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1

Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electronic Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials with Photon-in/Photon-out Soft-X-Ray Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The applications of resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy on a variety of carbon systems have yielded characteristic fingerprints. With high-resolution monochromatized synchrotron radiation excitation, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has emerged as a new source of information about electronic structure and excitation dynamics. Photon-in/photon-out soft-X-ray spectroscopy is used to study the electronic properties of fundamental materials, nanostructure, and complex hydrides and will offer potential in-depth understanding of chemisorption and/or physisorption mechanisms of hydrogen adsorption/desorption capacity and kinetics.

Guo, Jinghua

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

3

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized Magnetite Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

The crystal structure of magnetite nanoparticles may be transformed to maghemite by complete oxidation, but under many relevant conditions the oxidation is partial, creating a mixed-valence material with structural and electronic properties that are poorly characterized. We used X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy to characterize the products of oxidizing uncoated and oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles in air. The oxidization of uncoated magnetite nanoparticles creates a material that is structurally and electronically indistinguishable from maghemite. By contrast, while oxidized oleic acid-coated nanoparticles are also structurally indistinguishable from maghemite, Fe L-edge spectroscopy revealed the presence of interior reduced iron sites even after a 2-year period. We used X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K-edge to study the valence bands (VB) of the iron oxide nanoparticles, using resonant excitation to remove the contributions from oxygen atoms in the ligands and from low-energy excitations that obscured the VB edge. The bonding in all nanoparticles was typical of maghemite, with no detectable VB states introduced by the long-lived, reduced-iron sites in the oleic acid-coated sample. However, O K-edge absorption spectroscopy observed a 0.2 eV shift in the position of the lowest unoccupied states in the coated sample, indicating an increase in the semiconductor band gap relative to bulk stoichiometric maghemite that was also observed by optical absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the ferrous iron sites within ferric iron oxide nanoparticles coated by an organic ligand can persist under ambient conditions with no evidence of a distinct interior phase and can exert an effect on the global electronic and optical properties of the material. This phenomenon resembles the band gap enlargement caused by electron accumulation in the conduction band of TiO2.

Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Yin, Yadong; Falcone, Roger; Waychunas, Glenn A.

2010-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

X-ray polarization spectroscopy to study anisotropic velocity distribution of hot electrons produced by an ultra-high-intensity laser  

SciTech Connect

The anisotropy of the hot-electron velocity distribution in ultra-high-intensity laser produced plasma was studied with x-ray polarization spectroscopy using multilayer planar targets including x-ray emission tracer in the middle layer. This measurement serves as a diagnostic for hot-electron transport from the laser-plasma interaction region to the overdense region where drastic changes in the isotropy of the electron velocity distribution are observed. These polarization degrees are consistent with analysis of a three-dimensional polarization spectroscopy model coupled with particle-in-cell simulations. Electron velocity distribution in the underdense region is affected by the electric field of the laser and that in the overdense region becomes wider with increase in the tracer depth. A full-angular spread in the overdense region of 22.4 deg.{sub -2.4}{sup +5.4} was obtained from the measured polarization degree.

Inubushi, Y. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Okano, Y.; Nishimura, H.; Cai, H.; Nagatomo, H.; Kai, T.; Fujioka, S.; Nakamura, T.; Johzaki, T.; Mima, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kawamura, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Batani, D.; Morace, A.; Redaelli, R. [Dipartmento di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Fourment, C.; Santos, J. J.; Malka, G. [CELIA, Universite de Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, Talence (France); Boscheron, A.; Bonville, O.; Grenier, J. [CEA/CESTA, Le Barp (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L. [Nion, 1102 8th St., Kirkland, Washington 98033 (United States); Ramasse, Q. M. [SuperSTEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury, Keckwick Lane, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R. [Bruker Nano GmbH, Schwarzschildstr. 12, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Zan, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

7

Proton induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and selective x-ray fluorescence analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the analytical features and performance of an x-ray spectroscopy end station of moderate energy resolution operating with proton-induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams. The apparatus was designed, installed and operated at the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG Accelerator Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos,' Athens. The setup includes a two-level ultrahigh vacuum chamber that hosts in the lower level up to six primary targets in a rotatable holder; there, the irradiation of pure element materials-used as primary targets-with few-MeV high current ({approx}{mu}A) proton beams produces intense quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams of selectable energy. In the chamber's upper level, a six-position rotatable sample holder hosts the targets considered for x-ray spectroscopy studies. The proton-induced x-ray beam, after proper collimation, is guided to the sample position whereas various filters can be also inserted along the beam's path to eliminate the backscattered protons or/and to absorb selectively components of the x-ray beam. The apparatus incorporates an ultrathin window Si(Li) spectrometer (FWHM 136 eV at 5.89 keV) coupled with low-noise electronics capable of efficiently detecting photons down to carbon K{alpha}. Exemplary soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and results of selective x-ray fluorescence analysis are presented.

Sokaras, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Zarkadas, Ch. [PANalytical B.V., 7600 AA Almelo (Netherlands); Fliegauf, R.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Karydas, A. G. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Nuclear Spectrometry and Applications Laboratory, IAEA Laboratories, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect

We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Hiraoka, Koichi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kojima, Kenichi [Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8521 (Japan); Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke [NIMS Beamline Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Oguchi, Tamio [ISIR, Osaka University, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan); Taniguchi, Masaki [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electronic structure of phospho-olivines LixFePO4 (x=0,1) fromsoft-x-ray-absorption and -emission spectroscopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure of the phospho-olivine LixFePO4 wasstudied using soft-x-ray-absorption (XAS) and emission spectroscopies.Characteristic changes in the valence and conduction bands are observedupon delithation of LiFePO4 into FePO4. In LiFePO4, the Fe-3d states arelocalized with little overlap with the O-2p states. Delithiation ofLiFePO4 gives stronger hybridization between Fe-3d states and O-2p statesleading to delocalization of the O-2p states. The Fe L-edge absorptionspectra yield "fingerprints" of the different valence states of Fe inLiFePO4 and FePO4. Resonant soft-x-ray-emission spectroscopy at the Fe Ledge shows strong contributions from resonant inelastic soft x-rayscattering (RIXS), which is described using an ionic picture of the Fe-3dstates. Together the Fe L-edge XAS and RIXS study reveals a bondingcharacter of the Fe 3d-O2p orbitals in FePO4 in contrast to a nonbondingcharacter in LiFePO4.

Augustsson, A.; Zhuang, G.V.; Butorin, S.M.; Osorio-Guillen,J.M.; Dong, C.L.; Ahuja, R.; Chang, C.L.; Ross, P.N.; Nordgren, J.; Guo,J.-H.

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

10

Core Level Spectroscopies Surface Science and X-Ray Spectroscopy Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Level Spectroscopy Creation and Decay of Core Holes Spectroscopic Techniques X-ray Photoelectron (XPS) X-ray Absorption (XAS) X-ray Emission (XES) Auger Electron (AES) Core holes are created by the ionization of a core electron in XPS and by excitation in XAS . The XPS and XAS final states are highly unstable and the core hole decays by non-radiant Auger relaxation (AES) or by radiant x-ray emission processes (XES). XPS and AES probe the unoccupied electronic stru cture, while XAS projects the unoccupied valence states of the system onto a particular atom. A brief description of the each of the different spectroscopies illustrated by schematic pictures of the creation and decay with data measured for N2 adsorbed on Ni(100) can be found by scrolling

11

High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In support of these efforts, we also maintain laboratory x-ray sources from 1 keV to 300 keV, energy and intensity calibration facilities, and a vacuum ...

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 28, 2009 ... Recent Advances in Structural Characterization of Materials: Electron and X-Ray Microscopy: Structural Characterization of Nanoscale ...

13

Photon Sciences | Beamlines | SRX: Submicron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRX: Submicron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy SRX: Submicron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Poster | Fact Sheet | Preliminary Design Report Scientific Scope Scientific communities such as environmental sciences, life sciences, and material sciences have identified the need to develop analytical resources to advance the understanding of complex natural and engineered systems that are heterogeneous on the micron to nanometer scale. These needs for high intensity x-ray nanoprobes resulted in the commitment of the NSLS-II Project to build the Submicron Resolution X-ray (SRX) Spectroscopy beamline showing a unique combination of high spectral resolution over a very broad energy range and very high beam intensity in a sub-micrometer spot. NSLS-II will provide one of the best sources in the world for such an instrument.

14

Simulated X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy on the Water Dimer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability of an individual H{sub 2}O molecule to form multiple hydrogen bonds with neighboring molecules makes it an ideal substance for the study of hydrogen bonding. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can be used to study what intermolecular structures the hydrogen-bonded water molecules form. XAS excites core electrons from the oxygen 1 s atomic orbital to an unoccupied orbital. The resulting absorption spectrum shows the energy levels of the unoccupied orbitals, which in turn is dependent on the intermolecular structure of the H{sub 2}O system. Previous studies using molecular dynamics computer simulations have concluded that the intermolecular structure of liquid water is a distorted tetrahedron. Yet x-ray absorption spectra show discrepancies between liquid water and ice Ih, which is already known to have a rigid tetrahedral structure. The research group, which is based in the University of Sweden in Stockholm and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, has studied the possible presence of broken hydrogen bonds in the liquid water intermolecular structure to explain these deviations. Computer simulations are used to construct theoretical absorption spectra for models of liquid water including broken hydrogen bonds. Creating such models requires controlling variables. The simplest method of isolating individual variables, such as hydrogen bond length and angles, is to study the water dimer. Here, the water dimer is used to study how the absorption spectra change with the way the water molecules are positioned and oriented relative to each other.

Wung, A

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Exploring electronic structure through high-resolution hard x-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring electronic structure through high-resolution hard x-ray Exploring electronic structure through high-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopies Tuesday, July 23, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Dimosthenis Sokaras, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Modern high brilliance beamlines coupled with recent advances in hard-x-ray optics are establishing high-resolution hard x-ray spectroscopies as a powerful analytical tool for routine electronic structure investigations. Their advantageous characteristics like the chemical sensitivity or the hard x-rays penetration depth, that permits the implementation of difficult sample environments, expand the applicability of the relevant studies to multidisciplinary scientific fields. Simultaneously, the experimental

16

Advanced experimental applications for x-ray transmission gratings spectroscopy using a novel grating fabrication method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel fabrication method for soft x-ray transmission grating and other optical elements is presented. The method uses focused-ion-beam technology to fabricate high-quality free standing grating bars on transmission electron microscopy grids. High quality transmission gratings are obtained with superb accuracy and versatility. Using these gratings and back-illuminated CCD camera, absolutely calibrated x-ray spectra can be acquired for soft x-ray source diagnostics in the 100-3000 eV spectral range. Double grating combinations of identical or different parameters are easily fabricated, allowing advanced one-shot application of transmission grating spectroscopy. These applications include spectroscopy with different spectral resolutions, bandwidths, dynamic ranges, and may serve for identification of high-order contribution, and spectral calibrations of various x-ray optical elements.

Hurvitz, G.; Ehrlich, Y.; Shpilman, Z.; Levy, I.; Fraenkel, M. [Plasma Physics Department, Applied Physics Division, Soreq NRC, Yavne (Israel); Strum, G. [Solid State Department, Applied Physics Division, Soreq NRC, Yavne (Israel)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-rays Capture Electron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-rays Capture Electron 'Dance' By Glenn Roberts Jr. January 30, 2013 The way electrons move within and between molecules, transferring energy as they go, plays an important role...

19

Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic Probing Spatial, Electronic Structures with X-ray Scattering, Spectroscopic Techniques Wednesday, September 5, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Gang Chen Seminar: Structures at atomic scales are traditionally determined through X-ray crystallography that amplifies scattering intensities by introducing spatial periodicity. For amorphous materials and many macromolecules, such as viruses, proteins and biofilms, it is hard to determine structures due to their incapability to crystallize or change of configuration during crystallization. In this talk, I will present the application of X-ray reflectivity and a newly developed fluctuation X-ray scattering technique to study the structures of lipid membranes and randomly oriented nanoparticles. Three different types of domain registrations occurring with

20

X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

Krauss, Miriam Ilana

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials  

SciTech Connect

Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

Fischer, D.A. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Moodenbaugh, A.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ultra-soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy: A bulk and surface probe of materials  

SciTech Connect

Direct comparisons between surface and bulk of diverse materials can be made by simultaneous electron yield (5 nm depth sensitivity) and fluorescence yield (200 nm) ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements utilizing a rapid sample interchange apparatus. For example the orientations of functional groups have been characterized at and near the surface of a series of model polymeric materials highlighting the chemical and molecular sensitivity of ultra soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition we discuss a bulk sensitive use of fluorescence yield to non destructively study a buried metal polymer interface. A second bulk sensitive example is the use of fluorescence yield oxygen K near edge x-ray spectroscopy as a method to determine the hole state density of high Tc materials.

Fischer, D.A. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Mitchell, G.E.; Dekoven, B.M. (Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States)); Yeh, A.T.; Gland, J.L. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Moodenbaugh, A.R. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Title X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-50574 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Baker Farangis, Jonathan L. Slack, Ponnusamy Nachimuthu, Rupert C. C. Perera, Nobumichi Tamura, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Journal of Alloys and Compounds Volume 356-357 Start Page 204 Pagination 204-207 Date Published 08/2003 Keywords A. hydrogen storage materials, NEXAFS, thin film s; C. EXAFS, x-ray diffraction Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Mg K-edge and Ni, Co, and Ti L-edge spectra reflect both reversible and irreversible changes in the metal environments. A significant shift in the nickel L absorption edge shows it to be an active participant in hydride formation. The effect on cobalt and titanium is much less dramatic, suggesting that these metals act primarily as catalysts for formation of magnesium hydride.

24

SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Agenda Location Visitor Information Transportation Tourism & Dining SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application June 2-5, 2009 Group photo of the attendees at the SSRL School on X-ray Spectropscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application held June 2-5, 2009 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. » View photos from XAS 2009 Overview: Modern synchrotron radiation based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques offer the ability to probe local molecular scale physical and electronic structures that govern key properties of technological and environmental materials and molecular complexes. The high collimation, intensity, and tunability of SR allow the investigation of a wide range of materials, including thin films and interfaces, nanoparticles, amorphous materials, solutions, hydrated and disordered bacteriogenic minerals, soils, interfaces, and dissolved species.

25

Testing LaMgAl11O19 crystal for X-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the properties of the rare earth crystal LaMgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19} and its application to soft X-ray spectroscopy. Its relative reflectivity and half width rocking curve were measured to up to the reflection order of 28. In addition, a comparative measurement of the iron L-shell soft X-ray line emission was made on the EBIT-I Livermore electron beam ion trap by fielding the LaMgAl{sub 11}O{sub 19} crystal side by side with a rubidium hydrogen phthalate crystal in a flat crystal spectrometer. From these measurements, reflectivity and spectral resolving power were determined.

Chen, H; Beiersdorfer, P; Baronova, E; Kalashnikova, I; Stepanenko, M

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Two-dimensional stimulated resonance Raman spectroscopy of molecules with broadband x-ray pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressions for the two-dimensional stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy (2D-SXRS) signal obtained using attosecond x-ray pulses are derived. The 1D- and 2D-SXRS signals are calculated for trans-N-methyl acetamide (NMA) with broad bandwidth (181 as, 14.2 eV FWHM) pulses tuned to the oxygen and nitrogen K-edges. Crosspeaks in 2D signals reveal electronic Franck-Condon overlaps between valence orbitals and relaxed orbitals in the presence of the core-hole.

Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang Yu; Healion, Daniel; Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

27

Two-Dimensional Stimulated Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Molecules with Broadband X-ray Pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expressions for the two-dimensional Stimulated x-ray Raman Spectroscopy (2D-SXRS) signal obtained using attosecond x-ray pulses are derived. The 1D- and 2D-SXRS signals are calculated for trans-N-methyl acetamide (NMA) with broad bandwidth (FWHM ~14.2eV, 181 as) pulses tuned to the oxygen and nitrogen K-edges. Crosspeaks in 2D signals reveal electronic Franck-Condon overlaps between valence orbitals and relaxed orbitals in the presence of the core hole.

Jason D. Biggs; Yu Zhang; Daniel Healion; Shaul Mukamel

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Novel Approaches to Soft X-ray Spectroscopy: Scanning TransmissionX-ray Microscopy and Ambient Pressure X-Ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop focused on novel spectroscopies at Beamlines 11.0.2, 5.3.2 and 9.3.2 at the ALS. The workshop brought together users from a wide range of fields to highlight recent experimental and technical developments both in scanning transmission X-ray spectroscopy (STXM) and ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES). The morning session featured talks on experiments involving new developments at the STXM, while the afternoon session was devoted to those using APXPS. In the morning session, Tolek Tyliszczak discussed the improved detector developments at the STXM, such as an avalanche photodiode detector and fluorescence and electron detection, as well as the continued development of in situ cells for heating, gas flow, and electrochemical cells. Of these, only the avalanche photodiode in combination with a novel multichannel photon-counting system is in routine use in time-resolved studies. Bartel Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University) presented results of magnetic imaging with a time resolution of 70-100 ps combined with a lateral resolution of 20-40 nm performed with the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). As a complement to the time-domain ''pump-and-probe'' measurements, they developed a frequency-domain ''sine-excitation'' technique in order to study specific eigenmodes of these ferromagnetic patterns with high spatial resolution. This new approach was used to study the gyrotropic vortex motions in micron-sized ferromagnetic patterns. Adam Hitchcock (McMaster University) presented the development, in collaboration with Daniel Guay (INRS, Varennes) and Sherry Zhang, of the apparatus and techniques for applying STXM to in-situ studies of electrochemistry, in particular electrochromism in polyaniline. In addition, substantial progress was reported on a joint project to develop substrates and methods for chemically selective lithography of multilayer polymer systems. Selective patterns, such as that displayed in the figure, can now be written efficiently with the bend magnet STXM on Beamline 5.3.2. Yves Acremann (SSRL) discussed time and spatially resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments on spin transfer devices at the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). These elegant experiments explore time resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics within a 100 x 150 nm sample influenced by a spin-polarized current. This experiment shows that the magnetization in these magnetic nanostructures are not uniform, as they are influenced by the Oersted field of the charge current needed to generate the spin current. The implementation of a novel multichannel photon counting system in combination with an avalanche photon detector decreased the data-acquisition time by a factor of 10, owing to its ability to resolve the structure of multi bunch mode. Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University and SSRL) described ''Applications of STXM to Microbial Bioweathering and Biomineralization''. In the interaction of bacteria with ferrihydrite nanoparticles, microenvironments that were very different than the bulk material were observed, showing that bulk thermodynamics may not be useful for predicting micro phases. Gordon also presented work showing that iron nanoparticles are attracted to the negatively charged bacteria and form a coating that reduces iron oxide minerals. The afternoon session started with presentations by Simon Mun and Hendrik Bluhm, who discussed the current status and the future plans for the two APPES end-stations at the ALS, which are located at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2, respectively. In both end-stations, samples can be measured in gaseous environments at pressures of up to several Torr, which makes possible the investigation of numerous phenomena, in particular in the fields of atmospheric and environmental science as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Specific examples of the application of APPES were shown in the following presentations. John Hemminger (University of California, Irvine) reported on APPES investigations at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 of the interaction of alkali halide surfaces with water. The m

Bluhm, Hendrik; Gilles, Mary K.; Mun, Simon B.; Tyliszczak, Tolek

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy methods to study the photosynthetic water oxidizing complex, which contains a unique hetero-nuclear catalytic Mn4Ca cluster, are described. Issues of X-ray damage especially at the metal sites in the Mn4Ca cluster are discussed. The structure of the Mn4Ca catalyst at high-resolution which has so far eluded attempts of determination by X-ray diffraction, EXAFS and other spectroscopic techniques has been addressed using polarized EXAFS techniques applied to oriented PS II membrane preparations and PS II single crystals. A review of how the resolution of traditional EXAFS techniques can be improved, using methods such as range-extended EXAFS is presented, and the changes that occur in the structure of the cluster as it advances through the catalytic cycle are described. X-ray absorption and emission techniques (XANES and K? emission) have been used earlier to determine the oxidation states of the Mn4Ca cluster, and in this report we review the use of X-ray resonant Raman spectroscopy to understand the electronic structure of the Mn4Ca cluster as it cycles through the intermediate S-states.

Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko; Kern, Jan; Pushkar, Yulia; Sauer, Kenneth; Glatzel, Pieter; Bergmann, Uwe; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

2003-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ultrafast X-ray and 2-dimensional UV Spectroscopy of TiO2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Ultrafast X-ray and 2-dimensional UV Spectroscopy of TiO2 Nanoparticles. Author(s), Majed Chergui. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Majed ...

33

Sandia National Laboratories X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron ...  

... for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National ... high average power large area X-ray tube provides increased X-ray generation efficiency through ...

34

Electronic structure of delta-doped La:SrTiO{sub 3} layers by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have employed hard x-ray photoemission (HAXPES) to study a delta-doped SrTiO{sub 3} layer that consisted of a 3-nm thickness of La-doped SrTiO{sub 3} with 6% La embedded in a SrTiO{sub 3} film. Results are compared to a thick, uniformily doped La:SrTiO{sub 3} layer. We find no indication of a band offset for the delta-doped layer, but evidence of the presence of Ti{sup 3+} in both the thick sample and the delta-layer, and indications of a density of states increase near the Fermi energy in the delta-doped layer. These results further demonstrate that HAXPES is a powerful tool for the non-destructive investigation of deeply buried doped layers.

Kaiser, A. M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Peter-Gruenberg-Institut PGI-6, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gray, A. X. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Conti, G.; Fadley, C. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Jalan, B. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Kajdos, A. P.; Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Gloskovskii, A. [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Ueda, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobayashi, K. [NIMS Beamline Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Drube, W. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser We have demonstrated flash diffractive imaging of nanostructures using pulses from the first soft-X-ray free-electron...

36

Soft X-ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons and Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS, Figure 1) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. From these and related measurements, the following has been determined: (1) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large; (2) The number of Pu5f electrons is near 5; and (3) The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itineracy. Significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy or Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies.

Tobin, J G; Yu, S W

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Dynamics and rheology under continuous shear flow studied by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) has emerged as a unique technique allowing the measurement of dynamics in materials on mesoscopic lengthscales. In particular, applications in soft matter physics cover a broad range of topics which include, but are not limited to, nanostructured materials such as colloidal suspensions or polymers, dynamics at liquid surfaces, membranes and interfaces, and the glass or gel transition. One of the most common problems associated with the use of bright X-ray beams with soft materials is beam induced radiation damage, and this is likely to become an even more limiting factor at future synchrotron and free electron laser sources. Flowing the sample during data acquisition is one of the simplest method allowing to limit the radiation damage. In addition to distributing the dose over many different scatterers, the method also enables new functionalities such as time-resolved studies in mixing cells. Here, we further develop an experimental technique that was recently proposed combining XPCS and continuously flowing samples. More specifically, we use a model system to show how the macroscopic advective response to flow and the microscopic dissipative dynamics (diffusion) can be quantified from the X-ray data. The method has many potential applications, e.g. dynamics of glasses and gels under continuous shear/flow, protein aggregations processes, the interplay between dynamics and rheology in complex fluids.

Andrei Fluerasu; Pawel Kwasniewski; Chiara Caronna; Fanny Destremaut; Jean-Baptiste Salmon; Anders Madsen

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

38

Epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3}(100) films on Pt(100): A low-energy electron diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of epitaxial ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3} films on a Pt(100) substrate has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The films have been prepared by radio-frequency-assisted magnetron sputter deposition at room temperature and develop a long-range order upon annealing at 900 K in O{sub 2}. By adjusting the Ar and O{sub 2} partial pressures of the sputter gas, the stoichiometry was tuned to match that of a BaTiO{sub 3}(100) single crystal as determined by XPS. STM reveals the growth of continuous BaTiO{sub 3} films with unit cell high islands on top. With LEED already for monolayer thicknesses, the formation of a BaTiO{sub 3}(100)-(1 x 1) structure has been observed. Films of 2-3 unit cell thickness show a brilliant (1 x 1) LEED pattern for which an extended set of LEED I-V data has been acquired. At temperatures above 1050 K the BaTiO{sub 3} thin film starts to decay by formation of vacancy islands. In addition (4 x 4) and (3 x 3) surface reconstructions develop upon prolonged heating.

Foerster, Stefan; Huth, Michael; Schindler, Karl-Michael; Widdra, Wolf [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

39

Electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for X-ray scattering, diffraction and spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An electrochemical in-situ reaction cell for hard X-ray experiments with battery electrodes is described. Applications include the small angle scattering, diffraction, and near-edge spectroscopy of lithium manganese oxide electrodes.

Braun, Artur; Granlund, Eric; Cairns, Elton J.

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

40

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of the {omega} phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy  

SciTech Connect

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the {omega} phase in water quenched Ti-5553 alloy with a nominal composition of Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (wt.%), and the {omega} and the {beta} phase were distinguished by deconvoluting the XPS spectra of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p core level regions. In addition, it is found that the binding energy of core level electron of alloying elements shifts comparing with that of pure metals, and the fact was interpreted by charge redistribution model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique could be used to characterize the nano-scale {omega} phase in {beta} alloys. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We characterize the {omega} phase in Ti-5553 alloy by XPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding energy of Al2p, V2p and Cr2p electron are different in the {omega} and {beta} phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural difference leads to the binding energy gap.

Qin, Dongyang, E-mail: qindongyang19831205@126.com [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xian Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China) [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xian Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China); Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi'an 710016 (China); Lu, Yafeng [Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi'an 710016 (China)] [Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi'an 710016 (China); Zhang, Kong; Liu, Qian [The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)] [The State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhou, Lian [Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi'an 710016 (China)] [Northwest Institute for Non-ferrous Metal Research, Xi'an 710016 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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41

New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.  

SciTech Connect

Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY OF TRANSITION METAL-MAGNESIUM HYDRIDE FILMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Spectroscopy of Transition Metal-Magnesium Hydride Thin Films T. J. Richardson a, *, B. Farangis a , J. L. Slack a , P. Nachimuthu b , R. Pereira b , N. Tamura b , and M. Rubin a a Environmental Energy Technologies Division, b Advanced Light Source, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720, USA *Corresponding author, E-mail address: tjrichardson@lbl.gov Abstract Mixed metal thin films containing magnesium and a first-row transition element exhibit very large changes in both reflectance and transmittance on exposure to hydrogen gas. Changes in electronic structure and coordination of the magnesium and transition metal atoms during hydrogen absorption were studied using dynamic in situ transmission mode X-ray absorption

43

dosimetry of x-rays, gamma rays and electrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST and BIPM Standards for Air Kerma in Medium-Energy X-rays ... of the codes are available from the Government Printing Office, Washington, DC ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

44

X-ray Tube with Magnetic Electron Steering - Energy ...  

