

Mears, Kevin S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A thermodynamic study of waste heat recovery from GT-MHR using organic Rankine cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation on the utilization of waste heat from a gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) using different arrangements of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) for power production. The con...

Mortaza Yari; S. M. S. Mahmoudi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dual Loop Parallel/Series Waste Heat Recovery System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This system captures all the jacket water, intercooler, and exhaust heat from the engine by utilizing a single condenser to reject leftover heat to the atmosphere.

143

Waste Heat Recovery from High Temperature Off-Gases from Electric Arc Furnace  

SciTech Connect

This article presents a study and review of available waste heat in high temperature Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) off gases and heat recovery techniques/methods from these gases. It gives details of the quality and quantity of the sensible and chemical waste heat in typical EAF off gases, energy savings potential by recovering part of this heat, a comprehensive review of currently used waste heat recovery methods and potential for use of advanced designs to achieve a much higher level of heat recovery including scrap preheating, steam production and electric power generation. Based on our preliminary analysis, currently, for all electric arc furnaces used in the US steel industry, the energy savings potential is equivalent to approximately 31 trillion Btu per year or 32.7 peta Joules per year (approximately $182 million US dollars/year). This article describes the EAF off-gas enthalpy model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate available and recoverable heat energy for a given stream of exhaust gases coming out of one or multiple EAF furnaces. This Excel based model calculates sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases during tap to tap time accounting for variation in quantity and quality of off gases. The model can be used to estimate energy saved through scrap preheating and other possible uses such as steam generation and electric power generation using off gas waste heat. This article includes a review of the historical development of existing waste heat recovery methods, their operations, and advantages/limitations of these methods. This paper also describes a program to develop and test advanced concepts for scrap preheating, steam production and electricity generation through use of waste heat recovery from the chemical and sensible heat contained in the EAF off gases with addition of minimum amount of dilution or cooling air upstream of pollution control equipment such as bag houses.

Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of a Waste Heat Recovery System for Light Duty Diesel Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Substantial increases in engine efficiency of a light-duty diesel engine, which require utilization of the waste energy found in the coolant, EGR, and exhaust streams, may be increased through the development of a Rankine cycle waste heat recovery system

145

The Organic Rankine Cycle System, Its Application to Extract Energy From Low Temperature Waste Heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conservation of energy by its recovery from low temperature waste heat is of increasing importance in today's world energy crisis. The Organic Rankine Cycle is a cost efficient and proven method of converting low temperature (200-400o F) waste...

Sawyer, R. H.; Ichikawa, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat A Spin on Technology: Extracting Value from Wasted Heat November 12, 2010 - 2:12pm Addthis Ener-G-Rotors has developed a system that converts hot water and steam into electricity. | File photo Ener-G-Rotors has developed a system that converts hot water and steam into electricity. | File photo Joshua DeLung What are the key facts? This new system allows manufacturers to convert heated wastewater and steam to energy. $834,000 Recovery Act tax credit is helping Ener-G-Rotors startup to commercialize their product. A three year return on investment equals $42,000 savings on average each year using the GEN4 System. Wastewater and steam can be a challenging resource for manufacturers to manage. The heated wastewater and steam are either lost or must be cooled

147

Evaluation of Waste Heat Recovery and Utilization from Residential Appliances and Fixtures  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary In every home irrespective of its size, location, age, or efficiency, heat in the form of drainwater or dryer exhaust is wasted. Although from a waste stream, this energy has the potential for being captured, possibly stored, and then reused for preheating hot water or air thereby saving operating costs to the homeowner. In applications such as a shower and possibly a dryer, waste heat is produced at the same time as energy is used, so that a heat exchanger to capture the waste energy and return it to the supply is all that is needed. In other applications such as capturing the energy in drainwater from a tub, dishwasher, or washing machine, the availability of waste heat might not coincide with an immediate use for energy, and consequently a heat exchanger system with heat storage capacity (i.e. a regenerator) would be necessary. This study describes a two-house experimental evaluation of a system designed to capture waste heat from the shower, dishwasher clothes washer and dryer, and to use this waste heat to offset some of the hot water energy needs of the house. Although each house was unoccupied, they were fitted with equipment that would completely simulate the heat loads and behavior of human occupants including operating the appliances and fixtures on a demand schedule identical to Building American protocol (Hendron, 2009). The heat recovery system combined (1) a gravity-film heat exchanger (GFX) installed in a vertical section of drainline, (2) a heat exchanger for capturing dryer exhaust heat, (3) a preheat tank for storing the captured heat, and (4) a small recirculation pump and controls, so that the system could be operated anytime that waste heat from the shower, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer, and in any combination was produced. The study found capturing energy from the dishwasher and clothes washer to be a challenge since those two appliances dump waste water over a short time interval. Controls based on the status of the dump valve on these two appliances would have eliminated uncertainty in knowing when waste water was flowing and the recovery system operated. The study also suggested that capture of dryer exhaust heat to heat incoming air to the dryer should be examined as an alternative to using drying exhaust energy for water heating. The study found that over a 6-week test period, the system in each house was able to recover on average approximately 3000 W-h of waste heat daily from these appliance and showers with slightly less on simulated weekdays and slightly more on simulated weekends which were heavy wash/dry days. Most of these energy savings were due to the shower/GFX operation, and the least savings were for the dishwasher/GFX operation. Overall, the value of the 3000 W-h of displaced energy would have been $0.27/day based on an electricity price of $.09/kWh. Although small for today s convention house, these savings are significant for a home designed to approach maximum affordable efficiency where daily operating costs for the whole house are less than a dollar per day. In 2010 the actual measured cost of energy in one of the simulated occupancy houses which waste heat recovery testing was undertaken was $0.77/day.

Tomlinson, John J [ORNL; Christian, Jeff [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery in Process Industries  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project was to integrate advanced thermoelectric materials into a power generation device that could convert waste heat from an industrial process to electricity with an efficiency approaching 20%. Advanced thermoelectric materials were developed with figure-of-merit ZT of 1.5 at 275 degrees C. These materials were not successfully integrated into a power generation device. However, waste heat recovery was demonstrated from an industrial process (the combustion exhaust gas stream of an oxyfuel-fired flat glass melting furnace) using a commercially available (5% efficiency) thermoelectric generator coupled to a heat pipe. It was concluded that significant improvements both in thermoelectric material figure-of-merit and in cost-effective methods for capturing heat would be required to make thermoelectric waste heat recovery viable for widespread industrial application.

Adam Polcyn; Moe Khaleel

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Air Products, operates hydrogen production plants, which utilize large waste heat boilers (WHB)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cold End Inserts for Process Gas Waste Heat Boilers Overview Air Products, operates hydrogen walls. Air Products tasked our team to design an insert to place in the tubes of the WHB to increase flow velocity, thereby reducing fouling of the WHB. Objectives Air Products wishes that our team

Demirel, Melik C.

150

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards model-based control of a steam Rankine process for engine waste heat recovery Johan Peralez steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition engine, focusing in particular results on a steam process for SI engines, [3] on generic control issues and [4] which provides a comp

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

151

[Waste water heat recovery system]. Final report, September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The production capabilities for and field testing of the heat recovery system are described briefly. Drawings are included.

Not Available

1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

152

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes Jaschke, Helge Smedsrud, Sigurd Skogestad*, Henrik Manum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Operation of a Waste Incineration Plant for District Heating Johannes J¨aschke, Helge@chemeng.ntnu.no off-line. This systematic approach is here applied to a waste incineration plant for district heating. In district heating networks, operators usually wish to ob- tain the lowest possible return temperature

Skogestad, Sigurd

153

Waste heat recovery systems in the sugar industry: An Indian perspective  

SciTech Connect

This article identifies the key role of the sugar industry in the rural development of developing countries. The Indian sugar industry, already second largest among the country`s processing industries, shows even greater potential, according to the Plan Documents (shown in a table). The potential of waste heat in sugar processing plants, which produce white crystal sugar using the double sulphitation clarification process, is estimated at 5757.9 KJ/kg of sugar. Efficient waste heat recovery (WHR) systems could help arrest the trend of increasing production costs. This would help the sugar industry not only in India, but in many other countries as well. The innovative methods suggested and discussed briefly in this article include dehydration of prepared cane, bagasse drying, and juice heating using waste heat. These methods can reduce the cost of energy in sugar production by at least 10% and improve efficiency and productivity.

Madnaik, S.D.; Jadhav, M.G. [Walchand Inst. of Tech., Maharashtra (India)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The relative contribution of waste heat from power plants to global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence on global climate change, being caused primarily by rising levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, is perceived as fairly conclusive. It is generally attributed to the enhanced greenhouse effect, resulting from higher levels of trapped heat radiation by increasing atmospheric concentrations of gases such as CO2 (carbon dioxide). Much of these gases originate from power plants and fossil fuel combustion. However, the fate of vast amounts of waste heat rejected into the environment has evaded serious scholarly research. While 1kWh electricity generation in a typical condensing coal-fired power plant emits around 1kg of CO2, it also puts about 2kWh energy into the environment as low grade heat. For nuclear (fission) electricity the waste heat release per kWh is somewhat higher despite much lower CO2 releases. This paper evaluates the impact of waste heat rejection combined with CO2 emissions using Finland and California as case examples. The immediate effects of waste heat release from power production and radiative forcing by CO2 are shown to be similar. However, the long-term (hundred years) global warming by CO2-caused radiative forcing is about twenty-five times stronger than the immediate effects, being responsible for around 92% of the heat-up caused by electricity production.

R. Zevenhoven; A. Beyene

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evaluation of a fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system. A technical case study  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R&D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Large amounts of heat escape regularly through the waste-gas streams of industrial processes, particularly those processes that use furnaces, kilns, and calciners. Recovering this waste heat will conserve energy; however, the extremely high temperatures and corrosive nature of many flue and exhaust gases make conventional heat recovery difficult. One solution is a waste-heat recovery system that can withstand the high temperatures and rids itself of corrosion-causing particulates. OIT and Aerojet Energy Conversion Company recently completed a joint project to develop just such a system and to evaluate its long-term operation. This technology, called fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR), offers several advantages over conventional heat recovery, including high gas-side heat-transfer coefficients and a self-cleaning capability. The FBWHR system can recover heat from high-temperature, dirty waste-gas streams, such as those found in the metals, glass, cement, chemical, and petroleum-refining industries. In this multiyear R&D project, Aerojet designed and fabricated an FBWHR system that recovers heat from the corrosive flue gases of aluminum melt furnaces to produce process steam for the plant. The system was installed on a 34-million-Btu/h furnace used to melt aluminum scrap at ALCOA`s Massena, New York plant. During a successful one-year field test, the system produced 26 million lb of 175-psig saturated steam, recovering as much as 28% of the fuel energy input to the furnace.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluation of a fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) sponsors research and development (R D) to improve the energy efficiency of American industry and to provide for fuel flexibility. Large amounts of heat escape regularly through the waste-gas streams of industrial processes, particularly those processes that use furnaces, kilns, and calciners. Recovering this waste heat will conserve energy; however, the extremely high temperatures and corrosive nature of many flue and exhaust gases make conventional heat recovery difficult. One solution is a waste-heat recovery system that can withstand the high temperatures and rids itself of corrosion-causing particulates. OIT and Aerojet Energy Conversion Company recently completed a joint project to develop just such a system and to evaluate its long-term operation. This technology, called fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery (FBWHR), offers several advantages over conventional heat recovery, including high gas-side heat-transfer coefficients and a self-cleaning capability. The FBWHR system can recover heat from high-temperature, dirty waste-gas streams, such as those found in the metals, glass, cement, chemical, and petroleum-refining industries. In this multiyear R D project, Aerojet designed and fabricated an FBWHR system that recovers heat from the corrosive flue gases of aluminum melt furnaces to produce process steam for the plant. The system was installed on a 34-million-Btu/h furnace used to melt aluminum scrap at ALCOA's Massena, New York plant. During a successful one-year field test, the system produced 26 million lb of 175-psig saturated steam, recovering as much as 28% of the fuel energy input to the furnace.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermal energy recovery of low grade waste heat in hydrogenation process; tervinning av lgvrdig spillvrme frn en hydreringsprocess.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The waste heat recovery technologies have become very relevant since many industrial plants continuously reject large amounts of thermal energy during normal operation which (more)

Hedstrm, Sofia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Novel thermoelectric generator for stationary power waste heat recovery .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Internal combustion engines produce much excess heat that is vented to the atmosphere through the exhaust fluid. Use of solid-state thermoelectric (TE) energy conversion technology (more)

Engelke, Kylan Wynn.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project...

160

2008 DOE FCVT Merit Review: BSST Waste Heat Recovery Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Th Developing a System Architecture to Manage Wide Variations in Th ermal Power ermal Power Catalytic Converter Primary Heat Exchanger Rear Exhaust with Muffler Pump DCDC...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Using Waste Heat for External Processes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Consider Installing a Condensing Economizer...

162

XI. Index of Primary Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XI Index of Primary Contacts XI Index of Primary Contacts A Aaron, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Aceves, Salvador M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Adams, Stephen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .713 Adzic, Radoslav. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .384 Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .511 Ahmed, S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .451 Ahn, Channing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262, 267 Alam, Mohammad S.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .509 Andersen, Cindi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .811 Anton, Donald L.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230, 243 Arduengo III, Anthony J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274

163

6th International Symposium on Multiphase Flow, Heat Mass Transfer and Energy Conversion ISMF2009, Xi'an, China, 11-15 July 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case with materials of high thermal conductivity subjected to natural convection. To increase the heat is low. It is possible to appreciably enhance the performance of low thermal conductivity material. It also predicts based on computational simulation that the decrease in internal thermal resistance

Khandekar, Sameer

164

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, February 1-July 31, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Griffith, J.; Joshi, C.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program Turning Waste Heat into Power: Ener-G-Rotors and the Entrepreneurial Mentorship Program March 16, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis Ener-G-Rotors' 5kW prototype system | courtesy of Ener-G-Rotors Ener-G-Rotors' 5kW prototype system | courtesy of Ener-G-Rotors April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs If you've ever driven by an industrial plant, you've probably noticed big white plumes rising from the tops of the facilities. While it might look like smoke or pollution at first glance, most of the time those white plumes are comprised of steam and heat, or what Ener-G-Rotors CEO Michael Newell calls waste heat. Mike and the researchers of Ener-G-Rotors are finding ways to use this

166

Assessment of adsorber bed designs in waste-heat driven adsorption cooling systems for vehicle air conditioning and refrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of adsorber bed designs in waste-heat driven adsorption cooling systems for vehicle air conditioning Finned tube adsorber bed Specific cooling power Adsorber bed to adsorbent mass ratio a b s t r a c t Adsorber bed design strongly affects the performance of waste-heat driven adsorption cooling systems (ACS

Bahrami, Majid

167

Waste heat recovery system for recapturing energy after engine aftertreatment systems  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure provides a waste heat recovery (WHR) system including a Rankine cycle (RC) subsystem for converting heat of exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine, and an internal combustion engine including the same. The WHR system includes an exhaust gas heat exchanger that is fluidly coupled downstream of an exhaust aftertreatment system and is adapted to transfer heat from the exhaust gas to a working fluid of the RC subsystem. An energy conversion device is fluidly coupled to the exhaust gas heat exchanger and is adapted to receive the vaporized working fluid and convert the energy of the transferred heat. The WHR system includes a control module adapted to control at least one parameter of the RC subsystem based on a detected aftertreatment event of a predetermined thermal management strategy of the aftertreatment system.

Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

168

Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

USING CENTER HOLE HEAT TRANSFER TO REDUCE FORMATION TIMES FOR CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FROM PYROPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

The waste produced from processing spent fuel from the EBR II reactor must be processed into a waste form suitable for long term storage in Yucca Mountain. The method chosen produces zeolite granules mixed with glass frit, which must then be converted into a solid. This is accomplished by loading it into a can and heating to 900 C in a furnace regulated at 915 C. During heatup to 900 C, the zeolite and glass frit react and consolidate to produce a sodalite monolith. The resultant ceramic waste form (CWF) is then cooled. The waste is 52 cm in diameter and initially 300 cm long but consolidates to 150 cm long during the heating process. After cooling it is then inserted in a 5-DHLW/DOE SNF Long Canister. Without intervention, the waste takes 82 hours to heat up to 900 C in a furnace designed to geometrically fit the cylindrical waste form. This paper investigates the reduction in heating times possible with four different methods of additional heating through a center hole. The hole size is kept small to maximize the amount of CWF that is processed in a single run. A hole radius of 1.82 cm was selected which removes only 1% of the CWF. A reference computation was done with a specified inner hole surface temperature of 915 C to provide a benchmark for the amount of improvement which can be made. It showed that the heatup time can potentially be reduced to 43 hours with center hole heating. The first method, simply pouring high temperature liquid aluminum into the hole, did not produce any noticeable effect on reducing heat up times. The second method, flowing liquid aluminum through the hole, works well as long as the velocity is high enough (2.5 cm/sec) to prevent solidification of the aluminum during the initial front movement of the aluminum into the center hole. The velocity can be reduced to 1 cm/sec after the initial front has traversed the ceramic. This procedure reduces the formation time to near that of the reference case. The third method, flowing a gas through the center hole, also works well as long as the heat capacity times the velocity of the gas is equivalent to that of the flowing aluminum, and the velocity is high enough to produce an intermediate size heat transfer coefficient. The fourth method, using an electric heater, works well and heater sizes between 500 to 1000 Watts are adequate. These later three methods all can reduce the heatup time to 44 hours.

Kenneth J. Bateman; Charles W. Solbrig

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Organic Rankine Cycle System Preliminary Design with Corn Cob Biomass Waste Burning as Heat Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable energy source potencies in Indonesia are needed to be utilized to fulfill the electricity requirement in rural or remote area that not yet get electricity. One of the potency is biomass waste. Therefore, this paper discusses about the electricity generation preliminary design of Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) system with corn cob biomass waste burning as heat source, so it can be obtained the theoretic corn farm area requirement, electricity power, and thermal efficiency at heat source temperature and flow rate variations. Corn cob burning temperature can heat up the heating fluid that is heated by boiler with corn cob as the biomass fuel. Furthermore, that heating fluid is used as ORC electricity generation heat source. The independent variables in this study are the heating fluid temperature which varied between 110, 120, and 130oC, and the heating fluid flow rate that varied between 100, 150, and 200 liter/minute. \\{R141b\\} is selected to be the working fluid, palm oil is used for heating fluid and water as cooling fluid. The calculation results that the theoretic electricity power, thermal efficiency, and corn farm area requirement, respectively, are in the range of 3.5-8.5kW, 9.2-10.3%, and 49.5-101.1hectare/year. All of the highest range values are resulted at the highest temperature and flow rate, 130oC and 200 liter/minute. This result shows that corn cob burning heat is potential to be utilized as electricity generation heat source for rural society, particularly for some areas that have been studied.

Nur Rohmah; Ghalya Pikra; Agus Salim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

merge to form water thin film on tube condenser surface. The condensing mechanism will change from high efficiency dropwise condensation to low efficiency filmwise condensation. In this proposal, surface system is one of the most important facilities in power plants. High efficiency waste heat

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

172

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Hybrid Vehicles: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Using advanced materials, thermoelectric conversion of efficiencies on the order of 20% may be possible in the near future. Thermoelectric generators offer potential to increase vehicle fuel economy by recapturing a portion of the waste heat from the engine exhaust and generating electricity to power vehicle accessory or traction loads.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller...

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Final Report. Conversion of Low Temperature Waste Heat Utilizing Hermetic Organic Rankine Cycle  

SciTech Connect

The design of waste heat recovery using the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is updated. Advances in power electronics with lower cost enable the use of a single shaft, high-speed generator eliminating wear items and allowing hermetic sealing of the working fluid. This allows maintenance free operation and a compact configuration that lowers cost, enabling new market opportunities.

Fuller, Robert L.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Waste heat recovery from the European Spallation Source cryogenic helium plants - implications for system design  

SciTech Connect

The European Spallation Source (ESS) neutron spallation project currently being designed will be built outside of Lund, Sweden. The ESS design includes three helium cryoplants, providing cryogenic cooling for the proton accelerator superconducting cavities, the target neutron source, and for the ESS instrument suite. In total, the cryoplants consume approximately 7 MW of electrical power, and will produce approximately 36 kW of refrigeration at temperatures ranging from 2-16 K. Most of the power consumed by the cryoplants ends up as waste heat, which must be rejected. One hallmark of the ESS design is the goal to recycle waste heat from ESS to the city of Lund district heating system. The design of the cooling system must optimize the delivery of waste heat from ESS to the district heating system and also assure the efficient operation of ESS systems. This report outlines the cooling scheme for the ESS cryoplants, and examines the effect of the cooling system design on cryoplant design, availability and operation.

Jurns, John M. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bck, Harald [Sweco Industry AB, P.O. Box 286, 201 22 Malm (Sweden); Gierow, Martin [Lunds Energikoncernen AB, P.O. Box 25, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

Waste Heat Recovery in the Metal Working Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

recuperators supplying four 3" burners. The smaller (1,500 lb. capacity) forge furnace was not equipped with eductors. No furnace pres sure control was used. This furnace had one 10,000 scfh recuperator supplying two 2~" hot air burners. The heat treat... furnaces were both constant com bustion air, throttled fuel control. The motor ized valve in the fuel line was positioned by a position proportioning temperature controller according to a manually set set point and thermo couple input. Both furnaces...

McMann, F. C.; Thurman, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

LPG recovery from refinery flare by waste heat powered absorption refrigeration  

SciTech Connect

A waste heat powered ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Unit (ARU) has commenced operation at the Colorado Refining Company in Commerce City, Colorado. The ARU provides 85 tons of refrigeration at 30 F to refrigerate the net gas/treat gas stream, thereby recovering 65,000 barrels per year of LPG which formerly was flared or burned as fuel. The ARU is powered by the 290 F waste heat content of the reform reactor effluent. An additional 180 tons of refrigeration is available at the ARU to debottleneck the FCC plant wet gas compressors by cooling their inlet vapor. The ARU is directly integrated into the refinery processes, and uses enhanced, highly compact heat and mass exchange components. The refinery's investment will pay back in less than two years from increased recovery of salable product, and CO{sub 2} emissions are decreased by 10,000 tons per year in the Denver area.

Erickson, D.C.; Kelly, F.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Progress with heat resistant materials for waste incineration -- Alloy 45TM  

SciTech Connect

Heat resistant materials are used in a wide variety of modem industries such as metallurgical, chemical, petrochemical, heat treatment, heat recovery and waste incinerators and many others. The huge quantities of both municipal and industrial waste generated in the Western world has made ``controlled high temperature incineration`` a necessary technology for managing this problem. The evolution of this technology has not been without its cost. High temperature corrosion problems have led to many failures and unscheduled shutdowns. Proper materials of construction are vitally important for reliable, safe and cost effective operation of these systems. This paper describes the development of a new nickel based alloy, which combines the beneficial effects of high chromium and high silicon in combating these various corrosive environments encountered in incineration.

Agarwal, D.C. [VDM Technologies, Houston, TX (United States); Brill, U.; Kloewer, J. [Krupp-VDM GmbH, Werdohl (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Processing and utilizing high heat value, low ash alternative fuels from urban solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The history of technologies in the US that recover energy from urban solid waste is relatively short. Most of the technology as we know it evolved over the past 25 years. This evolution led to the development of about 100 modern mass burn and RDF type waste-to-energy plants and numerous small modular combustion systems, which collectively are handling about 20%, or about 40 million tons per year, of the nations municipal solid waste. Technologies also evolved during this period to co-fire urban waste materials with other fuels or selectively burn specific waste streams as primary fuels. A growing number of second or third generation urban waste fuels projects are being developed. This presentation discusses new direction in the power generating industry aimed at recovery and utilization of clean, high heat value, low ash alternative fuels from municipal and industrial solid waste. It reviews a spectrum of alternative fuels for feasible recovery and reuse, with new opportunities emerging for urban fuels processors providing fuels in the 6,000--15,000 BTU/LB range for off premises use.

Smith, M.L. [M.L. Smith Environmental and Associates, Tinley Park, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EXERGY ANALYSIS AND ENTROPY GENERATION MINIMIZATION OF THERMOELECTRIC WASTE HEAT RECOVERY FOR ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy recovery from waste heat is attracting more and more attention. All electronic systems consume electricity but only a fraction of it is used for information processing and for human interfaces, such as displays. Lots of energy is dissipated as heat. There are some discussions on waste heat recovery from the electronic systems such as laptop computers. However the efficiency of energy conversion for such utilization is not very attractive due to the maximum allowable temperature of the heat source devices. This leads to very low limits of Carnot efficiency. In contrast to thermodynamic heat engines, Brayton cycle, free piston Stirling engines, etc., authors previously reported that thermoelectric (TE) can be a cost-effective device if the TE and the heat sink are co-optimized, and if some parasitic effects could be reduced. Since the heat already exists and it is free, the additional cost and energy payback time are the key measures to evaluate the value of the energy recovery system. In this report, we will start with the optimum model of the TE power generation system. Then, theoretical maximum output, cost impact and energy payback are evaluated in the examples of electronics system. Entropy Generation Minimization (EGM) is a method already familiar in thermal management of electronics. The optimum thermoelectric waste heat recovery design is compared with the EGM approach. Exergy analysis evaluates the useful energy flow in the optimum TE system. This comprehensive analysis is used to predict the potential future impact of the TE material development, as the dimensionless figure-ofmerit (ZT) is improved.

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

182

Feasibility study of heat pumps for waste heat recovery in industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Includes abstract. A case study was thus carried out at an applicable local industry (brewery) to assess the feasibility of implementing the heat pump for (more)

De Waal, Devin.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The GTE Ceramic Recuperator for High Temperature Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steel Bllffalo Metal Casting Standard St.eel N.ati_onal Forge Ladish Co. Pr.Jt.t & \\.fllitney Ama", Specl."11t.v Metals Bethlehem Steel Cape Ann Forge Staolev Spring (TRw) Box Forge Reheat, Steel Box Forge Reheat, Steel 1 Box Forge Reheat...,807 1.9 1.8 31 St.andard Steel Burnham, PA Box forge. Reheat, Steel 32 National Forge Erie, PA Ladle Preheater. Steel :,.} Lad isb Co. Cyntbiaca, ....'Y Box Heat Treat, Steell 188.426 77,527 3. Pra t t & \\.on i tney East Hart.ford, CT Box...

Dorazio, R. E.; Gonzalez, J. M.; Ferri, J. L.; Rebello, W. J.; Ally, M. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cascaded organic rankine cycles for waste heat utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pair of organic Rankine cycle systems (20, 25) are combined and their respective organic working fluids are chosen such that the organic working fluid of the first organic Rankine cycle is condensed at a condensation temperature that is well above the boiling point of the organic working fluid of the second organic Rankine style system, and a single common heat exchanger (23) is used for both the condenser of the first organic Rankine cycle system and the evaporator of the second organic Rankine cycle system. A preferred organic working fluid of the first system is toluene and that of the second organic working fluid is R245fa.

Radcliff, Thomas D. (Vernon, CT); Biederman, Bruce P. (West Hartford, CT); Brasz, Joost J. (Fayetteville, NY)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd)...

186

The composition, heating value and renewable share of the energy content of mixed municipal solid waste in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions from waste incineration it is essential to know the share of the renewable energy content of the combusted waste. The composition and heating value information is generally available, but the renewable energy share or heating values of different fractions of waste have rarely been determined. In this study, data from Finnish studies concerning the composition and energy content of mixed MSW were collected, new experimental data on the compositions, heating values and renewable share of energy were presented and the results were compared to the estimations concluded from earlier international studies. In the town of Lappeenranta in south-eastern Finland, the share of renewable energy ranged between 25% and 34% in the energy content tests implemented for two sample trucks. The heating values of the waste and fractions of plastic waste were high in the samples compared to the earlier studies in Finland. These high values were caused by good source separation and led to a low share of renewable energy content in the waste. The results showed that in mixed municipal solid waste the renewable share of the energy content can be significantly lower than the general assumptions (5060%) when the source separation of organic waste, paper and cardboard is carried out successfully. The number of samples was however small for making extensive conclusions on the results concerning the heating values and renewable share of energy and additional research is needed for this purpose.

M. Horttanainen; N. Teirasvuo; V. Kapustina; M. Hupponen; M. Luoranen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of High-efficiency Thermoelectric Materials for Vehicle Waste Heat Utililization  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this . CRADA are: 1) Investigation of atomistic structure and nucleation of nanoprecipitates in (PbTe){sub I-x}(AgSbTe2){sub x} (LAST) system; and 2) Development of non-equilibrium synthesis of thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery. We have made significant accomplishment in both areas. We studied the structure of LAST materials using high resolution imaging, nanoelectron diffraction, energy dispersive spectrum, arid electron energy loss spectrum, and observed a range of nanoparticles The results, published in J. of Applied Physics, provide quantitative structure information about nanoparticles, that is essential for the understanding of the origin of the high thermoelectric performance in this class of materials. We coordinated non-equilibrium synthesis and characterization of thermoelectric materials for waste heat recovery application. Our results, published in J. of Electronic Materials, show enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit and robust mechanical properties in bulk . filled skutterudites.

Li, Qiang

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Minimum variance control of organic Rankine cycle based waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, an online self-tuning generalized minimum variance (GMV) controller is proposed for a 100KW waste heat recovery system with organic Rankine cycle (ORC). The ORC process model is formulated by the controlled autoregressive moving average (CARMA) model whose parameters are identified using the recursive least squares (RLS) algorithm with forgetting factor. The generalized minimum variance algorithm is applied to regulate ORC based waste heat recovery system. The contributions of this work are twofold: (1) the proposed control strategy is formulated under the data-driven framework, which does not need the precise mathematic model; (2) this proposed method is applied to handle tracking set-point variations and process disturbances by improved minimum objective GMV function. The performance of GMV controller is compared with the PID controller. The simulation results show that the proposed strategy can achieve satisfactory set-point tracking and disturbance rejection performance.

Guolian Hou; Shanshan Bi; Mingming Lin; Jianhua Zhang; Jinliang Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In-field remediation of tons of heavy metal-rich waste by Joule heating vitrification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An in-field remediation method of tons of Pb and Zn-rich ceramic waste based on Joule heating vitrification is presented. The progressive heating up to about 1850C led to the complete melting of the waste material and the rapid cooling of the melt formed a monolithic glass of 55tons. The obtained glass was chemically and morphologically homogeneous and immobilized the heavy metals and non-volatile inorganic compounds. The occurrence of crystalline phases such as zircon and cordierite was observed in the lowermost part of the monolith due to the different cooling rate. Leaching tests showed that the vitrified monolith presented a high chemical resistance and metal ions were immobilized into the glass matrix. The presented in-field vitrification process was highly effective in the remediation of tons of heavy metal-rich materials and can be exploited further for remediation of large amounts of soils and asbestos-based materials.

Francesco Dellisanti; Piermaria L. Rossi; Giovanni Valdr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A direct steam heat option for hydrothermal treatment of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual process for producing a gasifiable slurry from raw municipal solid waste (MSW) using direct steam heating is outlined. The process is based on the hydrothermal decomposition of the organic matter in the MSW, which requires the MSW to be heated to 300-350{degrees}C in the presence of water. A process model is developed and it is shown, based on preliminary estimates of the hydrothermal reaction stoichiometry, that a process using multiple pressure vessels, which allows recovery of waste heat, results in a process capable of producing a product slurry having a 40 wt % solids content with no waste water emissions. Results for a variety of process options and process parameters are presented. It is shown that the addition of auxiliary feedstock to the gasifier, along with the MSW derived slurry, results in more efficient gasification. It is estimated that 2.6 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of MSW and 16 kg/s of heavy oil. Without the additional feedstock, heavy oil in this case, only 0.49 kmol/s of hydrogen would be produced.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Light weight and economical exhaust heat exchanger for waste heat recovery using mixed radiant and convective heat transfer  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A hybrid heat exchanger is designed to keep highly stressed materials around the working fluid at a moderate temperature so that it can operate at higher working fluid pressure.

193

Waste Heat-to-Power in Small Scale Industry Using Scroll Expander for Organic Rankine Bottoming Cycle  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The project objective is to develop the scroll expander for Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems to be used in medium-grade waste heat recovery applications, and to validate and quantify the benefits of the prototype system.

194

Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat"  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Rejection/Recycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis & Tools to Spur Increased Deployment of " Waste Heat" Rejection/Recycling Hybrid GHP Systems in Hot, Arid or Semiarid Climates Like Texas Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description As GHP systems offer substantial energy efficiency by leveraging earth's intrinsic thermal capacitance, they could play a pivotal role in achieving the DoE's Building Technologies Pro-gram's "zero energy" goal in heavily cooling-dominated climates. Moreover, SHR-augmented GHP systems, in particular, could play a vital role in reducing building energy consumption and limiting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in heavily cooling dominated states, like Texas, which are experiencing large increases in population and correspondingly, peak electricity demand. If only 0.1% of Texas,' Arizona's, New Mexico's and Nevada's nearly 15 million-or 15,000-homes were to install new (or convert their existing HVAC or heat pump system to) a full or hybrid GHP system, it would result in between $400 and $800 million USD of new economic activity, most of which would be domestic. Moreover, these 15,000 homes would cut their annual energy consumption-and concomitant GHG emissions-by roughly 40-70%; on average they would save about $1,000 USD in annual operating costs, collectively saving about $15 million USD annually. A conservative GHP industry estimate is that at least 900 people would be directly employed for every 10,000 GHP units installed.

195

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARp?) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution Benjamin Brant Sabine Brueske Donald Erickson Riyaz Papar Planetec Planetec Energy Concepts Company Energy... in Denver, Colorado. The Waste Heat Ammo nia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP?) is based on a patented process and cycle design developed by Energy Concepts Co. (ECC) to cost effectively re cover 73,000 barrels a year of salable LPGs and gasoline...

Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

196

Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Xi an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd aka Xi an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd) Place Xi An, Shaanxi Province, China Zip 710021 Sector Wind energy Product Subsidiary of Xiâ€(tm)an Aero-Engine that manufactures its 600kW wind turbines in Xi An, China. References Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind Power Equipment Co Ltd) is a company located in Xi An, Shaanxi Province, China . References ↑ "[ Xi'an Nordex Wind Turbine Co Ltd (aka Xi'an Weide Wind

197

Dynamic modeling and optimal control strategy of waste heat recovery Organic Rankine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs) are particularly suitable for recovering energy from low-grade heat sources. This paper describes the behavior of a small-scale ORC used to recover energy from a variable flow rate and temperature waste heat source. A traditional static model is unable to predict transient behavior in a cycle with a varying thermal source, whereas this capability is essential for simulating an appropriate cycle control strategy during part-load operation and start and stop procedures. A dynamic model of the ORC is therefore proposed focusing specifically on the time-varying performance of the heat exchangers, the dynamics of the other components being of minor importance. Three different control strategies are proposed and compared. The simulation results show that a model predictive control strategy based on the steady-state optimization of the cycle under various conditions is the one showing the best results.

Sylvain Quoilin; Richard Aumann; Andreas Grill; Andreas Schuster; Vincent Lemort; Hartmut Spliethoff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize the energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air for the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) system is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, recirculating alumina particles are heated by the flue gas in a raining bed. The hot particles are then removed from the bed and placed in a fluidized bed where they are fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is preheated. The cooled particles are then returned to the raining bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this final report, the design, development, fabrication, and installation of a full-scale FBWHR system is detailed.

Patch, K.D.; Cole, W.E.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Determination of heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed: Extension to high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The heat conductivity ({lambda}) and the thermal diffusivity (a) of reacting glass batch, or melter feed, control the heat flux into and within the cold cap, a layer of reacting material floating on the pool of molten glass in an all-electric continuous waste glass melter. After previously estimating {lambda} of melter feed at temperatures up to 680 deg C, we focus in this work on the {lambda}(T) function at T > 680 deg C, at which the feed material becomes foamy. We used a customized experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples, which monitored the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible with feed was heated at a constant rate from room temperature up to 1100C. Approximating measured temperature profiles by polynomial functions, we used the heat transfer equation to estimate the {lambda}(T) approximation function, which we subsequently optimized using the finite-volume method combined with least-squares analysis. The heat conductivity increased as the temperature increased until the feed began to expand into foam, at which point the conductivity dropped. It began to increase again as the foam turned into a bubble-free glass melt. We discuss the implications of this behavior for the mathematical modeling of the cold cap.

Rice, Jarrett A.; Pokorny, Richard; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fluid Bed Waste Heat Boiler Operating Experience in Dirty Gas Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 13 to 15 million BTU per hour for fired boiler efficiencies of 80% to 70% respectively. The savings represents 85 to 90% of the energy entering the waste heat boiler. Equiva lent furnace efficiency increases from 25% to over 60% on high fire... Fired Boiler Efficiency 0.70 0.75 0.80 Energy Savings Furnace Efficiency Corresponding Peak Fuel Equivalent at High (1) . Savi ngs Fire on Melt 4453 kw (15.1x10 6 BTU/hr) 69% 4156 kw (14.1x10 6 BTU/hr) 66% 3896 kw (13.3x10 6 BTU/hr) 63% (1...

Kreeger, A. H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Optimization of waste heat recovery boiler of a combined cycle power plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the details of a procedure developed for optimization of a waste heat recovery boiler (WHRB) of a combined cycle power plant (CCPP) using the program for performance prediction of a typical CCPP, details of which have been presented elsewhere (Seyedan et al., 1994). In order to illustrate the procedure, the optimum design of a WHRB for a typical CCPP (employing dual-pressure bottoming cycle) built by a prominent Indian company, has been carried out. The present design of a WHRB is taken as the base design and the newer designs generated by this procedure are compared with it to assess the extent of cost reduction possible.

Seyedan, B.; Dhar, P.L.; Gaur, R.R. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bindra, G.S. [Bharat Heavy Electrical Ltd., New Delhi (India)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Demonstration of an on-site PAFC cogeneration system with waste heat utilization by a new gas absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and cost reduction of fuel cells is being promoted to achieve commercial on-site phosphoric acid fuel cells (on-site FC). However, for such cells to be effectively utilized, a cogeneration system designed to use the heat generated must be developed at low cost. Room heating and hot-water supply are the most simple and efficient uses of the waste heat of fuel cells. However, due to the short room-heating period of about 4 months in most areas in Japan, the sites having demand for waste heat of fuel cells throughout the year will be limited to hotels and hospitals Tokyo Gas has therefore been developing an on-site FC and the technology to utilize tile waste heat of fuel cells for room cooling by means of an absorption refrigerator. The paper describes the results of fuel cell cogeneration tests conducted on a double effect gas absorption chiller heater with auxiliary waste heat recovery (WGAR) that Tokyo Gas developed in its Energy Technology Research Laboratory.

Urata, Tatsuo [Tokyo Gas Company, LTD, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

203

Potential of organic Rankine cycle using zeotropic mixtures as working fluids for waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The performance of the ORC (organic Rankine cycle) systems using zeotropic mixtures as working fluids for recovering waste heat of flue gas from industrial boiler is examined on the basis of thermodynamics and thermo-economics under different operating conditions. In order to explore the potential of the mixtures as the working fluids in the ORC, the effects of various mixtures with different components and composition proportions on the system performance have been analyzed. The results show that the compositions of the mixtures have an important effect on the ORC system performance, which is associated with the temperature glide during the phase change of mixtures. From the point of thermodynamics, the performance of the ORC system is not always improved by employing the mixtures as the working fluids. The merit of the mixtures is related to the restrictive conditions of the ORC, different operating conditions results in different conclusions. At a fixed pinch point temperature difference, the small mean heat transfer temperature difference in heat exchangers will lead to a larger heat transfer area and the larger total cost of the ORC system. Compared with the ORC with pure working fluids, the ORC with the mixtures presents a poor economical performance.

You-Rong Li; Mei-Tang Du; Chun-Mei Wu; Shuang-Ying Wu; Chao Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Development of thermoacoustic engine operating by waste heat from cooking stove  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are about 1.5 billion people worldwide use biomass as their primary form of energy in household cooking[1]. They do not have access to electricity and are too remote to benefit from grid electrical supply. In many rural communities stoves are made without technical advancements mostly using open fires cooking stoves which have been proven to be extremely low efficiency and about 93% of the energy generated is lost during cooking. The cooking is done inside a dwelling and creates significant health hazard to the family members and pollution to environment. SCORE (www.score.uk.com) is an international collaboration research project to design and build a low-cost high efficiency woodstove that uses about half amount of the wood of an open wood fire and uses the waste heat of the stove to power a thermoacoustic engine (TAE) to produce electricity for applications such as LED lighting charging mobile phones or charging a 12V battery. This paper reviews on the development of two types of the thermoacoustic engine powered by waste heat from cooking stove which is either using Propane gas or burning of wood as a cooking energy to produce an acceptable amount of electricity for the use of rural communities.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development of thermoelectric power generation system utilizing heat of combustible solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The paper presents the development of thermoelectric power generation system utilizing heat of municipal solid waste. The systematic classification and design guideline are proposed in consideration of the characteristics of solid waste processing system. The conceptual design of thermoelectric power generation system is carried out for a typical middle scale incinerator system (200 ton/day) by the local model. Totally the recovered electricity is 926.5 kWe by 445 units (569,600 couples). In order to achieve detailed design, one dimensional steady state model taking account of temperature dependency of the heat transfer performance and thermoelectric properties is developed. Moreover, small scale on-site experiment on 60 W class module installed in the real incinerator is carried out to extract various levels of technological problems. In parallel with the system development, high temperature thermoelectric elements such as Mn-Si and so on are developed aiming the optimization of ternary compound and high performance due to controlled fine-grain boundary effect. The manganese silicide made by shrinking-rate controlled sintering method performs 5 ({mu}W/cm K{cflx 2}) in power factor at 800 K. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Kajikawa, T.; Ito, M.; Katsube, I. [Shonan Institute of Technology, Fujisawa, Kanagawa, 251 (Japan); Shibuya, E. [NKK Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 230 (Japan)

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1982-31 January 1983  

SciTech Connect

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W.E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery System development. Semiannual report, 1 August 1981-31 January 1982  

SciTech Connect

The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry.

Cole, W. E.; DeSaro, R.; Joshi, C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Two component absorption/phase separation chemical heat pump to provide temperature amplification to waste heat streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump that utilizes liquid/liquid phase separation rather than evaporation to separate two components in a heat of mixing chemical heat pump process. 3 figs.

Scott, T.C.; Kaplan, S.I.

1987-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Energy storage for desalination processes powered by renewable energy and waste heat sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Desalination has become imperative as a drinking water source for many parts of the world. Due to the large quantities of thermal energy and high quality electricity requirements for water purification, the desalination industry depends on waste heat resources and renewable energy sources such as solar collectors, photovoltaic arrays, geothermal and wind and tidal energy sources. Considering the mismatch between the source supply and demand and intermittent nature of these energy resources, energy storage is a must for reliable and continuous operation of desalination facilities. Thermal energy storage (TES) requires a suitable medium for storage and circulation while the photovoltaic/wind generated electricity needs to be stored in batteries for later use. Desalination technologies that utilize thermal energy and thus require storage for uninterrupted process operation are multi-stage flash distillation (MSF), multi-effect evaporation (MED), low temperature desalination (LTD) and humidificationdehumidification (HD) and membrane distillation (MD). Energy accumulation, storage and supply are the key components of energy storage concept which improve process performance along with better resource economics, and minimum environmental impact. Similarly, the battery energy storage (BES) is essential to store electrical energy for electrodialysis (ED), reverse osmosis (RO) and mechanical vapor compression (MVC) technologies. This research-review paper provides a critical review on current energy storage options for different desalination processes powered by various renewable energy and waste heat sources with focus on thermal energy storage and battery energy storage systems. Principles of energy storage (thermal and electrical energy) are discussed with details on the design, sizing, and economics for desalination process applications.

Veera Gnaneswar Gude

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Waste Heat Doesn't Have to be a Waste of Money- The American & Efird Heat Recovery Project: A First for the Textile Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& Efird, Inc., decided to upgrade their heat recovery system at its Dyeing & Finishing Plant in Mt. Holly, North Carolina. They chose an electric industrial process heat pump to enhance heat recovery and to lower operating costs. This application... of the industrial process heat pump was the first of its kind in the American textile industry and was the result of a three year cooperative effort between American & Efird, Inc. and Duke Power Company. This innovative application of heat pump technology has...

Smith, S. W.