The high average power large area X-ray tube provides ... Solar Photovoltaic; Solar ... Description This invention consists of a cathode and anode ...

45

Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Electronic Origin of Photoinduced Strain The Electronic Origin of Photoinduced Strain Modifying Proteins to Combat Disease Higher Temperature at the Earth's Core Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Ruthenium Complexes FEBRUARY 8, 2013 Bookmark and Share Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Exciting the atoms or molecules of a substance via the use of visible light, or photoexcitation, can play a significant role in a range of energy-conversion processes, such as natural photosynthesis (oxygen from water) and manmade solar cells (electricity from sunlight). But a better

46

The Next Challenge in X-Ray Science: Control of Resonant Electronic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and the implications for future scientific opportunities with x-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs). The historical journey starts with the development of radar microwave...

47

The Use of Micro-X-ray Fluorescence in a Scanning Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An X-ray gun with focusing capillary fiber optics interfaced with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is used for semi-quantitative XRF microanalysis by energy ...

48

X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Angeli-Greaves, M. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 90373 Caracas 1083A (Venezuela)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Ultrafast conversions between hydrogen bonded structures in liquid water observed by femtosecond x-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present the first femtosecond soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquids, enabling the observation of changes in hydrogen bond structures in water via core-hole excitation. The oxygen K-edge of vibrationally excited water is probed with femtosecond soft x-ray pulses, exploiting the relation between different water structures and distinct x-ray spectral features. After excitation of the intramolecular OH stretching vibration, characteristic x-ray absorption changes monitor the conversion of strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures to more disordered structures with weaker hydrogen-bonding described by a single subpicosecond time constant. The latter describes the thermalization time of vibrational excitations and defines the characteristic maximum rate with which nonequilibrium populations of more strongly hydrogen-bonded water structures convert to less-bonded ones. On short time scales, the relaxation of vibrational excitations leads to a transient high-pressure state and a transient absorption spectrum different from that of statically heated water.

Wen, Haidan; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the"map" approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and constructed a novel experimental setup for the study of liquids, with the long-term goal of investigating the electronic structure of biological systems in aqueous environments. We have developed a flow-through liquid cell in which the liquid is separated from vacuum by a thin Si3N4 or SiC window and which allows a precise control of temperature. This approach has significant advantages compared to static liquids cells used in the past. Furthermore, we have designed a dedicated high-transmission, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer. The high transmission makes it possible to measure complete resonant XES"maps" in less than an hour, giving unprecedented detailed insight into the electronic structure of the investigated sample. Using this new equipment we have investigated the electronic structure of liquid water. Furthermore, our XES spectra and maps give information about ultra-fast dissociation on the timescale of the O 1s core hole lifetime, which is strongly affected by the initial state hydrogen bonding configuration.

Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Bär, M.; Weigand, M.; Denlinger, J.D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Grunze, M.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First Free-Electron X-ray Laser First Free-Electron X-ray Laser The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser August 17, 2010 - 6:19pm Addthis The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Yesterday, Secretary Chu participated in the dedication of the world's first free-electron and most powerful X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). In light of this occasion (pun intended), we posted an in-depth look at the innovative nature of this new instrument and its potential to tackle some of life's biggest mysteries. The Secretary seemed just as geeked about the possibilities of the LCLS, stating that "this is a new instrument that will enable us to see the structure of materials that we could not determine by any other means ... Knowing those

52

Soft X-ray Studies of Pu Electronic Structure: Past Lessons and Future Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) have contributed greatly to our improved understanding of Pu electronic structure. From these and related measurements, the following has been determined. 1. The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting is large. 2. The number of Pu 5f electrons is near 5. 3. The Pu 5f spin-orbit splitting effect dominates 5f itinerancy. Significant questions remain concerning the nature of Pu electronic structure. Perhaps the missing piece of the puzzle is the direct experimental determination of the unoccupied electronic structure using high energy inverse photoelectron spectroscopy or Bremsstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS). Past BIS studies of Th and U indicate the feasibility and utility of Pu studies. To this end, a new BIS capability has been developed in our laboratory. Electron stimulated emission of photons has been carried out using the XES-350 monochromator and detector system. Some of our preliminary results are shown, using an electron excitation beam energy of 3000 eV. (authors)

Tobin, J.G.; Yu, S.W. [LLNL, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microscale X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy on the GSECARS Sector 13 at the APS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSECARS) is a national user facility for frontier research in the earth sciences using synchrotrons radiation at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. GSECARS provides earth scientists with access to the high-brilliance hard x-rays from this third-generation synchrotrons light source. The research conducted at this facility will advance our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials, the processes they control and the processes that produce them. All principal synchrotron-based analytical techniques in demand by earth scientists are being brought to bear on earth science problems: (1) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography and spectroscopy using the diamond anvil cell; (2) high-pressure/high-temperature crystallography using the large-volume press; (3) powder, single crystal and interface diffraction; (4) x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy; (5) x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis and microspectroscopy; and (6) mic...

Stephen-Sutto

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Multidimensional X-Ray Spectroscopy of Valence and Core Excitations in Cysteine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several nonlinear spectroscopy experiments which employ broadband x-ray pulses to probe the coupling between localized core and delocalized valence excitation are simulated for the amino acid cysteine at the K-edges of oxygen and nitrogen and the K and L-edges of sulfur. We focus on two dimensional (2D) and 3D signals generated by two- and three-pulse stimulated x-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) with frequency-dispersed probe. We show how the four-pulse x-ray signals $\\boldsymbol{k}_\\mathrm{I}=-\\boldsymbol{k}_1+\\boldsymbol{k}_2+\\boldsymbol{k}_3$ and $\\boldsymbol{k}_\\mathrm{II}=\\boldsymbol{k}_1-\\boldsymbol{k}_2+\\boldsymbol{k}_3$ can give new 3D insight into the SXRS signals. The coupling between valence- and core-excited states can be visualized in three dimensional plots, revealing the origin of the polarizability that controls the simpler pump-probe SXRS signals.

Jason D. Biggs; Yu Zhang; Daniel Healion; Shaul Mukamel

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

Galayda, John; /SLAC

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

56

An energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline, X6A, at NSLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy instrument has been built at the X6A beam port of the x-ray ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This instrument allows the collection of extended x-ray-absorption fine structure and/or x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra for many elements on the millisecond time scale. The beamline employs a four-point crystal bender and a rectangular Si 220 crystal to access incident energies between 6.5 and 21 keV. Because the polychromator focuses the synchrotron beam to a narrow 100-[mu]m line, this experimental apparatus is ideal for x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments in special environments such as at high pressures, for [ital in] [ital situ] experiments, and/or for very small samples. In this manuscript we will describe the instrument design and present data with which to evaluate the instrument. This beamline is available through the NSLS user proposal system.

Lee, P.L.; Beno, M.A.; Jennings, G.; Ramanathan, M.; Knapp, G.S.; Huang, K. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)); Bai, J. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) Department of Physics, Brooklyn College of CUNY, Brooklyn, New York 11210 (United States)); Montano, P.A. (Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60680 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Enhanced Electron Efficiency in an X-ray Diode  

SciTech Connect

The goal for this research is to optimize the XRD structure and usage configurations and increase the efficiency of the XRD. This research was successful in optimizing the XRD structure and usage configurations, thus creating a high efficiency XRD. Best efficiency occurs when there is an angle between the photocathode and incident X-rays.

K. Sun, L. MacNeil

2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

X-ray Spectroscopy and Pulse Radiolysis of Aqueous Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the liquid water microjet produced an electron signalozone (produced by VUV photolysis of oxgyen and water ice).also be produced by photolysis of liquid water in the vacuum

England, Alice Heller

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Backstreaming of a perfluorinated polyether pump oil—an x?ray photoelectron spectroscopy study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The backstreaming of a perfluorinated polyether mechanical pump oil was determined by using x?ray photoelectron spectroscopy to measure oil content on silicon wafer surfaces. Backstreaming test pressures ranged from 0.4 mTorr to 100 mTorr. Backstreaming was identified at most test pressures even though perfluorinated polyether pump oils have low vapor pressures. Overall

Robert Sherman; John Vossen

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

R-MATRIX ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Fe{sup 13+} AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE SOFT X-RAY AND EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY OF CORONA-LIKE PLASMAS  

SciTech Connect

Accurate excitation parameters are required to interpret the ultraviolet and X-ray spectra of Fe{sup 13+}. In this work, we use the AUTOSTRUCTURE code to describe the atomic structure of Fe{sup 13+}. The 197 lowest-lying fine-structure levels of the 3s{sup x} 3p{sup y} 3d{sup z} (x + y + z = 3), 3s {sup 2}4l, and 3s3p4{l_brace}s, p, and d{r_brace} configurations are included along with further correlation configurations: 3s3p4f, 3p{sup x} 3d{sup y} 4l (x + y = 2), 3l4l'4l'', and 3l3l'5l''. The resultant level energies, lifetimes of excited states, and oscillator strengths of transitions between these levels are assessed by comparison with available experimental data and previous calculations. Electron-impact excitation data among these lowest-lying levels are generated using the intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix method. We assess the present results by comparisons with laboratory measurement for the excitation to the metastable level 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 2} P {sup o} {sub 3/2} and with available close-coupling calculations for other excitations. Using these data and a collisional-radiative model, we have analyzed soft X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet spectra from space satellite observations of a stellar corona and of solar flares, as well as measurements from an electron beam ion trap. We assess the contribution from Fe{sup 13+} emission lines in the solar and Procyon corona observations, and find and identify new lines in the X-ray region observed in the solar and Procyon coronae. The laboratory measurements also confirm that weak lines (218.177 A and 224.354 A) of Fe{sup 13+} contribute to the observed intensities in solar observations. The polarization effect due to the directional monoenergetic distribution of the electron energy has been taken into account in comparison with the laboratory measurements. Electron density diagnostics for the astrophysical plasma sources have been performed using the updated data so as to investigate their sensitivity to the atomic data source.

Liang, G. Y.; Badnell, N. R. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Baumann, T. M.; Tawara, H.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Del Zanna, G. [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Storey, P. J., E-mail: guiyun.liang@strath.ac.u [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium batterymaterials  

SciTech Connect

Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite {pi}-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular orbital and orbital mixing between water molecules upon hydrogen bonding. Apart from the four-hydrogen-bonding structure in water, a structure where one hydrogen bond is broken could be separated and identified. The soft x-ray emission study of methanol showed the existence of ring and chain formations in the liquid phase and the dominating structures are formed of 6 and 8 molecules. Upon mixing of the two liquids, a segregation at the molecular level was found and the formation of new structures, which could explain the unexpected low increase of the entropy.

Augustsson, Andreas

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

SURFACE SEGREGATION STUDIES OF SOFC CATHODES: COMBINING SOFT X-RAYS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDENCE SPECTROSCOPY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system to grow heteroepitaxial thin-films of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes on single crystal substrates was developed. The cathode composition investigated was 20% strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on single crystal (111) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. By combining electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy XAS measurements, we conclude that electrically driven cation migration away from the two-phase gas-cathode interface results in improved electrochemical performance. Our results provide support to the premise that the removal of surface passivating phases containing Sr2+ and Mn2+, which readily form at elevated temperatures even in O2 atmospheric pressures, is responsible for the improved cathodic performance upon application of a bias.

Miara, Lincoln J.; Piper, L.F.J.; Davis, Jacob N.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Basu, Soumendra; Smith, K. E.; Pal, Uday B.; Gopalan, Srikanth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, January (IAP) 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered ...

Chatterjee, Nilanjan

65

The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report | Stanford...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report Friday, December 2, 2011 - 2:00pm SLAC, Redtail Conference Room (901-108) M. Altarelli, European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg,...

66

Entangled valence electron-hole dynamics revealed by stimulated attosecond x-ray Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

We show that broadband x-ray pulses can create wavepackets of valence electrons and holes localized in the vicinity of a selected atom (nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur in cysteine) by resonant stimulated Raman scattering. The subsequent dynamics reveals highly correlated motions of entangled electrons and hole quasiparticles. This information goes beyond the time-dependent total charge density derived from x-ray diffraction.

Healion, Daniel; Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

X-ray Free-Electron Lasers - Present and Future Capabilities [Invited  

SciTech Connect

The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fsto500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

Galayda, John; Ratner, John Arthur:a Daniel F.; White, William E.; /SLAC

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs. In particular, shales are unique in that they contain kerogen, a complex organic solid that controls factors such as the amount of hydrocarbon that can be produced from the reservoir and the rate at which the hydrocarbon is produced. The industry's current understanding of the chemical composition of kerogen is limited, preventing detailed

69

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30am SSRL Third Floor Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs. In particular, shales are unique in that they contain kerogen, a complex organic solid that controls factors such as the amount of hydrocarbon that can be produced from the reservoir and the rate at which the hydrocarbon is produced. The industry's current understanding of the chemical composition of kerogen is limited, preventing detailed

70

HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF A JET AND ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN THE CORONA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first hard X-ray observation of a solar jet on the limb with flare footpoints occulted, so that faint emission from accelerated electrons in the corona can be studied in detail. In this event on 2003 August 21, RHESSI observed a double coronal hard X-ray source in the pre-impulsive phase at both thermal and nonthermal energies. In the impulsive phase, the first of two hard X-ray bursts consists of a single thermal/nonthermal source coinciding with the lower of the two earlier sources, and the second burst shows an additional nonthermal, elongated source, spatially and temporally coincident with the coronal jet. Analysis of the jet hard X-ray source shows that collisional losses by accelerated electrons can deposit enough energy to generate the jet. The hard X-ray time profile above 20 keV matches that of the accompanying Type III and broadband gyrosynchrotron radio emission, indicating both accelerated electrons escaping outward along the jet path and electrons trapped in the flare loop. The double coronal hard X-ray source, the open field lines indicated by Type III bursts, and the presence of a small post-flare loop are consistent with significant electron acceleration in an interchange reconnection geometry.

Glesener, Lindsay; Lin, R. P.; Krucker, Saem, E-mail: glesener@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Science Laboratory, UC Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of Thin-Window Silicon Drift Detector for X-ray Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new set of thin-window silicon drift detectors composed of an array of hexagonal shaped detectors has been designed, constructed and tested for X-ray spectroscopy. Each individual ThinWinSDD has a thin entrance window on one side and a spiral shaped hexagonal cathode around a center anode on the other side. To produce the thin entrance window a 10 keV implantation of boron through a 500 A silicon dioxide was used. The implantation was followed by an annealing at 700 C for 30 min and a reactive ion etching step to ensure the removal of silicon dioxide from the smallest feature (5 mum). An aluminum layer is coated in the same vacuum system after back-sputtering. This step involves removing the native oxide that has formed on the top of the silicon substrate and then sputtering a 1100 A thick layer of aluminum onto the X-ray entrance window. The aluminum layer must be thick enough to block visible light, but thin enough to be transparent to soft X-rays down to 280 eV. We discuss first test results that include detector leakage current measurements and the response for multiple detectors exposed to the National Synchrotron Light Source's UV beam line U3C located at Brookhaven National Laboratory for X-ray energies as low as 280 eV.

Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies  

SciTech Connect

We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

Szlachetko, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Nachtegaal, M.; Boni, E. de; Willimann, M.; Safonova, O.; Sa, J.; Smolentsev, G.; Szlachetko, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Schmitt, B.; David, C.; Luecke, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bokhoven, J. A. van [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Jagodzinski, P. [University of Technology, Kielce (Poland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ultrahigh vacuum sample mount for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy up to very high temperature (150-1400 K)  

SciTech Connect

Spectroscopic studies are rarely performed at very high temperature, especially when combined with light from a synchrotron source. Demanding conditions of maintaining ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) during heating, together with the typically brief access to beam time at multiuser synchrotron end stations, may contribute to some of the reasons for the difficulty of such experiments. Consequently, a large number of materials with interesting properties and industrial applications at high temperature remain unexplored. The authors describe here a simple portable sample mount assembly that can be easily utilized at a beamline, with potential utility for a variety of spectroscopic measurements requiring elevated temperatures and an UHV environment. In the specific application described here, the authors use a resistive cartridge heater interfaced with a standard manipulator previously designed for cooling by liquid nitrogen with an UHV chamber and a cylindrical mirror analyzer for x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) [also known as electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA)] at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Stoughton, WI. The heater cartridge required only modest power to reach target temperatures using an open-loop temperature control. Finally, the authors describe the measurements of XPS (ESCA) and total-electron yield x-ray absorption spectroscopy on nanopowders and on single crystals grown by them. They emphasize the simplicity of the setup, which they believe would be of interest to groups performing measurements at large facilities, where access and time are both limited.

Williamsen, Mark S.; Ray, Shishir K.; Zou Ying; Dudek, John A.; Sen, Somaditya; Bissen, Mark; Kretsch, Laura; Palkar, Vaijayanti R.; Onellion, Marshall F.; Guptasarma, Prasenjit [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Synchrotron Radiation Center, 3731 Schneider Dr., Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1150 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 E. Kenwood Blvd., Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

High-brightness beamline for X-ray spectroscopy at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard-x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order-of-magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new ''Cowan type'' double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lindle, D.W. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (US). Dept. of Chemistry

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by X-RayAbsorption and Resonant X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-resolution x-ray absorption and emission spectra ofliquid water exhibit a strong isotope effect. Further, the emissionspectra show a splitting of the 1b1 emission line, a weak temperatureeffect, and a pronounced excitation-energy dependence. They can bedescribed as a superposition of two independent contributions. Bycomparing with gasphase, ice, and NaOH/NaOD, we propose that the twocomponents are governed by the initial state hydrogen bondingconfiguration and ultrafast dissociation on the time scale of the O 1score hole decay.

Fuchs, O.; Zharnikov, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Zubavichus, Y.; Bar, M.; Maier, F.; Denlinger, J.D.; Heske, C.; Grunze,M.; Umbach, E.

2007-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Wiggler-base Hard X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at CLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CLS 06ID-1 Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis Beamline (HXMA) is a general purpose hard X-ray spectroscopy beamline (5 to 40 keV) designed to serve users in XAFS, diffraction and microprobe communities. The beamline uses the synchrotron radiation from a superconducting wiggler. The primary beamline optics include a 1.2 m water-cooled silicon collimating mirror (separate Rh and Pt coating stripes), a liquid nitrogen cooled double crystal monochromator (Kohzu CMJ-1) housing two crystal pairs (Si 111 and 220), and a 1.15 m long water-cooled silicon toroidal focusing mirror (separate Rh and Pt coating stripes). All mirrors are equipped with dynamical meridian benders. The experimental hutch hosts three experimental setups for XAFS, diffraction and microprobe, respectively. Primary design considerations and some commissioning results are discussed.

Jiang, D. T. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Chen, N. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Geological Sciences Department, University of Saskachewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Sheng, W. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B. [and others

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

2003-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

Investigation of the Electronic Structure of Solid Density Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Forest, F J; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Faussurier, G; Blancard, C; Renaudin, P; Landen, O L

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Next Challenge in X-Ray Science: Control of Resonant Electronic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Next Challenge in X-Ray Science: Control of Resonant Electronic The Next Challenge in X-Ray Science: Control of Resonant Electronic Processes Wednesday, September 11, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Joachim Stöhr, LCLS My talk will give a historic perspective of the revolutionary science that was enabled by the advent of high power sources of coherent electromagnetic radiation and the implications for future scientific opportunities with x-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs). The historical journey starts with the development of radar microwave sources in the 1940s that fueled the development of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques which by now have led to 6 Nobel Prizes. The theoretical description of NMR as coherent processes between nuclear states by Rabi and Bloch also provided the theoretical basis for the optical laser and its applications. Over the last

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thin-film thickness measurement using x-ray peak ratioing in the scanning electron microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The procedure used to measure laser target film thickness using a scanning electron microscope is summarized. This method is generally applicable to any coating on any substrate as long as the electron energy is sufficient to penetrate the coating and the substrate produces an x-ray signal which can pass back through the coating and be detected. (MOW)

Elliott, N.E.; Anderson, W.E.; Archuleta, T.A.; Stupin, D.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

On emission of Cerenkov X-rays by electrons in carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect

Conditions are considered for generating Cerenkov X-rays by an electron beam propagating inside a bundle of carbon nanotubes upon synchronisation of the electron movement with one of the slow spatial harmonics of the electromagnetic field of a crystal tube. (cerenkov radiation)

Rivlin, L A [Moscow State Institute of Radio Engineering, Electronics and Automatics (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Oxidation of stepped Pt(111) studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory  

SciTech Connect

In this comparative density functional theory and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the interaction of oxygen with stepped Pt(111) surfaces, we show that both the initial adsorption and oxidation occur at the steps rather than terraces. An equivalent behavior was observed for the oxide formation at higher chemical potentials, where, after the formation of a one-dimensional PtO{sub 2}-type oxide at the steps, similar oxide chains form on the (111) terraces, indicating the initial stages of bulk oxide formation.

Bandlow, Jochen; Kaghazchi, Payam; Jacob, Timo [Institut fuer Elektrochemie, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Papp, C.; Traenkenschuh, B.; Streber, R.; Lorenz, M. P. A.; Fuhrmann, T.; Steinrueck, H.-P. [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Denecke, R. [Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Leipzig, Linnestr. 2, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of electrochemically deposited thin oxide films.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have utilized ''in situ'' X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy to investigate the structure and composition of thin oxide films of nickel and iron that have been prepared by electrodeposition on a graphite substrate from aqueous solutions. The films are generally disordered. Structural information has been obtained from the analysis of the data. We also present initial findings on the local structure of heavy metal ions, e.g. Sr and Ce, incorporated into the electrodeposited nickel oxide films. Our results are of importance in a number of technological applications, among them, batteries, fuel cells, electrochromic and ferroelectric materials, corrosion protection, as well as environmental speciation and remediation.

Balasubramanian, M.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

FPGA-based compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data acquisition system to perform real-time background subtraction and lower-level-discrimination-based compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector has been built and put into service at the Advanced Photon source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. A commercial frame grabber with on-board field-programmable gate array (FPGA) was used in the design, and continuously processes 60 frames per second each consisting of 1,024 x 1,024 pixels with up to 64512 photon hits per frame.

Madden, Timothy; Jemian, Peter; Narayanan, Surcsh; Sandy, Alec; Sikorski, Marcin; Sprung, Michael; Weizeorick, John

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging an Arsenic-Loving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern For many people, arsenic is synonymous with poison, so it is perhaps a surprise that some plants, such as the fern Pteris vittata (Figure 1) seem to quite deliberately accumulate large amounts of it. What is more, the plant converts it to the most toxic inorganic form known. How does it do this? First some background; while there is some evidence that arsenic is required for health [1], this is debatable. On the other hand, the poisonous nature of arsenic compounds was understood by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and it has been used throughout history as a homicidal and suicidal agent. It is found in two environmentally common oxy acids; arsenous acid (H3AsO3), and arsenic acid (H3AsO4), whose salts are known as arsenites and arsenates, respectively. Of these, the trivalent arsenic species are the most toxic. The infamous agent of murder is arsenic trioxide (white arsenic or As2O3), which is simply the (reputedly tasteless) anhydride of arsenous acid.

88

Core and Valence Excitations in Resonant X-ray Spectroscopy using Restricted Excitation Window Time-dependent Density Functional Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report simulations of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) and 1D stimulated X-ray Raman spectroscopy (SXRS) signals of cysteine at the oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur K and L2,3 edges. The simulated XANES signals from the restricted window time-dependent density functional theory (REW-TDDFT) and the static exchange (STEX) method are compared with experiments, showing that REW-TDDFT is more accurate and computationally less expensive than STEX. Simulated RIXS and 1D SXRS signals from REW-TDDFT give some insights on the correlation of different excitations in the molecule.

Zhang, Yu; Biggs, Jason D.; Healion, Daniel; Govind, Niranjan; Mukamel, Shaul

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

89

Hard x-ray or gamma ray laser by a dense electron beam  

SciTech Connect

A dense electron beam propagating through a laser undulator can radiate a coherent x-ray or gamma ray. This lasing scheme is studied with the Landau damping theory. The analysis suggests that, with currently available physical parameters, coherent gamma rays of up to 50 keV can be generated. The electron quantum diffraction suppresses the free electron laser action, which limits the maximum radiation.

Son, S. [18 Caleb Lane, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Joon Moon, Sung [8 Benjamin Rush Ln., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

X-ray And EUV Spectroscopy Of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions  

SciTech Connect

The Berlin EBIT has been established by the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik to generate atomic physics data in support of research in the field of controlled nuclear fusion, by measuring the radiation from highly charged ions in the x-ray, extreme ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges and providing valuable diagnostics for high temperature plasmas. In future fusion devices, for example ITER, currently being constructed at Cadarache, France, the plasma facing components will be armored with high-Z materials, most likely tungsten, due to the favorable properties of this element. At the same time the tremendous radiation cooling of these high-Z materials represents a threat to fusion and obliges one to monitor carefully the radiation. With EBIT a selected ensemble of ions in specific charge states can be produced, stored and excited for spectroscopic investigations. Employing this technique, we have for example resolved the wide structure observed around 5 nm at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak as originating from E1-transitions into the open 4d shell of tungsten ions in charge states 25+ to 37+ producing a band-like emission pattern. Further, these ions emit well-separated M1 lines in the EUV range around 65 nm suitable for plasma diagnostics. Kr-like to Cr-like tungsten ions (38+ to 50+) show strong soft-x-ray lines in the range 0.5 to 2 and 5 to 15 nm. Lines of even higher charged tungsten ions, up to Ne-like W{sup 64+}, abundant in the core plasma of present and future fusion test devices, have been investigated with high resolution Bragg-crystal spectroscopy at 0.13 nm. Recently, x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the dielectronic recombination LMn resonances of W{sup 60+} to W{sup 67+} ions have been preformed and compare well with atomic structure calculations.

Biedermann, Christoph; Radtke, Rainer [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 17491 Greifswald, and Institut fuer Physik der Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Arbeitsgruppe Plasmaphysik, Newtonstr 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

91

Monte Carlo Simulation of the Conversion X-Rays from the Electron Beam of PFMA-3  

SciTech Connect

PFMA-3, a dense Plasma Focus device, is being optimized as an X-ray generator. X-rays are obtained from the conversion of the electron beam emitted in the backward direction and driven to impinge on a 50 {mu}m brass foil. Monte Carlo simulations of the X-ray emission have been conducted with MCNPX. The electron spectrum had been determined experimentally and is used in the present work as input to the simulations. Dose to the brass foil has been determined both from simulations and from measurements with a thermographic camera, and the two results are found in excellent agreement, thus validating further the electron spectrum assumed as well as the simulation set-up. X-ray emission has been predicted both from bremsstrahlung and from characteristic lines. The spectrum has been found to be comprised of two components of which the one at higher energy, 30 divide 70 keV, is most useful for IORT applications. The results are necessary to estimate penetration in and dose to Standard Human Tissue.

Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M. [Montecuccolino Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, University of Bologna, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Rocchi, F. [Montecuccolino Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, University of Bologna, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); UTFISSM-PRONOC, ENEA, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tartari, A. [Department of Physics, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Annealing dependence of diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights probed by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier heights for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the diamond valence-band maximum was determined by theoretically calculating the diamond density of states and applying cross section corrections. The diamond-platinum Schottky barrier height was lowered by 0.2 eV after thermal annealing, indicating annealing may increase carrier injection in diamond devices leading to photoconductive gain. The platinum contacts on oxygen-terminated diamond was found to provide a higher Schottky barrier and therefore a better blocking contact than that of the silver contact in diamond-based electronic devices.

Gaowei, M.; Muller, E. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Rumaiz, A. K. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Weiland, C.; Cockayne, E.; Woicik, J. C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Jordan-Sweet, J. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Smedley, J. [Instrumentation Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

X-ray and vibrational spectroscopy of manganese complexes relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex of photosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

Manganese model complexes, relevant to the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosynthesis, were studied with Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), Mn Kb X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and vibrational spectroscopy. A more detailed understanding was obtained of the influence of nuclearity, overall structure, oxidation state, and ligand environment of the Mn atoms on the spectra from these methods. This refined understanding is necessary for improving the interpretation of spectra of the OEC. Mn XANES and Kb XES were used to study a di-(mu)-oxo and a mono-(mu)-oxo di-nuclear Mn compound in the (III,III), (III,IV), and (IV,IV) oxidation states. XANES spectra show energy shifts of 0.8 - 2.2 eV for 1-electron oxidation-state changes and 0.4 - 1.8 eV for ligand-environment changes. The shifts observed for Mn XES spectra were approximately 0.21 eV for oxidation state-changes and only approximately 0.04 eV for ligand-environment changes. This indicates that Mn Kb XES i s more sensitive to the oxidation state and less sensitive to the ligand environment of the Mn atoms than XANES. These complimentary methods provide information about the oxidation state and the ligand environment of Mn atoms in model compounds and biological systems. A versatile spectroelectrochemical apparatus was designed to aid the interpretation of IR spectra of Mn compounds in different oxidation states. The design, based on an attenuated total reflection device, permits the study of a wide spectral range: 16,700 (600 nm) - 225

Visser, Hendrik

2001-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Atomic physics studies of highly charged ions on tokamaks using x-ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

An overview is given of atomic physics issues which have been studied on tokamaks with the help resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The issues include the testing of model calculations predicting the excitation of line radiation, the determination of rate coefficients, and accurate atomic structure measurements. Recent research has focussed primarily on highly charged heliumlike (22 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 28) and neonlike (34 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 63) ions, and results are presented from measurements on the PLT and TFTR tokamaks. Many of the measurements have been aided by improved instrumental design and new measuring techniques. Remarkable agreement has been found between measurements and theory in most cases. However, in this review those areas are stressed where agreement is worst and where further investigations are needed. 19 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of model catalysts: At the edge of the gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a High-Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HP-XPS) and first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo study addressing the nature of the active surface in CO oxidation over Pd(100). Simultaneously measuring the chemical composition at the surface and in the near-surface gas-phase, we reveal both O-covered pristine Pd(100) and a surface oxide as stable, highly active phases in the near-ambient regime accessible to HP-XPS. Surprisingly, no adsorbed CO can be detected during high CO2 production rates, which can be explained by a combination of a remarkably short residence time of the CO molecule on the surface and mass-transfer limitations in the present set-up.

Blomberg, S; Gustafson, J; Martin, N M; Fernandes, V R; Borg, A; Liu, Z; Chang, R; Matera, S; Reuter, K; Lundgren, E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Beamline at the Siam Photon Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A bending magnet beamline has been constructed and commissioned for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Siam Photon Laboratory. The photon energy is tunable from 1830 eV to 8000 eV using a Lemmonier-type, fixed-exit double crystal monochromator equipped with InSb(111), Si(111), Ge(220) crystals. Elemental K-edges are then accessible from silicon to iron. A series of low conductance vacuum tubes has been designed and installed between the pumping chambers in the front end to obtain the proper pressure difference between the upstream and the downstream of the front end. Thus lower-energy photons, around K-edges of silicon, phosphorous, and sulfur, can be delivered to the experimental XAS station without being absorbed by a window. In this report, the design of the beamline is described. The commissioning results including the measured photon flux at sample and experimental XAS spectra are presented.

Klysubun, Wantana; Tarawarakarn, Pongjakr; Sombunchoo, Panidtha; Klinkhieo, Supat; Chaiprapa, Jitrin [National Synchrotron Research Center, 111 University Ave., Muang District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Songsiriritthigul, Prayoon [National Synchrotron Research Center, 111 University Ave., Muang District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

97

Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated electron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated electron Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated electron materials Friday, September 14, 2012 - 1:00pm SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Jun-Sik Lee Seminar One of the most challenging extant issues in condensed matter physics and applied materials science is the search for post-silicon based electronics, and multi-functional complex oxides offer hopes that new classes of devices can be developed out of these intriguing materials. In that context, the strongly correlated systems display an extremely rich interplay of charge, spin, and lattice interactions that have extensively been studied. This is because nature has already shown how powerful this interplay is: high Tc superconductivity, multiferroelectric, colossal magnetoresistance, and novel behavior in a heterostructure. Of the complex oxides, perovskites are

98

SOFT X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CYGNUS LOOP SUPERNOVA REMNANT  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a suborbital rocket flight whose scientific target was the Cygnus Loop Supernova Remnant. The payload consists of wire grid collimators, off-plane grating arrays, and gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. The system is designed for spectral measurements in the 17-107 A bandpass with a resolution up to {approx}60 ({lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}). The Extended X-ray Off-plane Spectrometer (EXOS) was launched on a Terrier-Black Brant rocket on 2009 November 13 from White Sands Missile Range and obtained 340 s of useable scientific data. The X-ray emission is dominated by O VII and O VIII, including the He-like O VII triplet at {approx}22 A. Another emission feature at {approx}45 A is composed primarily of Si XI and Si XII. The best-fit model to this spectrum is an equilibrium plasma model at a temperature of log(T) = 6.4 (0.23 keV).

Oakley, Phil [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 37-582F, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 37-582F, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); McEntaffer, Randall [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Van Allen Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Van Allen Hall, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Cash, Webster, E-mail: Oakley@mit.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory October 8-9, 2002 Organizers: John Miao & Keith Hodgson A workshop on "X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future" was held on October 8-9, 2002. This workshop, organized by John Miao (SSRL) and Keith Hodgson (SSRL) provided a forum to discuss the scientific applications of a variety of imaging and spectro-microscopic techniques, including photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray micro-probe. Twelve invited speakers discussed the important scientific applications of these techniques, and also predicted the future scientific directions with the advance of instrumentation and x-ray sources. The workshop was well attended with over fifty registered attendees.

100

Power efficient asynchronous multiplexer for X-ray sensors in medical imaging analog front-end electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new power efficient asynchronous multiplexer (MUX) for application in analog front-end electronics (AFE) used in X-ray medical imaging systems. Contrary to typical synchronous MUXes that have to be controlled by a clock, this circuit ... Keywords: Analog front end, Asynchronous circuits, Medical imaging, Multiplexers, X-ray detection

Rafa? D?ugosz; Pierre-André Farine; Kris Iniewski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

DIFFUSE HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN STARBURST GALAXIES AS SYNCHROTRON FROM VERY HIGH ENERGY ELECTRONS  

SciTech Connect

The origin of the diffuse hard X-ray (2-10 keV) emission from starburst galaxies is a long-standing problem. We suggest that synchrotron emission of 10-100 TeV electrons and positrons (e {sup {+-}}) can contribute to this emission, because starbursts have strong magnetic fields. We consider three sources of e {sup {+-}} at these energies: (1) primary electrons directly accelerated by supernova remnants, (2) pionic secondary e {sup {+-}} created by inelastic collisions between cosmic ray (CR) protons and gas nuclei in the dense interstellar medium of starbursts, and (3) pair e {sup {+-}} produced between the interactions between 10 and 100 TeV {gamma}-rays and the intense far-infrared (FIR) radiation fields of starbursts. We create one-zone steady-state models of the CR population in the Galactic center (R {<=} 112 pc), NGC 253, M82, and Arp 220's nuclei, assuming a power-law injection spectrum for electrons and protons. We consider different injection spectral slopes, magnetic field strengths, CR acceleration efficiencies, and diffusive escape times, and include advective escape, radiative cooling processes, and secondary and pair e {sup {+-}}. We compare these models to extant radio and GeV and TeV {gamma}-ray data for these starbursts, and calculate the diffuse synchrotron X-ray and inverse Compton (IC) luminosities of these starbursts in the models which satisfy multiwavelength constraints. If the primary electron spectrum extends to {approx}PeV energies and has a proton/electron injection ratio similar to the Galactic value, we find that synchrotron emission contributes 2%-20% of their unresolved, diffuse hard X-ray emission. However, there is great uncertainty in this conclusion because of the limited information on the CR electron spectrum at these high energies. IC emission is likewise a minority of the unresolved X-ray emission in these starbursts, from 0.1% in the Galactic center to 10% in Arp 220's nuclei, with the main uncertainty being the starbursts' magnetic field. We also model generic starbursts, including submillimeter galaxies, in the context of the FIR-X-ray relation, finding that anywhere between 0% and 16% of the total hard X-ray emission is synchrotron for different parameters, and up to 2% in the densest starbursts assuming an E {sup -2.2} injection spectrum and a diffusive escape time of 10 Myr (E/3 GeV){sup -1/2} (h/100 pc). Neutrino observations by IceCube and TeV {gamma}-ray data from HESS, VERITAS, and CTA can further constrain the synchrotron X-ray emission of starbursts. Our models do not constrain the possibility of hard, second components of primary e {sup {+-}} from sources like pulsars in starbursts, which could enhance the synchrotron X-ray emission further.

Lacki, Brian C. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)] [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Thompson, Todd A. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

MaRIE X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Pre-Conceptual Design  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will include a 50-keV X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL), a significant extension from planned and existing XFEL facilities. To prevent an unacceptably large energy spread arsing from energy diffusion, the electron beam energy should not exceed 20 GeV, which puts a significant constraint on the beam emittance. A 100-pC baseline design is presented along with advanced technology options to increase the photon flux and to decrease the spectral bandwidth through pre-bunching the electron beam.

Carlsten, Bruce E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barnes, Cris W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bishofberger, Kip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Duffy, Leanne D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heath, Cynthia E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Russell, Steven J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ryne, Robert D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Richard L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simakov, Evgenya I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yampolsky, Nikolai A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

RHESSI MICROFLARE STATISTICS. II. X-RAY IMAGING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS I. G. Hannah, S. Christe,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RHESSI MICROFLARE STATISTICS. II. X-RAY IMAGING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS I. G distribution of RHESSI flares and compare it to previous thermal energy distributions of transient events. We flares down to nanoflares. The fre- quency distribution of the energy in these events has been studied

California at Berkeley, University of

104

Simulation Studies of the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Oscillator  

SciTech Connect

Simulations of the x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator are presented that include transverse effects and realistic Bragg crystal properties with the two-dimensional code GINGER. In the present cases considered the radiation divergence is much narrower than the crystal acceptance, and the numerical algorithm can be simplified by ignoring the finite angular bandwidth of the crystal. In this regime GINGER shows that the saturated x-ray pulses have 109 photons and are nearly Fourier-limited with peak powers in excess of 1 MW. Wealso include preliminary results for a four-mirror cavity that can be tuned in wavelength over a few percent, with future plans to incorporate the full transverse response of the Bragg crystals into GINGER to more accurately model this tunable source.

Lindberg, R. R.; Shyd'ko, Y.; Kim, K.-J; Fawley, W. M.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear resonant X-ray spectroscopy of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 orthoenstatites JENNIFER M. JACKSON1,*, EMILY A. HAMECHER1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear resonant X-ray spectroscopy of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 orthoenstatites JENNIFER M. JACKSON1,*, EMILY A, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439, USA Abstract: We present nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) and synchrotron Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy (SMS) measurements, both nuclear resonant X

Jackson, Jennifer M.

106

Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EBT2 dosimetry of x-rays produced by the electron beam from a Plasma Focus for medical applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron beam emitted from the back of Plasma Focus devices is being studied as a radiation source for intraoperative radiation therapy applications. A Plasma Focus device is being developed to this aim, to be utilized as an x-ray source. The electron beam is driven to impinge on 50 {mu}m brass foil, where conversion x-rays are generated. Measurements with gafchromic film are performed to analyse the attenuation of the x-rays beam and to predict the dose given to the culture cell in radiobiological experiments to follow.

Ceccolini, E.; Mostacci, D.; Sumini, M. [Montecuccolino Nuclear Engineering Laboratory - DIENCA, University of Bologna, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Rocchi, F. [Montecuccolino Nuclear Engineering Laboratory - DIENCA, University of Bologna, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); UTFISSM-PRONOC, ENEA, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tartari, A. [Department of Physics, Ferrara University, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Mariotti, F. [ENEA, IRP-DOS, via dei Colli 16, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

X-ray spectroscopy of gamma-ray bursts: the path to the progenitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite great observational and theoretical effort, the burst progenitor is still a mysterious object. It is generally accepted that one of the best ways to unveil its nature is the study of the properties of the close environment in which the explosion takes place. We discuss the potentiality and feasibility of time resolved X-ray spectroscopy, focusing on the prompt gamma-ray phase. We show that the study of absorption features (or continuum absorption) can reveal the radial structure of the close environment, unaccessible with different techniques. We discuss the detection of absorption in the prompt and afterglow spectra of several bursts, showing how these are consistent with gamma-ray bursts taking place in dense regions. In particular, we show that the radius and density of the surrounding cloud can be measured through the evolution of the column density in the prompt burst phase. The derived cloud properties are similar to those of the star forming cocoons and globules within molecular clouds. We conclude that the burst are likely associated with the final evolutionary stages of massive stars.

Davide Lazzati; Rosalba Perna; Gabriele Ghisellini

2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Multipixel characterization of imaging CZT detectors for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our in-depth study of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) crystals to determine an optimum pixel and guard band configuration for Hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopy. We tested 20x20x5mm crystals with 8x8 pixels on a 2.46mm pitch. We have studied different types of cathode / anode contacts and different pixel pad sizes. We present the measurements of leakage current as well as spectral response for each pixel. Our I-V measurement setup is custom designed to allow automated measurements of the I-V curves sequentially for all 64 pixels, whereas the radiation properties measurement setup allows for interchangeable crystals with the same XAIM3.2 ASIC readout from IDEAS. We have tested multiple crystals of each type, and each crystal in different positions to measure the variation between individual crystals and variation among the ASIC channels. We also compare the same crystals with and without a grounded guard band deposited on the crystal side walls vs. a floating guard band and compare results to simulations. This study was carried out to find the optimum CZT crystal configuration for prototype detectors for the proposed Black-Hole Finder mission, EXIST.

S. V. Vadawale; J. Hong; J. Grindlay; P. Williams; M. Zhang; E. Bellm; T. Narita; W. Craig; B. Parker; C. Stahle; Feng Yan

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Understanding Sulfur Poisoning and Regeneration of Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of biofuels can proceed via a biomass gasification to produce syngas, which can then undergo catalytic conditioning and reforming reactions prior to being sent to a fuel synthesis reactor. Catalysts used for biomass conditioning are plagued by short lifetimes which are a result of, among other things, poisoning. Syngas produced from biomass gasification may contain between 30-300 ppm H2S, depending on the feedstock and gasification conditions, and H2S is a key catalyst poison. In order to overcome catalyst poisoning, either an H2S-tolerant catalyst or an efficient regeneration protocol should be employed. In this study, sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to monitor sulfur species on spent catalyst samples and the transformation of these species from sulfides to sulfates during steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. Additionally, nickel K-edge EXAFS and XANES are used to examine the state of nickel species on the catalysts. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H2S-poisoned nickel catalyst and although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Design and Operation of a High Pressure Reaction Cell for in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of catalytic reactions have been instrumental in advancing the understanding of catalytic processes. These measurements require an in situ catalysis reaction cell with unique properties. Here we describe the design and initial operation of an in situ/operando catalysis reaction cell for transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The cell is designed: to be an ideal catalytic reactor with no mass transfer effects; to give the same conversion and selectivity under similar space velocities as standard laboratory micro-reactors; to be operational temperatures up to 600 {sup o}C and pressures up to 14 bar; to be X-ray transparent allowing XAS measurement to be collected in transmission for all elements with Z {>=} 23 (vanadium K-edge at 5.5 keV); to measure the actual catalyst bed temperature; to not use o-ring seals, or water cooling; to be robust, compact, easy to assemble, and use, and relatively low cost to produce. The heart of the cell is fabricated from an X-ray transparent beryllium tube that forms a plug flow reactor. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a Re/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a function of hydrogen pressure from 0.05 to 8 bar, and from a Pt-Sn/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during n-heptane reforming are given as initial examples of the versatility of the reactor.

Bare,S.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S.; Mickelson, G.; Modica, F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

High-Pressure Evolution of Fe2O3 Electronic Structure Revealed by X-ray Absorption  

SciTech Connect

We report the first high pressure measurement of the Fe K-edge in hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in partial fluorescence yield geometry. The pressure-induced evolution of the electronic structure as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} transforms from a high-spin insulator to a low-spin metal is reflected in the x-ray absorption pre-edge. The crystal field splitting energy was found to increase monotonically with pressure up to 48 GPa, above which a series of phase transitions occur. Atomic multiplet, cluster diagonalization, and density-functional calculations were performed to simulate the pre-edge absorption spectra, showing good qualitative agreement with the measurements. The mechanism for the pressure-induced phase transitions of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discussed and it is shown that ligand hybridization significantly reduces the critical high-spin/low-spin gap pressure.

Kao, Chi-Chang

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

113

Development of Palladium L-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy And Its Application for Chloropalladium Complexes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a synchrotron-based experimental technique that provides information about geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. Combination of metal L-edge and ligand K-edge XAS has the potential to define the complete experimental ground state electronic structures for metal complexes with unoccupied d manifolds. We developed a quantitative treatment for Pd L-edge spectroscopy on the basis of the well-established chlorine K-edge XAS for a series of chloropalladium complexes that are pre-catalysts in various organic transformations. We found that Pd-Cl bonds are highly covalent, such as 24 {+-} 2%, 34 {+-} 3%, and 48 {+-} 4% chloride 3p character for each Pd-Cl bond in [PdCl{sub 4}]{sup 2-}, [PdCl{sub 6}]{sup 2-}, and PdCl{sub 2}, respectively. Pd(2p {yields} 4d) transition dipole integrals of 20.8 (SSRL)/16.9 (ALS) eV and 14.1 (SSRL)/11.9 (ALS) eV were determined using various combinations of L-edges for Pd(II) and Pd(IV), respectively. Application of metal-ligand covalency and transition dipole integrals were demonstrated for the example of bridging chloride ligands in PdCl{sub 2}. Our work lays the foundation for extending the quantitative treatment to other catalytically important ligands, such as phosphine, phosphite, olefin, amine, and alkyl in order to correlate the electronic structures of palladium complexes with their catalytic activity.

Boysen, R.B.; Szilagyi, R.K.

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

114

Understanding Electrocatalytic Pathways in Low and Medium Temperature Fuel Cells: Synchrotron-based In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, researchers have made significant developments in producing more advanced electrocatalytic materials for power generation applications. For example, traditional fuel cell catalysts often involve high-priced precious metals such as Pt. However, in order for fuel cells to become commercially viable, there is a need to reduce or completely remove precious metal altogether. As a result, a myriad of novel, unconventional materials have been explored such as chalcogenides, porphyrins, and organic-metal-macrocycles for low/medium temperature fuel cells as well as enzymatic and microbial fuel cells. As these materials increasingly become more complex, researchers often find themselves in search of new characterization methods, especially those which are allow in situ and operando measurements with element specificity. One such method that has received much attention for analysis of electrocatalytic materials is X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS is an element specific, core level absorption technique which yields structural and electronic information. As a core electron method, XAS requires an extremely bright source, hence a synchrotron. The resulting intensity of synchrotron radiation allow for experiments to be conducted in situ, under electrochemically relevant conditions. Although a bulk-averaging technique requiring rigorous mathematical manipulation, XAS has the added benefit that it can probe materials which possess no long range order. This makes it ideal to characterize nano-scale electrocatalysts. XAS experiments are conducted by ramping the X-ray photon energy while measuring absorption of the incident beam the sample or by counting fluorescent photons released from a sample due to subsequent relaxation. Absorption mode XAS follows the Beer-Lambert Law, {mu}x = log(I{sub 0}/I{sub t}) (1) where {mu} is the absorption coefficient, x is the sample thickness and I{sub 0} and I{sub t} are the intensities of the incident and transmission beams respectively. When the energy of the incident X-rays exceed the electron binding energy (E{sub 0}) of the element under investigation, the electron is ejected from the core to available excited states in the form of a photoelectron with kinetic energy: E{sub k} = h? - E{sub 0} (2) with, E{sub k} being the kinetic energy of the released photoelectron and h? the energy of the incident beam. In general, the X-ray absorption spectrum is broken down into two distinct energy regions: the X-ray absorption near-edge structure or XANES (-50eV {le} E{sub 0} {le} 50eV) and the extended X-ray absorption fine-structure or EXAFS (50eV {le} E{sub 0} {le} {approx}1000eV). The XANES region is dominated by low-energy photoelectrons which undergo multiple scattering events. As such, it can reveal information about oxidation state, local symmetry, electronic structure, and the extent of oxidation of a material. Due to this complex multiple scattering, there is no simple XANES equation to describe it quantitatively. However, recent advancements in computers and the evolution of numerical methods such as the FEFF code have made possible reliable XANES simulations. Photoelectrons in the EXAFS region have high enough E{sub k} to undergo primarily single back-scattering events. These back-scattered photoelectrons interfere with the outgoing photoelectrons, causing the oscillations in the absorption spectrum. Using the previously developed EXAFS equations it is now possible to model EXAFS data to determine coordination numbers, bond distances, and mean-square disorder (commonly referred to as Debye-Waller factor). EXAFS data is often shown by Fourier Transforming KSpace into distance, r, space where the total magnitude is plotted against the radial coordinates. This allow for easy qualitative comparison of samples. Employing EXAFS on nanoscale materials has the added advantage that it can quantitatively illustrate changes in atom-atom coordination, which can be related to particle size or morphology. Overall this technique enables the measurement of both bulk and surface adsor

Mukerjee, S.; Ziegelbauer, J; Arruda, T; Ramaker, D; Shyam, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Femtosecond X-Ray Free Electron Laser Pulse Duration Measurement from Spectral Correlation Function  

SciTech Connect

We present a novel method for measuring the duration of femtosecond x-ray pulses from self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron lasers by performing statistical analysis in the spectral domain. Analytical expressions of the spectral correlation function were derived in the linear regime to extract both the pulse duration and the spectrometer resolution. Numerical simulations confirmed that the method can be also used in the nonlinear regime. The method was demonstrated experimentally at the Linac Coherent Light Source by measuring pulse durations down to 13 fs FWHM.

Lutman, A. A

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Electronic State Interferences in Resonant X-Ray Emission after K-Shell Excitation in HCl  

SciTech Connect

We have measured a series of high-resolution x-ray spectra emitted upon resonant photoexcitation of HCl. The photon energy was tuned across the dissociative 1s{yields}6{sigma}* resonance and the Rydberg states converging to the Cl 1s{sup -1} threshold, and inelastic photon scattering was observed in the region of KL emission lines. Excellent agreement is found between fully ab initio calculated and measured spectra if interferences between different excitation-emission paths are taken into account. The effect of electronic state interferences is enhanced due to dynamical broadening of the 6{sigma}* resonance in HCl.

Kavcic, M.; Zitnik, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Simon, M. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Post Office Box 3000, SI-1001 Ljubljana (Slovenia); UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

High-Resolution Structure of the Photosynthetic Mn4Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Photosynthetic Mn 4 Ca Catalyst from X-ray Spectroscopystructure of the Mn 4 Ca catalyst at high-resolution whichthe structure of Mn 4 Ca catalyst as it cycles through the

Yano, Junko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Imaging X-ray spectroscopy with micro-X and Chandra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High spectral resolution observations of X-ray phenomena have the potential to uncover new physics. Currently, only point sources can be probed with high resolution spectra, using gratings. Extended objects like supernova ...

Rutherford, John (John Morton)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A high-resolution large-acceptance analyzer for X-ray fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Berman and Z. Yin, at the NSLS as well as Dr. H. Tompkinswhich was taken at the NSLS beamline X-25 shows a cleanwith soft X-rays. At the NSLS wiggler beamline X-25, we

Bergmann, Uwe; Cramer, Stephen P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

X-ray afterglows and spectroscopy of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I will review the constraints set by X-ray measurements of afterglows on several issues of GRB, with particular regard to the fireball model, the environment, the progenitor and dark GRB.

Luigi Piro

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHARACTERIZATION OF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS J. M. Jaklevic andOF ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOLS X~RAY J. M. Jaklevic and A. C.from the atmospheric aerosol. Modern air sampling technology

Jaklevic, J. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission  

SciTech Connect

In the case of very low eniittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

Wilke, M.D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Module to guide the expert use of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy by corrosion scientists  

SciTech Connect

This contribution, to the potential development of data systems having some degree of 'expert' character for use in x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), illustrates the manner in which models of 'Rules' might be developed by the user community. The field of corrosion science is taken as an example of one community of researchers who make regular use of XPS for well defined needs. These 'needs' are redefined as a series of Goals that have to be reached in order to characterize the surface in terms of layer sequences and the enrichment of given elements within them. Rules are written to allow a structured approach to achieve each Goal. A feature of this set of Rules is that they are designed expressly to allow automated interpretation of the survey scan. This approach is facilitated by the use of a recommendation that the survey spectrum be acquired as a series of accumulated scans instead of the usual approach of making a single scan through the spectrum. Repeat scans enable the information extracted by the operation of the Rules to be processed and displayed for information during the period that is normally used for the survey scan. It is intended that this information will inform the setting up of any subsequent high resolution scans and their interactive interpretation. It will also inform any future operations such as ion etching or angle-resolved measurements. In some cases, the information made available may be all that is required by the user and in this case the 'expert module' approach becomes particularly cost effective. The operation of the rules is illustrated throughout by an examination of data obtained for passivated stainless steel, giving a data set of measurements, typical of those made by corrosion scientists, that can be compared with the literature values obtained by more conventional XPS interpretation.