213

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from a Heavy-Duty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving the Control Performance of an Organic Rankine Cycle System for Waste Heat Recovery from and efficiency of those systems. The system considered here is an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for recovering internal combustion engines presented in [1]. The system considered here is an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

Use Feedwater Economizers for Waste Heat Recovery: Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Steam Energy Tips No.3  

SciTech Connect

A feedwater economizer reduces steam boiler fuel requirements by transferring heat from the flue gas to incoming feedwater. Boiler flue gases are often rejected to the stack at temperatures more than 100 F to 150 F higher than the temperature of the generated steam. Generally, boiler efficiency can be increased by 1% for every 40 F reduction in flue gas temperature. By recovering waste heat, an economizer can often reduce fuel requirements by 5% to 10% and pay for itself in less than 2 years. The table provides examples of the potential for heat recovery.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

WASTE HEAT RECOVERY USING THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES IN THE LIGHT METALS INDUSTRY  

SciTech Connect

Recently discovered thermoelectric materials and associated manufacturing techniques (nanostructures, thin-film super lattice, quantum wells...) have been characterized with thermal to electric energy conversion efficiencies of 12-25+%. These advances allow the manufacture of small-area, high-energy flux (350 W/cm2 input) thermoelectric generating (TEG) devices that operate at high temperatures (~750C). TEG technology offers the potential for large-scale conversion of waste heat from the exhaust gases of electrolytic cells (e.g., Hall-Hroult cells) and from aluminum, magnesium, metal and glass melting furnaces. This paper provides an analysis of the potential energy recovery and of the engineering issues that are expected when integrating TEG systems into existing manufacturing processes. The TEG module must be engineered for low-cost, easy insertion and simple operation in order to be incorporated into existing manufacturing operations. Heat transfer on both the hot and cold-side of these devices will require new materials, surface treatments and design concepts for their efficient operation.

Choate, William T.; Hendricks, Terry J.; Majumdar, Rajita

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Town of Hague landfill reclamation study: Research ways to increase waste heating value and reduce waste volume. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Monitored composing was studied as a method for reducing the quantity of waste requiring disposed from a landfill reclamation project. After each of two re-screening steps, composted {open_quotes}soil{close_quotes} from a single long windrow of varying depths and moisture content was subjected to analytical testing to determine its suitability to remain as backfill in a reclaimed landfill site. The remaining uncomposted waste was combusted at a waste-to-energy facility to determine if Btu values were improved. Results indicate that a full-scale composting operation could result in a net decrease of approximately 11 percent in disposal costs. The Btu value of the reclaimed waste was calculated to be 4,500 to 5,000 Btu/lb. The feasibility of composting reclaimed waste at other landfill reclamation projects will depend upon site-specific technical and economic factors, including size and nature of the organic fraction of the waste mass, local processing costs, and the cost of waste disposal alternatives.

Salerni, E. [SSB Environmental Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Performance Analysis of Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery System for Stationary CNG Engine Based on Organic Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to improve the electric efficiency of a stationary compressed natural gas (CNG) engine, a set of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system with internal heat exchanger (IHE) is designed to recover exhaust energy that is used to generate electricity. R416A is selected as the working fluid for the waste heat recovery system. According to the first and second laws of thermodynamics, the performances of the ORC system for waste heat recovery are discussed based on the analysis of engine exhaust waste heat characteristics. Subsequently, the stationary CNG engine-ORC with IHE combined system is presented. The electric efficiency and the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) are introduced to evaluate the operating performances of the combined system. The results show that, when the evaporation pressure is 3.5MPa and the engine is operating at the rated condition, the net power output and the thermal efficiency of the ORC system with IHE can reach up to 62.7kW and 12.5%, respectively. Compared with the stationary CNG engine, the electric efficiency of the combined system can be increased by a maximum 6.0%, while the BSFC can be reduced by a maximum 5.0%.

Songsong Song; Hongguang Zhang; Zongyong. Lou; Fubin Yang; Kai Yang; Hongjin Wang; Chen Bei; Ying Chang; Baofeng Yao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect waterlithium bromide (H2OLiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2OLiBr absorption chillers to provide 45MW of cooling at 5C. This could save approximately 9MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

Sahil Popli; Peter Rodgers; Valerie Eveloy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A new conceptual cold-end design of boilers for coal-fired power plants with waste heat recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract After conducting an in-depth analysis of the conventional boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery, this work proposed a new conceptual boiler cold-end design integrated with the steam cycle in a 1000MW CFPP, in which the preheating of air was divided into high-temperature air preheater (HTAP), main air preheater (MAP) and low-temperature air preheater (LTAP). The HTAP and an economizer were installed in separate flue ducts, and the low temperature economizer (LTE) was situated between the MAP and the LTAP in the main flue duct to heat the condensed water. In the proposed boiler cold-end design, the flue gas waste heat was not only used to heat condensed water, but also to further preheat the combustion air. The air temperature at the air-preheater outlet increases and part of the steam bleeds with high exergy can be saved, resulting in greater energy-savings and better economics. Results showed that, for a typical 1000MW CFPP in China, using the proposed boiler cold-end design for waste heat recovery could produce 13.3MWe additional net power output with a heat rate reduction of approximately 112.0kJ/kWh and could yield a net benefit of up to $85.8M per year, which is much greater than those of the conventional cases. Exergy destruction is also reduced from 49.9MWth in the conventional boiler cold-end design to 39.6MWth in the proposed design.

Yongping Yang; Cheng Xu; Gang Xu; Yu Han; Yaxiong Fang; Dongke Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling reaction quench times in the waste heat boiler of a Claus plant  

SciTech Connect

At the high temperatures found in the modified Claus reaction furnace, the thermal decomposition and oxidation of H[sub 2]S yields large quantities of desirable products, gaseous hydrogen (H[sub 2]) and sulfur (S[sub 2]). However, as the temperature of the gas stream is lowered in the waste heat boiler (WHB) located downstream of the furnace, the reverse reaction occurs leading to reassociation of H[sub 2] and S[sub 2] molecules. To examine the reaction quenching capabilities of the WHB, a rigorous computer model was developed incorporating recently published intrinsic kinetic data. A sensitivity study performed with the model demonstrated that WHBs have a wide range of operation with gas mass flux in the tubes from 4 to 24 kg/(m[sup 2] [center dot] s). Most important, the model showed that is was possible to operate WHBs such that quench times could be decreased to 40 ms, which is a reduction by 60% compared to a base case scenario. Furthermore, hydrogen production could be increased by over 20% simply by reconfiguring the WHB tubes.

Nasato, L.V.; Karan, K.; Mehrotra, A.K.; Behie, L.A. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Characteristics-Based Approach to Radioactive Waste Classification in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the impact of waste heat load on waste involve coupling waste heat load with metrics radionuclides in the waste, heat generated by

Djokic, Denia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Large-dimension, high-ZT Thermoelectric Nanocomposites for High-Power High-efficiency Waste Heat Recovery for Electricity Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Large-dimension, high-ZT BiTe and Pb-based nanocomposites produced with a low-cost scalable process were used for development and testing of TE module prototypes, and demonstration of a waste heat recovery system

223

Program Final Report - Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a vehicle analysis to assess the feasibility of thermoelectric technology for waste heat recovery and conversion to useful electrical power and found that eliminating the 500 W of electrical power generated by the alternator corresponded to about a 7% increase in fuel economy (FE) for a small car and about 6% for a full size truck. Electric power targets of 300 W were established for city and highway driving cycles for this project. We obtained critical vehicle level information for these driving cycles that enabled a high-level design and performance analysis of radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems for several potential vehicle platforms, and we identified the location and geometric envelopes of the radiator and exhaust gas thermoelectric subsystems. Based on this analysis, we selected the Chevrolet Suburban as the most suitable demonstration vehicle for this project. Our modeling and thermal analysis assessment of a radiator-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), however, revealed severe practical limitations. Specifically the small temperature difference of 100°C or less between the engine coolant and ambient air results in a low Carnot conversion efficiency, and thermal resistance associated with air convection would reduce this conversion efficiency even further. We therefore decided not to pursue a radiator-based waste heat recovery system and focused only on the exhaust gas. Our overall approach was to combine science and engineering: (1) existing and newly developed TE materials were carefully selected and characterized by the material researcher members of our team, and most of the material property results were validated by our research partners, and (2) system engineers worked closely with vehicle engineers to ensure that accurate vehicle-level information was used for developing subsystem models and designs, and the subsystem output was analyzed for potential fuel economy gains. We incorporated material, module, subsystem, and integration costs into the material selection criteria in order to balance various materials, module and subsystem design, and vehicle integration options. Our work on advanced TE materials development and on TEG system design, assembly, vehicle integration, and testing proceeded in parallel efforts. Results from our two preliminary prototype TEGs using only Bi-Te TE modules allowed us to solve various mechanical challenges and to finalize and fine tune aspects of the design and implementation. Our materials research effort led us to quickly abandon work on PbTe and focus on the skutterudite materials due to their superior mechanical performance and suitability at automotive exhaust gas operating temperatures. We synthesized a sufficiently large quantity of skutterudite material for module fabrication for our third and final prototype. Our TEG#3 is the first of its kind to contain state-of-the-art skutterudite-based TE modules to be installed and tested on a production vehicle. The design, which consisted of 24 skutterudite modules and 18 Bi-Te modules, attempted to optimize electrical power generation by using these two kinds of TE modules that have their peak performance temperatures matched to the actual temperature profile of the TEG during operation. The performance of TEG#3 was limited by the maximum temperature allowable for the Bi-Te TE modules located in the colder end of the TEG, resulting in the operating temperature for the skutterudite modules to be considerably below optimum. We measured the power output for (1) the complete TEG (25 Watts) and (2) an individual TE module series string (1/3 of the TEG) operated at a 60°C higher temperature (19 Watts). We estimate that under optimum operating temperature conditions, TEG#3 will generate about 235 Watts. With additional improvements in thermal and electrical interfaces, temperature homogeneity, and power conditioning, we estimate TEG#3 could deliver a power output of about 425 Watts.

Gregory Meisner

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive waste heat Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fotolia.de 12;3 Preface Recently, various press reports on waste manage- ment in Germany ... Source: Columbia University, Department of Earth and Environmental...

225

Fluidized-bed waste-heat recovery system development. Semiannual report, February 1, 1983-July 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect

A major energy loss in industry is the heat content of the flue gases from industrial process heaters. One effective way to utilize this energy, which is applicable to all processes, is to preheat the combustion air from the process heater. Although recuperators are available to preheat this air when the flue gases are clean, recuperators to recover the heat from dirty and corrosive flue gases do not exist. The Fluidized-Bed Waste-Heat Recovery (FBWHR) System is designed to preheat this combustion air using the heat available in dirty flue gas streams. In this system, a recirculating medium is heated by the flue gas in a fluidized bed. The hot medium is then removed from the bed and placed in a second fluidized bed where it is fluidized by the combustion air. Through this process, the combustion air is heated. The cooled medium is then returned to the first bed. Initial development of this concept is for the aluminum smelting industry. In this report, the accomplishments of the proceeding six-month period are described.

Cole, W. E.; De Saro, R.; Joshi, C.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Bioelectrochemical Integration of Waste Heat Recovery, Waste-to-Energy Conversion, and Waste-to-Chemical Conversion with Industrial Gas and Chemical Manufacturing Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A project to develop a microbial heat recovery cell (MHRC) system prototype using wastewater effluent samples from candidate facilities to produce either electric power or hydrogen

227

Heat Pipe Performance Enhancement with Binary Mixture Fluids that Exhibit Strong Concentration Marangoni Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.4 Heat Pipes for Waste Heat Recovery..analysis involving waste heat recovery of solar energyOverview of Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Technologies for

Armijo, Kenneth Miguel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system; Ten years of successful operation  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system. In the late 1970s, the Lielahti sulfite mill of G.A. Serlachius Corp. (now Metsa Serla Oy) began investigating alternative methods of sludge disposal. The mill had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons of bleached pulp, generated 80,000 tons of by-product lignin sulfonates, and specialized in dissolving pulps. Because of the end product's high quality requirements, the mill had a low pulp yield and high losses in the form of both dissolved and suspended solids.

Nickull, O. (Metsa Serla, Oy (FI)); Lehtonen, O. (Tampella Ltd., Tampere (FI)); Mullen, J. (Tampella Keeler, Williamsport, PA (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Determination of temperature-dependent heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of waste glass melter feed  

SciTech Connect

The cold cap is a layer of reacting glass batch floating on the surface of melt in an all-electric continuous glass melter. The heat needed for the conversion of the melter feed to molten glass must be transferred to and through the cold cap. Since the heat flux into the cold cap determines the rate of melting, the heat conductivity is a key property of the reacting feed. We designed an experimental setup consisting of a large cylindrical crucible with an assembly of thermocouples that monitors the evolution of the temperature field while the crucible is heated at a constant rate. Then we used two methods to calculate the heat conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the reacting feed: the approximation of the temperature field by polynomial functions and the finite-volume method coupled with least-squares analysis. Up to 680C, the heat conductivity of the reacting melter feed was represented by a linear function of temperature.

Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Waste heat recovery from the exhaust of a diesel generator using Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exhaust heat from diesel engines can be an important heat source to provide additional power using a separate Rankine Cycle (RC). In this research, experiments were conducted to measure the available exhaust heat from a 40kW diesel generator using two off-the-shelf heat exchangers. The effectiveness of the heat exchangers using water as the working fluid was found to be 0.44 which seems to be lower than a standard one. This lower performance of the existing heat exchangers indicates the necessity of optimization of the design of the heat exchangers for this particular application. With the available experimental data, computer simulations were carried out to optimize the design of the heat exchangers. Two heat exchangers were used to generate super-heated steam to expand in the turbine using two orientations: series and parallel. The optimized heat exchangers were then used to estimate additional power considering actual turbine isentropic efficiency. The proposed heat exchanger was able to produce 11% additional power using water as the working fluid at a pressure of 15bar at rated engine load. This additional power resulted into 12% improvement in brake-specific fuel consumption (bsfc). The effects of the working fluid pressure were also investigated to maximize the additional power production. The pressure was limited to 15bar which was constrained by the exhaust gas temperature. However, higher pressure is possible for higher exhaust gas temperatures from higher capacity engines. This would yield more additional power with further improvements in bsfc. At 40% part load, the additional power developed was 3.4% which resulted in 3.3% reduction in bsfc.

Shekh Nisar Hossain; Saiful Bari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Discusses isostatic pressing for scalable TE elements, properties characterization of nanostructured ZnO materials, and heat exchanger designs to improve device efficiency

232

Coupled Model for Heat and Water Transport in a High Level Waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

algorithm for mineral dehydration is also applied in the modeling. The Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer code (FEHM) is used to simulate coupled thermal, hydrological, and...

233

Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Working to expand the usage of thermoelectric technology beyond seat heating and cooling and in doing so reduce CO2 emissions and conserve energy.

234

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to (more)

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. During low demand periods, the unit is gas-fired and produces 150 psi steam at high efficiency. In the fall, the heat exchanger is converted to accept flue gas from the large original water tube boilers. The flue gas heats water, which preheats make...

Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Analysis of heat and mass transfer in sub-seabed disposal of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical basis is developed for the prediction of thermal and radionuclide transport in marine sediments. The theory is applied to the study of radioactive waste disposal by emplacement, in specially designed containers, well below the sediment/water interface. Numerical results are obtained for a specified model problem through use of two computer programs designed primarily for the analysis of waste disposal problems. One program (MARIAH) provides descriptions of the temperature and velocity fields induced by the presence of a container of thermally active nuclear waste. A second program (IONMIG), which utilizes the results of the thermal analysis, is used to provide predictions for the migration of four representative radionuclides: /sup 239/Pu, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 129/I, and /sup 99/Tc.

Hickox, C. E.; Gartling, D. K.; McVey, D. F.; Russo, A. J.; Nuttall, H. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Applications guide for waste heat recovery. Final Report, May-Dec. 1982  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey is assessed. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed: also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle R D.

Moynihan, P.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Section XI -- 25 years of development  

SciTech Connect

The original concept of nuclear power plant designers was that the higher standards of design and fabrication would make inservice inspections unnecessary, and little attention was given to provisions for access. By 1966 the Atomic Energy Commission recognized that a planned program of periodic inservice inspections would be needed. They began development of criteria, and encouraged industry code-writing organizations to do likewise. These groups joined forces in 1968, and their product was published by ASME in 1970 as part of the Boiler and Pressure Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Coolant Systems. Section XI, 24 pages in 1970, is now 723 pages. While it originally covered only light water reactor Class 1 components and piping, it now includes Class 2, 3, and containment, and liquid metal cooled reactor plants. Along the way, rules have been developed for gas-cooled and low pressure heavy water reactor plants. The growth in size of Section XI from its modest beginning has been largely because of recognition that the rules governing plant inspection/operation need to be considerably different from the rules provided for the component designer/manufacturer. Rules have been developed in the areas of repair/replacement technology, NDE methodology, NDE acceptance standards, and analytical evaluation methods in the absence of appropriate rules in Section III.

Hedden, O.F. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design of organic Rankine cycles for conversion of waste heat in a polygeneration plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycles provide an alternative to traditional steam Rankine cycles for the conversion of low grade heat sources, where steam cycles are known to be less efficient and more expensive. This work examines organic ...

DiGenova, Kevin (Kevin J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Optimal Organic Rankine Cycle Installation Planning for Factory Waste Heat Recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As Taiwans industry developed rapidly, the energy demand also rises simultaneously. In the production process, theres a lot of energy consumed in the process. Formally, the energy used in generating the heat in...

Yu-Lin Chen; Chun-Wei Lin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An integrated approach towards efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficient, scalable, and low cost vehicular thermoelectric generators development will include rapid synthesis of thermoelectric materials, different device geometries, heat sink designs, and durability and long-term performance tests

242

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limits potential use of waste heat for space conditioning.the attractive uses for waste heat in many circumstancesprovide electricity and use the waste heat for cleaning, the

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Power plant waste heat utilization in aquaculture. Volume II. Final report, 1 November 1976-1 November 1979  

SciTech Connect

A three-year research study on the constructive use of electric generating station waste heat in cooling effluents for fish production is presented. This volume specifically describes that part of the research conducted by Trenton State College. Water temperatures from the discharge canal of the Mercer Generating Station in New Jersey were blended with those from the Delaware River by pumps installed in strategic locations to achieve desired temperatures. The report further describes how recirculation is controlled during chlorination periods by activating and de-activating certain pumps. As a result of this procedure, plus an oxygen injection system, trout density was greatly increased. Techniques for growing and maintaining shrimp larvae and early juveniles in nursery systems are described. Harvest densities of the shellfish did not compare with those obtained for finfish.

Eble, A.F.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Waste-heat mariculture of striped bass for population enhancement and food production. Final report on Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Biological and economic data were obtained to determine whether the culture of striped bass (Morona saxatilis) in power plant thermal effluent could be a cost-effective means of utilizing an otherwise wasted energy resource to provide additional supplies of high-quality seafood. Experiments were conducted to provide some of the data necessary to predict tank-carrying capacity, food-conversion efficiency, and water flow requirements for striped bass cultured at high density in future commercial-scale operations. Computer models were developed for several modes of operation of a theoretical commercial production facility, and return-on-investment calculations were made which indicated that substantial profits are possible. At these sites, no heating or pumping of water would be required, and an annual return-on-operating costs of 103% was estimated.

Van Olst, J.C.; Carlberg, J.M.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allows high temperature waste heat utilization. Phosphoricnatural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; hot wateris limited by generated waste heat Regulatory constraints: -

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

"Computers may be thought of as engines for transforming free energy into waste heat and mathematical work", Charles H. Bennett [Ben82  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 5. "Computers may be thought of as engines for transforming free energy into waste heat the PORT section to obtain the complete input port characterization of the DUT: 1. Number of ports 2. Input port names and types (clock, connected to a constant or random value) 3. Input port parameters

Todorovich, Elías

247

Thermodynamic analysis of a low-pressure economizer based waste heat recovery system for a coal-fired power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An LPE (low-pressure economizer) based waste heat recovery system for a CFPP (coal-fired power plant) is investigated thermodynamically. With the installation of LPE in the flue before the FGD (flue gas desulfurizer), the heat contained in the exhaust flue gas can be recovered effectively and the water consumption can be reduced in the FGD resulted from the temperature dropped flue gas. The impacts on the related apparatuses after installing LPE in a CFPP are analyzed and the internal relationships among correlated parameters are presented. The efficiencies of LPE installed in a CFPP evaluated by the first law, the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are also compared and analyzed. A detailed case study based on a 350MW CFPP unit is presented and the variations of the thermal performance after the installation of LPE are investigated. The results show that the second law and the thermal equilibrium efficiencies are increased which can be indicators to evaluate the performance of the LPE system while the first law efficiency is decreased after installing LPE. Results also show that the saving of SCE (standard coal equivalent) is 3.85g/(kWh) for this CFPP unit under full load after installing LPE.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei; Shinan Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Using the sun and waste wood to heat a central Ohio home. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The description of a house in Ohio built on a south facing slope with two levels above ground on the north, east, and west sides and three levels exposed to the southern winter Sun is presented. The floor plan, a general history of the project, the operation of the system, the backup heat source (wood), the collection of data, and the procedure for determining actual heat loss are described. Additionally, the calculation of the solar contribution percentage and the amount of mass to be included in the greenhouse and problems with an indirect gain wall are discussed. The location of the wood stove in the system is noted. The east wall temperature data are given. Soil temperature, air infiltration, thermal comfort, and energy usage are discussed. (MCW).

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Overview and status of project to develop...

250

Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Development of Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of...

251

An experimental study of waste heat recovery from a residential refrigerator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of an integrated heat recovery system which has been designed both to enhance the performance of a residential refrigerator and simultaneously to provide preheated water for an electric hot water heater. A commercial, indirect-heated hot water tank was retrofitted with suitable tubing to permit it to serve as a water cooled condenser for a residential refrigerator. This condenser operates in parallel with the air-cooled condenser tubing of the refrigerator so that either one or the other is active when the refrigerator is running. The refrigerator was housed in a controlled-environment chamber, and it was instrumented so that its performance could be monitored carefully in conjunction with the water pre-heating system. The system has been tested under a variety of hot water usage protocols, and the resulting data set has provided significantly insight into issues associated with commercial implementation of the concept. For the case of no water usage, the system was able to provide a 35 C temperature rise in the storage tank after about 100 hours of continuous operation, with no detectable deterioration of the refrigerator performance. Preliminary tests with simulations of high water usage, low water usage, and family water usage indicate a possible 18--20% energy savings for hot water over a long period of operation. Although the economic viability for such a system in a residential environment would appear to be sub-marginal, the potential for such a system associated with commercial-scale refrigeration clearly warrants further study, particularly for climates for which air conditioning heat rejection is highly seasonal.