Castle, J. E. [Surface Analysis Laboratory, School of Engineering, Mail Drop H6, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of water on metals and oxides at ambient conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing the elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. Conventional XPS experiments have been limited to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions due to a short mean free path of electrons in a gas phase. The recent advances in instrumentation coupled with third-generation synchrotron radiation sources enables in-situ XPS measurements at pressures above 5 Torr. In this review, we describe the basic design of the ambient pressure XPS setup that combines differential pumping with an electrostatic focusing. We present examples of the application of in-situ XPS to studies of water adsorption on the surface of metals and oxides including Cu(110), Cu(111), TiO2(110) under environmental conditions of water vapor pressure. On all these surfaces we observe a general trend where hydroxyl groups form first, followed by molecular water adsorption. The importance of surface OH groups and their hydrogen bonding to water molecules in water adsorption on surfaces is discussed in detail.

Salmeron, Miquel; Yamamoto, S.; Bluhm, H.; Andersson, K.; Ketteler, G.; Ogasawara, H.; Salmeron, M.; Nilsson, A.

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of gas/solidinterfaces at near-ambient conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a quantitative, chemically specific technique with a probing depth of a few angstroms to a few nanometers. It is therefore ideally suited to investigate the chemical nature of the surfaces of catalysts. Because of the scattering of electrons by gas molecules, XPS is generally performed under vacuum conditions. However, for thermodynamic and/or kinetic reasons, the catalyst's chemical state observed under vacuum reaction conditions is not necessarily the same as that of a catalyst under realistic operating pressures. Therefore, investigations of catalysts should ideally be performed under reaction conditions, i.e., in the presence of a gas or gas mixtures. Using differentially pumped chambers separated by small apertures, XPS can operate at pressures of up to 1 Torr, and with a recently developed differentially pumped lens system, the pressure limit has been raised to about 10 Torr. Here, we describe the technical aspects of high-pressure XPS and discuss recent applications of this technique to oxidation and heterogeneous catalytic reactions on metal surfaces.

Bluhm, Hendrik; Havecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Kiskinova,Maya; Schlogl, Robert; Salmeron, Miquel

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

126

Influence of diffraction in crystals on the coherence properties of X-ray free-electron laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

The spatial and temporal evolution of the field of random X-ray femtosecond pulses and their coherent properties upon pulse propagation in free space and under dynamical diffraction in perfect crystals in the Bragg and Laue geometries has been analyzed on the basis of the formalism developed in statistical optics. Particular attention is paid to the influence of large pulse propagation distances, which are characteristic of lengthy channels of X-ray free-electron lasers.

Bushuev, V. A., E-mail: vabushuev@yandex.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Samoylova, L. [European XFEL GmbH (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Introduction to Neutron and X-Ray Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scattering Studies of Thin Scattering Studies of Thin Polymer Films Introduction to Neutron and X-Ray Scattering Sunil K. Sinha UCSD/LANL Acknowledgements: Prof. R.Pynn( Indiana U.) Prof. M.Tolan (U. Dortmund) Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen 1845-1923 1895: Discovery of X-Rays 1901 W. C. Röntgen in Physics for the discovery of x-rays. 1914 M. von Laue in Physics for x-ray diffraction from crystals. 1915 W. H. Bragg and W. L. Bragg in Physics for crystal structure determination. 1917 C. G. Barkla in Physics for characteristic radiation of elements. 1924 K. M. G. Siegbahn in Physics for x-ray spectroscopy. 1927 A. H. Compton in Physics for scattering of x-rays by electrons. 1936 P. Debye in Chemistry for diffraction of x-rays and electrons in gases.

128

Soft x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of superoxide KO2 J.-S. Kang,* D. H. Kim, and J. H. Hwang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soft x-ray absorption and photoemission spectroscopy study of superoxide KO2 J.-S. Kang,* D. H. Kim of superoxide KO2 was investigated by employing soft x-ray absorption spectros- copy XAS and core cooling, O2 - molecular bond axes seem to tilt to have a lower crystal monoclinic symme- try. By lowering

Min, Byung Il

129

Band alignment of InGaZnO{sub 4}/Si interface by hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Although amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} has intensively been studied for a semiconductor channel material of thin-film transistors in next-generation flat-panel displays, its electronic structure parameters have not been reported. In this work, the electron affinities ({chi}) and the ionization potentials (I{sub p}) of crystalline and amorphous InGaZnO{sub 4} (c-IGZO and a-IGZO) were measured using bulk-sensitive hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. First, the {chi} and I{sub p} values of c-IGZO and a-IGZO thin films were estimated by aligning the Zn 2p{sub 3/2} core level energies to a literature value for ZnO, which provided {chi} = 3.90 eV and I{sub p} = 7.58 eV for c-IGZO and 4.31 eV and 7.41 eV for a-IGZO. It was also confirmed that the escape depth of the photoelectrons excited by the photon energy of 5950.2 eV is 3.3 nm for a-IGZO and large enough for directly measuring the interface electronic structure using a-IGZO/c-Si heterojunctions. It provided the valence band offset of {approx}2.3 eV, which agrees well with the above data. The present results substantiate that the a-IGZO/c-Si interface follows well the Schottky-Mott rule.

Lee, Kyeongmi; Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-1, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Nomura, Kenji [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yanagi, Hiroshi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medical and Engineering Material Science and Technology, University of Yamanashi, 4-4-37 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8510 (Japan); Ikenaga, Eiji; Sugiyama, Takeharu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kobayashi, Keisuke [National Institute for Materials Science, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox R3-1, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Mailbox S2-13, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser  

SciTech Connect

Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Comparison of SOFC Cathode Microstructure Quantified using X-ray Nanotomography and Focused Ioni Beam-scanning Electron Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray nanotomography and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) have been applied to investigate the complex 3D microstructure of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrodes at spatial resolutions of 45 nm and below. The application of near edge differential absorption for x-ray nanotomography and energy selected backscatter detection for FIB-SEM enable elemental mapping within the microstructure. Using these methods, non-destructive 3D x-ray imaging and FIB-SEM serial sectioning have been applied to compare three-dimensional elemental mapping of the LSM, YSZ, and pore phases in the SOFC cathode microstructure. The microstructural characterization of an SOFC cathode is reported based on these measurements. The results presented demonstrate the viability of x-ray nanotomography as a quantitative characterization technique and provide key insights into the SOFC cathode microstructure.

G Nelson; W Harris; J Lombardo; J Izzo Jr.; W Chiu; P Tanasini; M Cantoni; J Van herle; C Comninellis; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals  

SciTech Connect

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub x} {approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

Stoupin, S.; Shvydko, Y.; Shu, D.; Khachatryan, R.; Xiao, X. (X-Ray Science Division)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Design of a continuous-flow reactor for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy of solids in supercritical fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and performance of a novel high-temperature and high-pressure continuous-flow reactor, which allows for x-ray absorption spectroscopy or diffraction in supercritical water and other fluids under high pressure and temperature. The in situ cell consists of a tube of sintered, polycrystalline aluminum nitride, which is tolerant to corrosive chemical media, and was designed to be stable at temperatures up to 500 deg. C and pressures up to 30 MPa. The performance of the reactor is demonstrated by the measurement of extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a carbon-supported ruthenium catalyst during the continuous hydrothermal gasification of ethanol in supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 24 MPa.

Dreher, M.; De Boni, E.; Nachtegaal, M.; Wambach, J.; Vogel, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Application of soft x-ray appearance potential spectroscopy to light lanthanides, 4d transition metals, and insulators  

SciTech Connect

Evaporated films of La, Ce, Yb, Y, Ag--Mn(5 percent), KCl, MnF$sub 2$, CsCl and LaF$sub 3$ were studied using the soft x-ray appearance potential spectroscopy (SXAPS) technique. Studies were also made of bulk polycrystalline samples of Y, Zr, Nb, and Mo. The results are discussed in terms of existing SXAPS theories. Several similarities between soft x-ray absorption (SXA) data and the SXAPS results are discussed, and it is shown that the SXA data can aid in the interpretation of SXAPS spectra when using the well-known self-convolution model. In this approximation the absorption coefficient, $alpha$(E), is substituted for the density of states, N(E-E/sub c/) $Yields$ $alpha$(E). For more localized excitations, a convolution of $alpha$(E) with bremsstrahlung isochromat data, based on Wendin's two density of states formalism is used to predict SNAPS results. (auth)

Smith, R. J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Kaonic Atom X?ray Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In kaonic atoms energy displacement and broadening of states result from the strong interaction. The most simple kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen and deuterium open the possibility to measure this strong interaction induced shift and width by x?ray spectroscopy. In the SIDDHARTA experiment al LNF (Frascati) the DA?NE electron?positron collider delivers nearly mono?energetic negatively charged kaons from ? meson decay. This unique kaon source is used to form kaonic atoms. New high performance x?ray detectors (silicon drift detectors) arranged in an array allow x?ray spectroscopy with high energy resolution combined with timing capability. High precision x?ray measurements like SIDDHARTA at LNF will open the way to study the low energy regime of the strong force in the antikaon?nucleon interaction. The experiment and its current status is presented in this talk.

J. Marton; on behalf of the SIDDHARTA Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Single-crystal Raman spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at beamline X26-C of the NSLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-dimensional structures derived from X-ray diffraction of protein crystals provide a wealth of information. Features and interactions important for the function of macromolecules can be deduced and catalytic mechanisms postulated. Still, many questions can remain, for example regarding metal oxidation states and the interpretation of ‘mystery density’, i.e. ambiguous or unknown features within the electron density maps, especially at 2A ? resolutions typical of most macromolecular structures. Beamline X26-C at the

Deborah Stoner-ma; John M. Skinner; Dieter K. Schneider; Matt Cowan; Robert M. Sweet; Allen M. Orville

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by an intense ultrashort laser pulse,” Science, vol. 298,generated from intense laser-plasma interactions,” Appl.monochromatic x-rays in the laser synchrotron source

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Studies of Cu(II) in soil by X-ray absorption spectroscopy A. I. Frenkel1 and G. V. Korshin2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of Cu(II) in soil by X-ray absorption spectroscopy A. I. Frenkel1 and G. V. Korshin2 1. Frenkel, A. I. and Korshin, G. V. 2001. Studies of Cu(II) in soil by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Can. J. Soil Sci. 81: 271­276. Based on original data for copper, this paper evaluates the use and advantages

Frenkel, Anatoly

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141

Ultra-Short Electron Bunch and X-Ray Temporal Diagnostics with an X-Band Transverse Deflector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The measurement of ultra-short electron bunches on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), generation of sub-ten femtosecond X-ray pulses is possible, and some efforts have been put into both ultra-short electron and X-ray beam diagnostics. Here we propose a single-shot method using a transverse rf deflector (X-band) after the undulator to reconstruct both the electron bunch and X-ray temporal profiles. Simulation studies show that about 1 fs (rms) time resolution may be achievable in the LCLS and is applicable to a wide range of FEL wavelengths and pulse lengths. The jitter, resolution and other related issues will be discussed. The successful operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), with its capability of generating free-electron laser (FEL) X-ray pulses from a few femtoseconds (fs) up to a few hundred fs, opens up vast opportunities for studying atoms and molecules on this unprecedented ultrashort time scale. However, tremendous challenges remain in the measurement and control of these ultrashort pulses with femtosecond precision, for both the electron beam (e-beam) and the X-ray pulses. For ultrashort e-beam bunch length measurements, a standard method has been established at LCLS using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) deflector, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as {approx} 10 fs rms. However, the e-beam with low charges of 20 pC at LCLS, which is expected to be less than 10 fs in duration, is too short to be measured using this transverse deflector. The measurement of the electron bunch length is helpful in estimating the FEL X-ray pulse duration. However, for a realistic beam, such as that with a Gaussian shape or even a spiky profile, the FEL amplification varies along the bunch due to peak current or emittance variation. This will cause differences between the temporal shape or duration of the electron bunch and the X-ray pulse. Initial experiments at LCLS have revealed that characterization of the X-ray pulse duration on a shot-by-shot basis is critical for the interpretation of the data. However, a reliable x-ray pulse temporal diagnostic tool is not available so far at the LCLS. We propose a novel method in this paper to characterize the FEL X-ray pulse duration and shape. A transverse rf deflector is used in conjunction with an e-beam energy spectrometer, located after the FEL undulator. By measuring the difference in the e-beam longitudinal phase space between FEL-on and FEL-off, we can obtain the time-resolved energy loss and energy spread induced from the FEL radiation, allowing the FEL X-ray temporal shape to be reconstructed.

Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC; Behrens, C.; /DESY

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Double-core excitations in formamide can be probed by X-ray double-quantum-coherence spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The attosecond, time-resolved X-ray double-quantum-coherence four-wave mixing signals of formamide at the nitrogen and oxygen K-edges are simulated using restricted excitation window time-dependent density functional theory and the excited core hole approximation. These signals, induced by core exciton coupling, are particularly sensitive to the level of treatment of electron correlation, thus providing direct experimental signatures of electron and core-hole many-body effects and a test of electronic structure theories.

Zhang Yu; Healion, Daniel; Biggs, Jason D.; Mukamel, Shaul [Department of Chemistry, University of California, 450 Rowland Hall, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

2013-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect

The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

X-ray generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

Dawson, John M. (Los Angeles, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum z-pinch plasma with tungsten backlighter planar wire array source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption features from K-shell aluminum z-pinch plasmas have recently been studied on Zebra, the 1.7 MA pulse power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. In particular, tungsten plasma has been used as a semi-backlighter source in the generation of aluminum K-shell absorption spectra by placing a single Al wire at or near the end of a single planar W array. All spectroscopic experimental results were recorded using a time-integrated, spatially resolved convex potassium hydrogen phthalate (KAP) crystal spectrometer. Other diagnostics used to study these plasmas included x-ray detectors, optical imaging, laser shadowgraphy, and time-gated and time-integrated x-ray pinhole imagers. Through comparisons with previous publications, Al K-shell absorption lines are shown to be from much lower electron temperature ({approx}10-40 eV) plasmas than emission spectra ({approx}350-500 eV).

Osborne, G. C.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Weller, M. E.; Shrestha, I.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Ouart, N. D. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Synchrotron X-ray Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy; (3) variable kinetic energy X-ray ... advanced materials is critical to the development and optimization of products ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detection X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Detection of Adsorption Sites in Supported Metal Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS) is demonstrated as a new tool to identify the geometry of metal adsorption sites and the orbitals involved in bonding. The type of CO adsorption site on a nanoparticular Pt-Al2O3 catalyst is determined. The orbitals involved in the Pt - CO bonding are identified using theoretical FEFF8.0 calculations. In situ application of HERFD XAS is applicable to a large number of catalytic systems and will provide fundamental insights in structure - performance relationships.

Tromp, Moniek [University of Southampton, School of Chemistry, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Institute for chemical and bioengineering ETH Zurich (Switzerland); Safonova, Olga V.; Glatzel, Pieter [ESRF, Grenoble (France); Groot, Frank M. F. de [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Evans, John [University of Southampton, School of Chemistry, Highfield, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Firmware lower-level discrimination and compression applied to streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy area-detector data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a data acquisition system to perform on-the-fly background subtraction and lower-level discrimination compression of streaming x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy data from a fast charge-coupled device (CCD) area detector. The system is built using a commercial frame grabber with an on-board field-programmable gate array. The system is capable of continuously processing at least 60 CCD frames per second each consisting of 1024 x 1024 16-bit pixels with < or approx. 15 000 photon hits per frame at a maximum compression factor of {approx_equal}95%.

Madden, T.; Fernandez, P.; Jemian, P.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A. R.; Sikorski, M.; Sprung, M.; Weizeorick, J. [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Harmonic Generation at Lower Electron Energies for a Hard X-ray FEL  

SciTech Connect

There are several schemes currently being investigated to pre-bunch the electron beam and step the coherent bunching up to higher harmonics, all which require modulator sections which introduce additional energy modulation. X-ray FELs operate in a regime where the FEL parameter, {rho} is equal to or less than the effective energy spread introduced from the emittance in the electron beam. Because of this large effective energy spread, the energy modulation introduced from harmonic generation schemes would seriously degrade FEL performance. This problem can be mitigated by incorporating the harmonic generation scheme at a lower electron kinetic energy than the energy at the final undulator. This will help because the effective energy spread from emittance is reduced at lower energies, and can be further reduced by making the beam transversely large. Then the beam can be squeezed down slowly enough in the subsequent accelerator sections so that geometric debunching is mitigated. The beam size inside the dispersive chicanes and in the accelerator sections must be carefully optimized to avoid debunching, and each subharmonic modulator section must generate enough energy modulation to overcome the SASE noise without significantly increasing the gain length in the final undulator. Here we show analytical results that demonstrate the feasibility of this harmonic pre-bunching scheme.

Marksteiner, Quinn R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

X-RAY NONLINEAR OPTICAL PROCESSES IN ATOMS USING A SELF-AMPLIFIED SPONTANEOUS EMISSION FREE-ELECTRON LASER  

SciTech Connect

X-ray free electron lasers (xFEL) will open new avenues to the virtually unexplored territory of non-linear interactions of x rays with matter. Initially xFELs will be based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE). Each SASE pulse consists of a number of coherent intensity spikes of random amplitude, i.e. the process is chaotic and pulses are irreproducible. The coherence time of SASE xFELs will be a few femtoseconds for a photon energy near 1 keV. The importance of coherence properties of light in non-linear optical processes was theoretically discovered in the early 1960s. In this contribution we will illustrate the impact of field chaoticity on x-ray non-linear optical processes on neon for photon energies around 1 keV and intensities up to 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Resonant and non-resonant processes are discussed. The first process to be addressed is the formation of a double-core hole in neon by photoionization with x rays above 1.25 keV energy. In contrast to the long-wavelength regime, non-linear optical processes in the x-ray regime are characterized in general by sequential single-photon single-electron interactions. Despite this fact, the sequential absorption of multiple x-ray photons depends on the statistical properties of the radiation field. Treating the x rays generated by a SASE FEL as fully chaotic, a quantum-mechanical analysis of inner-shell two-photon absorption is performed. By solving a system of time-dependent rate equations, we demonstrate that double-core hole formation in neon via x-ray two-photon absorption is enhanced by chaotic photon statistics. At an intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}, the statistical enhancement is about 30%, much smaller than typical values in the optical regime. The second part of this presentation discusses the resonant Auger effect of atomic neon at the 1s-3p transition (at 867.1 eV). For low X-ray intensity, the excitation process 1s {yields} 3p in Neon can be treated perturbatively. The core-hole excited 1s{sup -1} 3p state is embedded in the continuum and decays via Auger-process on the timescale of approximately 5 fs. Increasing the x-ray intensity above 1.5 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, a peak intensity accessible with xFEL sources in the near future, x-ray induced emission from 3p back to 1s becomes possible, i.e. Rabi oscillations between these two levels can be induced. For the numerical analysis of this process, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. The observation of x-ray-driven atomic populations dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic xFEL pulses. In addition to requiring single-shot measurements, sub-femtosecond temporal resolution would be needed. The Rabi oscillations will, however, be imprinted on the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron (see Fig. 1). Measuring the resonant Auger-electron line profile will provide information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

Rohringer, N

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

151

R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating structure. Demonstration experiments in advanced seeding techniques, such as EEHG, and other optical manipulations to enhance the FEL process are required to reduce technical risk in producing temporally coherent and ultrashort x-ray output using optical seed lasers. Success of EEHG in particular would result in reduced development and cost of laser systems and accelerator hardware for seeded FELs. With a 1.5-2.5 GeV linac, FELs could operate in the VUV-soft x-ray range, where the actual beam energy will be determined by undulator technology; for example, to use the lower energy would require the use of advanced designs for which undulator R&D is needed. Significant reductions in both unit costs and accelerator costs resulting from the lower electron beam energy required to achieve lasing at a particular wavelength could be obtained with undulator development. Characterization of the wakefields of the vacuum chambers in narrow-gap undulators will be needed to minimize risk in ability to deliver close to transform limited pulses. CW superconducting RF technology for an FEL facility with short bunches at MHz rate and up to mA average current will require selection of design choices in cavity frequency and geometry, higher order mode suppression and power dissipation, RF power supply and distribution, accelerating gradient, and cryogenics systems. R&D is needed to define a cost and performance optimum. Developments in laser technology are proceeding at rapid pace, and progress in high-power lasers, harmonic generation, and tunable sources will need to be tracked.

Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stöhr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Local structure of indium oxynitride from x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron x-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) measurements of In L{sub 3} edge is used in conjunction with first principles calculations to characterize rf magnetron sputtered indium oxynitride at different O contents. Good agreement between the measured and the independently calculated spectra are obtained. Calculations show that the XANES spectra of this alloy are sensitive to the coordination numbers of the In atoms, i.e., fourfold for indium nitride-like structures and sixfold for indium oxide-like structures, but not to the substitution of nearest neighbor N by O or vice versa.

T-Thienprasert, J.; Onkaw, D.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S. [School of Physics, Suranaree University of Technology and National Synchrotron Research Center, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Nukeaw, J.; Sungthong, A. [Nanotechnology Research Center of KMITL and Department of Applied Physics, King Mongkut' s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520 (Thailand); Porntheeraphat, S. [Thai Microelectronics Center, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Singkarat, S. [Fast Neutron Research Facility, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources  

SciTech Connect

We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Rajkovic, Ivan; Quevedo, Wilson; Gruebel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko [IFG Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kalus, Christian [Abteilung Betrieb Beschleuniger BESSYII, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J. [PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kennedy, Brian [MAX-lab, PO Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

REACTION KINETICS AND X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY STUDIES OF YTTRIUM CONTAINING METAL HYDRIDE ELECTRODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This was a study of electrode degradation mechanisms and the reaction kinetics of LaNi{sub 4.7}Sn{sub 0.3}, La{sub (1{minus}x)}, (x = 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3) and La{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.3}Ni{sub 4.6}Sn{sub 0.3}Co{sub 0.1} metal hydride electrodes. Alloy characterization included x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray absorption (XAS), hydrogen absorption in a Sieverts apparatus, and electrochemical cycling of alloy electrodes. The atomic volume of H was determined for two of the alloys. Electrochemical kinetic measurements were made using steady state galvanostatic measurements, galvanodynamic sweep, and electrochemical impedance techniques. XAS was used to examine the degree of corrosion of the alloys with cycling. Alloying with Y decreased the corrosion rate. The results are consistent with corrosion inhibition by a Y containing passive film. The increase in the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with increasing depth of discharge was much greater on the Y containing alloys. This may be due to the dehydriding of the catalytic species on the surface of the metal hydride particles.

TICIANELLI,E.A.; MUKERJEE,S.; MCBREEN,J.; ADZIC,G.D.; JOHNSON,J.R.; REILLY,J.J.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Probing the hydrogen-bond network of water via time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report time-resolved studies of hydrogen bonding in liquid H2O, in response to direct excitation of the O-H stretch mode at 3 mu m, probed via soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge. This approach employs a newly developed nanofluidic cell for transient soft x-ray spectroscopy in liquid phase. Distinct changes in the near-edge spectral region (XANES) are observed, and are indicative of a transient temperature rise of 10K following transient laser excitation and rapid thermalization of vibrational energy. The rapid heating occurs at constant volume and the associated increase in internal pressure, estimated to be 8MPa, is manifest by distinct spectral changes that differ from those induced by temperature alone. We conclude that the near-edge spectral shape of the oxygen K-edge is a sensitive probe of internal pressure, opening new possibilities for testing the validity of water models and providing new insight into the nature of hydrogen bonding in water.

Huse, Nils; Wen, Haidan; Nordlund, Dennis; Szilagyi, Erzsi; Daranciang, Dan; Miller, Timothy A.; Nilsson, Anders; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Spectroscopic differentiation between O-atom vacancy and divacancy defects, respectively, in TiO2 and HfO2 by X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defect state features have been detected in second derivative O K edge spectra for thin films of nano-crystalline TiO"2 and HfO"2. Based on soft X-ray photoelectron band edge spectra, and the occurrence of occupied band edge 4f states in Gd(Sc,Ti)O"3, ... Keywords: Bound resonance states, Divacancies, Immobile and mobile vacancies, Monovacancies, Pre-edge regime, X-ray absorption spectroscopy

G. Lucovsky; K. -B. Chung; J. -W. Kim; D. Norlund

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Auto-oligomerization and hydration of pyrrole revealed by x-ray absorption spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra have been measured at the carbon and nitrogen K-edges of the prototypical aromatic molecule, pyrrole, both in the gas phase and when solvated in water, and compared with spectra simulated using a combination of classical molecular dynamics and first principles density functional theory in the excited state core hole approximation. The excellent agreement enabled detailed assignments. Pyrrole is highly reactive, particularly in water, and reaction products formed by the auto-oligomerization of pyrrole are identified. The solvated spectra have been measured at two different temperatures, indicating that the final states remain largely unaffected by both hydration and temperature. This is somewhat unexpected, since the nitrogen in pyrrole can donate a hydrogen bond to water.

Advanced Light Source; Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Duffin, Andrew M.; England, Alice H.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

INJECTION AND ACCELERATION OF ELECTRONS AT A STRONG SHOCK: RADIO AND X-RAY STUDY OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA 2011dh  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we develop a model for the radio and X-ray emissions from the Type IIb supernova (SN IIb) 2011dh in the first 100 days after the explosion, and investigate a spectrum of relativistic electrons accelerated at a strong shock wave. The widely accepted theory of particle acceleration, the so-called diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) or Fermi mechanism, requires seed electrons with modest energy with {gamma} {approx} 1-100, and little is known about this pre-acceleration mechanism. We derive the energy distribution of relativistic electrons in this pre-accelerated energy regime. We find that the efficiency of the electron acceleration must be low, i.e., {epsilon}{sub e} {approx}< 10{sup -2} as compared to the conventionally assumed value of {epsilon}{sub e} {approx} 0.1. Furthermore, independent of the low value of {epsilon}{sub e}, we find that the X-ray luminosity cannot be attributed to any emission mechanisms suggested as long as these electrons follow the conventionally assumed single power-law distribution. A consistent view between the radio and X-ray can only be obtained if the pre-acceleration injection spectrum peaks at {gamma} {approx} 20-30 and then only a fraction of these electrons eventually experience the DSA-like acceleration toward the higher energy-then the radio and X-ray properties are explained through the synchrotron and inverse Compton mechanisms, respectively. Our findings support the idea that the pre-acceleration of the electrons is coupled with the generation/amplification of the magnetic field.