Clark, R.A.; Smith, R.N.; Jensen, M.K. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Final Report: Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat  

SciTech Connect

This research and development (R&D) project exemplifies a shared public private commitment to advance the development of energy efficient industrial technologies that will reduce the U.S. dependence upon foreign oil, provide energy savings and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a Direct Evaporator for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for the conversion of waste heat from gas turbine exhaust to electricity. In conventional ORCs, the heat from the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to a hydrocarbon based working fluid by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. The Direct Evaporator accomplishes preheating, evaporation and superheating of the working fluid by a heat exchanger placed within the exhaust gas stream. Direct Evaporation is simpler and up to 15% less expensive than conventional ORCs, since the secondary oil loop and associated equipment can be eliminated. However, in the past, Direct Evaporation has been avoided due to technical challenges imposed by decomposition and flammability of the working fluid. The purpose of this project was to retire key risks and overcome the technical barriers to implementing an ORC with Direct Evaporation. R&D was conducted through a partnership between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and General Electric (GE) Global Research Center (GRC). The project consisted of four research tasks: (1) Detailed Design & Modeling of the ORC Direct Evaporator, (2) Design and Construction of Partial Prototype Direct Evaporator Test Facility, (3) Working Fluid Decomposition Chemical Analyses, and (4) Prototype Evaluation. Issues pertinent to the selection of an ORC working fluid, along with thermodynamic and design considerations of the direct evaporator, were identified. The FMEA (Failure modes and effects analysis) and HAZOP (Hazards and operability analysis) safety studies performed to mitigate risks are described, followed by a discussion of the flammability analysis of the direct evaporator. A testbed was constructed and the prototype demonstrated at the GE GRC Niskayuna facility.

Donna Post Guillen; Jalal Zia

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fossil fuel sources of waste heat and other lossesthat this is only the waste heat from fossil generation,an estimate of the total waste heat from fossil generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

255

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

256

Evaluation of Brayton and Rankine alternatives for diesel waste heat exploitation  

SciTech Connect

A diesel engine may produce exhaust-gas thermal energy in excess of that needed for turbocharging. Alternatives for exploitation of the energy by producing work may be direct expansion through a gas turbine (completing a Brayton cycle that begins with the engine's compression and combustion), or transfer of heat into a Rankine cycle. It is demonstrated that either alternative may have a domain in which it is superior in work done, or in exhaust volume per unit mass of diesel exhaust. Computation models are developed and demonstrated for finding the boundaries along which the Rankine and Brayton alternatives have equal merit in either work or exhaust volume.

Woodward, J.B. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Application of a low pressure economizer for waste heat recovery from the exhaust flue gas in a 600MW power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a case study of recovering the waste heat of the exhaust flue gas before entering a flue gas desulphurizer (FGD) in a 600MW power plant. This waste heat can be recovered by installing a low pressure economizer (LPE) to heat the condensed water which can save the steam extracted from the steam turbine for heating the condensed water and then extra work can be obtained. The energy and water savings and the reduction of CO2 emission resulted from the LPE installation are assessed for three cases in a 600MW coal-fired power plant with wet stack. Serpentine pipes with quadrate finned extensions are selected for the LPE heat exchanger which has an overall coefficient of heat transfer of 37W/m2K and the static pressure loss of 781Pa in the optimized case. Analysis results show that it is feasible to install \\{LPEs\\} in the exhaust flue gas system between the pressurizing fan and the FGD, which has little negative impacts on the unit. The benefits generated include saving of standard coal equivalent (SCE) at 24g/(kWh) and saving of water at 2535t/h under full load operation with corresponding reduction of CO2 emission.

Chaojun Wang; Boshu He; Shaoyang Sun; Ying Wu; Na Yan; Linbo Yan; Xiaohui Pei

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Juan A. Blanco & Dave Flanders (University of British Columbia/Universidad Pblica de Navarra), Dale Littlejohn & Peter Robinson (Community Energy Association), David Dubois (Wood Waste to Rural Heat Project)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Dale Littlejohn & Peter Robinson (Community Energy Association), David Dubois (Wood Waste to Rural Heat determine if forest biomass from wildfire abatement can sustainably fuel a district heating system #12...............................................................................................................11 3.1 The pros: multiple and multiplicative benefits of biomass heating systems..................11

Pedersen, Tom

259

"Potential for Combined Heat and Power and District Heating and Cooling from Waste-to-Energy Facilities in the U.S. Learning from the Danish Experience"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used for the generation of electricity. The advantages of district heating using WTE plants are heating and cooling system in Indianapolis. However, there are few U.S. hot water district heating systems,800 district heating and cooling systems, providing 320 million MWh of thermal energy. Currently, 28 of the 88

Shepard, Kenneth

260

Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Development and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Demonstration of and Demonstration of Waste Heat Integration with Solvent Process for More Efficient CO 2 Removal from Coal-Fired Flue Gas Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

262

Determination of Thermal-Degradation Rates of Some Candidate Rankine-Cycle Organic Working Fluids for Conversion of Industrial Waste Heat Into Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETERMINATION OF THERMAL-DEGRADATION RATES OF SOME CANDIDATE RANKINE-CYCLE ORGANIC WORKING FLUIDS FOR CONVERSION OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE HEAT INTO POWER Mohan L. Jain, Jack Demirgian, John L. Krazinski, and H. Bushby Argonne National Laboratory..., Argonne, Illinois Howard Mattes and John Purcell U.S. Department of Energy ABSTRACT Serious concerns over the long-term thermal In a previous study [1] based on systems stability of organic working fluids and its effect analysis and covering...

Jain, M. L.; Demirgian, J.; Krazinski, J. L.; Bushby, H.; Mattes, H.; Purcell, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Observation of a New $\\Xi_{b}$ Baryon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The observation of a new b baryon via its strong decay into $\\Xi_{b}^- \\pi^+$ (plus charge conjugates) is reported. The measurement uses a data sample of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 inverse femtobarns. The known $\\Xi_b^-$ baryon is reconstructed via the decay chain $\\Xi_{b}^- \\to J/\\psi \\Xi^- \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^- \\Lambda^0 \\pi^-$, with $\\Lambda^0 \\to p \\pi^-$. A peak is observed in the distribution of the difference between the mass of the $\\Xi_{b}^- \\pi^+$ system and the sum of the masses of the $\\Xi_{b}^-$ and $\\pi^+$, with a significance exceeding five standard deviations. The mass difference of the peak is 14.84 +/- 0.74 (stat.) +/- 0.28 (syst.) MeV. The new state most likely corresponds to the $J^P=3/2^+$ companion of the $\\Xi_b$.

Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hrmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knnz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Lonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jrmie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Ald Jnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custdio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Mntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Hrknen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampn, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindn, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Menp, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs. fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed.

Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Proceedings of the ASME Heat Transfer Division. Volume 4: Natural convection within a horizontal circular cylinder heated from below and cooled from above; Numerical methods for coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction; Thermal analysis in waste processing and disposal; Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems; HTD-Volume 335  

SciTech Connect

The first two sections as listed in the title contain 7 papers. The third section on thermal analysis contains 18 papers arranged into the following topical areas: Thermal treatment and municipal wastes; Thermal hydraulics in hazardous and nuclear waste processing and disposal; and Waste processing. Heat transfer in fire and combustion systems contains 17 papers arranged into the following topical sections: Soot/radiation; Combustion systems; Multiphase combustion; and Flames and fires. Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Pepper, D.W. [ed.] [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Douglass, R.W. [ed.] [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Heinrich, J.C. [ed.] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Simulation study on lignite-fired power system integrated with flue gas drying and waste heat recovery Performances under variable power loads coupled with off-design parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignite is a kind of low rank coal with high moisture content and low net heating value, which is mainly used for electric power generation. However, the thermal efficiency of power plants firing lignite directly is very low. Pre-drying is a proactive option, dehydrating raw lignite to raise its heating value, to improve the power plant thermal efficiency. A pre-dried lignite-fired power system integrated with boiler flue gas drying and waste heat recovery was proposed in this paper. The plant thermal efficiency could be improved by 1.51% at benchmark condition due to pre-drying and waste heat recovery. The main system performances under variable power loads were simulated and analyzed. Simulation results show that the improvement of plant thermal efficiency reduced to 1.36% at 50% full load. Moreover, the influences of drying system off-design parameters were simulated coupled with power loads. The variation tendencies of main system parameters were obtained. The influence of pre-drying degree (including moisture content of pre-dried lignite and raw lignite) on the plant thermal efficiency diminishes gradually with the decreasing power load. The dryer thermal efficiency and dryer exhaust temperature are also main factors and the influences on system parameters have been quantitatively analyzed.

Xiaoqu Han; Ming Liu; Jinshi Wang; Junjie Yan; Jiping Liu; Feng Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Savannah River Site Public and regulatory involvement in the transuranic (TRU) program and their effect on decisions to dispose of Pu-238 heat source tru waste onsite  

SciTech Connect

The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of heat source Pu-238 TRU waste. As can be imagined, a decision to dispose of TRU waste onsite versus shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) in New Mexico for disposal is of considerable interest to the stakeholders in South Carolina. The interaction between the stakeholders not only include the general public, but also the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and Region IV of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The discussions, educational sessions, and negotiations include resolution of equity issues as well and moved forward to an understanding of the difficulties including risk management faced by the Ship-to- WIPP program. Once the program was better understood, the real negotiations concerning equity, safety, and risk to workers from handling Pu-238 waste could begin. This paper will also discuss the technical, regulatory, and public involvement aspects of disposal onsite that must be properly communicated if the program is to be successful. The Risk Based End State Vision Report for the Savannah River Site includes a variance that proposes on-site near surface disposal of waste from the program to produce Pu-238 heat sources for deep space probes. On-site disposal would greatly reduce the risk to workers by eliminating the need to repackage the waste in order to characterize it and ship it to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Significant cost savings can also be realized. A performance assessment was completed to demonstrate that on-site disposal of this waste can be done while meeting the Department of Energy and EPA performance objectives for disposal of TRU waste in a non-WIPP location such as the SRS. This analysis provides a means of demonstrating the technical basis for this alternative to management, stakeholders and regulators. The technical analysis is required to demonstrate that the performance objectives contained in 40 CFR 191, Environmental Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes will be met over a 10,000 year period. This paper will describe the successful results of this technical, regulatory, and public involvement program, explore why and how the accomplishments occurred, and describe the future challenges along with the road map for the future. In doing this, the TRU Ship-to-WIPP program must be described to give the readers an understanding of the technical complexities that must be communicated successfully to achieve constructive stakeholder participation and regulatory approval. (authors)

Bert Crapse, H.M. [U. S. Department of Energy, Washington (United States); Sonny, W.T. [Goldston Washington Savannah River Company (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Xi an Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xi an Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd Xi an Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Xi'an Huanghe Photovoltaic Technology Co Ltd Place Xi'an, Shaanxi Province, China Sector Solar Product China-based solar cell and module manufacturer. Coordinates 43.429695°, 12.935155° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.429695,"lon":12.935155,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

Observation of $\\eta_{c}$ decay into $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$ final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a data sample of $2.25\\times10^{8}$ $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector, we present the first observation of the decays of $\\eta_{c}$ mesons to $\\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$. The branching fractions are measured to be $(2.11\\pm0.28_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.18_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.50_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ and $(0.89\\pm0.16_{\\rm stat.}\\pm0.08_{\\rm syst.}\\pm0.21_{\\rm PDG})\\times10^{-3}$ for $\\eta_{c} \\to \\Sigma^{+}\\bar{\\Sigma}^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\bar{\\Xi}^{+}$, respectively. These branching fractions provide important information on the helicity selection rule in charmonium-decay processes.

Ablikim, M; Albayrak, O; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Coccetti, F; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q Z; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhong, Z; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Specifying Waste Heat Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, refineries,kilns, incineration systems and cogeneration and combined cycle plants,to mention a few applications.Depending on several factors such as quantity of gas or steam floW,cleanl1ness of gas,gas and steam pressure and space availabilitY,they may... of incinerator.whether fixed bed.rotary kiln or fluid bed.Sla9ging constituents present in the gas can result in bridging of tubes by molten salts if tube spacing is not wide,particularly at the boiler inlet.Ash hoppers ,soot blowers and cleaning lanes...

Ganapathy, V.

271

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One hundred fifty reports were reviewed along with interviews of some twelve recuperator manufacturers and research organizations. Of the reports reviewed, the consensus was that the majority of recuperators used in the U.S. are constructed of 300...

Ward, M. E.; Solomon, N. G.; Tabb, E. S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Effects of heat treatment and formulation on the phase composition and chemical durability of the EBR-ll ceramic waste form.  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste salts generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II will be immobilized in a ceramic waste form (CWF). Tests are being conducted to evaluate the suitability of the CWF for disposal in the planned federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. In this report, the results of laboratory tests and analyses conducted to address product consistency and thermal stability issues called out in waste acceptance requirements are presented. The tests measure the impacts of (1) variations in the amounts of salt and binder glass used to make the CWF and (2) heat treatments on the phase composition and chemical durability of the waste form. A series of CWF materials was made to span the ranges of salt and glass contents that could be used during processing: between 5.0 and 15 mass% salt loaded into the zeolite (the nominal salt loading is 10.7%, and the process control range is 10.6 to 11.2 mass%), and between 20 and 30 mass% binder glass mixed with the salt-loaded zeolite (the nominal glass content is 25% and the process control range is 20 to 30 mass%). In another series of tests, samples of two CWF products made with the nominal salt and glass contents were reheated to measure the impact on the phase composition and durability: long-term heat treatments were conducted at 400 and 500 C for durations of 1 week, 4 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year; short-term heat treatments were conducted at 600, 700, 800, and 850 C for durations of 4, 28, 52, and 100 hours. All of the CWF products that were made with different amounts of salt, zeolite, and glass and all of the heat-treated CWF samples were analyzed with powder X-ray diffraction to measure changes in phase compositions and subjected to 7-day product consistency tests to measure changes in the chemical durability. The salt loading had the greatest impact on phase composition and durability. A relatively large amount of nepheline, Na{sub 4}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 4}, was formed in the material made with 5.0 mass% salt loading, which was also the least durable of the materials that were tested. Nepheline was not detected in materials made with salt-loaded zeolites containing 15 or 20 mass% salt. Conversely, halite was not detected with XRD in materials made with 5.0 or 7.5 mass% salt loading, but similar amounts of halite were measured in the other CWF materials. The sodalite contents of all materials were similar. The halite content in the CWF source material used in the short-term heat-treatment study, which had the nominal salt and binder glass loadings, was determined to be about 1.3 mass% by standard addition analysis. Heat treatment had only a small effect on the phase composition: the amount of halite increased to as much as 3.7 mass%, and trace amounts of nepheline were detected in samples treated at 800 and 850 C. The CWF samples treated at high temperatures had lower amounts of halite detected in the rapid water-soluble test. The releases of B, Na, and Si in the product consistency tests (PCTs) were not sensitive to the heat-treatment conditions. The PCT responses of all salt-loaded and heat-treated CWF materials were well below that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass.

Ebert, W. E.; Dietz, N. L.; Janney, D. E.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

APPLICANT INFORMATION (SEE ALSO SECTION XI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the Mozambique Ministry of Health, a CIDA dental/health-care project, a periodontal health project with Mexico mechanics, wave motion and sound, heat, electricity and magnetism, light and modern physics; must include

Saskatchewan, University of

274

Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat Recovery System for Light-Duty Vehicles Low and high Temperature Dual Thermoelectric Generation Waste Heat...

275

Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications...

276

Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Working to expand the usage of thermoelectric...

277

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

278

Xi'an, China: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xi'an, China: Energy Resources Xi'an, China: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Xi'an, China Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 1790630 Coordinates 34.258333°, 108.928611° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.258333,"lon":108.928611,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

279

XiAn Lv Jing Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

XiAn Lv Jing Technology XiAn Lv Jing Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name XiAn Lv Jing Technology Place Xian, Shaanxi Province, China Sector Solar Product Xian-based solar integrated company. Coordinates 34.27301°, 108.928009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.27301,"lon":108.928009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

280

Risk-based inspection in ASME Section XI  

SciTech Connect

By 1970 the first edition of the ASME Code Section XI, Inservice Inspection of Nuclear Reactor Coolant Systems was published. From its inception, the Section XI inservice inspection scope was based on a fundamental risk-based selection process. In other words the inservice inspection scope included components where the consequences of a pressure boundary failure were high. Once the consequence significant system boundaries were established, inspections would then be performed at locations believed to be most susceptible service induced failure. Current Section XI requirements require that inspection locations be selected on the basis of peak stress and fatigue usage values contained in the Design Reports. These original stress calculations were designed to qualify a design and assure that the plant would provide reliable service throughout its design life. For the most part, the fatigue usage values in these reports do not provide an accurate measure of service life. As service history has demonstrated, the use of Design Report stresses and fatigue usage values can be misleading. The Section XI ISI inspection requirements have always been intended to focus inspections at those locations in the plant that pose the greater risk to reactor safety. This fundamental principle behind the Section XI inspection requirements has guided Section XI since its inception. However, today Utility resources are limited. The move in many states to deregulate utilities and growing competition from independent power producers is challenging Owners to reduce operating and maintenance cost without sacrificing safety. These programs should allow plants to focus limited resources on those locations where damage mechanisms are active and consequences are high. This will provide for efficient use of plants resources and improve safety.

Lance, J.J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Full-scale tests of sulfur polymer cement and non-radioactive waste in heated and unheated prototypical containers  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur polymer cement has been demonstrated to be superior to portland cement in the stabilization of numerous troublesome low- level radioactive wastes, notably mixed waste fly ash, which contains heavy metals. EG G Idaho, Inc. conducted full-scale, waste-stabilization tests with a mixture of sulfur polymer cement and nonradioactive incinerator ash poured over simulated steel and ash wastes. The container used to contain the simulated waste for the pour was a thin-walled, rectangular, steel container with no appendages. The variable in the tests was that one container and its contents were at 65{degree}F (18{degree}C) at the beginning of the pour, while the other was preheated to 275{degree}F (135{degree}C) and was insulated before the pour. The primary goal was to determine the procedures and equipment deemed operationally acceptable and capable of providing the best probability of passing the only remaining governmental test for sulfur polymer cement, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's full-scale test. The secondary goal was to analyze the ability of the molten cement and ash mixture to fill different size pipes and thus eliminate voids in the resultant 24 ft{sup 3} monolith.

Darnell, G.R.; Aldrich, W.C.; Logan, J.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Full-scale tests of sulfur polymer cement and non-radioactive waste in heated and unheated prototypical containers  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur polymer cement has been demonstrated to be superior to portland cement in the stabilization of numerous troublesome low- level radioactive wastes, notably mixed waste fly ash, which contains heavy metals. EG&G Idaho, Inc. conducted full-scale, waste-stabilization tests with a mixture of sulfur polymer cement and nonradioactive incinerator ash poured over simulated steel and ash wastes. The container used to contain the simulated waste for the pour was a thin-walled, rectangular, steel container with no appendages. The variable in the tests was that one container and its contents were at 65{degree}F (18{degree}C) at the beginning of the pour, while the other was preheated to 275{degree}F (135{degree}C) and was insulated before the pour. The primary goal was to determine the procedures and equipment deemed operationally acceptable and capable of providing the best probability of passing the only remaining governmental test for sulfur polymer cement, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s full-scale test. The secondary goal was to analyze the ability of the molten cement and ash mixture to fill different size pipes and thus eliminate voids in the resultant 24 ft{sup 3} monolith.

Darnell, G.R.; Aldrich, W.C.; Logan, J.A.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of River Protection review of the High Level Waste Facility heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

284

Application guide for waste heat recovery with organic Rankine cycle equipment. Final report May-Dec 82  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the state-of-the-art of commercially available organic Rankine cycle (ORC) hardware from a literature search and industry survey. Engineering criteria for applying ORC technology are established, and a set of nomograms to enable the rapid sizing of the equipment is presented. A comparison of an ORC system with conventional heat recovery techniques can be made with a nomogram developed for a recuperative heat exchanger. A graphical technique for evaluating the economic aspects of an ORC system and conventional heat recovery method is discussed; also included is a description of anticipated future trends in organic Rankine cycle RandD.

Moynihan, P.I.

1983-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

First Observation of Inclusive {ital B} Decays to the Charmed Strange Baryons {Xi}{sup 0}{sub {ital c}} and {Xi}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}  

SciTech Connect

Using data collected in the region of the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the CLEO II detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), we present the first observation of B mesons decaying into the charmed strange baryons {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} and {Xi}{sup +}{sub c} . We find 79{plus_minus}27 {Xi}{sup 0}{sub c} and 125{plus_minus}28 {Xi}{sup +}{sub c} candidates from B decays, leading to product branching fractions of B({bar B}{r_arrow}{Xi}{sup 0}{sub c}X)B({Xi}{sup 0}{sub c}{r_arrow}{Xi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +})= (0.144{plus_minus}0.048 {plus_minus}0.021) {times}10{sup {minus}3} and B({bar B}{r_arrow}{Xi}{sup +}{sub c}X)B({Xi}{sup +}{sub C}{r_arrow} {Xi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}) =(0.453{plus_minus} 0.096{sup +0.085}{sub {minus}0.065}){times} 10{sup {minus}3} . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; OGrady, C.; Schmidtler, M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Asner, D.M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Gronberg, J.; Hill, T.S.; Kutschke, R.; Lange, D.J.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Witherell, M.S. [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Balest, R.; Behrens, B.H.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Foland, A.D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hopman, P.I.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Ward, C. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C.D.; Lohner, M.; Prescott, C.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R.A.; Gao, Y.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Browder, T.E.; Li, F.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J.L. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States)] [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Hans, R.M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M.A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

released by the buried wastes and heat remain ing in theOF 10-YEAR-OLD WASTES Waste Heat Source C h a r a c t e r ia t e r s e c t i o n s . WASTE HEAT SOURCE CHARACTERIZATION

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Identify and Visualize Differences in Traffic Data Zhonghua Xi*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identify and Visualize Differences in Traffic Data Zhonghua Xi* , Jyh-Ming Lien* , Yi-Chang Chiu visualization is developed to automatically search for events of interest using quantitative metrics, while also relies on traffic analysis. Traffic analysis can be approached as a problem of searching for trends

Lien, Jyh-Ming

288

PS10 Solar Power Tower Xi Jing, Fang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the solar energy to the grid in 2007 Operating cash flow 1.4 millions in 2007.Operating cash flow 1PS10 Solar Power Tower Xi Jing, Fang #12;Overview Magnitudes , Cost & TechnologiesMagnitudes , Cost Technological ,Social Problems and PolicyTechnological ,Social Problems and Policy ChallengesChallenges #12

Prevedouros, Panos D.

289

Observation of the $\\Xi_b^0$ Baryon  

SciTech Connect

The first observation of the heavy baryonic state {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0} is reported by the CDF Collaboration. A new decay mode of the established state {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} is also observed. In both cases the decay into a {Xi}{sub c} plus a charged pion is seen, with an equivalent statistical significance of above 6.8{sigma}. The quark model of elementary particles is well established and has a impressive history of success in its account of hadronic states. Nevertheless, it is important to continue to test it by searching for hitherto unobserved particles that are predicted to exist, both to provide continued confirmation of the quark model, and to provide a background for the possible discovery of unusual types of particle. In this presentation we report the first observation, by the CDF Collaboration, of a new baryonic state, the {Xi}{sub b}{sup 0}. This consists of a bsu quark combination and fills an important gap in the set of baryons containing a b quark.

Bussey, Peter; /Glasgow U.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Strangeness Balance in HADES Experiments and the Xi- Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HADES data on a strangeness production in Ar+KCl collisions at 1.76A GeV are analyzed within a minimal statistical model. The total negative strangeness content is fixed by the observed K^+ multiplicities on event-by-event basis. Particles with negative strangeness are assumed to remain in chemical equilibrium with themselves and in thermal equilibrium with the environment until a common freeze-out. Exact strangeness conservation in each collision event is explicitly preserved. This implies that Xi baryons can be released only in events where two or more kaons are produced. An increase of the fireball volume due to application of a centrality trigger in HADES experiments is taken into account. We find that experimental ratios of K-/K+, Lambda/K+ and Sigma/K+ can be satisfactorily described provided in-medium potentials are taken into account. However, the calculated Xi-/Lambda/K+ ratio proves to be significantly smaller compared to the measured value (8 times lower than the experimental median value and 3 times lower than the lower error bar). Various scenarios to explain observed Xi enhancement are discussed. Arguments are given in favor of the Xi production in direct reactions. The rates of the possible production processes are estimated and compared.

E. E. Kolomeitsev; B. Tomasik; D. N. Voskresensky

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Combustion and performance of a diesel engine with preheated Jatropha curcas oil using waste heat from exhaust gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The viscosity and density of CJO (crude Jatropha oil) were reduced by heating it using the heat from exhaust gas of a diesel engine with an appropriately designed helical coil heat exchanger. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the combustion characteristics of a DI (direct injection) diesel engine using PJO (preheated Jatropha oil). It exhibited a marginally higher cylinder gas pressure, rate of pressure rise and heat release rate as compared to HSD (high speed diesel) during the initial stages of combustion for all engine loadings. Ignition delay was shorter for PJO as compared to HSD. The results also indicated that BSFC (brake specific fuel consumption) and EGT (exhaust gas temperature) increased while BTE (brake thermal efficiency) decreased with PJO as compared to HSD for all engine loadings. The reductions in CO2 (carbon dioxide), HC (hydrocarbon) and \\{NOx\\} (nitrous oxide) emissions were observed for PJO along with increased CO (carbon monoxide) emission as compared to those of HSD.

Priyabrata Pradhan; Hifjur Raheman; Debasish Padhee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A newly designed economizer to improve waste heat recovery: A case study in a pasteurized milk plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An economizer is normally employed to perform heat recovery from hot exhaust gases to cold fluid. In this work, a newly designed economizer is devised to achieve high heat recovery in a pasteurized milk plant. In the economizer, the hot exhaust gas is divided into two channels flowing up on the left and right sides. After that, it is moving down passing over aligned banks of tubes, which water is flowing inside, in a triple passes fashion. Moreover, three dimensional (3D) models with heat transfer including fluid dynamic have been developed, validated by actual plant data and used to evaluate the performance of the economizer. Simulation results indicate that the newly designed economizer can recover the heat loss of 38% and can achieve the cost saving of 13%.

Sathit Niamsuwan; Paisan Kittisupakorn; Iqbal M. Mujtaba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF A STIRLING ENGINE POWERED HEAT ACTIVATED HEAT PUMP W. D. C. Richards and W. L. Auxer General Electric Company Space Division King of Prussia, Pa. ABSTRACT A heat activated heat pump (HAHP for space heating since it directly utilizes the engine waste heat in addition to the energy obtained

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

294

Container Approval for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste with Negligible Heat Generation in the German Konrad Repository - 12148  

SciTech Connect

Since the license for the Konrad repository was finally confirmed by legal decision in 2007, the Federal Institute for Radiation Protection (BfS) has been performing further planning and preparation work to prepare the repository for operation. Waste conditioning and packaging has been continued by different waste producers as the nuclear industry and federal research institutes on the basis of the official disposal requirements. The necessary prerequisites for this are approved containers as well as certified waste conditioning and packaging procedures. The Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) is responsible for container design testing and evaluation of quality assurance measures on behalf of BfS under consideration of the Konrad disposal requirements. Besides assessing the container handling stability (stacking tests, handling loads), design testing procedures are performed that include fire tests (800 deg. C, 1 hour) and drop tests from different heights and drop orientations. This paper presents the current state of BAM design testing experiences about relevant container types (box shaped, cylindrical) made of steel sheets, ductile cast iron or concrete. It explains usual testing and evaluation methods which range from experimental testing to analytical and numerical calculations. Another focus has been laid on already existing containers and packages. The question arises as to how they can be evaluated properly especially with respect to lack of completeness of safety assessment and fabrication documentation. At present BAM works on numerous applications for container design testing for the Konrad repository. Some licensing procedures were successfully finished in the past and BfS certified several container types like steel sheet, concrete until cast iron containers which are now available for waste packaging for final disposal. However, large quantities of radioactive wastes had been placed into interim storage using containers which are not already licensed for the Konrad repository. Safety assessment of these so-called 'old' containers is a big challenge for all parties because documentation sheets about container design testing and fabrication often contain gaps or have not yet been completed. Appropriate solution strategies are currently under development and discussion. Furthermore, BAM has successfully initiated and established an information forum, called 'ERFA QM Konrad Containers', which facilitates discussions on various issues of common interest with respect to Konrad container licensing procedures as well as the interpretation of disposal requirements under consideration of operational needs. Thus, it provides additional, valuable supports for container licensing procedures. (authors)

Voelzke, Holger; Nieslony, Gregor; Ellouz, Manel; Noack, Volker; Hagenow, Peter; Kovacs, Oliver; Hoerning, Tony [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 12200 Berlin (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

Chapter 9 Formula Sheet yi = 0 + 1xi + i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 9 Formula Sheet yi = ¯0 + ¯1xi + ²i s2 LF = 1 n ¡ 2 X (y ¡ ^y)2 = 1 n ¡ 2 X e2 e¤ i = ei sLF s 1 ¡ 1 n ¡ (xi ¡ ¹x)2 P (x ¡ ¹x)2 T = b1 ¡ # sLF pP (x ¡ ¹x)2 b1 § t sLF qX (x ¡ ¹x)2 ^y = b0 + b1x T = ^y ¡ # sLF s 1 n + (x ¡ ¹x)2 P (x ¡ ¹x)2 ^y § tsLF s 1 n + (x ¡ ¹x)2 P (x ¡ ¹x)2 (b0 + b1x) § p 2f sLF

Vardeman, Stephen B.

297

CMS HF calorimeter PMTs and Xi(c)+ lifetime measurement  

SciTech Connect

This thesis consists of two parts: In the first part we describe the Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) selection and testing processes for the Hadronic Forward (HF) calorimeter of the CMS, a Large Hadron Collier (LHC) experiment at CERN. We report the evaluation process of the candidate PMTs from three different manufacturers, the complete tests performed on the 2300 Hamamatsu PMTs which will be used in the HF calorimeter, and the details of the PMT Test Station that is in University of Iowa CMS Laboratories. In the second part we report the {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime measurement from SELEX, the charm hadro-production experiment at Fermilab. Based upon 301 {+-} 31 events from three di.erent decay channels, by using the binned maximum likelihood technique, we observe the lifetime of {Xi}{sub c}{sup +} as 427 {+-} 31 {+-} 13 fs.

Akgun, Ugur; /Iowa U.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Final Report: Assessment of Combined Heat and Power Premium Power Applications in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas generator with waste heat recovery at a facilityCCHP locations that are using waste heat for cooling alsouse some of the waste heat directly for water or space

Norwood, Zack

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the rejected waste heat from power generation. (c)and for use of the waste heat, a condenser is muchcycle ? t Fraction of waste heat recovered from Rankine

Norwood, Zachary Mills

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

High vacuum indirectly-heated rotary kiln for the removal and recovery of mercury from air pollution control scrubber waste  

SciTech Connect

SepraDyne corporation (Denton, TX, US) has conducted pilot-scale treatability studies of dewatered acid plant blowdown sludge generated by a copper smelter using its recently patented high temperature and high vacuum indirectly-heated rotary retort technology. This unique rotary kiln is capable of operating at internal temperatures up to 850 C with an internal pressure of 50 torr and eliminates the use of sweep gas to transport volatile substances out of the retort. By removing non-condensables such as oxygen and nitrogen at relatively low temperatures and coupling the process with a temperature ramp-up program and low temperature condensation, virtually all of the retort off-gases produced during processing can be condensed for recovery. The combination of rotation, heat and vacuum produce the ideal environment for the rapid volatilization of virtually all organic compounds, water and low-to-moderate boiling point metals such as arsenic, cadmium and mercury.

Hawk, G.G.; Aulbaugh, R.A. [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)] [Scientific Consulting Labs., Inc., Farmers Branch, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced ''adiabatic'' diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum improvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

Bailey, M.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ELEC3028 Digital Transmission Overview & Information Theory S Chen 1. A source emits symbols Xi, 1 i 6, in the BCD format with probabilities P(Xi)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.03 101 5. Derive the coding efficiency of both the uncoded BCD signal as well as the Shannon-Fano coded symbols Xi, 1 i 6, in the BCD format with probabilities P(Xi) as given in Table 1, at a rate Rs = 9. Apply Shannon-Fano coding to the source signal characterised in Table 1. Are there any disadvantages

Chen, Sheng

303

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300 C to 800 C to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100 C to 1400 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Vitrification of waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating and immobilizing waste for disposal. Waste, preferably, biologically, chemically and radioactively hazardous, and especially electronic wastes, such as circuit boards, are placed in a crucible and heated by microwaves to a temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. to incinerate organic materials, then heated further to a temperature in the range of approximately 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to vitrify. Glass formers, such as borosilicate glass, quartz or fiberglass can be added at the start of the process to increase the silicate concentration sufficiently for vitrification.

Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Encouraging Combined Heat and Power in California Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentive ($/W) wind turbine waste heat to power pressurewind turbines, fuel cells, organic rankine cycle/waste heat capture, pressure reduction turbines, advanced energy storage, and combined heat and power

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Radioactive Waste Radioactive Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Radioactive Waste at UF Bldg 831 392-8400 #12;Radioactive Waste · Program is designed to;Radioactive Waste · Program requires · Generator support · Proper segregation · Packaging · labeling #12;Radioactive Waste · What is radioactive waste? · Anything that · Contains · or is contaminated

Slatton, Clint

307

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG preferable to grid power only when the waste heat can bethe grid electricity it displaces when the waste heat from

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Evaluation of potential and consequences of steam bump in high heat waste tanks and assessment and validation of GOTH computer code  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the thermal hydraulic analysis performed using the GOTH computer code to evaluate the potential and consequences of steam bumps in high heat waste tanks. The analysis was performed for three different sludge volumes that correspond to the current sludge volume in tank AZ-101, combined sludge volumes of tank AZ-101 and tank AZ-102 and the projected consolidated sludge volume of tank C-106 and tank AY-102. For each case, the steam bump potential was evaluated starting the simulation with a realistic best estimate initial temperature distribution as well as with a conservative potentially possible axial temperature distribution in the sludge. To include further conservatism in estimating the consequent release of radioactive material, steam bump analyses were also performed suppressing steam condensation with subcooled liquid in waste. In addition,calculations were performed with in leakage flow paths corresponding to open risers and pump and sluice pit cover blocks as well as with normal in leakage flow paths due to drain pipes and infiltration paths. Therefore, the report presents the steam bump evaluations encompassing from an extremely conservative case of initiating a steam bump with local saturation temperature throughout the sludge with condensation suppressed and open risers to a realistic potential case with loss of cooling of initiating at steam bump with only the bottom layer with local saturation temperature with condensation included considering only the normal in leakage flow paths. The results show that in all cases the consequences from an energetic bump may not be acceptable, and the safe operation should include keeping peak sludge temperatures below local saturation values. The report also includes a brief description of the capability and validation of models used in the GOTH computer code.

Sathyanarayana, K., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas chillers, waste heat or solar heat; hot wateris limited by generated waste heat Regulatory constraints: -might favor the use of waste heat from DG units or from

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ammoniated salt heat pump  

SciTech Connect

A thermochemical heat pump/energy storage system using liquid ammoniate salts is described. The system, which can be used for space heating or cooling, provides energy storage for both functions. The bulk of the energy is stored as chemical energy and thus can be stored indefinitely. The system is well suited to use with a solar energy source or industrial waste heat.

Haas, W.R.; Jaeger, F.J.; Giordano, T.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Waste Steam Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination has been made of the recovery of waste steam by three techniques: direct heat exchange to process, mechanical compression, and thermocompression. Near atmospheric steam sources were considered, but the techniques developed are equally...

Kleinfeld, J. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Development and experimental study on organic Rankine cycle system with single-screw expander for waste heat recovery from exhaust of diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A single-screw expander with 155mm diameter screw has been developed. A spiral-tube type evaporator and an aluminum multi-channel parallel type condenser have also been developed with weight of 147kg and 78kg, respectively. Based on the development of above components, an ORC (organic Rankine cycle) system prototype was assembled and tested for waste heat recovery from diesel engine exhaust. An experimental system was built for this ORC system, and experiments were conducted for different expander torque and diesel engine loads. Influences of expander torque and diesel engine loads on the performances of ORC system were studied. The results indicated that the maximum of the power output is 10.38kW and the biggest ORC efficiency and overall system efficiency are respectively 6.48% and 43.8%, which are achieved at 250kW of diesel engine output. Meanwhile the biggest improvement of overall system efficiency is 1.53%. The maximums of volume efficiency, adiabatic efficiency and total efficiency of single-screw expander are 90.73%, 73.25% and 57.88%, respectively.

Ye-Qiang Zhang; Yu-Ting Wu; Guo-Dong Xia; Chong-Fang Ma; Wei-Ning Ji; Shan-Wei Liu; Kai Yang; Fu-Bin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Strangeness Balance in HADES Experiments and the Xi- Enhancement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HADES data on a strangeness production in Ar+KCl collisions at 1.76A GeV are analyzed within a minimal statistical model. The total negative strangeness content is fixed by the observed K^+ multiplicities on event-by-event basis. Particles with negative strangeness are assumed to remain in chemical equilibrium with themselves and in thermal equilibrium with the environment until a common freeze-out. Exact strangeness conservation in each collision event is explicitly preserved. This implies that Xi baryons can be released only in events where two or more kaons are produced. An increase of the fireball volume due to application of a centrality trigger in HADES experiments is taken into account. We find that experimental ratios of K-/K+, Lambda/K+ and Sigma/K+ can be satisfactorily described provided in-medium potentials are taken into account. However, the calculated Xi-/Lambda/K+ ratio proves to be significantly smaller compared to the measured value (8 times lower than the experimental median value and 3 tim...

Kolomeitsev, E E; Voskresensky, D N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume XI, Part I  

SciTech Connect

This document is divided into the following parts: radioactive waste processing, salvage/scrap value estimate, and radionuclide inventory of primary systems. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Measurement of the $\\Xi^0 \\rightarrow \\Lambda\\gamma$ Decay Asymmetry and Branching Fraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In data taken with the NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS in 1999, 730 candidates of the weak radiative hyperon decay Xi0 -> Lambda gamma have been found with an estimated background of 58 +- 8 events. From these events the Xi0 -> Lambda gamma decay asymmetry has been determined to alpha(Xi0 -> Lambda gamma) = -0.78 +- 0.18_stat +- 0.06_syst, which is the first evidence of a decay asymmetry in Xi0 -> Lambda gamma. The branching fraction of the decay has been measured to be Br(Xi0 -> Lambda gamma) = (1.16 +- 0.05_stat +- 0.06_syst) x 10^-3.

Lai, A; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; uhadar-Dnszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, Giulio; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Govi, G; Grafstrm, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Norton, A; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Gaponenko, A N; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Tatishvili, G T; Tkachev, A L; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Martin, V; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savri, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Becker, H G; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Kpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schnharting, V; Schu, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pep, M; Piccini, M; Bertanza, L; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, Ren; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Guida, R; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Gnther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton; Widhalm, L

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Modeling and Experimental Validation of a Rankine Cycle Based Exhaust WHR System for Heavy Duty Applications; Modellering och experimentell validering av ett Rankinecykelbaserat Waste Heat Recovery-system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? To increase the efficiency of the engine is one of the biggest challenges for heavy vehicles. One possible method is the Rankine based Waste (more)

Carlsson, Carin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Atomic data and spectral line intensities for Ni XI  

SciTech Connect

Electron impact collision strengths, energy levels, oscillator strengths, and spontaneous radiative decay rates are calculated for Ni XI. We include in the calculations the 12 lowest configurations, corresponding to 180 fine-structure levels: 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 6}, s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}3d{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 6}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 5}4l, and 3s3p{sup 6}4l with l = s, p, d, f. Collision strengths are calculated at five incident energies for all transitions: 7.45, 17.6, 31.4, 50.1, and 75.2 Ry above the threshold of each transition. An additional energy, very close to the transition threshold, has been added, whose value is between 0.0007 Ry and 0.25 Ry depending on the levels involved. Calculations have been carried out using the Flexible Atomic Code. The scattering problem is solved in the distorted wave approximation. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated as a function of electron temperature by assuming a Maxwellian electron velocity distribution. Using the excitation rate coefficients and the radiative transition rates of the present work, combined with close coupling collision excitation rate coefficients available in the literature for the lowest 17 levels, statistical equilibrium equations for level populations are solved at electron densities covering the range of 10{sup 8}-10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and at an electron temperature of logT{sub e}K=6.1, corresponding to the maximum abundance of Ni XI. Spectral line intensities are calculated, and their diagnostic relevance is discussed. This dataset will be made available in the next version of the CHIANTI database.

Bhatia, A.K. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Landi, E., E-mail: Landi@nrl.navy.mi [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

least two seconds. The waste heat from the co-processingis drawn from the waste heat of the associated cementSewage sludge drying using waste heat from cement plant flue

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced industrial heat Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management and Air Flow) - Waste Heat Recovery in Industrial Processes... on roads - District heating systems - Various industrial processes Geothermal Heat Pumps -...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of heat were removed from the high level waste tanks at Hanford. Called cesium and strontium, these elements had to be taken out of single shell waste tanks to reduce the...

322

Subthreshold Xi- Production in Collisions of p(3.5 GeV)+Nb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on the production of the double-strange cascade hyperon $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ are reported for collisions of p\\,(3.5~GeV)\\,+\\,Nb, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18 at GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy-Ion Research, Darmstadt. For the first time, subthreshold $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ production is observed in proton-nucleus interactions. Assuming a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ phase-space distribution similar to that of $\\mathrm{\\Lambda}$ hyperons, the production probability amounts to $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}=(2.0\\,\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\,\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(norm)}\\,\\pm 0.6\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-4}$ resulting in a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-/(\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0)}$ ratio of $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}/\\ P_{\\mathrm{\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0}}=(1.2\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-2}$. Available model predictions are significantly lower than the estimated $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ yield.

Agakishiev, G; Balanda, A; Belver, D; Belyaev, A V; Berger-Chen, J C; Blanco, A; Bhmer, M; Boyard, J L; Cabanelas, P; Chernenko, S; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O V; Finocchiaro, P; Fonte, P; Friese, J; Frhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzon, J A; Gernhuser, R; Gbel, K; Golubeva, M; Gonzalez-Diaz, D; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Heinz, T; Hennino, T; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Iori, I; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kmpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krasa, A; Krizek, F; Krcken, R; Kuc, H; Khn, W; Kugler, A; Kurepin, A; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lang, S; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Liu, T; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Maier, L; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Michalska, B; Michel, J; Mntz, C; Naumann, L; Pachmayer, Y C; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Reshetin, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Schmah, A; Schwab, E; Siebenson, J; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Strbele, H; Stroth, J; Sturm, C; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Trebacz, R; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Weber, M; Wendisch, C; Wstenfeld, J; Yurevich, S; Zanevsky, Y V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Subthreshold Xi- Production in Collisions of p(3.5 GeV)+Nb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results on the production of the double-strange cascade hyperon $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ are reported for collisions of p\\,(3.5~GeV)\\,+\\,Nb, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES) at SIS18 at GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy-Ion Research, Darmstadt. For the first time, subthreshold $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ production is observed in proton-nucleus interactions. Assuming a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ phase-space distribution similar to that of $\\mathrm{\\Lambda}$ hyperons, the production probability amounts to $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}=(2.0\\,\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\,\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(norm)}\\,\\pm 0.6\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-4}$ resulting in a $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-/(\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0)}$ ratio of $P_{\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}}/\\ P_{\\mathrm{\\Lambda+\\Sigma^0}}=(1.2\\pm 0.3\\,\\mathrm{(stat)}\\pm0.4\\,\\mathrm{(syst)})\\times10^{-2}$. Available model predictions are significantly lower than the estimated $\\mathrm{\\Xi^-}$ yield.