Maeda, Keiichi, E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli-IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

159

X-ray absorption spectroscopy on the calcium cofactor to the manganese cluster in photosynthetic oxygen evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with Mn, calcium and chloride ions are necessary cofactors for oxygen evolution in Photosystem II (PS II). To further test and verify whether Ca is close to the Mn cluster, the authors substituted strontium for Ca and probed from the Sr point of view for any nearby Mn. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Sr-reactivated PS II indicates major differences between the intact and NH{sub 2}OH-treated samples. In intact samples, the Fourier transform of the Sr EXAFS shows a Fourier peak that is missing in inactive samples. This peak II is best simulated by two Mn neighbors at a distance of 3.5 Angstrom, confirming the proximity of Ca (Sr) cofactor to the Mn cluster. In addition, polarized Sr EXAFS on oriented Sr-reactivated samples shows this peak II is dichroic: large magnitude at 10 degrees (angle between the PS II membrane normal and the x-ray electric field vector) and small at 80 degrees. Analysis of the dichroism yields the relative angle between the Sr-Mn vector and membrane normal (23 degrees {+-} 4 degrees), and the isotropic coordination number for these layered samples. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has also been employed to assess the degree of similarity between the manganese cluster in PS II and a family of synthetic manganese complexes containing the distorted cubane [Mn{sub 4}O{sub 3}X] core (X = benzoate, acetate, methoxide, hydroxide, azide, fluoride, chloride or bromide). In addition, Mn{sub 4}O{sub 3}Cl complexes containing three or six terminal Cl ligands at three of the Mn were included in this study. The EXAFS method detects the small changes in the core structures as X is varied in this series, and serves to exclude these distorted cubanes of C3v symmetry as a topological model for the Mn catalytic cluster. The sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra for the amino acids cysteine, methionine, their corresponding oxidized forms cystine and methionine sulfoxide, and glutathione show distinct differences between the thiol and disulfide forms. Sulfur XANES is also used to detect changes (within 5%) of the thiol-to-disulfide ratio in whole human blood, plasma, and erythrocytes.

Cinco, Roehl M.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Reply to Comment on"Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by X-ray Absorption and Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Ref. [1], we present and analyze experimental high resolution x-ray emission spectra (XES) of liquid water which exhibit a splitting of the 1b1 line into two components. We also suggest a qualitative model to explain the experimental spectra which, even though tentative (as clearly stated in the summary of Ref. [1]), is able to explain ALL available experimental data. In the preceding Comment, Pettersson et al. [3]claim that a spectrum with two similarly sharp 1b1 features both from a dissociated product (d2) and from the intact molecule (d1) would be"unphysical and unsubstantiated" since"the path connecting initial and final structure" is not taken into account. In the meantime, we have collected new data [2], which further support and strengthen our model.

Heske, C.; Zharnikov, M.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Zubavichus, Y.; Bar, M.; Maier, F.; Denlinger, J. D.; Fuchs, O.; Grunze, M.; Umbach, E.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on Pd doped SnO{sub 2} liquid petroleum gas sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation deals with the electrical response of palladium doped tin oxide, as a means of improving the selectivity for liquid petroleum gas (LPG) in the presence of CO, CH{sub 4}. The sensor element with the composition of Pd(1.5 wt{percent}) in the base material SnO{sub 2} sintered at 800{degree}C, has shown a high sensitivity towards LPG with a negligible cross interference of CO and CH{sub 4} at an operating temperature of 350{degree}C. This greatly suggests the possibility of utilizing the sensor for the detection of LPG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies have been carried out to determine the possible chemical species involved in the gas-solid interaction and the enhancing mechanism of the Pd doped SnO{sub 2} sensor element, towards LPG sensitivity. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Phani, A.R. [Department of Physics, University of LAquila, 67040, LAquila (Italy)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Assessment of Aided Phytostabilization of Copper-Contaminated Soil by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Extractions  

SciTech Connect

Field plots were established at a timber treatment site to evaluate remediation of Cu contaminated topsoils with aided phytostabilization. Soil containing 2600 mg kg{sup -1} Cu was amended with a combination of 5 wt% compost and 2 wt% iron grit, and vegetated. Sequential extraction was combined with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to correlate changes in Cu distribution across five fractions with changes in the predominant Cu compounds two years after treatment in parallel treated and untreated field plots. Exchangeable Cu dominated untreated soil, most likely as Cu(II) species non-specifically bound to natural organic matter. The EXAFS spectroscopic results are consistent with the sequential extraction results, which show a major shift in Cu distribution as a result of soil treatment to the fraction bound to poorly crystalline Fe oxyhydroxides forming binuclear inner-sphere complexes.

J Kumpiene; M Mench; C Bes; J Fitts

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Energy band alignment of InGaZnO{sub 4}/Si heterojunction determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the valence band offset ({Delta}E{sub V}) of the InGaZnO{sub 4} (IGZO)/Si heterojunction. The IGZO films were grown on Si (100) using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. A value of {Delta}E{sub V} = 2.53 eV was obtained by using In 3d{sub 5/2}, Ga 2p{sub 3/2} core energy levels as references. Taking into consideration the experimental band gap of 3.20 eV of the IGZO, this would result in a conduction band offset {Delta}E{sub C} = 0.45 eV in this heterostructure.

Xie Zhangyi; Lu Hongliang; Xu Saisheng; Geng Yang; Sun Qingqing; Ding Shijin; Zhang, David Wei [State Key Laboratory of ASIC and System, Department of Microelectronics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of vanadium oxides andrelated compounds  

SciTech Connect

In today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one ''spintronic'' device that exploits both charge and ''spin'' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; and (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 {micro}m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (< 4 at.%) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2{sup +} state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2{sup +} state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS. revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

Schmitt, Thorsten

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of vanadium oxides andrelated compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one ''spintronic'' device that exploits both charge and ''spin'' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; and (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 {micro}m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (< 4 at.%) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2{sup +} state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2{sup +} state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS. revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

Schmitt, Thorsten

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Auger electron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

A review of Auger electron spectroscopy is presented. Methods, resolution, sensitivity, and uses are discussed. 30 references, 10 figures. (GHT)

Somorjai, G.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effects of sulfation level on the desulfation behavior of pre-sulfated Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts: a combined H2 Temperature-Programmed Reaction, in-situ sulfur K-edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect

Desulfation by hydrogen of pre-sulfated Pt(2wt%) BaO(20wt%)/Al2O3 with various sulfur loading (S/Ba = 0.12, 0.31 and 0.62) were investigated by combining H2 temperature programmed reaction (TPRX), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in-situ sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), and synchrotron time-resolved x-ray diffraction (TR-XRD) techniques. We find that the amount of H2S desorbed during the desulfation in the H2 TPRX experiments is not proportional to the amount of initial sulfur loading. The results of both in-situ sulfur K-edge XANES and TR-XRD show that at low sulfur loadings, sulfates were transformed to a BaS phase and remained in the catalyst, rather than being removed as H2S. On the other hand, when the deposited sulfur level exceeded a certain threshold (at least S/Ba = 0.31) sulfates were reduced to form H2S, and the relative amount of the residual sulfide species in the catalyst was much less than at low sulfur loading. Unlike samples with high sulfur loading (e.g., S/Ba = 0.62), H2O did not promote the desulfation for the sample with S/Ba of 0.12, implying that the formed BaS species originating from the reduction of sulfates at low sulfur loading are more stable to hydrolysis. The results of this combined spectroscopy investigation provide clear evidence to show that sulfates at low sulfur loadings are less likely to be removed as H2S and have a greater tendency to be transformed to BaS on the material, leading to the conclusion that desulfation behavior of Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts is markedly dependent on the sulfation levels.

Kim, Do Heui; Szanyi, Janos; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscopic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscopic Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscopic Refinement Friday, September 28, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 322 SSRL Presents Kevin Stone X-ray absorption spectroscopy has become an important tool in understanding the electronic structure of materials. Resonant absorption edges in the soft x-ray regime are especially interesting as they allow the study of the lighter elements, such as in organic or organo-metallic substances, as well as important L-edges of the 3d transition metals important in magnetic and oxide systems. Measurements of soft x-ray absorption spectra are inherently surface sensitive, and are plagued by issues such as extinction (in electron yield measurements) or self absorption (in fluorescence yield

170

X-ray lithography source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

X-ray lithography source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Windsor, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Hiller, Larry J. (Livermore, CA); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Menlo Park, CA)

2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Compact x-ray source and panel  

SciTech Connect

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator  

SciTech Connect

Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

175

Delivery confirmation of bolus electron conformal therapy combined with intensity modulated x-ray therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that a bolus electron conformal therapy (ECT) dose plan and a mixed beam plan, composed of an intensity modulated x-ray therapy (IMXT) dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT plan, can be accurately delivered. Methods: Calculated dose distributions were compared with measured dose distributions for parotid and chest wall (CW) bolus ECT and mixed beam plans, each simulated in a cylindrical polystyrene phantom that allowed film dose measurements. Bolus ECT plans were created for both parotid and CW PTVs (planning target volumes) using 20 and 16 MeV beams, respectively, whose 90% dose surface conformed to the PTV. Mixed beam plans consisted of an IMXT dose plan optimized on top of the bolus ECT dose plan. The bolus ECT, IMXT, and mixed beam dose distributions were measured using radiographic films in five transverse and one sagittal planes for a total of 36 measurement conditions. Corrections for film dose response, effects of edge-on photon irradiation, and effects of irregular phantom optical properties on the Cerenkov component of the film signal resulted in high precision measurements. Data set consistency was verified by agreement of depth dose at the intersections of the sagittal plane with the five measured transverse planes. For these same depth doses, results for the mixed beam plan agreed with the sum of the individual depth doses for the bolus ECT and IMXT plans. The six mean measured planar dose distributions were compared with those calculated by the treatment planning system for all modalities. Dose agreement was assessed using the 4% dose difference and 0.2 cm distance to agreement. Results: For the combined high-dose region and low-dose region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.7% and 96.2%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.9% and 97.4%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the high-dose gradient region, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.1% and 94.62%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 89.2% and 95.1%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For all regions, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 98.8% and 97.3%, respectively, for the bolus ECT plans and 97.5% and 95.9%, respectively, for the mixed beam plans. For the IMXT component of the mixed beam plans, pass rates for the parotid and CW plans were 93.7% and 95.8%. Conclusions: Bolus ECT and mixed beam therapy dose delivery to the phantom were more accurate than IMXT delivery, adding confidence to the use of planning, fabrication, and delivery for bolus ECT tools either alone or as part of mixed beam therapy. The methodology reported in this work could serve as a basis for future standardization of the commissioning of bolus ECT or mixed beam therapy. When applying this technology to patients, it is recommended that an electron dose algorithm more accurate than the pencil beam algorithm, e.g., a Monte Carlo algorithm or analytical transport such as the pencil beam redefinition algorithm, be used for planning to ensure the desired accuracy.

Kavanaugh, James A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 (United States); Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Fontenot, Jonas P.; Henkelmann, Gregory [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4001 and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Chu, Connel; Carver, Robert A. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Charge transfer effects in electrocatalytic Ni-C revealed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Binary Ni-C thin-film alloys, which have been shown to be passive against corrosion in hot sulphuric acid solution whilst also being electrocatalytically active, were investigated by XPS to determine the oxidation state of the metal and carbon components. The Ni component produces a Ni 2p spectrum similar to that of metallic nickel (i.e., no oxidation occurs) but with a 0.3 eV shift to higher binding energy (BE) due to electron donation to the carbon matrix. The C 1s peak shows a shift to lower BE by accepting electrons from the Ni nanocrystals. A cluster-model analysis of the observed Ni 2p spectrum is consistent with the electron transfer from the nickel to the carbon.

Haslam, G. E.; Chin, X.-Y.; Burstein, G. T. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke St., Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Sato, K.; Mizokawa, T. [Department of Complexity Science and Engineering, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8651 (Japan)

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

177

Critical-angle transmission grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy on the International X-ray Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution spectroscopy at energies below 1 keV covers the lines of C, N, O, Ne and Fe ions, and is central to studies of the Interstellar Medium, the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium, warm absorption and outflows in ...

Heilmann, Ralf K.

178

X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy ofGaP_{1-x}N_x Photocorroded as a Result of Hydrogen Productionthrough Water Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells produce hydrogen gas through the sunlight driven electrolysis of water. By extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and storing solar energy in the H-H bond, they offer a promising renewable energy technology. Addition of dilute amounts of nitrogen to III-V semiconductors has been shown to dramatically increase the stability of these materials for hydrogen production. In an effort to learn more about the origin of semiconductor photocorrosion in PEC cells, three samples of p-type GaP with varying levels of nitrogen content (0%, 0.2%, 2%) were photocorroded and examined by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). GaPN samples were observed to be more efficient during the hydrogen production process than the pure GaP samples. Sample surfaces contained gallium oxides in the form of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ga(OH){sub 3} and phosphorus oxide (P{sub 2}O{sub 5}), as well as surface oxides from exposure to air. A significant shift in intensity from bulk to surface peaks dramatic nitrogen segregation to the surface during photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Further investigations, including using a scanning electron microscope to investigate sample topography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis for solution analyses, are under way to determine the mechanism for these changes.

Mayer, Marie A.; /Illinois U., Urbana /SLAC

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOCAL TITANIUM ENVIRONMENT IN DOPED SODIUM ALUMINUM HYDRIDE USING X-RAY ADSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ti K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to explore the local titanium environment and valence in 2-4 mol% Ti-doped sodium alanate. An estimate of the oxidation state of the dopant, based upon known standards, revealed a zero-valent titanium atom. An analysis of the near-edge and extended fine structures indicates that the Ti does not enter substitutional or interstitial sites in the NaAlH{sub 4} lattice. Rather, the Ti is located on/near the surface and is coordinated by 10.2 {+-} 1 aluminum atoms with an interatomic distance of 2.82 {+-} 0.01 {angstrom}, similar to that of TiAl{sub 3}. The Fourier transformed EXAFS spectra reveals a lack of long-range order around the Ti dopant indicating that the Ti forms nano-clusters of TiAl{sub 3}. The similarity of the spectra in the hydrided and dehydrided samples suggests that the local Ti environment is nearly invariant during hydrogen cycling.

GRAETZ, J.; IGNATOV, A. YU; TYSON, T.A.; REILLY, J.J.; JOHNSON, J.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Microscopic linear liquid streams in vacuum: Injection of solvated biological samples into X-ray free electron lasers  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic linear liquid free-streams offer a means of gently delivering biological samples into a probe beam in vacuum while maintaining the sample species in a fully solvated state. By employing gas dynamic forces to form the microscopic liquid stream (as opposed to a conventional solid-walled convergent nozzle), liquid free-streams down to 300 nm diameter have been generated. Such 'Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzles' (GDVN) are ideally suited to injecting complex biological species into an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) to determine the structure of the biological species via Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX). GDVN injector technology developed for this purpose is described.

Doak, R. B.; DePonte, D. P.; Nelson, G.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Spence, J. C. H.; Weierstall, U. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Determining the electron-phonon coupling strength from Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering at transition metal L-edges  

SciTech Connect

We show that high-resolution Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) provides direct, element-specific and momentum-resolved information on the electron-phonon (e-p) coupling strength. Our theoretical analysis indicates how the e-p coupling can be extracted from RIXS spectra by determining the differential phonon scattering cross-section. An alternative manner to extract the coupling is to use the one- and two-phonon loss ratio, which is governed by the e-p coupling strength and the core-hole lifetime. This allows the determination of the e-p coupling on an absolute energy scale.

Ament, L.J.P.; van Veenendaal, M.; van den Brink, J. (Leiden); (NIU); (IFW Dresden)

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of Sulfation Level on the Desulfation Behavior of Presulfated Pt-BaO/Al2O3 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts: A Combined H2 Temperature-Programmed Reaction, in Situ Sulfur K-Edge X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect

Desulfation by hydrogen of presulfated Pt (2 wt %)-BaO(20 wt %)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with various sulfur loading (S/Ba = 0.12, 0.31, and 0.62) were investigated by combining H{sub 2} temperature programmed reaction (TPRX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), and synchrotron time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TR-XRD) techniques. We find that the amount of H{sub 2}S desorbed during the desulfation in the H{sub 2} TPRX experiments is not proportional to the amount of initial sulfur loading. The results of both in situ sulfur K-edge XANES and TR-XRD show that at low sulfur loadings, sulfates were transformed to a BaS phase and remained in the catalyst rather than being removed as H{sub 2}S. On the other hand, when the deposited sulfur level exceeded a certain threshold (at least S/Ba = 0.31) sulfates were reduced to form H{sub 2}S, and the relative amount of the residual sulfide species in the catalyst was much less than at low sulfur loading. Unlike samples with high sulfur loading (e.g., S/Ba = 0.62), H{sub 2}O did not promote the desulfation for the sample with S/Ba of 0.12, implying that the formed BaS species originating from the reduction of sulfates at low sulfur loading are more stable to hydrolysis. The results of this combined spectroscopy investigation provide clear evidence to show that sulfates at low sulfur loadings are less likely to be removed as H{sub 2}S and have a greater tendency to be transformed to BaS on the material, leading to the conclusion that desulfation behavior of Pt-BaO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lean NO{sub x} trap catalysts is markedly dependent on the sulfation levels.

Kim, D.H.; Hanson, J.; Szanyi, J.; Kwak, J.H.; Wang, X.; Hanson, J.C.; Engelhard, M.; and Peden, C.H.F.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Influence of the cobalt particle size in the CO hydrogenation reaction studied by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cobalt, nanoparticles, Fischer-Tropsch, X-ray absorption (oxides [5] and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis [6,7]. Itswhich is inactive for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This oxide

Herranz, Tirma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Electron spectra of xenon clusters irradiated with a laser-driven plasma soft-x-ray laser pulse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Xenon clusters were irradiated with plasma soft-x-ray laser pulses (having a wavelength of 13.9 nm, time duration of 7 ps, and intensities of up to 10 GW/cm{sup 2}). The laser photon energy was high enough to photoionize 4d core electrons. The cross section is large due to a giant resonance. The interaction was investigated by measuring the electron energy spectra. The photoelectron spectra for small clusters indicate that the spectral width due to the 4d hole significantly broadens with increasing cluster size. For larger clusters, the electron energy spectra evolve into a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution, as a strongly coupled cluster nanoplasma is generated.

Namba, S.; Takiyama, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Hasegawa, N.; Kishimoto, M.; Nishikino, M.; Kawachi, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

End station for nanoscale magnetic materials study: Combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

We have constructed an end station for nanoscale magnetic materials study at the soft X-ray beamline HiSOR BL-14 at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center. An ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was installed for an in situ characterization of nanoscale magnetic materials in combination with soft X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy experiment. The STM was connected to the XMCD experimental station via damper bellows to isolate it from environmental vibrations, thus achieving efficient spatial resolution for observing Si(111) surface at atomic resolution. We performed an in situ experiment with STM and XMCD spectroscopy on Co nanoclusters on an Au(111) surface and explored its practical application to investigate magnetic properties for well-characterized nanoscale magnetic materials.

Ueno, Tetsuro; Sawada, Masahiro; Namatame, Hirofumi [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Kishimizu, Yusuke; Kimura, Akio [Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Taniguchi, Masaki [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Speciation of Trace Elements in Biological and Environmental Samples by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: The Role of Plants and Microbes in Remediation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants can accumulate, detoxify, and transform trace elements present in contaminated soil and water, leading to the phytoremediation of contaminated sites. An important factor for consideration is the chemical form of trace elements accumulated in tissues of different plant species used for phytoremediation. This report describes the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for successfully determining the speciation of trace elements in biological and environmental samples.

2001-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Progress on PEEM3 - An Aberration Corrected X-Ray Photoemission Electron Microscope at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron Microscope at the ALS A.A.MacDowell 1 , J.Feng 1 ,the Advanced Light Source (ALS). An electron mirror combinedat the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This limit is due to the

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Obtaining attosecond X-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 429, 243 (1999). [18] LCLS Design Study Group, ReportLinac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) [18], except the electron

Zholents, A.A.; Penn, G.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Detection of atomic and molecular mega-electron-volt projectiles using an x-ray charged coupled device camera  

SciTech Connect

We show that an x-ray charge coupled device (CCD) may be used as a particle detector for atomic and molecular mega-electron-volt (MeV) projectiles of around a few hundred keV per atomic mass unit. For atomic species, spectroscopic properties in kinetic energy measurements (i.e., linearity and energy resolution) are found to be close to those currently obtained with implanted or surface barrier silicon particle detectors. For molecular species, in order to increase the maximum kinetic energy detection limit, we propose to put a thin foil in front of the CCD. This foil breaks up the molecules into atoms and spreads the charges over many CCD pixels and therefore avoiding saturation effects. This opens new perspectives in high velocity molecular dissociation studies with accelerator facilities.

Chabot, M.; Martinet, G.; Bouneau, S.; Genolini, B.; Grave, X.; Nguyen, K.; Le Gailliard, C.; Rosier, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d'Orsay, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay cedex (France); Beroff, K.; Pino, T.; Feraud, G.; Friha, H. [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay, INP-CNRS, Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay cedex (France); Villier, B. [Hamamatsu Photonics (France)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Short-range atomic structure of 1 wt. % Ga [delta]-stabilized plutonium by x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy we have determined the radii of the first three atomic shells around Ga and the first Pu shell in a fcc Pu alloy stabilized by 1 wt. % Ga. We find the Ga to be substitutional in the fcc lattice, with the first and second shells contracted by 3.7 and 0.9%, respectively, relative to distances expected from the lattice constant derived from x-ray diffraction. The lattice is well ordered around Ga, but there is considerable static disorder in all observed coordination shells of Pu. We discuss these results in relation to the mechanism by which Ga effects phase stabilization.

Cox, L.E.; Martinez, R. (Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Nickel, J.H.; Conradson, S.D.; Allen, P.G. (Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Growth and structure of water on SiO2 films on Si investigated byKelvin probe microscopy and in situ X-ray Spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect

The growth of water on thin SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers at vapor pressures between 1.5 and 4 torr and temperatures between -10 and 21 C has been studied in situ using Kelvin Probe Microscopy and X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopies. From 0 to 75% relative humidity (RH) water adsorbs forming a uniform film 4-5 layers thick. The surface potential increases in that RH range by about 400 mV and remains constant upon further increase of the RH. Above 75% RH the water film grows rapidly, reaching 6-7 monolayers at around 90% RH and forming a macroscopic drop near 100%. The O K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectrum around 75% RH is similar to that of liquid water (imperfect H-bonding coordination) at temperatures above 0 C and ice-like below 0 C.

Verdaguer, A.; Weis, C.; Oncins, G.; Ketteler, G.; Bluhm, H.; Salmeron, M.

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

194

Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of C60/Copper Phthalocyanine/MoO3 Interfaces: Role of Reduced MoO3 on Energetic Band Alignment and Improved Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interfacial electronic structure of C{sub 60}/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) thin films grown in situ on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates has been studied using synchrotron radiation-excited photoelectron spectroscopy in an attempt to understand the influence of oxide interlayers on the performance of small molecule organic photovoltaic devices. The MoO{sub 3} layer on ITO is found to significantly increase the work function of the substrate and induces large interface dipoles and band bending at the CuPc/MoO{sub 3} interface. The large band bending confirms the formation of an internal potential that assists hole extraction from the CuPc layer to the electrode. The electronic structure of the MoO{sub 3} layer on ITO was also examined using various soft X-ray spectroscopies to probe the conductive nature of the MoO{sub 3} thin film.

S Cho; L Piper; A DeMasi; A Preston; K Smith; K Chauhan; R Hatton; T Jones

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Validity of automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy algorithm to determine the amount of substance and the depth distribution of atoms  

SciTech Connect

The author reports a systematic study of the range of validity of a previously developed algorithm for automated x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, which takes into account the variation in both peak intensity and the intensity in the background of inelastically scattered electrons. This test was done by first simulating spectra for the Au4d peak with gold atoms distributed in the form of a wide range of nanostructures, which includes overlayers with varying thickness, a 5 A layer of atoms buried at varying depths and a substrate covered with an overlayer of varying thickness. Next, the algorithm was applied to analyze these spectra. The algorithm determines the number of atoms within the outermost 3 {lambda} of the surface. This amount of substance is denoted AOS{sub 3{lambda}} (where {lambda} is the electron inelastic mean free path). In general the determined AOS{sub 3{lambda}} is found to be accurate to within {approx}10-20% depending on the depth distribution of the atoms. The algorithm also determines a characteristic length L, which was found to give unambiguous information on the depth distribution of the atoms for practically all studied cases. A set of rules for this parameter, which relates the value of L to the depths where the atoms are distributed, was tested, and these rules were found to be generally valid with only a few exceptions. The results were found to be rather independent of the spectral energy range (from 20 to 40 eV below the peak energy) used in the analysis.

Tougaard, Sven [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Pharmacy, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M DK-5230 (Denmark)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation from the Brookhaven Vacuum-Ultraviolet ElectronArgonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Physicist Physics Department Brookhaven National Laboratory

Staples, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coherent transition radiation generated at a plasma-and G. Fubiani, “Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedW. P. Leemans, “Synchrotron radiation from electron beams in

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Design Optimization for an X-Ray Free Electron Laser Driven by SLAC Linac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY SLAC LINAC Ming Xie, LawrenceLaser (FEL) driven by the SLAC linac. The study assumes theis carried out for the SLAC FEL over all independent system

Xie, Ming

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A joint x-ray and neutron study on amicyanin reveals the role of protein dynamics in electron transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The joint x-ray/neutron diffraction model of the Type I copper protein, amicyanin from Paracoccus denitrificans was determined at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. The protein was crystallized using reagents prepared in D{sub 2}O. About 86% of the amide hydrogen atoms are either partially or fully exchanged, which correlates well with the atomic depth of the amide nitrogen atom and the secondary structure type, but with notable exceptions. Each of the four residues that provide copper ligands is partially deuterated. The model reveals the dynamic nature of the protein, especially around the copper-binding site. A detailed analysis of the presence of deuterated water molecules near the exchange sites indicates that amide hydrogen exchange is primarily due to the flexibility of the protein. Analysis of the electron transfer path through the protein shows that residues in that region are highly dynamic, as judged by hydrogen/deuterium exchange. This could increase the rate of electron transfer by transiently shortening through-space jumps in pathways or by increasing the atomic packing density. Analysis of C-H{hor_ellipsis}X bonding reveals previously undefined roles of these relatively weak H bonds, which, when present in sufficient number can collectively influence the structure, redox, and electron transfer properties of amicyanin.