G. Agakishiev; O. Arnold; A. Balanda; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; J. C. Berger-Chen; A. Blanco; M. Bhmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Cabanelas; S. Chernenko; A. Dybczak; E. Epple; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Frhlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhuser; K. Gbel; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Gumberidze; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kmpfer; T. Karavicheva; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; G. Kornakov; R. Kotte; A. Krasa; F. Krizek; R. Krcken; H. Kuc; W. Khn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; V. Ladygin; R. Lalik; S. Lang; K. Lapidus; A. Lebedev; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; C. Mntz; L. Naumann; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; J. Siebenson; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Strbele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebacz; H. Tsertos; T. Vasiliev; V. Wagner; M. Weber; C. Wendisch; J. Wstenfeld; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATION OF COMBINED HEAT AND POWER SYSTEMS for Certification of Combined Heat and Power Systems Pursuant to the Waste Heat and Carbon Emissions Reduction Act Heat and Power System Pursuant to the Waste Heat and Carbon Emissions Reduction Act, Public Utilities

325

7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculated above. 7-123 A Carnot heat engine cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of steam can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between transfer. Therefore, the maximum efficiency of the actual heat engine will be lower than the value

Bahrami, Majid

326

The Big Picture on Process Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Publications Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces Metal and Glass Manufacturers Reduce Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems...

327

Plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel by two-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating  

SciTech Connect

A previously developed method for analyzing the plasma processing of spent nuclear fuel is generalized to a plasma containing multicharged fuel ions. In such a plasma, ion cyclotron resonance heating of nuclear ash ions should be carried out in two monochromatic RF fields of different frequencies, provided that the fraction of {xi} multicharged ions is small, {xi} {<=} 0.1, a condition that substantially restricts the productivity of systems for processing spent nuclear fuel. Ways of overcoming this difficulty are discussed.

Timofeev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute (Russian Federation)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cooling, Heating, and Power for Commercial Buildings - Benefits...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

recuperators to maximize generation efficiency, even if waste heat is utilized. chpbenefitscommercialbuildings.pdf More Documents & Publications Opportunities for...

329

Hybrid Heat Pump Design and Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Hybrid Heat Pump (HHP) converts industrial waste heat into process steam. Waste heat at temperatures as low as approximately 200F can be used. Steam output covers a range between 12,000 Ib/h and 50,000 Ib/h, depending on the application...

Wagner, J. R.; Koebberman, W. F.

330

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Systems Hazards Analysis Activities HIAR-WTP-2014-01-27 This...

331

Observation of the decay Xi0 ---> Sigma+ mu- anti-nu(mu)  

SciTech Connect

The {Xi}{sup 0} muon semi-leptonic decay has been observed for the first time with nine identified events using the KTeV beam line and detector at Fermilab. The decay is normalized to the {Xi}{sup 0} beta decay mode and yields a value for the ratio of decay rates {Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Lambda}({Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +}e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) of (1.8{sub -0.5}{sup +0.7}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -2} at the 68% confidence level. This is in agreement with the SU(3) flavor symmetric quark model.

Alavi-Harati, A.; Alexopoulos, T.; Arenton, M.; Barbosa, R.F.; Barker, A.R.; Barrio, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellavance, A.; Blucher, E.; Bock, G.J.; Bown, C.; Bright, S.; Cheu, E.; Coleman, R.; Corcoran, M.D.; Cox, B.; Erwin, A.R.; Escobar, C.O.; Ford, R.; Glazov, A.; Golossanov, A.; /Arizona U. /UCLA /UC, San Diego /Campinas State U. /Chicago U.,

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

333

Waste minimization assessment procedure  

SciTech Connect

Perry Nuclear Power Plant began developing a waste minimization plan early in 1991. In March of 1991 the plan was documented following a similar format to that described in the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual. Initial implementation involved obtaining management's commitment to support a waste minimization effort. The primary assessment goal was to identify all hazardous waste streams and to evaluate those streams for minimization opportunities. As implementation of the plan proceeded, non-hazardous waste streams routinely generated in large volumes were also evaluated for minimization opportunities. The next step included collection of process and facility data which would be useful in helping the facility accomplish its assessment goals. This paper describes the resources that were used and which were most valuable in identifying both the hazardous and non-hazardous waste streams that existed on site. For each material identified as a waste stream, additional information regarding the materials use, manufacturer, EPA hazardous waste number and DOT hazard class was also gathered. Once waste streams were evaluated for potential source reduction, recycling, re-use, re-sale, or burning for heat recovery, with disposal as the last viable alternative.

Kellythorne, L.L. (Centerior Energy, Cleveland, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

HLW Glass Waste Loadings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HLW HLW Glass Waste Loadings Ian L. Pegg Vitreous State Laboratory The Catholic University of America Washington, DC Overview Overview  Vitrification - general background  Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) technology  Factors affecting waste loadings  Waste loading requirements and projections  WTP DWPF  DWPF  Yucca Mountain License Application requirements on waste loading  Summary Vitrification  Immobilization of waste by conversion into a glass  Internationally accepted treatment for HLW  Why glass?  Amorphous material - able to incorporate a wide spectrum of elements over wide ranges of composition; resistant to radiation damage  Long-term durability - natural analogs Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large  Relatively simple process - amenable to nuclearization at large scale  There

335

Heat Pump Strategies and Payoffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After evaluating numerous waste heat sources and heat pump designs for energy recovery, we have become aware that a great deal of confusion exists about the economics of heat pumps. The purpose of this article is to present some simple formulas...

Gilbert, J. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes...

Peterson, G. R.

337

SCALE UP OF Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 AND B4C/B9C SUPERLATTICES FOR HARVESTING OF WASTE HEAT IN DIESEL ENGINES  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric devices show significant promise for harvesting and recovery of waste heat from diesel engines, exhaust systems and industrial heat sources. While these devices convert a heat flow directly into electrical energy, cooling can be accomplished by the same device with application of a direct current (Peltier effect). Conversion efficiencies of bulk thermoelectric systems, however, are still too low for economical power conversion in diesel powered vehicles and heavy vehicles. Thermoelectric superlattice devices have demonstrated the potential for increased efficiencies and utilization of waste heat. Although reported efficiencies are well above 15%, fabrication costs are still too high for use in diesel engine systems. To realize this efficiency goal of {approx} 20% and power generation in the kWMW range, large quantities of superlattice materials are required. Additionally, if the figure of merit (ZT) of these superlattices can be increased to > 2, even less superlattice material will be required to generate electric power from heat in diesel engines. We report on development of and recent progress in scale up of Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 and B4C/B9C superlattices for thermoelectric applications, and particularly for fabrication of large quantities of these materials. We have scaled up the magnetron sputtering process to produce large quantities of Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 and B4 C/B9C superlattices with high ZT at low cost. Quantum well films with up to 1000 layers were deposited onto substrate areas as large as 0.5 m2 by magnetron sputtering. Initial studies showed that the power factor of these SL's was high enough to produce a ZT significantly greater than 1. Both p- and n-type superlattices were fabricated to form a complete thermoelectric power generating device. ZT measurements will be reported, and based on measured power factor of these materials, should be significantly greater than 1. These results are encouraging for the use of quantum well materials in thermoelectric power generation.

Martin, P; Olsen, L

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

338

Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...4). Although disposal of HLW remains...for long-term disposal is through deep...successful waste-disposal program has eluded...geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Authorized...Administration withdrew funding for Yucca Mountain...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

340

Heat rejection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for rejecting waste heat consists of a cooling tower incorporating a plurality of coolant tubes provided with cooling fins and each having a plurality of cooling channels therein, means for directing a heat exchange fluid from the power plant through less than the total number of cooling channels to cool the heat exchange fluid under normal ambient temperature conditions, means for directing water through the remaining cooling channels whenever the ambient temperature rises above the temperature at which dry cooling of the heat exchange fluid is sufficient and means for cooling the water.

Smith, Gregory C. (Richland, WA); Tokarz, Richard D. (Richland, WA); Parry, Jr., Harvey L. (Richland, WA); Braun, Daniel J. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FEMP--Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

heat pump-like an air conditioner or refrigera- heat pump-like an air conditioner or refrigera- tor-moves heat from one place to another. In the summer, a geothermal heat pump (GHP) operating in a cooling mode lowers indoor temperatures by transferring heat from inside a building to the ground outside or below it. Unlike an air condition- er, though, a heat pump's process can be reversed. In the winter, a GHP extracts heat from the ground and transfers it inside. Also, the GHP can use waste heat from summer air-conditioning to provide virtually free hot-water heating. The energy value of the heat moved is typically more than three times the electricity used in the transfer process. GHPs are efficient and require no backup heat because the earth stays at a relatively moderate temperature throughout the year.

342

Heating System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating System Basics Heating System Basics Heating System Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:32pm Addthis A variety of heating technologies are available today. You can learn more about what heating systems and heat pumps are commonly used today and how they work below. To learn how to use these technologies in your own home, see the Home Heating Systems section on Energy Saver. Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Wood and Pellet Heating Provides a way to heat a building using biomass or waste sources. Electric Resistance Heating Can be supplied by centralized electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Active Solar Heating Uses the sun to heat either air or liquid and can serve as a supplemental

343

Heating System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating System Basics Heating System Basics Heating System Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:32pm Addthis A variety of heating technologies are available today. You can learn more about what heating systems and heat pumps are commonly used today and how they work below. To learn how to use these technologies in your own home, see the Home Heating Systems section on Energy Saver. Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Wood and Pellet Heating Provides a way to heat a building using biomass or waste sources. Electric Resistance Heating Can be supplied by centralized electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Active Solar Heating Uses the sun to heat either air or liquid and can serve as a supplemental

344

An Information Dependant Computer Program for Engine Exhaust Heat Recovery for Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A computer program was developed to help engineers at rural Alaskan village power plants to quickly evaluate how to use exhaust waste heat from individual diesel power plants.

345

Energy Integration and Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Microcombined Heat and Power Systems and Other Renewable Systems Using Biomass Waste Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(2, 3) The microgeneration or self-generation concept for dwellings is associated with several advantages, such as (1) cutting emissions of greenhouse gases, (2) reducing the number of people living in fuel poverty, (3) reducing the demands on transmission systems and distribution systems, (4) reducing the need for those systems to be modified, (5) enhancing the availability of electricity and heat for consumers, and (6) encouraging consumer engagement with energy efficient technologies. ... The SOFC can utilize heat of oxidization of gaseous fuels, such as hydrogen, syngas, and natural gas, in the anode in the presence of an oxidant in the cathode, to produce electricity. ... The biomass gasification plant under consideration comprises gasifiers, gas cooling and clean up technologies, gas turbines, heat recovery steam generators (HRSG), etc. ...

Jhuma Sadhukhan; Yingru Zhao; Matthew Leach; Nigel P. Brandon; Nilay Shah

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

346

Search for CP Violation in \\Xi and \\Lambda Hyperon Decays: Status of the HyperC P Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Search for CP Violation in \\Xi and \\Lambda Hyperon Decays: Status of the HyperC P Experiment Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22901, USA HyperCP (E871), a Fermilab experiment searching for CP violation in \\Xi and \\Lambda hyperon decays, finished its first data taking run at the end

Fermilab Experiment E871

347

Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb and heat sink grease respectively). The dynamics of thermal effects is also presented. PACS 42.55.Xi (Diode-pumped in a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG crystal, using a calibrated infrared camera, with a 60-µm spatial resolution

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

Anais XI SBSR, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 05 -10 abril 2003, INPE, p. 2193 -2200. MAPSAR: A NEW L-BAND SPACEBORNE SAR MISSION FOR ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anais XI SBSR, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 05 - 10 abril 2003, INPE, p. 2193 - 2200. 2193 MAPSAR: A NEW the 9 7 38 4 #12;Anais XI SBSR, Belo Horizonte, Brasil, 05 - 10 abril 2003, INPE, p. 2193 - 2200. 2194

Domingues, Margarete Oliveira

349

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization Summary Notes from 28 May 2008 Generic Technical Issue...

350

Nuclear Waste: Knowledge Waste?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...06520, USA. Nuclear power is re-emerging...proclaiming a nuclear renaissance...example, plant safety...liabilities, terrorism at plants and in transport...high-level nuclear wastes (HLW...factor in risk perceptions...supporting nuclear power in the abstract...

Eugene A. Rosa; Seth P. Tuler; Baruch Fischhoff; Thomas Webler; Sharon M. Friedman; Richard E. Sclove; Kristin Shrader-Frechette; Mary R. English; Roger E. Kasperson; Robert L. Goble; Thomas M. Leschine; William Freudenburg; Caron Chess; Charles Perrow; Kai Erikson; James F. Short

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

351

Residential Multi-Function Gas Heat Pump: Efficient Engine-Driven...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

operate a conventional electric heat pump system, fuel is first converted to energy at a power plant where the waste heat is typically discharged to the environment. Electrical...

352

Simulation of energy use in residential water heating systems Carolyn Dianarose Schneyer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as solar-assisted pre-heat and waste water heat recovery components. A total of 7,488 six- day simulations

Victoria, University of

353

Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste (i.e, mixture of biohazardous and chemical or radioactive waste), call Environment, Health2/2009 Biohazardous Waste Disposal Guidelines Sharps Waste Solid Lab Waste Liquid Waste Animals Pathological Waste Description Biohazard symbol Address: UCSD 200 West Arbor Dr. San Diego, CA 92103 (619

Tsien, Roger Y.

354

Religion in the cosmological ideas in Ukraine (from XI to XVII century)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmology, whose object is the Universe, is in contact with the religion closer than any other science. We will try to trace the historical change of views on the universe in Ukraine from XI to XVII centuries and show the influence of religion in the construction of the models of the Universe in that time.

Koltachykhina, O Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Optimal control of robot behaviour using language Xi Wang, Asok Ray*, Peter Lee and Jinbo Fu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal control of robot behaviour using language measure1 Xi Wang, Asok Ray*, Peter Lee and Jinbo presents optimal control of robot behaviour in the discrete event setting. Real signed measure of the language of supervised robot behaviour serves as the performance index for synthesis of the optimal policy

Ray, Asok

356

Lattice Boltzmann method on irregular meshes Gongwen Peng, Haowen Xi, Comer Duncan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice Boltzmann method on irregular meshes Gongwen Peng, Haowen Xi, Comer Duncan Department for the lattice Boltzmann method (FVLBM) is described. The scheme uses a finite­volume formulation based the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has been demonstrated to be an effective simulation method for fluid flow

Chou, So-Hsiang

357

Enabling Peer to Peer Grids Geoffrey Fox Shrideep Pallickara Xi Rao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enabling Peer to Peer Grids Geoffrey Fox Shrideep Pallickara Xi Rao Community Grid Computing-to-peer (P2P) grid comprising resources such as relatively static clients, high-end resources and a dynamic that will support such a hybrid environment. We designed a distributed publish-subscribe system Narada

358

XI. DIFFUSEGLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is measured on a horizontal surface and intensity on the tilted collector surface is calculated via a two39 XI. DIFFUSE­GLOBAL CORRELATIONS: SEASONAL VARIATIONS Estimating the performance of a solar system requires an accurate assessment of incident solar radiation. Ordinarily, solar radiation

Oregon, University of

359

A `Hot Potato' Gray Code for Permutations Xi Sisi Shen 1,3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A `Hot Potato' Gray Code for Permutations Xi Sisi Shen 1,3 Department of Mathematics and Statistics by the chil- dren's game of Hot Potato. Our order is a transposition Gray code, meaning that consecutive) It must transpose value n (the "hot potato"); (2) It must transpose positions that are circularly adjacent

Williams, Aaron

360

Thermodynamic and economic optimizations of a waste heat to power plant driven by a subcritical ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) using pure or zeotropic working fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper carried out the thermodynamic and economic optimizations of a subcritical ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) using a pure or a zeotropic mixture working fluid. Two pure organic compounds, i.e. n-pentane and R245fa, and their mixtures with various concentrations were used as ORC working fluid for this study. Two optimizations, i.e. exergy efficiency maximization and LCOE (Levelized Cost of Electricity) minimization, were performed to find out the optimum operating conditions of the system and to determine the best working fluid from the studied media. Hot water at temperature of 150C and pressure of 5bars was used to simulate the heat source medium. Whereas, cooling water at temperature of 20C was considered to be the heat sink medium. The mass flow rate of heat source is fixed at 50kg/s for the optimizations. According to the results, the n-pentane-based ORC showed the highest maximized exergy efficiency (53.2%) and the lowest minimized LCOE (0.0863 $/kWh). Regarding \\{ORCs\\} using zeotropic working fluids, 0.05 and 0.1 \\{R245fa\\} mass fraction mixtures present the comparable economic features and thermodynamic performances to the system using n-pentane at minimum LCOE. The ORC using \\{R245fa\\} represents the least profitable system.

Van Long Le; Abdelhamid Kheiri; Michel Feidt; Sandrine Pelloux-Prayer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Parameter survey on heating conditions for glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste fabrication from type-A zeolite containing simulating FPs  

SciTech Connect

In the pyrometallurgical reprocessing for metal fuel cycle, fission products (FPs) in the spent salt is converted into a glass-bonded sodalite by means of Pressure-less Consolidation (PC). Although a standard condition of the PC method was reported, the reason for choosing this condition is not clear particularly for the temperature condition. In the present study, a parameter survey on the heating condition was performed by fabricating the glass-bonded sodalite containing simulating FPs under various conditions. The maximum temperature, the heating duration, the glass ratio in the initial material, and the weight load for pressing the material were chosen as the variable parameters. The mass balance of each element and the quality of the product were evaluated. It was exhibited that both the volatilized content and the free salt in the product were reduced by lowering the maximum temperature. The apparent density of the product was enhanced by both increasing the heating duration and increasing the weight load. Accordingly, lowering the maximum temperature while increasing the weight load was chosen to modify the fabricating condition. As a result of the modified condition, both the volatilized and the free salt ratios were reduced without significant change in the apparent density of the product. (authors)

Fujihata, Kenji; Uozumi, Koichi; Tsukada, Takeshi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Handbook of industrial and hazardous wastes treatment. 2nd ed.  

SciTech Connect

This expanded Second Edition offers 32 chapters of industry- and waste-specific analyses and treatment methods for industrial and hazardous waste materials - from explosive wastes to landfill leachate to wastes produced by the pharmaceutical and food industries. Key additional chapters cover means of monitoring waste on site, pollution prevention, and site remediation. Including a timely evaluation of the role of biotechnology in contemporary industrial waste management, the Handbook reveals sound approaches and sophisticated technologies for treating: textile, rubber, and timber wastes; dairy, meat, and seafood industry wastes; bakery and soft drink wastes; palm and olive oil wastes; pesticide and livestock wastes; pulp and paper wastes; phosphate wastes; detergent wastes; photographic wastes; refinery and metal plating wastes; and power industry wastes. This final chapter, entitled 'Treatment of power industry wastes' by Lawrence K. Wang, analyses the stream electric power generation industry, where combustion of fossil fuels coal, oil, gas, supplies heat to produce stream, used then to generate mechanical energy in turbines, subsequently converted to electricity. Wastes include waste waters from cooling water systems, ash handling systems, wet-scrubber air pollution control systems, and boiler blowdown. Wastewaters are characterized and waste treatment by physical and chemical systems to remove pollutants is presented. Plant-specific examples are provided.

Lawrence Wang; Yung-Tse Hung; Howard Lo; Constantine Yapijakis (eds.)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

From Heat to Electricity: How "nano" Saved Thermoelectrics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, reliable #12;Thermoelectric applications Waste heat recovery · Automobiles · Over the road trucks% of energy becomes waste heat, even a 10% capture and conversion to useful forms can have huge impactFrom Heat to Electricity: How "nano" Saved Thermoelectrics Sponsored by Mercouri Kanatzidis

Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

364

Waste reduction assistance program (WRAP) on-site audit report: Secondary seafood processor  

SciTech Connect

The waste audit report presents the findings of a study at a fish processing plant in Alaska. Process descriptions, waste generation, waste management practices, and waste reduction alternatives are discussed. Recommendations for waste reduction include implementing a heat recovery system, using alternative packaging, and mechanizing processes. Appendices include state regulations and information on the Alaska Science and Technology Foundation.

Not Available

1989-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Wilders Grove Solid Waste Services Center | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grove Solid Waste Services Center Project objective: Provide demonstration of Geothermal Heat Pumps viability on energy usage for future Service Centers planned by the City of...

366

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A New Type Heat Exchanger for Coal Burning Boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To make the best of heat energy in the flue gas exhausted from a coal burning boiler, the design proposal for a new type of heat exchanger was put forward in the paper. Via the new type of heat exchanger, temperature of the flue gas can be decreased ... Keywords: waste heat utilization, energy conservation, special heat exchanger, economizer

Bingwen Zhang; Yingjin Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

369

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Process for remediation of plastic waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

371

andradionuclide mixed wastes: Topics by E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steam -> Electr. & Heat Av 50 Range 47-80 Landfill Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Biomass Energy Plants...

372

The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Digestion Source separated biomass fraction or Sorted bio-fraction of MSW AD Biogas -> Electr. & Heat 100

373

Design Considerations for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in these high-quality waste heat streams, at today's oil prices, is approximately 12 billion dollars per year. Heat recovery is perhaps one of the largest energy conservation opportunities available to U. S. industries today. The author reviews basic heat...

Bywaters, R. P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Combined Heat and Power: Expanding CHP in Your State  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbines Electricity On-Site Consumption Sold to Utility Fuel Natural Gas Propane Biogas Landfill Gas Coal Steam Waste Products Others Generator Heat Exchanger Thermal Process...

375

Measurement of the Michel Parameter xi" in Polarized Muon Decay and Implications on Exotic Couplings of the Leptonic Weak Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Michel parameter xi" has been determined from a measurement of the longitudinal polarization of positrons emitted in the decay of polarized and depolarized muons. The result, xi" = 0.981 +- 0.045stat +- 0.003syst, is consistent with the Standard Model prediction of unity, and provides an order of magnitude improvement in the relative precision of this parameter. This value sets new constraints on exotic couplings beyond the dominant V-A description of the leptonic weak interaction.

R. Prieels; O. Naviliat-Cuncic; P. Knowles; P. Van Hove; X. Morelle; J. Egger; J. Deutsch; J. Govaerts; W. Fetscher; K. Kirch; J. Lang

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Analysis of Organic Rankine Cycle for Low and Medium Grade Heat Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) is an effective technique to generate power from low and medium temperature heat source, including industrial waste heat, solar heat, geothermal and biomass etc. Advantages of ORC are high efficiency, simple system, environment ... Keywords: organic Rankine cycle, new energy, waste heat recovery

Zhonghe Han; Yida Yu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity...

Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Department of Mechanical Engineering "Heat Under the Microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications ranging from thermoelectric waste heat recovery to radio astronomy. BIOGRAPHY Austin MinnichDepartment of Mechanical Engineering presents "Heat Under the Microscope: Uncovering an essential role in nearly every technological application, ranging from space power generation to consumer

Militzer, Burkhard

380

Nonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Also, the energy that results from waste combustion is often used to produce heat and/or electricityNonlinear Model Predictive Control of Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plants M. Leskens , R.h.Bosgra@tudelft.nl, p.m.j.vandenhof@tudelft.nl Keywords : nonlinear model predictive control, municipal solid waste

Van den Hof, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

382

Analysis of Energy-Rescued Potential of a Hot Water Heating Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Architecture energy consumption occupies a big ratio of overrall energy consumption, while heating energy consumption is a main part of it. Therefore, analyzing the generation of heat waste is important. In this paper, based on a test of a heating...

Han, J.; Wang, D.; Tian, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermal Predictions of the Cooling of Waste Glass Canisters  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive liquid waste from five decades of weapons production is slated for vitrification at the Hanford site. The waste will be mixed with glass forming additives and heated to a high temperature, then poured into canisters within a pour cave where the glass will cool and solidify into a stable waste form for disposal. Computer simulations were performed to predict the heat rejected from the canisters and the temperatures within the glass during cooling. Four different waste glass compositions with different thermophysical properties were evaluated. Canister centerline temperatures and the total amount of heat transfer from the canisters to the surrounding air are reported.

Donna Post Guillen

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

385

Application of microwave solidification technology to radioactive waste  

SciTech Connect

The EPA has declared vitrification to be the Best Available Demonstrated Technology (BDAT) for High Level Radioactive Waste (40 CFR 268.42). Vitrification has been chosen as the method of choice for treating a number of radioactive residues and wastes in the DOE complex. Vitrification offers advantages of waste volume reduction, the ability to handle changing waste forms, and a stable, nonleachable final waste form. Microwave heating is a superior method for vitrification of radioactive wastes. Advantages of microwave heating include: (1) direct waste heating, eliminates need for electrodes, refractories and other consumables; (2) ``in-can`` processing allows for treatment of the material in its final container, (3) a mechanically simple system where the microwaves are generated away from the treatment area and transmitted to the treatment applicator by a wave guide, thus minimizing worker exposure to radiation; (4) easier equipment maintenance; and (5) a high degree of public acceptance.

Harris, M.; Sprenger, G.; Roushey, B.; Fenner, G.; Nieweg, R.

1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Why Blow Away Heat? Harvest Server's Heat Using Ther-moelectric Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why Blow Away Heat? Harvest Server's Heat Using Ther- moelectric Generators Ted Tsung-Te Lai, Wei ABSTRACT This paper argues for harvesting energy from servers' wasted heat in data centers. Our approach is to distribute a large number of thermoelectric generators (TEGs) on or nearby server hotspot components whose

Huang, Polly

387

Industrial Heat Recovery with Organic Rankine Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs are encouraging energy intensive industries to investigate alternative means of waste heat recovery from process streams. The use of organic fluids in Rankine cycles offers improved potential for economical cogeneration from...

Hnat, J. G.; Patten, J. S.; Cutting, J. C.; Bartone, L. M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Natural Zeolites in Solar Energy Heating, Cooling, and Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thereby reducing the energy consumption by almost half. The concept...heat, or any type of fossil fuel. This heat pump has two operating...of the internal combustion engine as the heat source for the...utilizing the waste heat of the engine with a 60 sec cycling time...

Dimiter I. Tchernev

389

"Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems."  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and development of electronic devices, power generation modules, and waste energy harvesting techniques alloys. Thermal conductivity of bismuth-doped III-V alloys Thermoelectric power generation (TPG) has become an increasingly popular technology for waste heat recovery in the last few years. The efficiency

Acton, Scott

390

A new cascade-type heat conversion system  

SciTech Connect

Various heat conversion systems have different operating temperatures. This paper shows how, in a solar energy system some of the waste heat from a thermophotovoltaic arrangement can be made to operate a thermionic power generator. The waste heat of the thermionic power generator can then be made to operate an alkali-metal thermal electric converter, and the waste heat from the alkali-metal thermal electric converter as well as the rest of the waste heat of the thermophotovoltaic system can be made to operate a methane reformation system. Stored heat from the methane reformation system can be made to operate the system at night. The overall system efficiency of the example shown is 42.6%. As a prime source of heat a nuclear pile or burning hydrogen may be used.

Newman, E. [Twenty-First Century Power Co., Northridge, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Waste to Energy Energy Recovery of Green Bin Waste: Incineration/Biogas Comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents how to determine marginal incinerator energy efficiencies. This concept should be applied in ... depend on the technical level, the surrounding energy system, and the waste type/heating value ...

Lasse Tobiasen; Kristian Kahle

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

In-situ vitrification of waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the in-situ vitrification of waste materials in a disposable can that includes an inner container and an outer container is disclosed. The method includes the steps of adding frit and waste materials to the inner container, removing any excess water, heating the inner container such that the frit and waste materials melt and vitrify after cooling, while maintaining the outer container at a significantly lower temperature than the inner container. The disposable can is then cooled to ambient temperatures and stored. A device for the in-situ vitrification of waste material in a disposable can is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Powell, J.R.; Reich, M.; Barletta, R.

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø DTU 09-06-08 1 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models Poul Erik Grohnheit, Kenneth DTU 09-06-08 2 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models · European law 1999 Directive and current (focusing on Denmark) Long tradition for waste incineration for district heating · How to model waste-to-energy

394

System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect

To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Geothermal Heat Pumps- Heating Mode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In winter, fluid passing through this vertical, closed loop system is warmed by the heat of the earth; this heat is then transferred to the building.

396

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides. With a 45-ton...

397

Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear waste is radioactive material no longer considered valuable...238U, 235U, and 226Ra (where the latter decays to 222Rn gas by emitting an alpha particle) or formed through fission of fissile radioisotopes ...

Rob P. Rechard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel Economy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The largest automakers strive to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to meet regulations by improving engine efficiency. A device that recovers a portion of the (more)

Capano, Gianmarco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Automotive Waste Heat Conversion to Power Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

400

Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Quantum Well Thermoelectrics and Waste Heat Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

402

Engine Waste Heat Recovery Concept Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

403

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment waste characterization Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 > >> 41 Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context Summary: of estimating heat value of municipal wastes, from the view point...

406

Gaseous emissions during concurrent combustion of biomass and non-recyclable municipal solid waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass and municipal solid waste offer sustainable sources ... form of combined cooling, heat and power. Combustion of biomass has a lesser impact than solid fossil ... an integrated, sustainable waste managemen...

Ren Laryea-Goldsmith; John Oakey; Nigel J Simms

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

An Evaluation of Industrial Heat Pumps for Effective Low-Temperature Heat Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The implementation of industrial heat pumps utilizing waste water from various industrial processes for the production of process steam is presented as a viable economic alternative to a conventional fossil-fired boiler and as an effective fuel...

Leibowitz, H. M.; Colosimo, D. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thermodynamic and heat transfer analysis of heat recovery from engine test cell by Organic Rankine Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During manufacture of engines, evaluation of engine performance is essential. This is accomplished in test cells. During the test, a significant portion of heat energy released by the fuel is wasted. In this stud...

Naser Shokati; Farzad Mohammadkhani; Navid Farrokhi

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE TO WATTS Waste is a Resource! energy forum Case Studies from Estonia, Switzerland, Germany Bossart,· ABB Waste-to-Energy Plants Edmund Fleck,· ESWET Marcel van Berlo,· Afval Energie Bedrijf From Waste to Energy To Energy from Waste #12;9.00-9.30: Registration 9.30-9.40: Chairman Ella Stengler opens

Columbia University

410

VI.5 Recycling of plastic waste, rubber waste and end-of-life cars in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary Among different types of consumer waste in Germany, plastic waste, rubber waste, and end-of-life cars are closely intertwined. Processing techniques applied to these types of consumer waste are identical in many cases. This chapter outlines these similarities and discusses each type of consumer waste. The regulations for plastic waste recycling only apply to private households. Regulations are limited to packaging waste with the ordinance on packaging waste being the legal provision. The recycling of packaging remnants from production or defective production units is partially organized by producers themselves. Energy recovery of plastic packaging is limited to combined heat and power stations. Packaging waste that cannot be submitted to mechanical recycling is usually treated by the means of feedstock recycling. The treatment of plastic waste comprises fragmentation, sizing, sorting, washing and drying, agglomeration, and granulation. Rubber waste is unsuitable for deposition at landfill sites because of poor compressibility, resilient surfaces, extremely long rotting time, and forming of cavities with air inclusion. An increased utilization of rubber waste in the production of new tires depends directly on the quality of the vulcanization process.

Peter Dreher; Martin Faulstich; Gabriele Weber-Blaschke; Burkhard Berninger; Uwe Keilhammer

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Production of $\\Sigma(1385)^{\\pm}$ and $\\Xi(1530)^{0}$ in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The production of the strange and double-strange baryon resonances ($\\Sigma(1385)^{\\pm}$, $\\Xi(1530)^{0}$) has been measured at mid-rapidity ($\\left | y \\right |Xi\\pi$ channel, has been carried out but no evidence is seen.

Abelev, Betty Bezverkhny; Adamova, Dagmar; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agostinelli, Andrea; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Ahn, Sul-Ah; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Berger, Martin Emanuel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubskiy, Mikhail; Boehmer, Felix Valentin; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile Ioan; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortese, Pietro; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dainese, Andrea; Dang, Ruina; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; De Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dorheim, Sverre; Dubey, Anand Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;- 5 - 1. INTRODUCTION The storage of heat producing radioactive waste in rock salt, will produce of the brine migration under influence of the decreasing heat production in the waste. A general expressionRIS?-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment

414

The Advantages of Sealless Pumps in Heat Transfer Fluid Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE ADV ANTAGES OF SEALLESS PUMPS IN HEAT TRANSFER FLUID SERVICES Michael D. Smith Engineering Manager Sundstrand Fluid Handling Arvada, CO ABSTRACT The expectations for heat transfer fluid (HTF) system safety and reliability... of the issues which challenge mechanical seals. In addition, one type of sealless pump, the canned motor pump, raises the thermal efficiency of HTF systems. Waste heat from the drive motors of m'ost pumps is dissipated to the air. A shaft driven fan wastes...

Smith, M. D.

415

List of Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Space Heat Incentives Space Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 278 Passive Solar Space Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 278) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Corporate) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts Commercial Biomass Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Municipal Solid Waste Passive Solar Space Heat Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) (Massachusetts) Industry Recruitment/Support Massachusetts General Public/Consumer Biomass

416

Development and analysis of non-linearity in the pressure waves resulting from thermoacoustic heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supplies the heat to the stack) and an ambient heat exchanger (which rejects the waste heat to the ambientDevelopment and analysis of non-linearity in the pressure waves resulting from thermoacoustic heat heat engines are intrinsically simple, reliable, environmentally friendly and reasonably efficient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha contaminated wastes Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and solid radioactively contaminated wastes in unlined... that uses electrical power to heat and melt contaminated soil, fusing the ... Source: Pint, Bruce A. - Materials...

418

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

419

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Heat Generated Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Generated Cooling Heat Generated Cooling A counterintuitive but promising path to reducing the loads imposed by automotive air conditioning systems is to use heat-specifically the waste heat generated by engines. This can be an abundant source of energy, since most light-duty vehicles with combustion engines are only about 30% efficient at best. With that degree of thermal efficiency, an engine releases 70% of its fuel energy as waste heat through the coolant, exhaust gases, and engine compartment warm-up. During much of a typical drive cycle, the engine efficiency is even lower than 30%. As efficiency decreases, the amount of waste heat increases, representing a larger potential energy source. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction (VALR) team is investigating a number of heat generated cooling technologies

420

Poster presentation during the 2005 Sigma Xi Student Research Symposium at The University of Toledo Chapter of Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society, April 16, 2005.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

monoxide is one of the most important reducing gases to be detected in combustion of hydrocarbon fuel, petroleum and automobile industries, heat treating furnaces and also in the first stages of fire. Given its

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Search for direct CP violation in \\Lambda and \\Xi hyperon decays C. G. White, a R. A. Burnstein, a M. Carmack, j A. Chakravorty, a A. Chan, b Y. C. Chen, b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Search for direct CP violation in \\Lambda and \\Xi hyperon decays C. G. White, a R. A. Burnstein for direct CP violation in \\Xi \\Gamma ( ¯ \\Xi + ) and \\Lambda ( ¯ \\Lambda) decays is underway at FNAL. Experiment E871 (HyperCP) intends to perform a precision measurement of the angular distribution of protons

Fermilab Experiment E871

422

Locating Heat Recovery Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and for the years ahead is the de~ice known as the "Reat Pump," the "Reverse Ran,kine Cycle," or the "Vapor Compression System." ~'ctu? ally, all of these are the same thing. En-ergy level is restored by application of a ce~tain amount of prime energy (shaft... level Rankine cycle or bot toming cycle could have an application. Figure 11 shows the same hot process waste water heat source and the same disengaging drum that was shown in Figure 10. Instead of compressing the vapor, however, it is expanded...

Waterland, A. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

424

Combined Flue Gas Heat Recovery and Pollution Control Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the field of heat recovery now make it possible to recover a portion of the wasted heat and improve the working conditions of the air purification equipment. Proper design and selection of heat recovery and pollution control equipment as a combination...

Zbikowski, T.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Effects of biodrying process on municipal solid waste properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the effect of biodrying process on municipal solid waste (MSW) properties was studied. The results obtained indicated that after 14d, biodrying reduced the water content of waste, allowing the production of biodried waste with a net heating value (NHV) of 16,7792,074kJkg?1 wet weight, i.e. 41% higher than that of untreated waste. The low moisture content of the biodried material reduced, also, the potential impacts of the waste, i.e. potential self-ignition and potential odors production. Low waste impacts suggest to landfill the biodried material obtaining energy via biogas production by waste re-moistening, i.e. bioreactor. Nevertheless, results of this work indicate that biodrying process because of the partial degradation of the organic fraction contained in the waste (losses of 290gkg?1 VS), reduced of about 28% the total producible biogas.

F. Tambone; B. Scaglia; S. Scotti; F. Adani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983: Defense Waste Processing Facility November 8, 1983 The Department begins construction of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant in South Carolina. DWPF is designed to make high-level nuclear waste into a glass-like substance, which will then be shipped to a repository. DWPF will mix borosilicate glass with the waste, heat it to 2000 degrees F, and pour the mixture into stainless steel canisters. The mixture will cool into solid glass that can be permanently stored. DWPF will immobilize the more than 34 million gallons of liquid high-level waste that have accumulated from producing defense-related nuclear materials

427

Summary of research on waste minimization studies by Japan Waste Research Foundation (JWRF)  

SciTech Connect

Japan is trying to provide a qualitatively better environment and the treatment of incinerator gas emissions is an indispensable part of pollution prevention programs. Therefore, a large part of incinerator wastes will be disposed of in landfills for municipal solid waste, and volume reduction and stabilization are major items on the technology agenda. For these reasons, the purpose of this research is waste minimization, namely reducing the volume of wastes that must be disposed of in landfills. This is being done by studying ways to use heat treatment to reduce the volume of incinerator ash, to develop technology for the effective use of treated material and to render fly ash and fused salts harmless. In addition, the author seeks to establish more advanced municipal solid waste treatment systems that reduce (slim) waste by using space efficiently and recovering metals in incinerator residue and fly ash for recycling.

Nabeshima, Yoshiro [Tamagawa Univ., Machida City, Tokyo (Japan)] [Tamagawa Univ., Machida City, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Full Document and Summary Versions...

429

Plasma Mass Filters For Nuclear Waste Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Practical disposal of nuclear waste requires high-throughput separation techniques. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which contains the most active and mobile radioisotopes and produces most of the heat. We suggest that the fission products could be separated as a group from nuclear waste using plasma mass filters. Plasmabased processes are well suited to separating nuclear waste, because mass rather than chemical properties are used for separation. A single plasma stage can replace several stages of chemical separation, producing separate streams of bulk elements, fission products, and actinoids. The plasma mass filters may have lower cost and produce less auxiliary waste than chemical processing plants. Three rotating plasma configurations are considered that act as mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, the Ohkawa filter, and the asymmetric centrifugal trap.

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

431

Waste Processing | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Processing Waste Processing Workers process and repackage waste at the Transuranic Waste Processing Centers Cask Processing Enclosure. Workers process and repackage waste at...

432

Waste Hoist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Hoist: 45-ton Rope-Guide Friction Hoist Largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1985 Completely enclosed (for contamination control), the waste hoist at WIPP is a modern friction hoist with rope guides (uses a balanced counterweight and tail ropes). With a 45-ton capacity, it was the largest friction hoist in the world when it was built in 1986. Hoist deck footprint: 2.87m wide x 4.67m long Hoist deck height: 2.87m wide x 7.46m high Access height to the waste hoist deck is limited by a high-bay door at 4.14m high Nominal configuration is 2-cage (over/under), with bottom (equipment) cage interior height of 4.52m The photo, at left, shows the 4.14m high-bay doors at the top collar of the waste hoist shaft. The perpendicular cross section of the opening is 3.5m x 4.14m, but the bottom cage cross section is 2.87m x 4.5m (and 4.67m into the plane of the photo).

433

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue (more)

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Conversion of Low-Grade Heat into Power Using Supercritical Rankine Cycles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Low-grade heat sources, here defined as below 300 C, are abundantly available as industrial waste heat, solar thermal, and geothermal, to name a few. However, (more)

Chen, Huijuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Studying the advisability of using gas-turbine unit waste gases for heating feed water in a steam turbine installation with a type T-110/120-12.8 turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results of calculation studying of a possibility of topping of a steam-turbine unit (STU) with a type T-110/120-12.8 turbine of the Urals Turbine Works (UTZ) by a gas-turbine unit (GTU) of 25-MW capacity the wast...

A. D. Trukhnii; G. D. Barinberg; Yu. A. Rusetskii

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

ENERGY ABSORBER HEAT PUMP SYSTEM TO SUPPLEMENT HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS IN AN INDOOR SWIMMING POOL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Compared with convontional indoor swimming pools with traditional plant engineering, the Schwalmtal indoor swimming pool has a final energy consumption of just 40%. This low consumption is achieved by improved insulation of the building's enveloping surface, through the operation of systems for the recovery of heat from drain water and waste air as well as by the operation of a heat pump system to gain ambient heat. The decentralised heat recovery systems met between 40 and 80% of the heat requirements in the supply areas where they were used. The electric heat pump system, which is operated in the bivalent mode in parallel to a heating boiler, could generate 75% of the heat provided by the central heating circuit to meet the residual heat requirements. The report illustrates the structure of the residual heat requirements of the central heating circuit. A description is given of the measured coefficients of performance of the brine/water heat pump connected by a brine circuit with two different energy absorber types - energy stack and energy roof. Finally, the ambient energy gained with the absorbers is broken down into the various kinds of heat gains from radiation, convection, condensation etc. KEYWORDS Energy absorber; energy stack; energy roof; heat pump; heat recovery systems; indoor swimming pool; energy engineering concept.

K. Leisen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Method for forming microspheres for encapsulation of nuclear waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microspheres for nuclear waste storage are formed by gelling droplets containing the waste in a gelation fluid, transferring the gelled droplets to a furnace without the washing step previously used, and heating the unwashed gelled droplets in the furnace under temperature or humidity conditions that result in a substantially linear rate of removal of volatile components therefrom.

Angelini, Peter (Oak Ridge, TN); Caputo, Anthony J. (Knoxville, TN); Hutchens, Richard E. (Knoxville, TN); Lackey, Walter J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Stinton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, heat and mass transfer, drying, pyrolysis, combustion of pyrolysis gases, combustion and gasificationTHERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF HEAVY METALS BEHAVIOUR DURING MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATION Y. ME´ NARD, A Me´tallurgie (LSG2M) Nancy, France T he incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) contributes

Boyer, Edmond

439

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from problematic for landfill operations by generating undesirable heat, liquid leachate, and gases

440

Municipal solid waste combustion: Waste-to-energy technologies, regulations, and modern facilities in USEPA Region V  

SciTech Connect

Table of Contents: Incinerator operations (Waste preprocessing, combustion, emissions characterization and emission control, process monitoring, heat recovery, and residual ash management); Waste-to-energy regulations (Permitting requirements and operating regulations on both state and Federal levels); Case studies of EPA Region V waste-to-energy facilities (Polk County, Minnesota; Jackson County, Michigan; La Crosse, Wisconsin; Kent County, Michigan; Elk River, Minnesota; Indianapolis, Indiana); Evaluation; and Conclusions.

Sullivan, P.M.; Hallenbeck, W.H.; Brenniman, G.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Industrial heat pumps - types and costs  

SciTech Connect

Confusion about energy savings and economics is preventing many potentially beneficial applications for industrial heat pumps. The variety of heat pumps available and the lack of a standard rating system cause some of this confusion. The authors illustrate how a simple categorization based on coefficient of performance (COP) can compare the cost of recovering waste energy with heat pumps. After evaluating examples in which the cost of energy delivered was calculated based on estimates of capital cost, operating costs, and maintenance costs, they compare heat pumps from the various categories on the basis of economics. 6 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

Chappell, R.N.; Bliem, C.J. Jr.; Mills, J.I.; Demuth, O.J.; Plaster, D.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Numerical analysis of vapor flow in a micro heat pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be modeled as a classical blowing and suction problem, i. e. ?(00) = v(00) = o ?(I, p) = v(L0) = 0 ?(x, 0) = ?(x, H) = 0 i(x, 0) = v(x), v(x, H) = -i'(x) 0&x&I. , (2. 6) v(x, 0) = 0, v(x, H) = 0 I. , &x&(L, +L, ) i(x, 0) = -v(x), v(x, H) = v(x) (L, +L... are considerably smoother and appear more reasonable Figure 5. 6 presents the velocity vector which is under q=40W/cm2, H=0. 003m uniform heat flux linear heat flux 0 00 0 O'I 0 02 0. 03 0. 04 0. 05 0 06 x(m) Fig. 5. 2 Heat flux distribution influence...