Sukumar, N.; Mathews, F.S.; Langan, P.; Davidson, V.L. (Cornell); (UMMC); (WU-MED); (LANL)

2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

BAYESIAN CONFIDENCE LIMITS OF ELECTRON SPECTRA OBTAINED THROUGH REGULARIZED INVERSION OF SOLAR HARD X-RAY SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Many astrophysical observations are characterized by a single, non-repeatable measurement of a source brightness or intensity, from which we are to construct estimates for the true intensity and its uncertainty. For example, the hard X-ray count spectrum from transient events such as solar flares can be observed only once, and from this single spectrum one must determine the best estimate of the underlying source spectrum I({epsilon}), and hence the form of the responsible electron spectrum F(E). Including statistical uncertainties on the measured count spectrum yields a 'confidence strip' that delineates the boundaries of electron spectra that are consistent with the observed photon spectrum. In this short article, we point out that the expectation values of the source brightness and its variance in a given photon energy bin are in general not (as has been assumed in prior works) equal to n, the number of counts observed in that energy bin. Rather, they depend both on n and on prior knowledge of the overall photon spectrum. Using Bayesian statistics, we provide an explicit procedure and formulas for determining the 'confidence strip' (Bayesian credible region) for F(E), thus providing rigorous bounds on the intensity and shape of the accelerated electron spectrum.

Emslie, A. Gordon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Massone, Anna Maria, E-mail: emslieg@wku.edu, E-mail: annamaria.massone@cnr.it [CNR-SPIN, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Driven with an X-Band Injector and Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hydrogen absorption in epitaxial W/Nb(001) and polycrystalline Fe/Nb(110) multilayers studied in-situ by X-ray/neutron scattering techniques and X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be absorbed in large quantities by 100 {angstrom} thin Nb layers embedded in epitaxial W/Nb and polycrystalline Fe/Nb multilayers. The solubility and the hydrogen-induced structural changes of the host lattice are explored in-situ by small-angle neutron/X-ray reflectometry and high-angle diffraction. These measurements reveal for both systems that the relative out-of-plane expansion of the Nb layers is considerably larger than the relative increase of the Nb interplanar spacing indicating two distinctly different mechanisms of hydrogen absorption. In Fe/Nb multilayers, hydrogen expands the Nb interplanar spacing in a continuous way as function of the external pressure. In contrast, the Nb lattice expansion is discontinuous in epitaxial W/Nb multilayers: A jump in the Nb(002) Bragg reflection position occurs at a critical hydrogen pressure of 1 mbar. In-situ EXAFS spectroscopy also exhibits an irreversible expansion of the Nb lattice in the film plane for p{sub H{sub 2}}> 1 mbar. This can be regarded as a structural phase transition from an exclusively out-of-plane to a three-dimensionally expanded state at low and high hydrogen pressures, respectively.

Klose, F.; Rehm, C.; Fieber-Erdmann, M.; Holub-Krappe, E.; Bleif, H. J.; Sowers, H.; Goyette, R.; Troger, L.; Maletta, H.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

203

X?ray Fluorescence (XRF) Assay Using Laser Compton Scattered (LCS) X?rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Compton Scattered (LCS) X?rays are produced as a result of the interaction between accelerated electrons and a laser beam. The yield of LCS X?rays is dependent on the laser power

Syed F. Naeem; Khalid Chouffani; Douglas P. Wells

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Real-time x-ray response of biocompatible solution gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the real-time x-ray irradiation response of charge and pH sensitive solution gate AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. The devices show stable and reproducible behavior under and following x-ray radiation, including a linear integrated response with dose into the muGy range. Titration measurements of devices in solution reveal that the linear pH response and sensitivity are not only retained under x-ray irradiation, but an irradiation response could also be measured. Since the devices are biocompatible, and can be simultaneously operated in aggressive fluids and under hard radiation, they are well-suited for both medical radiation dosimetry and biosensing applications.

Hofstetter, Markus; Funk, Maren; Paretzke, Herwig G.; Thalhammer, Stefan [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Howgate, John; Sharp, Ian D.; Stutzmann, Martin [Walter Schottky Institut, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have fielded a hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager with high aspect ratio pinholes to measure the spatially resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel. First measurements show that hot electron preheat does not limit obtaining the fuel areal densities required for ignition and burn.

Doeppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Thomas, C. A.; Burns, S.; Celliers, P. M.; Izumi, N.; LaCaille, G.; McNaney, J. M.; Prasad, R. R.; Robey, H. F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Compton polarimeters for the study of hard X-rays arising from energetic collisions of electrons and ions with matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel position-sensitive x-ray detectors are presented that, when applied as Compton polarimeters, enable precise and efficient linear polarization studies of hard x-rays up to several 100 keV. We give an analytical formula which yields a rough estimate of the polarimeter efficiencies of such detector systems. Moreover, we briefly summarize a recent linear polarization measurement of the Lyman-{alpha}{sub 1} radiation in a H-like high-Z system, namely U91+.

Weber, G.; Braeuning, H.; Fritzsche, S.; Gumberidze, A.; Maertin, R.; Reuschl, R.; Schwemlein, M.; Spillmann, U.; Surzhykov, A.; Winters, D. F. A.; Stoehlker, Th. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Jena (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Jena (Germany)

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy of M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray Supernova Remnant in M33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present and interpret new X-ray data for M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in M33. The SNR is in seen projection against (and appears to be interacting with) the bright Hii region NGC592. Data for this source were obtained as part of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) 1

Terrance J. Gaetz; William P. Blair; John P. Hughes; P. Frank Winkler; Knox S. Long; Thomas G; Benjamin Williams; Richard J. Edgar; Parviz Ghavamian; Paul P. Plucinsky; Manami Sasaki; Robert P. Kirshner; Miguel Avillez; Dieter Breitschwerdt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development and characterization of a novel compact x-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For elemental analysis, x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is a rapid and simple method of analysis, which provides both quantitative and qualitative information. In general, most XRF instruments are not suited for use as portable field instruments. Most commercial XRF spectrometers require cooling units for the anode, large power supplies and, in some cases, liquid nitrogen to cool the x-ray detectors. Alternative x-ray sources using radioactive isotopes have been considered for portable XRF, but safety regulations and public concerns have hampered their usage. An x-ray source has been developed which uses a solid state electron multiplier to enhance the electron gain from a simple filament. The overall gain from the electron multiplier is sufficient to generate x-rays. However, the novel source produces less heating of the anode, eliminating the cooling unit requirement. This feature along with the small size of the electron multiplier, allows for a compact design, which lends itself to portability. An additional feature is that the power consumption of the system is lower than a typical xray tube system. Initial studies have shown that the system behaves similar to a conventional x-ray tube. Increasing anode voltage (electron energy) causes improved yield of the higher energy x-rays. Also, increasing the electron multiplier voltage (electron intensity) increases overall intensity of the x-ray output. Using the new source for XRF studies, the limits of detection were comparable with values reported in the literature. It was necessary, however, to prepare the samples using single elements to reduce matrix affects and lessen effects of overlapping peaks. In general the x-ray source shows potential as a portable x-ray source that may be used in the field.

Woo, Ronald Yut

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and structural analysis of amorphous SiO{sub x}N{sub y} films deposited at low temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We establish, using a tetrahedral model, the bonding properties of amorphous silicon oxynitride (a-SiO{sub x}N{sub y}) films deposited at low temperatures (LTs) by electron-cyclotron resonance chemical-vapor deposition (ECRCVD) on several substrates and under various conditions of gas flows and total gas pressure in a dilute mixture of SiH{sub 4}+N{sub 2} in Ar. The atomic percentage of each tetrahedral unit incorporated in the film network is calculated from the deconvolution of the high-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra in the Si 2p{sub 3/2} region and corroborated by the results obtained from both survey scans and the high-resolution XPS spectra in the N 1s region. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} phase is the most important one and the only bonding unit which is incorporated in all our LT ECRCVD SiO{sub x}N{sub y} films. The incorporation of all the other component tetrahedrons depends strongly on growth conditions. The threshold values of the N/Si atomic ratio for which intrinsic defects, such as Si-Si bonds, are not incorporated in the network depend on the O/Si ratio incorporated in the films, mainly due to the competition between oxygen and nitrogen atoms in their reaction with silicon dangling bonds. The effect of the total gas pressure on the atomic percentages of the oxidation states present in the LT ECRCVD SiO{sub x}N{sub y} films is qualitatively similar to the effect of the ion bombarding energy or the plasma density. O-N bonds are present only in samples having high amount of oxygen and nitrogen in their networks. For these films, our results show unambiguously the presence of the N-Si{sub 2}O tetrahedron and suggest that N-Si{sub 3-{nu}}O{sub {nu}} tetrahedrons with {nu}{>=}2 are not incorporated in their networks. A correlation is observed between the N-Si{sub 2}O and the Si-O{sub 3}(ON) tetrahedrons whose component peak is localized at (104.0{+-}0.2) eV in the Si 2p{sub 3/2} region of the XPS data, which suggests that both bonding units coexist in these films as some sort of complex bonding configuration.

Cova, P.; Poulin, S.; Masut, R.A. [Departmento de Fisica, Laboratorio de Simulacion de Dispositivos Semiconductores, Universidad de Oriente, Apartado 124, Cumana 6101, Sucre (Venezuela); Regroupement Quebecois sur les Materiaux de Pointe (RQMP) and Departement de Genie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Two-temperature accretion flows in magnetic cataclysmic variables: Structures of post-shock emission regions and X-ray spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use a two-temperature hydrodynamical formulation to determine the temperature and density structures of the post-shock accretion flows in magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) and calculate the corresponding X-ray spectra. The effects of two-temperature flows are significant for systems with a massive white dwarf and a strong white-dwarf magnetic field. Our calculations show that two-temperature flows predict harder keV spectra than one-temperature flows for the same white-dwarf mass and magnetic field. This result is insensitive to whether the electrons and ions have equal temperature at the shock but depends on the electron-ion exchange rate, relative to the rate of radiative loss along the flow. White-dwarf masses obtained by fitting the X-ray spectra of mCVs using hydrodynamic models including the two-temperature effects will be lower than those obtained using single-temperature models. The bias is more severe for systems with a massive white dwarf.

Saxton, C; Cropper, M; Ramsay, G; Saxton, Curtis; Wu, Kinwah; Cropper, Mark; Ramsay, Gavin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Measurement of the valence band-offset in a PbSe/ZnO heterojunction by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

A heterojunction of PbSe/ZnO has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to directly measure the valence-band offset (VBO) of the heterojunction. The VBO, {Delta}E{sub V}, was determined as 2.51 {+-} 0.05 eV using the Pb 4p{sup 3/2} and Zn 2p{sup 3/2} core levels as a reference. The conduction-band offset, {Delta}E{sub C}, was, therefore, determined to be 0.59 {+-} 0.05 eV based on the above {Delta}E{sub V} value. This analysis indicates that the PbSe/ZnO heterojunction forms a type I (Straddling Gap) heterostructure.

Li Lin; Qiu Jijun; Weng Binbin; Yuan Zijian; Shi Zhisheng [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Li Xiaomin; Gan Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sellers, Ian R. [Deparment of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Particle size effect of hydride formation and surface hydrogen absorption of nanosized palladium catalysts : L{sub 3} edge vs K edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particle size effect on the formation of palladium hydride and on surface hydrogen adsorption was studied at room temperature using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Pd K and L{sub 3} edges. Hydride formation was indirectly observed by lattice expansion in Pd K edge XANES spectra and by EXAFS analysis. Hydride formation was directly detected in the L{sub 3} edge spectra. A characteristic spectral feature caused by the formation of a Pd-H antibonding state showed strong particle size dependence. The L{sub 3} edge spectra were reproduced using full multiple scattering analysis and density of state calculations, and the contributions of bulk absorbed and surface hydrogen to the XANES spectra could be distinguished. The ratio of hydrogen on the surface versus that in the bulk increased with decreasing particle size, and smaller particles dissolved less hydrogen.

Tew, M. W.; Miller, J. T.; van Bokhoven, J. A. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( SUF-USR); (ETH Zurich)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

X-ray data booklet. Revision  

SciTech Connect

A compilation of data is presented. Included are properties of the elements, electron binding energies, characteristic x-ray energies, fluorescence yields for K and L shells, Auger energies, energy levels for hydrogen-, helium-, and neonlike ions, scattering factors and mass absorption coefficients, and transmission bands of selected filters. Also included are selected reprints on scattering processes, x-ray sources, optics, x-ray detectors, and synchrotron radiation facilities. (WRF)

Vaughan, D. (ed.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Photo-Induced Spin-State Conversion in Solvated Transition Metal Complexes Probed via Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Solution-phase photoinduced low-spin to high-spin conversion in the FeII polypyridyl complex [Fe(tren(py)3)]2+ (where tren(py)3 is tris(2-pyridylmethyliminoethyl)amine) has been studied via picosecond soft X-ray spectroscopy. Following 1A1 --> 1MLCT (metal-to-ligand charge transfer) excitation at 560 nm, changes in the iron L2- and L3-edges were observed concomitant with formation of the transient high-spin 5T2 state. Charge-transfer multiplet calculations coupled with data acquired on low-spin and high-spin model complexes revealed a reduction in ligand field splitting of 1 eV in the high-spin state relative to the singlet ground state. A significant reduction in orbital overlap between the central Fe-3d and the ligand N-2p orbitals was directly observed, consistent with the expected ca. 0.2 Angstrom increase in Fe-N bond length upon formation of the high-spin state. The overall occupancy of the Fe-3d orbitals remains constant upon spin crossover, suggesting that the reduction in sigma-donation is compensated by significant attenuation of pi-back-bonding in the metal-ligand interactions. These results demonstrate the feasibility and unique potential of time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study ultrafast reactions in the liquid phase by directly probing the valence orbitals of first-row metals as well as lighter elements during the course of photochemical transformations.

Huse, Nils; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jamula, Lindsey; McCusker, James K.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Schoenlein, Robert W.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): X-ray Imaging Spectroscopy of M33SNR21, the Brightest X-ray Supernova Remnant in M33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present and interpret new X-ray data for M33SNR21, the brightest X-ray supernova remnant (SNR) in M33. The SNR is in seen projection against (and appears to be interacting with) the bright HII region NGC592. Data for this source were obtained as part of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) Very Large Project. The nearly on-axis Chandra data resolve the SNR into a ~5" diameter (20 pc at our assumed M33 distance of 817+/-58 kpc) slightly elliptical shell. The shell is brighter in the east, which suggests that it is encountering higher density material in that direction. The optical emission is coextensive with the X-ray shell in the north, but extends well beyond the X-ray rim in the southwest. Modeling the X-ray spectrum with an absorbed sedov model yields a shock temperature of 0.46(+0.01,-0.02) keV, an ionization timescale of n_e t = $2.1 (+0.2,-0.3) \\times 10^{12}$ cm$^{-3}$ s, and half-solar abundances (0.45 (+0.12, -0.09)). Assuming Sedov dynamics gives an average preshock H density of 1.7 +/- 0.3 cm$^{-3}$. The dynamical age estimate is 6500 +/- 600 yr, while the best fit $n_e t$ value and derived $n_e$ gives 8200 +/- 1700 yr; the weighted mean of the age estimates is 7600 +/- 600 yr. We estimate an X-ray luminosity (0.25-4.5 keV) of (1.2 +/- 0.2) times $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (absorbed), and (1.7 +/- 0.3) times $10^{37}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (unabsorbed), in good agreement with the recent XMM-Newton determination. No significant excess hard emission was detected; the luminosity $\\le 1.2\\times 10^{35}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ (2-8 keV) for any hard point source.

Terrance J. Gaetz; William P. Blair; John P. Hughes; P. Frank Winkler; Knox S. Long; Thomas G. Pannuti; Benjamin Williams; Richard J. Edgar; Parviz Ghavamian; Paul P. Plucinsky; Manami Sasaki; Robert P. Kirshner; Miguel Avillez; Dieter Breitschwerdt

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

217

X-Ray Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 17, 2009 ... Stress Mapping Analysis by Ray Tracing (SMART): A New Technique ... technique of synchrotron X-ray topography, where a grid made out of ...

218

Synchrotron x-ray spectroscopy of Eu/HNO{sub 3} aqueous solutions at high temperatures and pressures and Nb-bearing silicate melt phases coexisting with hydrothermal fluids using a modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell and rail assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified hydrothermal diamond anvil cell (HDAC) rail assembly has been constructed for making synchrotron x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and x-ray mapping measurements on fluids or solid phases in contact with hydrothermal fluids up to {approx}900 deg. C and 700 MPa. The diamond anvils of the HDAC are modified by laser milling grooves or holes, for the reduction of attenuation of incident and fluorescent x rays and sample cavities. The modified HDAC rail assembly has flexibility in design for measurement of light elements at low concentrations or heavy elements at trace levels in the sample and the capability to probe minute individual phases of a multiphase fluid-based system using focused x-ray microbeam. The supporting rail allows for uniform translation of the HDAC, rotation and tilt stages, and a focusing mirror, which is used to illuminate the sample for visual observation using a microscope, relative to the direction of the incident x-ray beam. A structure study of Eu(III) aqua ion behavior in high-temperature aqueous solutions and a study of Nb partitioning and coordination in a silicate melt in contact with a hydrothermal fluid are described as applications utilizing the modified HDAC rail assembly.

Mayanovic, Robert A.; Anderson, Alan J.; Bassett, William A.; Chou, I-Ming [Department of Physics, Astronomy and Materials Science, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri 65897 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, St. Francis Xavier University, P.O. Box 5000, Antigonish, Nova Scotia B2G 2W5 (Canada); Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); MS 954, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

An in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the effect of Sn additions to carbon-supported Pt electrocatalysts: Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C) with an adsorbed layer of underpotential deposited (upd) Sn is a much better catalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) than a carbon-supported platinum-tin (PtSn/C) alloy. In situ X-ray absorption (XAS) was used to determine the differences in the effects that the two methods of Sn addition have on the electronic properties and the structural properties of the catalyst. X-ray diffraction and XAS at the Pt L{sub 3} and L{sub 2} edges indicate that the PtSn/C catalyst has a Pt{sub 3}Sn L1{sub 2} structure, and alloying with Sn causes partial filling of the Pt d band vacancies and an increase in the Pt-Pt bond distance from 2.77 to 2.8 {angstrom}. However, upd Sn does not perturb Pt structurally or electronically. XAS at the Sn K edge indicates that both the upd Sn on Pt/C and the surface Sn on PtSn/C are associated with oxygenated species at all potentials, and that the nature and strength of the Sn-O bonds are potential dependent. The differences in the activity of the two catalysts for the MOR are due to the effects of alloying on the Pt electronic structure that inhibit the ability of the Pt to adsorb methanol and dissociate C-H bonds. The ability of PtSn/C to adsorb oxygen at low potentials enhances its activity for CO oxidation.

Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction of phase transitions in Cr2O3 to 61 GPa Sang-Heon Shim*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Laboratory SSRL using mono- chromatic x-ray beams ( 0.4959 Ã? at CHESS and 0.7277 Ã? at SSRL

Duffy, Thomas S.

223

X-Ray Absorption Characterization of Diesel Exhaust Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have characterized particulates from a 1993 11.1 Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine with electronic unit injectors operated using fuels with and without methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) and overbased calcium sulfonate added. X-ray photoabsorption (XAS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the diesel particulates. Results reveal a mixture of primarily Mn-phosphate with some Mn-oxide, and Ca-sulfate on the surface of the filtered particulates from the diesel engine.

Nelson, A J; Ferreira, J L; Reynolds, J G; Roos, J W

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Spectroscopy Spectroscopy Print In spectroscopy experiments, a sample is illuminated with light and the various product particles (electrons, ions, or fluorescent photons) are detected and analyzed.The unifying feature is that some "property" of a material is measured as the x-ray (photon) energy is swept though a range of values. At the most basic level, one measures the absorption, transmission, or reflectivity of a sample as a function of photon energy. Probes that use the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum (10-100 eV) are very well matched to the elucidation of bonding in solids, surfaces, and molecules; to the investigation of electron-electron correlations in solids, atoms, and ions; and to the study of reaction pathways in chemical dynamics. At the lowest end of this energy range (below 1 eV) we have infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz spectroscopies, which are well matched to vibrational modes and other modes of excitation.

225

Microgap x-ray detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

227

An iterative three-dimensional electron density imaging algorithm using uncollimated Compton scattered x rays from a polyenergetic primary pencil beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray film-screen mammography is currently the gold standard for detecting breast cancer. However, one disadvantage is that it projects a three-dimensional (3D) object onto a two-dimensional (2D) image, reducing contrast between small lesions and layers of normal tissue. Another limitation is its reduced sensitivity in women with mammographically dense breasts. Computed tomography (CT) produces a 3D image yet has had a limited role in mammography due to its relatively high dose, low resolution, and low contrast. As a first step towards implementing quantitative 3D mammography, which may improve the ability to detect and specify breast tumors, we have developed an analytical technique that can use Compton scatter to obtain 3D information of an object from a single projection. Imaging material with a pencil beam of polychromatic x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at each point on the detector plane. A comparable distribution may be calculated using a known incident x-ray energy spectrum, beam shape, and an initial estimate of the object's 3D mass attenuation and electron density. Our iterative minimization algorithm changes the initially arbitrary electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the analytically predicted and experimentally measured spectra at each point on the detector plane. The simulated electron density converges to that of the object as the differences are minimized. The reconstruction algorithm has been validated using simulated data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. We applied the imaging algorithm to a cylindrically symmetric breast tissue phantom containing multiple inhomogeneities. A preliminary ROC analysis scores greater than 0.96, which indicate that under the described simplifying conditions, this approach shows promise in identifying and localizing inhomogeneities which simulate 0.5 mm calcifications with an image voxel resolution of 0.25 cm and at a dose comparable to mammography.

Van Uytven, Eric; Pistorius, Stephen; Gordon, Richard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada) and Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3A 1R9 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, HSC Room GA216, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, HSC Room GA216, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada) and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, HSC Room GA216, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrafast X-ray and 2-dimensional UV Spectroscopy of TiO2 Nanoparticles: Majed Chergui1; 1Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Mesoporous titanium ...

229

High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

230

Water adsorption, solvation and deliquescence of alkali halide thin films on SiO2 studied by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of water on KBr thin films evaporated onto SiO2 was investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) by ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. At 30percent RH adsorbed water reaches a coverage of approximately one monolayer. As the humidity continues to increase, the coverage of water remains constant or increases very slowly until 60percent RH, followed by a rapid increase up to 100percent RH. At low RH a significant number of the Br atoms are lost due to irradiation damage. With increasing humidity solvation increases ion mobility and gives rise to a partial recovery of the Br/K ratio. Above 60percent RH the increase of the Br/K ratio accelerates. Above the deliquescence point (85percent RH), the thickness of the water layer continues to increase and reaches more than three layers near saturation. The enhancement of the Br/K ratio at this stage is roughly a factor 2.3 on a 0.5 nm KBr film, indicating a strong preferential segregation of Br ions to the surface of the thin saline solution on SiO2.

Arima, Kenta; Jiang, Peng; Deng, Xingyi; Bluhm, Henrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of negative electrodes from high-power lithium-ion cells showing various levels of power fade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-power lithium-ion cells for transportation applications are being developed and studied at Argonne National Laboratory. The current generation of cells containing LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}O{sub 2}-based cathodes, graphite-based anodes, and LiPF6-based electrolytes show loss of capacity and power during accelerated testing at elevated temperatures. Negative electrode samples harvested from some cells that showed varying degrees of power and capacity fade were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The samples exhibited a surface film on the graphite, which was thicker on samples from cells that showed higher fade. Furthermore, solvent-based compounds were dominant on samples from low power fade cells, whereas LiPF{sub 6}-based products were dominant on samples from high power fade cells. The effect of sample rinsing and air exposure is discussed. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the formation of compounds suggested by the XPS data.

Herstedt, Marie; Abraham, Daniel P.; Kerr, John B.

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

232

Kinetics of the sulfur oxidation on palladium: A combined in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density-functional study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We studied the reaction kinetics of sulfur oxidation on the Pd(100) surface by in situ high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio density functional calculations. Isothermal oxidation experiments were performed between 400 and 500 K for small amounts ({approx}0.02 ML) of preadsorbed sulfur, with oxygen in large excess. The main stable reaction intermediate found on the surface is SO{sub 4}, with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} being only present in minor amounts. Density-functional calculations depict a reaction energy profile, which explains the sequential formation of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and eventually SO{sub 4}, also highlighting that the in-plane formation of SO from S and O adatoms is the rate limiting step. From the experiments we determined the activation energy of the rate limiting step to be 85 {+-} 6 kJ mol{sup -1} by Arrhenius analysis, matching the calculated endothermicity of the SO formation.

Gotterbarm, Karin; Hoefert, Oliver; Lorenz, Michael P. A.; Streber, Regine; Papp, Christian [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Luckas, Nicola; Vines, Francesc [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Steinrueck, Hans-Peter [Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Erlangen Catalysis Resource Center (ECRC), Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Interface Controlled Processes, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Goerling, Andreas [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Interface Controlled Processes, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

linked to Au, Ag, and indium tin oxide (ITO) by this method.band spectrum of ITO (indium tin oxide). The valence band is

Hamad, Kimberly S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 2-5 FESEM of 60Å CdSe nanocrystals on hexanedithiol/properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals andCdSe)..

Hamad, Kimberly S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

236

Optimization of the Configuration of Pixilated Detectors Based on the Shannon-Nyquist Theory for the X-Ray Spectroscopy of Hot Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an optimization of the detector configuration, based on the Shannon-Nyquist theory, for two major x-ray diagnostic systems on tokamaks and stellarators: x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers and x-ray pinhole cameras. Typically, the spectral data recorded with pixilated detectors are oversampled, meaning that the same spectral information could be obtained using fewer pixels. Using experimental data from Alcator C-Mod, we quantify the degree of oversampling and propose alternate uses for the redundant pixels for additional diagnostic applications.

E. Wang, P. Beiersdorfer, M. Bitter, L.F. Delgado-Aprico, K.W. Hill and N. Pablant

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

237

Optimization of the Configuration of Pixilated Detectors Based on the Sgabbib-Nyquist Theory for the X-ray Spectroscopy of Hot Tokamak Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes an optimization of the detector configuration, based on the Shannon-Nyquist theory, for two major x-ray diagnostic systems on tokamaks and stellarators: x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers and x-ray pinhole cameras. Typically, the spectral data recorded with pixilated detectors are oversampled, meaning that the same spectral information could be obtained using fewer pixels. Using experimental data from Alcator C-Mod, we quantify the degree of oversampling and propose alternate uses for the redundant pixels for additional diagnostic applications.