Liu, Xiaoqin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Search for the magnetic field of the O7.5 III star xi Persei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclical wind variability is an ubiquitous but as yet unexplained feature among OB stars. The O7.5 III(n)((f)) star xi Persei is the brightest representative of this class on the Northern hemisphere. As its prominent cyclical wind properties vary on a rotational time scale (2 or 4 days) the star has been already for a long time a serious magnetic candidate. As the cause of this enigmatic behavior non-radial pulsations and/or a surface magnetic field are suggested. We present a preliminary report on our attempts to detect a magnetic field in this star with high-resolution measurements obtained with the spectropolarimeter Narval at TBL, France during 2 observing runs of 5 nights in 2006 and 5 nights in 2007. Only upper limits could be obtained, even with the longest possible exposure times. If the star hosts a magnetic field, its surface strength should be less than about 300 G. This would still be enough to disturb the stellar wind significantly. From our new data it seems that the amplitude of the known non-r...

Henrichs, H F; de Jong, J A; Kaper, L; Donati, J F; Catala, C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Heat Stroke  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

stress, from exertion or hot environments, places stress, from exertion or hot environments, places workers at risk for illnesses such as heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Heat Stroke A condition that occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature, and can cause death or permanent disability. Symptoms ■ High body temperature ■ Confusion ■ Loss of coordination ■ Hot, dry skin or profuse sweating ■ Throbbing headache ■ Seizures, coma First Aid ■ Request immediate medical assistance. ■ Move the worker to a cool, shaded area. ■ Remove excess clothing and apply cool water to their body. Heat Exhaustion The body's response to an excessive loss of water and salt, usually through sweating. Symptoms ■ Rapid heart beat ■ Heavy sweating ■ Extreme weakness or fatigue ■

445

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste-Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composition of Municipal Solid Waste- Need for Thermal Treatment in the present Indian context of estimating heat value of municipal wastes, from the view point of assessing the waste's amenability for thermal treatment in the Indian context at the present juncture. The paper also seeks to reason out

Columbia University

447

Press Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and regenerative heat recovery is used to boost the plant's overall energy efficiency. The majority of the wastePress Release Von Roll Inova to build the UK's largest energy-from-waste plant Zürich, September, 1 Roll Inova will build the UK's largest energy-from-waste facility. The contract is worth approximately

Columbia University

448

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radioactive Waste Management (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section regulates the transportation and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Minnesota, and establishes a Nuclear Waste Council to monitor the federal high-level radioactive waste...

452

Preliminary one-dimensional thermal analysis of waste emplacement in tuffs  

SciTech Connect

One-dimensional calculations of near-field temperatures resulting from waste emplacement in a multiple-layered tuff stratigraphy are presented. Results indicate a marked sensitivity of peak temperatures to assignment of in-situ fluid pressure, geothermal-heat flux, waste type, and location of waste relative to a specific stratigraphic discontinuity. Under the criterion that allowable initial-power densities are limited by the occurrence of boiling at a distance of 10 m from emplaced waste, allowable power densities are calculated to range up to 150 kW/acre or more, depending upon geothermal heat flux and waste type.

Bulmer, B.M.; Lappin, A.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences  

SciTech Connect

Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

Wiltsee, G.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Optimization and heat and water integration for biodiesel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation of biodiesel using waste cooking oil and algae oil. We consider 5 different technologies: Energy, Biofuels, Biodiesel, Cooking Oil, Mathematical optimization, Algae1 Optimization and heat and water integration for biodiesel production from cooking oil

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

455

A R&D Program for Advanced Industrial Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall goal of the DOE Industrial Heat Pump Program is to foster research and development which will allow more efficient and economical recovery of waste energy in industry. Specifically, the program includes the identification of appropriate...

Hayes, A. J.

456

Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste stream options in terms of waste loading and/or decay time required before treatment. For Option 1, glass ceramics show an increase in waste loading of 15 mass % and reduction in decay time of 24 years. Decay times of {approx}50 years or longer are close to the expected age of the fuel that will be reprocessed when the modified open or closed fuel cycle is expected to be put into action. Option 2 shows a 2x to 2.5x increase in waste loading with decay times of only 45 years. Note that for Option 2 glass, the required decay time before treatment is only 35 years because of the waste loading limits related to the solubility of MoO{sub 3} in glass. If glass was evaluated for similar waste loadings as those achieved in Option 2 glass ceramics, the decay time would be significantly longer than 45 years. These glass ceramics are not optimized, but already they show the potential to dramatically reduce the amount of waste generated while still utilizing the proven processing technology used for glass production.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Method for recovering metals from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method for recovering materials from waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, a vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800{degrees}C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1000--1550{degrees}C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.

Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Radioactive Waste Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

1984-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

Transuranic Waste Requirements  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Waste?to?Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Waste?to?Energy Presentation by Jonathan Male, Director of the Bioenery Technolgies Office, Department of Energy

462

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, Michael A. (Santa Cruz, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Heat collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat collector and method suitable for efficiently and cheaply collecting solar and other thermal energy are provided. The collector employs a heat pipe in a gravity-assist mode and is not evacuated. The collector has many advantages, some of which include ease of assembly, reduced structural stresses on the heat pipe enclosure, and a low total materials cost requirement. Natural convective forces drive the collector, which after startup operates entirely passively due in part to differences in molecular weights of gaseous components within the collector.

Merrigan, M.A.

1981-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Amounts of Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term nuclear waste...embraces all residues from the use of radioactive materials, including uses in medicine and industry. The most highly radioactive of these are the spent fuel or reprocessed wastes from co...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

Saldin, Dilano

466

Search for the Xi(2220) and Study of the X(3872) at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

The BABAR Collaboration performed a search for x (2220) production in the initial-state radiation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma} J/{Psi}, J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -} or J/{Psi} {yields} {gamma}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}. No evidence for the {xi} (2220) resonance has been found. The 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of branching fractions are sensitive to the spin and helicity hypotheses. These upper limits are of the order 10{sup -5}, below the values reported in previous experiments. Also at BABAR, the decays B {yields} J/{Psi} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K are studied to search for the decay X(3872) {yields} J/{Psi}{gamma}. This search yields a four standard deviation evidence for X(3872) {yields} J/{Psi}{omega}, with product branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} X(3872)K{sup +}) x {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/{Psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.2(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}, and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} X(3872)K{sup 0}) x {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/y{Psi}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}. A detailed study of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} mass distribution from X(3872) decay favors a negative-parity assignment but does not rule out the positive-parity hypothesis.

Mokhtar, Arafat Gabareen; /SLAC

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary Name: IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Cost: Free Related Tools Energy Development Index (EDI) Harmonized Emissions Analysis Tool (HEAT) Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model ... further results A simple spreadsheet model for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from existing waste management practices (transportation, composting, anaerobic digestion, mechanical biological treatment, recycling, landfilling) in

469

The Economic and Environmental Aspects of Heat Exchanger Cleaning -- How FP&L Has Used the Newly Patented MCC Process to Clean Turbine Lube Oil Coolers to Maximize Efficiency and Minimize Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of efficient and timely cleaning of heat exchangers. There are great differences in the cleaning processes that are used to clean exchanger bundles in industry today. The cleaning of turbine lube oil coolers is a specialized case in point. A newly patented...

Wood, H. A. T.

470

Nevada nuclear waste storage investigations: briefing book  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) are discussed briefly. The tuff in Yucca mountains being investigated as a possible repository host for radioactive wastes. The Spent Fuel Test-Climax began in the spring of 1980 in the northeastern Nevada Test Site about 1400 ft below the desert surface. The test has provided significant scientific and technical contributions in the following areas: heat impact on a large underground facility in a hard, brittle rock, impact of ventilation designs on repository heat removal, suitability and operational characteristics of instrumentation in a repository, impact of the mining procedures on underground openings and the surrounding rock, and heat and radiation effects on the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of granite.

NONE

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Tips: Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Water Heating Tips: Water Heating Tips: Water Heating May 2, 2012 - 4:53pm Addthis Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water. Insulate your water heater to save energy and money, or choose an on-demand hot water heater to save even more. Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water. Insulate your water heater to save energy and money, or choose an on-demand hot water heater to save even more. Water heating is the second largest energy expense in your home. It typically accounts for about 18% of your utility bill. There are four ways to cut your water heating bills: use less hot water, turn down the thermostat on your water heater, insulate your water heater, or buy a new, more efficient model. Water Heating Tips Install aerating, low-flow faucets and showerheads. Repair leaky faucets promptly; a leaky faucet wastes gallons of

472

Tips: Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating Tips: Water Heating May 2, 2012 - 4:53pm Addthis Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water. Insulate your water heater to save energy and money, or choose an on-demand hot water heater to save even more. Keep Your Energy Bills Out of Hot Water. Insulate your water heater to save energy and money, or choose an on-demand hot water heater to save even more. Water heating is the second largest energy expense in your home. It typically accounts for about 18% of your utility bill. There are four ways to cut your water heating bills: use less hot water, turn down the thermostat on your water heater, insulate your water heater, or buy a new, more efficient model. Water Heating Tips Install aerating, low-flow faucets and showerheads. Repair leaky faucets promptly; a leaky faucet wastes gallons of

473

Waste recycling in the textile industry. (Latest citations from World Textile Abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling of fiberous and other waste materials from textile production. The use of recyclable materials such as cellulosic and polymeric wastes, cloth scraps, fiber waste, glass fiber wastes, and waste dusts for use in textile products, insulation, paneling and other building supplies, yarns, roping, and pavement materials are considered. Equipment for collecting, sorting, and processing textile wastes is also discussed. Heat recovery and effluent treatment in the textile industry are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Recycling of sodium waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recycling of sodium waste ... Methods for handling and recycling a dangerous and costly chemical. ...

Bettina Hubler-Blank; Michael Witt; Herbert W. Roesky

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly.

ELLEFSON, M.D.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

476

Infectious waste feed system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

Coulthard, E. James (York, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

478

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1992-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

479

Method of calculation of heat generation rates for DWPF glass. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specifications (WAPS) require estimates of the heat generation rate of DWPF waste glasses. Estimates of the heat generation rates of projected glass compositions are to be reported in the Waste Form Qualification Report. Similar estimates for actual production glasses are to be reported in the Production Records. In this report, a method of calculating the heat generation rate from the radionuclide inventory is provided. Application of the method to the DWPF Design-Basis glass indicates that the heat generation rate can be accurately estimated from the Sr-90, Y-90, Cs-137, Ba-137m, and Pu-238 contents alone.

Plodinec, M.J.

1993-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. Change 1 dated 6/19/01 removes the requirement that Headquarters is to be notified and the Office of Environment, Safety and Health consulted for exemptions for use of non-DOE treatment facilities. Certified 1-9-07.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "xi waste heat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Bacteria eats radioactive waste  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria eats radioactive waste Bacteria eats radioactive waste Name: deenaharper Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: In my studies, I have found that everything in this world is balanced. When something dies it is converted into life. Is there anything out there that could convert radioactive material into a harmless substance? Some sort of bacteria that consumes radiation? Replies: The reason why radiation is so harmful is that is produces free radicals in living tissue, that is, it de-stabilizes molecules by tearing off electrons due to intense energies. These free radicals start a chain reaction of destruction, de-stabilizing neighboring molecules. If this continues unchecked, cells die, genetic material are mutated, and tissue aging accelerates. It is somewhat like being burned. Fire oxidizes by a similar free radical reaction. (Hence the term "sun burn.") The natural defenses against free radical reactions in biological systems are antioxidants, which are enzymes, nutrients, and other chemicals, which quench free radical reactions. Without them, life would very quickly cease. To my knowledge, no microorganism has an antioxidant capacity great enough to withstand even minimal exposure to any type of radiation. Microorganisms are actually very susceptible to radiation, which is why heat and gamma irradiation are used to sterilize food, instruments, etc. However, you raise an interesting possibility in that perhaps one can be genetically engineered to have super- antioxidant capacity, but that may be beyond current technology. Plus, if any got loose, given the exponential rate of reproduction, they may become an uncontrollable health hazard, as it would be very difficult to destroy them!

482

UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

403 403 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142288403 Varnish cache server UK Energy Statistics: Renewables and Waste, Commodity Balances (2010) Dataset Summary Description Annual commodity balances (supply, consumption) for renewables and waste in the UK from 1998 to 2009. Published as part of the Digest of UK energy statistics (DUKES), by the UK Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC). Waste includes: wood waste, farm waste, sewage gas, landfill gas, waste and tyres. Renewables includes: wood, plant-based biomass, geothermal and active solar heat, hydro, wind, wave and tidal, and liquid biofuels. These data were used to produce Tables 7.1 to 7.3 in the Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics 2010 (available: http://decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/dukes/348-dukes-2...).

483

Waste package/repository impact study: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Method to synthesize dense crystallized sodalite pellet for immobilizing halide salt radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as cesium and strontium and hazardous materials such as barium. A sodalite intermediate is prepared by mixing appropriate amounts of silica, alumina and sodium hydroxide with respect to sodalite and heating the mixture to form the sodalite intermediate and water. Heating is continued to drive off the water to form a water-free intermediate. The water-free intermediate is mixed with either waste salt or waste salt which has been contacted with zeolite to concentrate the radionuclides and hazardous material. The waste salt-intermediate mixture is then compacted and heated under conditions of heat and pressure to form sodalite with the waste salt, radionuclides and hazardous material trapped within the sodalite cage structure. This provides a final product having excellent leach resistant capabilities.

Koyama, Tadafumi (Tokyo, JP)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method to synthesize dense crystallized sodalite pellet for immobilizing halide salt radioactive waste  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a method for immobilizing waste chloride salts containing radionuclides such as cesium and strontium and hazardous materials such as barium. A sodalite intermediate is prepared by mixing appropriate amounts of silica, alumina and sodium hydroxide with respect to sodalite and heating the mixture to form the sodalite intermediate and water. Heating is continued to drive off the water to form a water-free intermediate. The water-free intermediate is mixed with either waste salt or waste salt which has been contacted with zeolite to concentrate the radionuclides and hazardous material. The waste salt-intermediate mixture is then compacted and heated under conditions of heat and pressure to form sodalite with the waste salt, radionuclides and hazardous material trapped within the sodalite cage structure. This provides a final product having excellent leach resistant capabilities.

Koyama, T.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

System Modeling and Building Energy Simulations of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect

To improve the system performance of a gas engine driven heat pump (GHP) system, an analytical modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated with a detailed vapor compression heat pump system design model. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using the desiccant system the sensible heat ratio (SHR- sensible heat ratio) can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% at rated operating conditions. In addtion,using EnergyPlus, building energy simulations have been conducted to assess annual energy consumptions of GHP in sixteen US cities, and the performances are compared to a baseline unit, which has a electrically-driven air conditioner with the seasonal COP of 4.1 for space cooling and a gas funace with 90% fuel efficiency for space heating.

Mahderekal, Isaac [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Vineyard, Edward [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Catalytic bromine recovery from HBr waste  

SciTech Connect

Waste HBr is formed during the bromination of many organic molecules, such as flame retardants, pharmaceuticals, and agricultural chemicals. For over 50 years attempts to recover the bromine from waste HBr by catalytic oxidation have been unsuccessful due to low catalyst activity and stability. The discovery of a new high-activity catalysts with excellent long-term stability and life capable of high HBr conversion below 300{degrees}C has made catalytic oxidation of waste HBr commercially feasible. The oxidation of anhydrous HBr using oxygen is highly exothermic, giving an adiabatic temperature rise of 2000{degrees}C. Use of 48 wt% HBr in the oxidation reduces the adiabatic temperature rise to only 300{degrees}C. A multitubular heat exchanger type of reactor can then be used to manage the heat. A 5,000 kg/yr pilot plant was built to verify the performance of the catalyst, the suitability of the reactor materials of construction, and the multibular reactor concept. The pilot unit has a single full-scale reactor tube 4 m long and 2.54 cm in diameter with a hot oil jacket for heat management. Excellent catalyst stability was observed during a 600 h catalyst-life test. HBr conversion of 99% was maintained throughout the run, and over 360 kg of bromine was produced. The temperature at a localized hot spot near the reactor inlet was only 15-20{degrees}C above the reactor inlet temperature, indicating efficient heat management.

Schubert, P.F.; Beatty, R.D.; Mahajan, S. [Catalytica Inc., Mountain View, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Heat transfer in a thermoelectric generator for diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design and test results obtained for a 1kW thermoelectric generator used to convert the waste thermal energy in the exhaust of a Diesel engine directly to electric energy. The paper focuses on the heat transfer within the generator and shows what had to be done to overcome the heat transfer problems encountered in the initial generator testing to achieve the output goal of 1kW electrical. The 1kW generator uses Bismuth-Telluride thermoelectric modules for the energy conversion process. These modules are also being evaluated for other waste heat applications. Some of these applications are briefly addressed.

Bass, J.C. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities Waste-to-Energy: Waste Management and Energy Production Opportunities July 24, 2014 9:00AM to 3:30PM EDT U.S....

490

Radioactive Waste Management Manual  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Manual further describes the requirements and establishes specific responsibilities for implementing DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, for the management of DOE high-level waste, transuranic waste, low-level waste, and the radioactive component of mixed waste. The purpose of the Manual is to catalog those procedural requirements and existing practices that ensure that all DOE elements and contractors continue to manage DOE's radioactive waste in a manner that is protective of worker and public health and safety, and the environment. Does not cancel other directives.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

491

RH-TRU Waste Content Codes  

SciTech Connect

The Remote-Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) Content Codes (RH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of RH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (RH-TRAMPAC).1 The RH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the RH-TRU 72-B. This document is a catalog of RH-TRU 72-B authorized contents by site. A content code is defined by the following components: A two-letter site abbreviation that designates the physical location of the generated/stored waste (e.g., ID for Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). The site-specific letter designations for each of the sites are provided in Table 1. A three-digit code that designates the physical and chemical form of the waste (e.g., content code 317 denotes TRU Metal Waste). For RH-TRU waste to be transported in the RH-TRU 72-B, the first number of this three-digit code is 3. The second and third numbers of the three-digit code describe the physical and chemical form of the waste. Table 2 provides a brief description of each generic code. Content codes are further defined as subcodes by an alpha trailer after the three-digit code to allow segregation of wastes that differ in one or more parameter(s). For example, the alpha trailers of the subcodes ID 322A and ID 322B may be used to differentiate between waste packaging configurations. As detailed in the RH-TRAMPAC, compliance with flammable gas limits may be demonstrated through the evaluation of compliance with either a decay heat limit or flammable gas generation rate (FGGR) limit per container specified in approved content codes. As applicable, if a container meets the watt*year criteria specified by the RH-TRAMPAC, the decay heat limits based on the dose-dependent G value may be used as specified in an approved content code. If a site implements the administrative controls outlined in the RH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 2.4 of the RH-TRU Payload Appendices, the decay heat or FGGR limits based on a 10-day shipping period (rather than the standard 60-day shipping period) may be used as specified in an approved content code. Requests for new or revised content codes may be submitted to the WIPP RH-TRU Payload Engineer for review and approval, provided all RH-TRAMPAC requirements are met.

Washington TRU Solutions

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Hydrogen bond topology and the ice VII/VIII and Ih/XI proton ordering phase transitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ice Ih, ordinary ice at atmospheric pressure, is a proton-disordered crystal that when cooled under special conditions is believed to transform to ferroelectric proton-ordered ice XI, but this transformation is still subject to controversy. Ice VII, also proton disordered throughout its region of stability, transforms to proton-ordered ice VIII upon cooling. In contrast to the ice Ih/XI transition, the VII/VIII transition and the crystal structure of ice VIII are well characterized. In order to shed some light on the ice Ih proton ordering transition, we present the results of periodic electronic density functional theory calculations and statistical simulations. We are able to describe the small energy differences among the innumerable H-bond configurations possible in a large simulation cell by using an analytic theory to extrapolate from electronic DFT calculations on small unit cells to cells large enough to approximate the thermodynamic limit. We first validate our methods by comparing our predictions to the well-characterized ice VII/VIII proton ordering transition, finding agreement with respect to both the transition temperature and structure of the low-temperature phase. For ice Ih, our results indicate that a proton-ordered phase is attainable at low temperatures, the structure of which is in agreement with the experimentally proposed ferroelectric Cmc21 structure. The predicted transition temperature of 98K is in qualitative agreement with the observed transition at 72K on KOH-doped ice samples.

Chris Knight; Sherwin J. Singer; Jer-Lai Kuo; Tomas K. Hirsch; Lars Ojame; Michael L. Klein

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

493

Safer Transportation and Disposal of Remote Handled Transuranic Waste - 12033  

SciTech Connect

Since disposal of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) began in 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) has had difficulty meeting the plans and schedule for disposing this waste. PECOS Management Services, Inc. (PECOS) assessed the feasibility of proposed alternate RH-TRU mixed waste containerisation concepts that would enhance the transportation rate of RH-TRU waste to WIPP and increase the utilization of available WIPP space capacity for RH-TRU waste disposal by either replacing or augmenting current and proposed disposal methods. In addition engineering and operational analyses were conducted that addressed concerns regarding criticality, heat release, and worker exposure to radiation. The results of the analyses showed that the concept, development, and use of a concrete pipe based design for an RH-TRU waste shipping and disposal container could be potentially advantageous for disposing a substantial quantity of RHTRU waste at WIPP in the same manner as contact-handled RH waste. Additionally, this new disposal method would eliminate the hazard associated with repackaging this waste in other containers without the requirement for NRC approval for a new shipping container. (authors)

Rojas, Vicente; Timm, Christopher M.; Fox, Jerry V. [PECOS Management Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Molten Salt Oxidation of mixed wastes  

SciTech Connect

Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) can be characterized as a simple noncombustion process; the basic concept is to introduce air and wastes into a bed of molten salt, oxidize the organic wastes in the molten salt, use the heat of oxidation to keep the salt molten and remove the salt for disposal or processing and recycling. The process has been developed through bench-scale and pilot-scale testing, with successful destruction demonstration of a wide variety of hazardous and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes including chemical warfare agents, combustible solids, halogenated solvents, polychlorinated biphenyls, plutonium-contaminated solids, uranium-contaminated solvents and fission product-contaminated oil. The MSO destruction efficiency of the hazardous organic constituents in the wastes exceeds 99.9999%. Radioactive species, such as actinides and rare earth fission products, are retained in the salt bath. These elements can be recovered from the spent salt using conventional chemical processes, such as ion exchange, to render the salt as nonradioactive and nonhazardous. This paper reviews the principles and capabilities of MSO, previous mixed waste studies, and a new US Department of Energy program to demonstrate the process for the treatment of mixed wastes.

Gay, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.; Newman, C. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

"Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

497

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form (Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic). The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended.

Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal sy