: E. Wang, P. Beiersdorfer, M. Bitter, L.F. Delgado-Apricio, K.W. Hill and N. Pablant

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Print Spectroscopy Print In spectroscopy experiments, a sample is illuminated with light and the various product particles (electrons, ions, or fluorescent photons) are detected and analyzed.The unifying feature is that some "property" of a material is measured as the x-ray (photon) energy is swept though a range of values. At the most basic level, one measures the absorption, transmission, or reflectivity of a sample as a function of photon energy. Probes that use the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum (10-100 eV) are very well matched to the elucidation of bonding in solids, surfaces, and molecules; to the investigation of electron-electron correlations in solids, atoms, and ions; and to the study of reaction pathways in chemical dynamics. At the lowest end of this energy range (below 1 eV) we have infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz spectroscopies, which are well matched to vibrational modes and other modes of excitation.

239

Spectroscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy Print Spectroscopy Print In spectroscopy experiments, a sample is illuminated with light and the various product particles (electrons, ions, or fluorescent photons) are detected and analyzed.The unifying feature is that some "property" of a material is measured as the x-ray (photon) energy is swept though a range of values. At the most basic level, one measures the absorption, transmission, or reflectivity of a sample as a function of photon energy. Probes that use the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum (10-100 eV) are very well matched to the elucidation of bonding in solids, surfaces, and molecules; to the investigation of electron-electron correlations in solids, atoms, and ions; and to the study of reaction pathways in chemical dynamics. At the lowest end of this energy range (below 1 eV) we have infrared, far-infrared, and terahertz spectroscopies, which are well matched to vibrational modes and other modes of excitation.

240

Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics  

SciTech Connect

Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

X Ray Scattering | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

X Ray Scattering X Ray Scattering Materials Sciences and Engineering (MSE) Division MSE Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs BES Funding Opportunities The Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Scientific Highlights Reports and Activities Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas X Ray Scattering Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This activity supports basic research on the fundamental interactions of photons with matter to achieve an understanding of atomic, electronic, and magnetic structures and excitations and their relationships to materials properties. The main emphasis is on x-ray scattering, spectroscopy, and imaging research, primarily at major BES-supported user facilities.

242

X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal XAS data from PS II at SSRL BL 9-3. It consists of aRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), the Advanced Light Source (operated by DOE OBES. The SSRL Biomedical Technology program

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crystal XAS data from PS II at SSRL BL 9-3. It consists of aRadiation Laboratory (SSRL), the Advanced Light Source (operated by DOE OBES. The SSRL Biomedical Technology program

Yano, Junko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning micro-Raman spectroscopy of structural irregularities and strains deep inside the multilayered InGaN/GaN heterostructure  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy are used to study the spatial distribution of strains in the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN layers and structural quality of these layers in a multilayered light-emitting diode structure produced by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition onto (0001)-oriented sapphire substrates. It is shown that elastic strains almost completely relax at the heterointerface between the thick GaN buffer layer and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN buffer superlattice. It is established that the GaN layers in the superlattice are in a stretched state, whereas the alloy layers are in a compressed state. In magnitude, the stretching strains in the GaN layers are lower than the compressive strains in the InGaN layers. It is shown that, as compared to the buffer layers, the layers of the superlattice contain a smaller number of dislocations and the distribution of dislocations is more randomly disordered. In micro-Raman studies on scanning through the thickness of the multilayered structure, direct evidence is obtained for the asymmetric gradient distributions of strains and crystal imperfections of the epitaxial nitride layers along the direction of growth. It is shown that the emission intensity of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum well is considerably (more than 30 times) higher than the emission intensity of the GaN barrier layers, suggesting the high efficiency of trapping of charge carriers by the quantum well.

Strelchuk, V. V., E-mail: Strelch@isp.kiev.ua; Kladko, V. P.; Avramenko, E. A.; Kolomys, O. F.; Safryuk, N. V.; Konakova, R. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Yavich, B. S., E-mail: byavich@soptel.ru [ZAO Svetlana-Optoelectronics (Russian Federation); Valakh, M. Ya.; Machulin, V. F.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

X-ray microtomography  

SciTech Connect

In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

Landis, Eric N., E-mail: landis@maine.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Maine, 5711 Boardman Hall, Orono, Maine 04469 (United States); Keane, Denis T., E-mail: dtkeane@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University (United States); DND-CAT, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Bldg. 432/A002, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Inhomogeneity and glass-forming ability in the bulk metallic glass Pd{sub 42.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} as seen via x-ray spectroscopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core-level photoemission spectroscopy and anomalous x-ray scattering (AXS) measurements were performed for the Pd{sub 42.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} (PNCP) excellent metallic glass to investigate the chemical nature and local atomic structure, and the results were compared to those in Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 40}P{sub 20}. The P 2p core levels clearly separate into two states, indicating that the P atoms have two different chemical sites, which is a strong experimental proof for the existence of an elastic inhomogeneity. From the AXS close to the Pd K edge, a specific Pd-P-Pd atomic configuration was observed, which is related to the stable state in the P 2p core levels. All of the core levels measured in PNCP have the deepest binding energies among these glasses, indicating the most stable electronic states. Local structure around the P atoms is discussed by the AXS data and a metastable crystal appeared in a supercooled metallic alloy close to PNCP.

Hosokawa, S. [Center for Materials Research Using Third-Generation Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, Hiroshima Institute of Technology, Hiroshima 731-5193 (Japan); Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Sato, H.; Nakatake, M. [Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan); Ichitsubo, T.; Matsubara, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Happo, N. [Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Berar, J.-F.; Boudet, N. [Institut Neel, CNRS, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Usuki, T. [Department of Material and Biological Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Pilgrim, W.-C. [Physikalische Chemie, Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Nishiyama, N. [R and D Institute of Metals and Composites for Future Industries, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

250

Statistically meaningful data on the chemical state of ironprecipitates in processed multicrystalline silicon usingsynchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray fluorescence microscopy (mu-XRF), x-ray beam induced current (XBIC), and x-ray absorption spectromicroscopy (mu-XAS) were performed on fully-processed Bay Six cast multicrystalline silicon and aluminum-gettered AstroPower Silicon-Film(TM) sheet material. Over ten iron precipitates--predominantly of iron silicide--were identified at low lifetime regions in both materials, both at grain boundaries and intragranular defects identified by XBIC. In addition, large (micron-sized) particles containing oxidized iron and other impurities (Ca, Cr, Mn) were found in BaySix material. The smaller iron silicide precipitates were more numerous and spatially distributed than their larger oxidized iron counterparts, and thus deemed more detrimental to minority carrier diffusion length.

Buonassisi, T.; Heuer, M.; Istratov, A.A.; Weber, E.R.; Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Marcus, M.; Lu, J.; Rozgonyi, G.; Schindler, R.; Jonczyk, R.; Rand, J.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

251

Development of soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system with a two-dimensional angle-resolved time-of-flight analyzer at SPring-8 BL07LSU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a soft x-ray time-resolved photoemission spectroscopy system using synchrotron radiation (SR) at SPring-8 BL07LSU and an ultrashort pulse laser system. Two-dimensional angle-resolved measurements were performed with a time-of-flight-type analyzer. The photoemission spectroscopy system is synchronized to light pulses of SR and laser using a time control unit. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by mapping the band structure of a Si(111) crystal over the surface Brillouin zones and observing relaxation of the surface photo-voltage effect using the pump (laser) and probe (SR) method.

Ogawa, Manami; Yamamoto, Susumu; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Yukawa, Ryu; Fukushima, Akiko; Harasawa, Ayumi; Kakizaki, Akito; Matsuda, Iwao [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kousa, Yuka; Kondoh, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshihito [RIKEN/SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

4D Functional Materials Science with X-ray Microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Studies of Lattice Dynamics in Thin Bismuth Films · Understanding Fatigue and Corrosion-Fatigue Behavior by In Situ 3D X-ray ...

253

Particle Accelerator & X-Ray Optics | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hard X-Ray Quad Collimator Facilitates Microcrystallography Experiments Isotopic Abundance in Atom Trap Trace Analysis Nanomaterials Analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope...

254

X RAY TU E WITH MAGNETI ELE TRON STEERING  

Sandia National Laboratories has created an improved efficiency compact X-ray source to address a wide range ... escape the anode and cause electron h ...

255

Improved Treatment of X-ray Resistant & Inoperable Cancers ...  

If the electron beam can be transported to the internal cancer without exposure to tissue, ... This figure shows a comparison of X-ray radiation ...

256

Formation of an SEI on a LiMn(2)O(4) Cathode during Room Temperature Charge-Discharge Cycling Studied by Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy at the Fluorine K-edge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formation on the surface of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrodes during room temperature charge-discharge cycling was studied using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Fluorine (F) K-edge. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} electrodes without any binder were prepared by electrostatic spray deposition to eliminate the signal originating from the PVDF binder in the F K-edge X-ray absorption spectra. The F K-edge absorption spectra show that the SEI layer forms at a very early stage of cycling. SEI growth takes place during discharge. In addition, LiF formation is accelerated if the discharge step follows a charge step. The F K-edge absorption spectra suggest that the major component of the SEI is LiF.

Chung, K.Y.; Yang, X.; Yoon, W.-S.; Kim, K.-B.; Cho, B.-W.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

X-ray Security Screening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National and International Standards for X-ray Security Screening Applications. Summary: The primary objective of this ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

259

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

260

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

262

Tunable X-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

263

Deflection gating for time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a newly developed gating technique for a time-resolving photoemission microscope. The technique makes use of an electrostatic deflector within the microscope's electron optical system for fast switching between two electron-optical paths, one of which is used for imaging, while the other is blocked by an aperture stop. The system can be operated with a switching time of 20 ns and shows superior dark current rejection. We report on the application of this new gating technique to exploit the time structure in the injection bunch pattern of the synchrotron radiation source BESSY II at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for time-resolved measurements in the picosecond regime.

Wiemann, C.; Kaiser, A. M.; Cramm, S. [Peter Gruenberg Institut PGI-6 'Electronic Properties', Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Schneider, C. M. [Peter Gruenberg Institut PGI-6 'Electronic Properties', Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Fakultaet fuer Physik and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE), Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

The potential for extending the spectral range accessible to the european X-ray free electron laser in the direction of longer wavelengths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The baseline specifications of European XFEL give a range of wavelengths between 0.1 nm and 2 nm. This wavelength range at fixed electron beam energy 17.5 GeV can be covered by operating the SASE FEL with three undulators which have different period and tunable gap. A study of the potential for the extending the spectral range accessible to the XFEL in the direction of longer wavelengths is presented. The extension of the wavelength range to 6 nm would be cover the water window in the VUV region, opening the facility to a new class of experiments. There are at least two possible sources of VUV radiation associated with the X-ray FEL; the "low (2.5 GeV) energy electron beam dedicated" and the " 17.5 GeV spent beam parasitic" (or "after-burner") source modes. The second alternative, "after-burner undulator" is the one we regard as most favorable. It is possible to place an undulator as long as 80 meters after 2 nm undulator. Ultimately, VUV undulator would be able to deliver output power approaching 100 GW. A b...

Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

266

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

267

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

268

Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electron heated target temperature measurements in petawatt laser experiments based on extreme ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent methods (extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy, imaging at 68 and 256 eV) have been used to measure planar target rear surface plasma temperature due to heating by hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by ultraintense laser-plasma interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in the 50-400 eV region and imaging at the 68 and 256 eV photon energies give a planar deuterated carbon target rear surface pre-expansion temperature in the 125-150 eV range, with the rear plasma plume averaging a temperature approximately 74 eV.

Ma, T. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Beg, F. N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Chung, H.-K.; Key, M. H.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Hatchett, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Chen, C. D. [Plasma Science Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Freeman, R. R.; Link, A.; Offermann, D. T.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [College of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The Ohio State University, 425 Stillman Hall, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1123 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy system with a servo-motor-driven channel-cut monochromator with a temporal resolution of 10 ms  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a quick-scanning x-ray absorption fine structure (QXAFS) system and installed it at the recently constructed synchrotron radiation beamline BL33XU at the SPring-8. Rapid acquisition of high-quality QXAFS data was realized by combining a servo-motor-driven Si channel-cut monochromator with a tapered undulator. Two tandemly aligned monochromators with channel-cut Si(111) and Si(220) crystals covered energy ranges of 4.0-28.2 keV and 6.6-46.0 keV, respectively. The system allows the users to adjust instantly the energy ranges of scans, the starting angles of oscillations, and the frequencies. The channel-cut crystals are cooled with liquid nitrogen to enable them to withstand the high heat load from the undulator radiation. Deformation of the reflecting planes is reduced by clamping each crystal with two cooling blocks. Performance tests at the Cu K-edge demonstrated sufficiently high data quality for x-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended x-ray absorption fine-structure analyses with temporal resolutions of up to 10 and 25 ms, respectively.

Nonaka, T.; Dohmae, K.; Araki, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Hirose, Y. [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Uruga, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Tanida, H.; Goto, S. [JASRI/Spring-8, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mochizuki, T. [JASRI/Spring-8, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Toyama Corp., Zama, Kanagawa 228-0003 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Scanning x-ray microscope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning x-ray microscope is described including: an x-ray source capable of emitting a beam of x-rays; a collimator positioned to receive the beam of x-rays and to collimate this beam, a focusing cone means to focus the beam of x-rays, directed by the collimator, onto a focal plane, a specimen mount for supporting a specimen in the focal plane to receive the focused beam of x-rays, and x-ray beam scanning means to relatively move the specimen and the focusing cone means and collimator to scan the focused x-ray beam across the specimen. A detector is disposed adjacent the specimen to detect flourescent photons emitted by the specimen upon exposure to the focused beam of x-rays to provide an electrical output representative of this detection. Means are included for displaying and/or recording the information provided by the output from the detector, as are means for providing information to the recording and/or display means representative of the scan rate and position of the focused x-ray beam relative to the specimen whereby the recording and/or display means can correlate the information received to record and/or display quantitive and distributive information as to the quantity and distribution of elements detected in the specimen. Preferably there is provided an x-ray beam modulation means upstream, relative to the direction of emission of the xray beam, of the focusing cone means.

Wang, C.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Photon Sciences | Beamlines | IXS: Inelastic X-ray Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IXS: Inelastic X-ray Scattering IXS: Inelastic X-ray Scattering Poster | Fact Sheet | Preliminary Design Report Scientific Scope Many hot topics related to the high frequency dynamics of condensed matter require both a narrower and steeper resolution function and access to a broader dynamic range than what are currently available. This represents a sort of "no man's land" that falls right in the dynamic gap lying between the high frequency spectroscopies, such as inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), and the low frequency ones. New IXS spectrometers with improved energy and momentum resolutions would be required to fill this gap. To achieve this goal, a new x-ray optics concept for both the monochromatization and energy analysis of x-rays will be implemented at the NSLS-II Inelastic X-ray Scattering beamline. This solution exploits the

273

X-ray chemistry in envelopes around young stellar objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present chemical models of the envelope of a young stellar object (YSO) exposed to a central X-ray source. The models are applied to the massive star-forming region AFGL 2591 for different X-ray fluxes. The total X-ray ionization rate is dominated by the `secondary' ionization rate of H2 resulting from fast electrons. The carbon, sulphur and nitrogen chemistries are discussed. It is found that He+ and H3+ are enhanced and trigger a peculiar chemistry. Several molecular X-ray tracers are found and compared to tracers of the far ultraviolet (FUV) field. Like ultraviolet radiation fields, X-rays enhance simple hydrides, ions and radicals. In contrast to ultraviolet photons, X-rays can penetrate deep into the envelope and affect the chemistry even at large distances from the source. Whereas the FUV enhanced species cover a region of 200-300 AU, the region enhanced by X-rays is >1000 AU. Best-fit models for AFGL 2591 predict an X-ray luminosity LX > 1e+31 ergs/s with a hard X-ray spectrum TX > 3e+07 K. Furthermore, we find LX/Lbol ~ 1e-6. The chemistry of the bulk of the envelope mass is dominated by cosmic-ray induced reactions rather than by X-ray induced ionization for X-ray luminosities LX < 1e+33 ergs/s. The calculated line intensities of HCO+ and HCS+ show that high-J lines are more affected than lower J lines by the presence of X-rays due to their higher critical densities, and that such differences are detectable even with large aperture single-dish telescopes. Future instruments such as Herschel-HIFI or SOFIA will be able to observe X-ray enhanced hydrides whereas the sensitivity and spatial resolution of ALMA is well-suited to measure the size and geometry of the region affected by X-rays.

P. Staeuber; S. D. Doty; E. F. van Dishoeck; A. O. Benz

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

275

VERY LARGE TELESCOPE/X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE CANDIDATE BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARY MAXI J1659-152 IN OUTBURST  

SciTech Connect

We present the optical to near-infrared spectrum of MAXI J1659-152 during the onset of its 2010 X-ray outburst. The spectrum was obtained with X-shooter on the ESO Very Large Telescope early in the outburst simultaneous with high-quality observations at both shorter and longer wavelengths. At the time of the observations, the source was in the low-hard state. The X-shooter spectrum includes many broad ({approx}2000 km s{sup -1}), double-peaked emission profiles of H, He I, and He II, characteristic signatures of a low-mass X-ray binary during outburst. We detect no spectral signatures of the low-mass companion star. The strength of the diffuse interstellar bands results in a lower limit to the total interstellar extinction of A{sub V} {approx_equal} 0.4 mag. Using the neutral hydrogen column density obtained from the X-ray spectrum we estimate A{sub V} {approx_equal} 1 mag. The radial velocity structure of the interstellar Na I D and Ca II H and K lines results in a lower limit to the distance of {approx}4 {+-} 1 kpc, consistent with previous estimates. With this distance and A{sub V} , the dereddened spectral energy distribution represents a flat disk spectrum. The two 10 minute X-shooter spectra show significant variability in the red wing of the emission-line profiles, indicating a global change in the density structure of the disk, though on a timescale much shorter than the typical viscous timescale of the disk.

Kaur, Ramanpreet; Kaper, Lex; Ellerbroek, Lucas E.; Russell, David M.; Altamirano, Diego; Wijnands, Rudy; Yang Yijung; Van der Horst, Alexander; Van der Klis, Michiel [Astronomical Institute 'Anton Pannekoek', University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); D'Avanzo, Paolo [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, 23807 Merate (Italy); De Ugarte Postigo, Antonio; Fynbo, Johan P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, Copenhagen 2100 (Denmark); Flores, Hector [GEPI, Paris Observatory, CNRS, University of Paris-Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Goldoni, Paolo [Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie, 10 rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Thoene, Christina C. [IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Wiersema, Klaas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Kuulkers, Erik, E-mail: r.kaur@uva.nl [European Space Agency, European Space Astronomy Centre, P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain)

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

High-Energy Processes in Young Stars: Chandra X-ray Spectroscopy of HDE 283572, RY Tau, and LkCa 21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Weak-lined T Tauri stars (WTTS) represent the important stage of stellar evolution between the accretion phase and the zero-age main sequence. At this stage, the star decouples from its accretion disk, and spins up to a higher rotation rate than in the preceding classical T Tauri phase. Consequently, dynamo processes can be expected to become even stronger at this stage. High energy processes can have effects on the remaining circumstellar material, possibly including protoplanets and planetesimals, and these effects may account for certain observable properties of asteroids in the current solar system. Chandra observed for 100 ks the WTTS HDE 283572 which probes the PMS stage of massive A-type stars. We present first results of the analysis of its high-resolution X-ray spectrum obtained with the High-Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer. A wide range of Fe lines of high ionization states are observed, indicating a continuous emission measure distribution. No significant signal is detected longward of the O \\textsc{viii} Ly$\\alpha$ line because of the high photoelectric absorption. We also report on the preliminary analysis of the zeroth order spectra of RY Tau and LkCa21. In particular, we show evidence of an emission line in RY Tau at 6.4 keV that we identify as fluorescent emission by neutral Fe caused by a strong X-ray flare which illuminated some structure in (or surrounding) the CTTS. A comparison of X-ray spectra of classical T Tau stars, other WTTS, and young main-sequence stars is made.

Marc Audard; Stephen L. Skinner; Kester W. Smith; Manuel Guedel; Roberto Pallavicini

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

277

Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

Silver, Eric H. (Berkeley, CA); Legros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norm W. (Livermore, CA); Goulding, Fred (Lafayette, CA); Landis, Don (Pinole, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Adsorption and decomposition of Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 3} at platinum surfaces: An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an attractive power source for mobile applications due to the high-energy density of methanol, the portability and ease of distribution of liquid rather than gaseous fuel, and elimination of the need for a bulky, power-consuming fuel reformer. There are several factors limiting the power output of polymer electrolyte DMFCs. One of the major factors is the slow kinetics of the methanol electrooxidation reaction on the conventional platinum catalyst material. A CH{sub 3}CN-modified triruthenium carbonyl cluster, Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 9}(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 3}(I), has been adsorbed on platinum and platinum oxide surfaces from dichloromethane solutions. The modified surface has been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and polarized grazing angle Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microscopy. The proposed mechanism for the adsorption of I involves the chemisorption of the metal cluster at the platinum surface by losing the acetonitrile ligand. The original cluster, Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub 12}, could not be adsorbed under the same experimental conditions used for cluster I. The cluster-modified surface was treated with hydrogen for the reduction of the cluster to its metallic state on the Pt surface. This was done at different temperatures. The XPS results show the formation of a complex Ru-RuO{sub 2}-RuO{sub 3}/Pt surface.

Fachini, E.R.; Cabrera, C.R. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

280

X-Ray Scattering Group, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D.F. Inelastic x-ray scattering investigations of lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO1-xFy superconductors. Proceedings of The 9th International Conference on Spectroscopies in Novel...

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281

X-ray Science Division: Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division: Groups Division: Groups Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics (AMO) Primary Contact: Stephen Southworth Work focuses on understanding how strong optical and x-ray fields interact with matter, with an emphasis on photonic control of electronic, atomic and molecular motion. Chemical and Materials Science (CMS) Primary Contact: Randy Winans Research Disciplines: Chemistry, Materials Science Detectors (DET) Primary Contact: Antonino Miceli GMCA Structural Biology Facility (MX) Primary Contact: Robert Fischetti Research Disciplines: Biology, Life Sciences Imaging (IMG) Primary Contact: Francesco DeCarlo Research Disciplines: Materials Science, Biology, Physics, Life Sciences Inelastic X-ray & Nuclear Resonant Scattering (IXN) Primary Contact: Thomas Gog Research Disciplines: Condensed Matter Physics, Geophysics, Materials

282

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Multivariate Curve Resolution Analysis for Interpretation of Dynamic Cu K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Spectra for a Cu Doped V2O5 Lithium Battery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vanadium pentoxide materials prepared through sol-gel processes act as excellent intercalation hosts for lithium as well as polyvalent cations. A chemometric approach has been applied to study the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) evolution during in situ scanning of the Cu{sub 0.1}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} xerogel/Li ions battery. Among the more common techniques, the fixed size windows evolving factor analysis (FSWEFA) permits the number of species involved in the experiment to be determined and the range of existence of each of them. This result, combined with the constraints of the invariance of the total concentration and non-negativity of both concentrations and spectra, enabled us to obtain the spectra of the pure components using a multivariate curve resolution refined by an alternate least squares fitting procedure. This allowed the normalized concentration profile to be understood. This data treatment evidenced the occurrence, for the first time, of three species during the battery charging. This fact finds confirmation by comparison of the pure spectra with the experimental ones. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis confirms the occurrence of three different chemical environments of Cu during battery charging.

Conti, P.; Zamponi, S; Giorgetti, M; Berrettoni, M; Smyrl, W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Frontiers in X-Ray Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

Linda Young

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

X-RAY PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY OF X RAY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NANOMATERIALS – GRAPHENE AND III-V INTERFACES RM Wallace RM Wallace ... Conclusions 29 Page 30. Graphene at a Crossroads ...

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

286

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

287

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

288

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

289

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

290

Background X-ray Spectrum of Radioactive Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) is commonly used with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyze the elemental compositions and microstructures of a variety of samples. For example, the microstructures of nuclear fuels are commonly investigated with this technique. However, the radioactivity of some materials introduces additional X-rays that contribute to the EDS background spectrum. These X-rays are generally not accounted for in spectral analysis software, and can cause misleading results. X-rays from internal conversion [1], Bremsstrahlung [2] radiation associated with alpha ionizations and beta particle interactions [3], and gamma rays from radioactive decay can all elevate the background of radioactive materials.

Shannon Yee; Dawn E. Janney

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

X-ray compass for determining device orientation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

X-ray compass for determining device orientation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

294

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

295

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

296

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

297

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft X Rays Print The geometric structure of liquid water has been investigated in detail by many techniques, but many details are still under debate, such as the actual number of hydrogen bonds (at a given time) between the various water molecules. Even less is known about the electronic structure. Since it is the intermittent bonding between water molecules that gives liquid water its peculiar characteristics, the electronic structure plays a crucial role in understanding the properties of the liquid state. Consequently, information essential for insight into chemical and biological processes in aqueous environments is lacking. To address this need, researchers from Germany and the U.S. have used soft x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS to gain detailed insight into the electronic structure of liquid water. Their spectra show a strong isotope and a weak temperature effect, and, for the first time, a splitting of the primary emission line in x-ray emission spectra. By making use of the internal "femtosecond clock" of the core-hole lifetime, a detailed picture of the electronic structure can be painted that involves fast dissociation processes of the probed water molecules.

298

Determining Relative f and d Orbital Contributions to M?Cl Covalency in MCl62– (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and UOCl5 Using Cl K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect

Chlorine K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and ground-state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) were used to probe electronic structure for O{sub h}-MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}(M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and C{sub 4v}-UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, and to determine the relative contributions of valence 3d, 4d, 5d, 6d, and 5f orbitals in M-Cl bonding. Spectral interpretations were guided by time-dependent DFT calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths, which agree well with the experimental XAS spectra. The data provide new spectroscopic evidence for the involvement of both 5f and 6d orbitals in actinide-ligand bonding in UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}. For the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, where transitions into d orbitals of t{sub 2g} symmetry are spectroscopically resolved for all four complexes, the experimentally determined Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond increases from 8.3(4)% (TiCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}) to 10.3(5)% (ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), 12(1)% (HfCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), and 26 18(1)% (UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}). Chlorine K-edge XAS spectra of UOCl{sub 5}{sup -} provide additional insights into the transition assignments by 27 lowering the symmetry to C{sub 4v}, where five pre-edge transitions into both 5f and 6d orbitals are observed. For UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, the XAS data 28 suggest that orbital mixing associated with the U 5f orbitals is considerably lower than that of the U 6d orbitals. For both UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}29 and UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, the ground-state DFT calculations predict a larger 5f contribution to bonding than is determined experimentally. 30 These findings are discussed in the context of conventional theories of covalent bonding for d- and f-block metal complexes.

Minasian, Stefan G.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Martin, Richard L.; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Shuh, David K.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Yang, Ping

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

299

Evolution of local structures in polycrystalline Zn1?xMgxO (0<=x<=0.15) studied by Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray pair-distribution-function analysis  

SciTech Connect

The local structures of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O alloys have been studied by Raman spectroscopy and by synchrotron x-ray pair-distribution-function (PDF) analysis. Within the solid solution range (0 {le} x {le} 0.15) of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O, the wurtzite framework is maintained with Mg homogeneously distributed throughout the wurtzite lattice. The E{sub 2}{sup high} Raman line of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O displays systematic changes in response to the evolution of the crystal lattice upon the Mg substitution. The redshift and broadening of the E{sub 2}{sup high} mode are explained by the expansion of hexagonal ab dimensions and compositional disorder of Zn/Mg, respectively. Synchrotron x-ray PDF analyses of Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O reveal that the Mg atoms have a slightly reduced wurtzite parameter u and more regular tetrahedral bond distances than the Zn atoms. For both Zn and Mg, the internal tetrahedral geometries are independent of the alloy composition.

Kim, Young-Il; Page, Katharine; Limarga, Andi M.; Clarke, David R.; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB)

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

X-rays from T Tau: A test case for accreting T Tauri stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We test models for the generation of X-rays in accreting T Tauri stars (TTS), using X-ray data from the classical TTS T Tau. High-resolution spectroscopy from the Reflection Grating Spectrometers on XMM-Newton is used to infer electron densities, element abundances and the thermal structure of the X-ray source. We also discuss the ultraviolet light curve obtained by the Optical Monitor, and complementary ground-based photometry. A high-resolution image from Chandra constrains contributions from the two companions of T Tau N. The X-ray grating spectrum is rich in emission lines, but shows an unusual mixture of features from very hot (~30 MK) and very cool (1-3 MK) plasma, both emitted by similar amounts of emission measure. The cool plasma confirms the picture of a soft excess in the form of an enhanced OVII/OVIII Lya flux ratio, similar to that previously reported for other accreting TTS. Diagnostics from lines formed by this plasma indicate low electron densities (cool ``soft-excess'' plasma is orders of magnitude below that predicted for an accretion shock, assuming previously determined accretion rates of (3-6)E-8 M_sun/y. We argue that loading of magnetic field lines with infalling material suppresses the heating process in a part of the corona. We thus suggest that the X-ray production of T Tau is influenced by the accretion process although the X-rays may not form in the bulk of the accretion footpoints.

M. Guedel; S. L. Skinner; S. Yu. Mel'nikov; M. Audard; A. Telleschi; K. R. Briggs

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

TENDER ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TENDER ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTION TENDER ENERGY X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY (TES) Project Team: S. Bare 1,2 , J. Brandes 3 , T. Buonassisi 4 , J. Chen 5,2 , M. Croft 6 , E. DiMasi 7 , A. Frenkel 8,2 , D. Hesterberg 9 , S. Hulbert 7,2 , S. Khalid 7 , S. Myneni 10 , P. Northrup 7,11 , E.T. Rasbury 11 , B. Ravel 12 , R. Reeder 11 , J. Rodriguez 7,2 , D. Sparks 5,13 , V. Stojanoff 7 , G. Waychunas 14 1 UOP LLC, 2 Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium, 3 Skidaway Inst. of Oceanography, 4 MIT Laboratory for Photovoltaics Research, 5 Univ. of Delaware, 6 Rutgers Univ., 7 Brookhaven National Lab, 8 Yeshiva Univ., 9 North Carolina State Univ., 10 Princeton Univ., 11 Stony Brook Univ., 12 NIST, 13 Delaware Environmental Inst., 14 Lawrence Berkeley National Lab TECHNIQUES: High performance and in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and spatially-resolved XAS of

302

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Kinoform optics applied to X-ray photon correlation specroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moderate-demagnification higher-order silicon kinoform focusing lenses have been fabricated to facilitate small-angle X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments. The geometric properties of such lenses, their focusing performance and their applicability for XPCS measurements are described. It is concluded that one-dimensional vertical X-ray focusing via silicon kinoform lenses significantly increases the usable coherent flux from third-generation storage-ring light sources for small-angle XPCS experiments.

Sandy, A.R.; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Narayanan, S.; Sprung, M.; Su, J.D; Isakovic, A.F.; Stein, A.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron lasers there has been interest in using coherent x-rays to probe condensed matter systems....

305

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures by X-ray Spectro...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F. Schlotter and J. Sthr (SSRL) The unprecedented properties of X-ray free electron lasers (X-FELs) under development world wide will open the door for entirely new classes of...

306

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - X-ray Laser Brings Cellular...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a March experiment indicates it has, for the first time, used an X-ray free-electron laser - SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source - to reconstitute the structure of a G...

307

Science Challenges & Opportunities for an Advanced X-ray Free...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Challenges & Opportunities for an Advanced X-ray Free-electron Laser Wednesday, October 2, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Kavli 3rd Floor Conference Room Robert Schoenlein, Lawrence...

308

X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

X-ray Transition Energies Search Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[skip navigation] X-ray Transition Energies Database Main Page Search for X-ray transition energies by element(s), transition ...

310

Resonant Auger Effect at High X-Ray Intensity  

SciTech Connect

The resonant Auger effect of atomic neon exposed to high-intensity x-ray radiation in resonance with the 1s {yields} 3p transition is discussed. High intensity here means that the x-ray peak intensity is sufficient ({approx} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) to induce Rabi oscillations between the neon ground state and the 1s{sup -1}3p ({sup 1}P) state within the relaxation lifetime of the inner-shell vacancy. For the numerical analysis presented, an effective two-level model, including a description of the resonant Auger decay process, is employed. Both coherent and chaotic x-ray pulses are treated. The latter are used to simulate radiation from x-ray free-electron lasers based on the principle of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Observing x-ray-driven atomic population dynamics in the time domain is challenging for chaotic pulse ensembles. A more practical option for experiments using x-ray free-electron lasers is to measure the line profiles in the kinetic energy distribution of the resonant Auger electron. This provides information on both atomic population dynamics and x-ray pulse properties.

Rohringer, N; Santra, R

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Importance of secondary-electron collisional ionization (avalanche) for x-ray pulses incident on missiles-in-flight. Technical report, 1 February 1984-14 May 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report present a series of contour plots for both strong and moderate avalanche on the electric field-pressure plane. Plots are given for effective electric field durations from 0.1 to 100 ns, consistent with times corresponding to x-ray pulse widths of interest in nuclear weapon effects. The computations were carried out with special concern for accuracy. The adequacy of the air-chemistry data set is confirmed by comparison with experimental swarm data. The effect of the delay for the avalanche frequency to reach its steady-state value is included in the calculations.

Bloomberg, H.W.

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

Automated Chemical Analysis of Internally Mixed Aerosol Particles Using X-ray Spectromicroscopy at the Carbon K-Edge  

SciTech Connect

We have developed an automated data analysis method for atmospheric particles using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled with near edge X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). This method is applied to complex internally mixed submicrometer particles containing organic and inorganic material. Several algorithms were developed to exploit NEXAFS spectral features in the energy range from 278 to 320 eV for quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of elemental carbon, organic carbon, potassium, and noncarbonaceous elements in particles of mixed composition. This energy range encompasses the carbon K-edge and potassium L2 and L3 edges. STXM/NEXAFS maps of different chemical components were complemented with a subsequent analysis using elemental maps obtained by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDX). We demonstrate the application of the automated mapping algorithms for data analysis and the statistical classification of particles.

Gilles, Mary K; Moffet, R.C.; Henn, T.; Laskin, A.

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Characterization of fuel cell electrocatalysts using x-ray methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High surface area electrocatalysts are critical components of high efficiency low cost polymer membrane fuel cells. The platinum and/or platinum alloy catalysts are typically prepared as nanocrystalline carbon supported and unsupported anode and cathode materials. The choice of catalyst type depends on whether the application is for hydrogen or direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 2 nm crystallite size Pt supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon is the anode and cathode catalyst most commonly used for hydrogen fuel cells while Pt-Ru alloys of 3-5 nm are currently being used for anode catalysts in DMFC systems. Key parameters for successful catalyst design are average alloy composition, crystal structure, crystallite composition crystallite size and size distribution. All of the aforementioned parameters can be efficently and nondistructively measured using laboratory scale X-ray analysis methods. Recent advances in personal computer technology allow for full profile (Rietveld) and Warren-Averbach Fourier transform X-ray diffraction methods to be performed quickly and routinely. Full profile, also known as whole pattern analysis methods, model the entire X-ray diffraction pattern rather than just peak maxima. Highly overlapped diffraction patterns are very common in nanocrystalline materials due to size related line broadening phenomena. Full profile methods allow for the precise determination of lattice parameters and accurate measurement of individual diffraction line intensities. Phase fractions and percentages of amorphous material can also be estimated using full profile analysis techniques. Warren-Averbach Fourier transform methods allow for the determination of particle size distributions. This method offers advantages in speed and cost over electron microscopic analysis methods to obtain crystallite size distributions. Fundamental parameter X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy methods allows for the rapid accurate determination of catalyst composition and mass loadings on raw materials and membrane electrode assemblies. Another advantage of this method over older empirical standard methods is the elimination of many calibration standards of different compositions. The fundamental parameter method needs only a single standard per element for calibration. We have analyzed a large number of Pt and Pt/Ru based catalysts prepared by various synthesis techniques. These methods include unsupported and supported catalysts prepared by: colloidal precipitation, spray pyrolysis and ultrasonic atomization freeze drying methods. As prepared catalysts vary substantially crystallite size and size distribution. The degree of crystallinity, alloy composition and oxidation state also vary substantially with preparation method.

Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Zawodzinski, C. (Christine); Ren, X. (Xiaoming)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 thin film is low electrical resistivity, which affects thetemperature. The low electrical resistivity of BiFeO 3 thinneeds the high electrical resistivity in order to obtain

Higuchi, T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Soft X-Ray Spectroscopic Study of Dense Strontium-Doped Lanthanum Manganite Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the Mn charge state, chemical composition, and electronic structure of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO) cathodes during the catalytic activation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) has been studies using X-ray spectroscopy of as-processed, exposed, and activated dense thin LSMO films. Comparison of O K-edge and Mn L{sub 3,2}-edge X-ray absorption spectra from the different stages of LSMO cathodes revealed that the largest change after the activation occurred in the Mn charge state with little change in the oxygen environment. Core-level X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Mn L{sub 3} resonant photoemission spectroscopy studies of exposed and as-processed LSMO determined that the SOFC environment (800 C ambient pressure of O{sub 2}) alone results in La deficiency (severest near the surface with Sr doping >0.55) and a stronger Mn{sup 4+} contribution, leading to the increased insulating character of the cathode prior to activation. Meanwhile, O K-edge X-ray absorption measurements support Sr/La enrichment nearer the surface, along with the formation of mixed Sr{sub x}Mn{sub y}O{sub z} and/or passive MnO{sub x} and SrO species.

L Piper; A Preston; S Cho; A DeMasi; J Laverock; K Smith; L Miara; J Davis; S Basu; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

317

Femtosecond Time-Delay X-ray Holography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Delay X-ray Holography Time-Delay X-ray Holography X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) will produce photon pulses with a unique and desirable combination of properties. Their short X-ray wavelengths allow penetration into materials and the ability to probe structure at and below the nanometer scale. Their ultra-short duration gives information about this structure at the fundamental time-scales of atoms and molecules. The extreme intensity of the pulses will allow this information to be acquired in a single shot, so that these studies can be carried out on non-repeatable processes or on weakly-scattering objects that will be modified by the pulse. A fourth property of XFEL pulses is their high transverse coherence, which brings the promise of decades of innovation in visible optics to the X-ray regime, such as holography, interferometry, and laser-based imaging. Making an effective use of XFEL pulses, however, will benefit from innovations that are new to both X-ray science and coherent optics. One such innovation is the new method of time-delay X-ray holography [i], recently demonstrated at the FLASH FEL at DESY in Hamburg, to measure the evolution of objects irradiated by intense pulses.

318

Apparatus for obtaining an X-ray image  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A computed tomography apparatus in which a fan-shaped X-ray beam is caused to pass through a section of an object, enabling absorption detection on the opposite side of the object by a detector comprising a plurality of discrete detector elements. An electron beam generating the X-ray beam by impacting upon a target is caused to rotate over the target.

Watanabe, Eiji (Tokyo, JP)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

X-RAY FLUORESCENCE MICROPROBE (XFM) TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAY FLUORESCENCE MICROPROBE (XFM) RAY FLUORESCENCE MICROPROBE (XFM) TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS WORLD-LEADING MICROFOCUSED EXAFS SPECTROSCOPY * XFM is an optimized three-pole wiggler beamline for the characterization of materials in an "as-is" state that are chemically heterogeneous at the micrometer scale via synchrotron induced X-ray fluorescence. * XFM includes instrumentation for microbeam X-ray fluorescence (µXRF), diffraction (µXRD) and fluorescence computed microtomography (FCMT) . However, it is optimized to provide users state-of-the-art microfocused Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (µEXAFS) spectroscopy between 4 to 20 keV. * XFM will trade-off beam size and flux for sample configuration flexibility. This includes more readily achievable stability

320

Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate  

SciTech Connect

Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwiatkowski, Kris K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapustinsky, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

X-ray emission from colliding laser plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Colliding Au, CD and Ti-Cr plasmas have been generated by illuminating two opposing foils each with a {approximately} 100J, 0.5 nsec, 2{omega} Nd-glass laser beam from the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos. The plasmas are being used to study plasma interactions which span the parameter regime from interpenetrating to collisional stagnation. X-ray emission during the laser target interaction and the subsequent collision is used to diagnose the initial plasma conditions and the colliding plasma properties. X-ray instrumentation consists of a 100 ps gated x-ray pinhole imager, a time-integratcd bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrograph and a gated x-ray spectrograph used to record isoelectronic spectra from the Ti-Cr plasmas. The imager has obtained multi-frame images of the collision and therefore, a measure of the stagnation length which is a function of the ion charge state and density and a strong function of the electron temperature. Other instrumentation includes a Thomson scattering spectrometer with probe beam, neutron detectors used to monitor the CD coated foil collisions and an ion spectrometer. We will describe the current status of the experiments and current results with emphasis on the x-ray emission diagnostics. We will also briefly describe the modeling using Lasnex and ISIS, a particle-in-cell code with massless fluid electrons and inter particle (classical) collisions.

Wilke, M.; Obst, A.W.; Winske, D. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

The complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 measured by the RGS instruments aboard XMM-Newton. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra demonstrate that the soft X-ray emission is extremely rich in X-ray emission lines and radiative recombination continua (RRC), with no clear evidence for any underlying continuum emission. Line emission, and the associated RRC, are clearly detected from hydrogen-like and helium-like ionization states of neon, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The measured lines are blueshifted with a velocity of between ~100-1000 km/s, with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 4151, approximately consistent with the outflow velocities of the absorption lines observed in the UV, suggestive of an origin for the UV and soft X-ray emission in the same material. Plasma diagnostics imply a range of electron temperatures of ~1-5x10^4 K and electron densities of between 10^8-10^10 cm^-3. The soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 is extremely similar to that of NGC 1068, suggesting that the soft X-ray excesses observed in many Seyfert galaxies may be composed of similar emission features. Modelling the RGS spectra in terms of emission from photoionized and photoexcited gas in an ionization cone reproduces all of the hydrogen-like and helium-like emission features observed in the soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 in detail and confirms the correspondence between the soft X-ray emission in NGC 4151 and NGC 1068.

N. J. Schurch; R. S. Warwick; R. E. Griffiths; S. M. Kahn

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

Reliable before-fabrication forecasting of expected surface slope distributions for x-ray optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of x-ray optics for the LCLS free-electron laser,” Proc.beamlines and diagnostics at LCLS,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods A

Yashchuk, Yekaterina V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

High-speed X-ray Full-field Imaging Applications at the APS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High-speed X-ray Full-field Imaging Applications at the APS ... Advances in Orientation Imaging Microscopy in Transmission Electron ...

326

Chest x-Rays | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chest x-Rays Chest x-Rays Chest x-Rays Chest X-ray B-Reading The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica. The B-reading is considered a special reading because doctors who are certified by NIOSH to perform B-readings use a specific protocol to read and record the findings as developed by the International Labour Organization (ILO). The ILO's protocol provides rules for systematically examining the x-ray in a step-by-step method and recording certain abnormalities or changes on the chest x-ray that can be attributable to

327

Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

Fridriksson, Joel Karl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

Le Gros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Larabell, Carolyn A. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

329

Tokamak physics studies using x-ray diagnostic methods  

SciTech Connect

X-ray diagnostic measurements have been used in a number of experiments to improve our understanding of important tokamak physics issues. The impurity content in TFTR plasmas, its sources and control have been clarified through soft x-ray pulse-height analysis (PHA) measurements. The dependence of intrinsic impurity concentrations and Z/sub eff/ on electron density, plasma current, limiter material and conditioning, and neutral-beam power have shown that the limiter is an important source of metal impurities. Neoclassical-like impurity peaking following hydrogen pellet injection into Alcator C and a strong effect of impurities on sawtooth behavior were demonstrated by x-ray imaging (XIS) measurements. Rapid inward motion of impurities and continuation of m = 1 activity following an internal disruption were demonstrated with XIS measurements on PLT using injected aluminum to enhance the signals. Ion temperatures up to 12 keV and a toroidal plasma rotation velocity up to 6 x 10/sup 5/ m/s have been measured by an x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) with up to 13 MW of 85-keV neutral-beam injection in TFTR. Precise wavelengths and relative intensities of x-ray lines in several helium-like ions and neon-like ions of silver have been measured in TFTR and PLT by the XCS. The data help to identify the important excitation processes predicted in atomic physics. Wavelengths of n = 3 to 2 silver lines of interest for x-ray lasers were measured, and precise instrument calibration techniques were developed. Electron thermal conductivity and sawtooth dynamics have been studied through XIS measurements on TFTR of heat-pulse propagation and compound sawteeth. A non-Maxwellian electron distribution function has been measured, and evidence of the Parail-Pogutse instability identified by hard x-ray PHA measurements on PLT during lower-hybrid current-drive experiments.

Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Fredrickson, E.; Hsuan, H.; McGuire, K.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Sesnic, S.; Stevens, J.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

SYNCHROTRON X-RAY BASED CHARACTERIZATION OF CDZNTE CRYSTALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals can be used for the room temperature-based detection of {gamma}-radiation. Structural/morphological heterogeneities within CZT, such as twinning, inclusions, and polycrystallinity can affect detector performance. We used a synchrotron-based X-ray technique, specifically extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, to determine whether there are differences on a local structural level between intact CZT of high and low radiation detector performance. These studies were complemented by data on radiation detector performance and transmission IR imaging. The EXAFS studies revealed no detectable local structural differences between the two types of CZT materials.

Duff, M

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

Spielman, R.B.

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Advances Toward Inner-Shell Photo-Ionization X-Ray Lasing at 45 (Angstrom)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inner-shell photo-ionization (ISPI) scheme requires photon energies at least high enough to photo-ionize the K-shell. {approx}286 eV, in the case of carbon. As a consequence of the higher cross-section, the inner-shell are selectively knocked out, leaving a hole state 1s2s{sup 2}2p{sup 2} in the singly charged carbon ion. This generates a population inversion to the radiatively connected state 1s{sup 2}2s{sup 2}2p in C+, leading to gain on the 1s-2p transition at 45 {angstrom}. The resonant character of the lasing transition in the single ionization state intrinsically allows much higher quantum efficiency compared to other schemes. Competing processes that deplete the population inversion include auto-ionization, Auger decay, and in particular collisional ionization of the outer-shell electrons by electrons generated during photo-ionization. These competing processes rapidly quench the gain. Consequently, the pump method must be capable of populating the inversion at a rate faster than the competing processes. This can be achieved by an ultra-fast, high intensity laser that is able to generate an ultra-fast, bright x-ray source. With current advances in the development of high-power, ultra-short pulse lasers it is possible to realize fast x-ray sources based that can deliver powerful pulses of light in the multiple hundred terawatt regime and beyond. They will discuss in greater detail concept, target design and a series of x-ray spectroscopy investigations they have conducted in order to optimize the absorber/x-ray converter--filter package.

Moon, S J; Weber, F A; Celliers, P M; Eder, D C

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

334

Compressed sensing for multidimensional electronic spectroscopy experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed sensing is a processing method that significantly reduces the number of measurements needed to accurately resolve signals in many fields of science and engineering. We develop a two-dimensional (2D) variant of compressed sensing for multidimensional electronic spectroscopy and apply it to experimental data. For the model system of atomic rubidium vapor, we find that compressed sensing provides significantly better resolution of 2D spectra than a conventional discrete Fourier transform from the same experimental data. We believe that by combining powerful resolution with ease of use, compressed sensing can be a powerful tool for the analysis and interpretation of ultrafast spectroscopy data.

J. N. Sanders; S. Mostame; S. K. Saikin; X. Andrade; J. R. Widom; A. H. Marcus; A. Aspuru-Guzik

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

The complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 measured by the RGS instruments aboard XMM-Newton. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra demonstrate that the soft X-ray emission is extremely rich in X-ray emission lines and radiative recombination continua (RRC), with no clear evidence for any underlying continuum emission. Line emission, and the associated RRC, are clearly detected from hydrogen-like and helium-like ionization states of neon, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The measured lines are blueshifted with a velocity of between ?100-1000 km s ?1, with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 4151, approximately consistent with the outflow velocities of the absorption lines observed in the UV spectrum of NGC 4151 (Kriss et al. 1995), suggestive of an origin for the UV and soft X-ray emission in the same material. Plasma diagnostics from the observed helium-like triplets, imply a range of electron temperatures of ?1-5×10 4 K and electron densities of between 10 8-10 10 cm ?3. The soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 is extremely similar to that of NGC 1068, both in terms of the atomic species present and in terms of the relative strengths

N. J. Schurch; R. S. Warwick; R. E. Griffiths; S. M. Kahn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the complex soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 measured by the RGS instruments aboard XMM-Newton. The XMM-Newton RGS spectra demonstrate that the soft X-ray emission is extremely rich in X-ray emission lines and radiative recombination continua (RRC), with no clear evidence for any underlying continuum emission. Line emission, and the associated RRC, are clearly detected from hydrogen-like and helium-like ionization states of neon, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. The measured lines are blueshifted with a velocity of between ~100-1000 km/s, with respect to the systemic velocity of NGC 4151, approximately consistent with the outflow velocities of the absorption lines observed in the UV, suggestive of an origin for the UV and soft X-ray emission in the same material. Plasma diagnostics imply a range of electron temperatures of ~1-5x10^4 K and electron densities of between 10^8-10^10 cm^-3. The soft X-ray spectrum of NGC 4151 is extremely similar to that of NGC 1068, suggesting that th...

Schurch, N J; Griffiths, R E; Kahn, S M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J{approx}5x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E=10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately D{sub x}=0.5 {mu}m.

Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohara, T. [Topcon Corporation, 75-1 Hasunuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Photoionization electronic spectroscopy of AlAg  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AlAg is produced in a supersonic molecular beam by laser vaporization of alloy samples in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. Electronic spectroscopy is studied with resonant two-photon photoionization. In addition to the two electronic excited states previously reported by Clements and Barrow, we have observed ten new states. Vibrational analyses are presented for each of these states, and rotational analyses are given for selected states. The number and characteristics of these excited states are compared to the predictions of recent [ital ab] [ital initio] calculations.

Robbins, D.L.; Yeh, C.S.; Pilgrim, J.S.; Lang, G.L.; Duncan, M.A. (Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Measurement of the central ion and electron temperature of tokamak plasmas from the x-ray line radiation of high-Z impurity ions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes measurements of the central ion and electron temperature of tokamak plasmas from the observation of the 1s - 2p resonance lines, and the associated dielectronic (1s/sup 2/nl - 1s2pnl, with n greater than or equal to 2) satellites, of helium-like iron (Fe XXV) and titanium (Ti XXI). The satellite to resonance line ratios are very sensitive to the electron temperature and are used as an electron temperature diagnostic. The ion temperature is deduced from the Doppler width of the 1s - 2p resonance lines. The measurements have been performed with high resolution Bragg crystal spectrometers on the PLT (Princeton Large Torus) and PDX (Poloidal Divertor Experiment) tokamaks. The details of the experimental arrangement and line evaluation are described, and the ion and electron temperature results are compared with those obtained from independent diagnostic techniques, such as the analysis of charge-exchange neutrals and measurements of the electron cyclotron radiation. The obtained experimental results permit a detailed comparison with theoretical predictions.

Bitter, M.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Hill, K.W.; Horton, R.; Roney, W.; Sauthoff, N.; Stodiek, W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Free-Electron Laser-Powered Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that have resisted all other techniques in structural biology. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the development of quantum information processors. Like nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), EPR spectroscopy becomes more powerful at high magnetic fields and frequencies, and with excitation by coherent pulses rather than continuous waves. However, the difficulty of generating sequences of powerful pulses at frequencies above 100 GHz has, until now, confined high-power pulsed EPR to magnetic fields of 3.5 T and below. Here we demonstrate that ~1 kW pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) can power a pulsed EPR spectrometer at 240 GHz...

Takahashi, S; Edwards, D T; van Tol, J; Ramian, G; Han, S; Sherwin, M S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SSRL School 2008 on Hard X-ray Scattering Techniques in MES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20-22, 2008 SSRL School on Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Techniques in Environmental and Materials Sciences: Theory and Application Group photo from the 2008 SSRL...

342

Pt–metal oxide aerogel catalysts: X-ray photoemission investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was used to study Pt–metal oxide aerogel catalysts that have been developed to respond to increased NO x emissions of lean-burn engines. Lean-burn engines

A. J. Nelson; John G. Reynolds; R. D. Sanner; P. R. Coronado; L. M. Hair

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

Fischer, Peter

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A window is disclosed that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 {micro}m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons. 1 fig.

Logan, C.M.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Cooled window for X-rays or charged particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A window that provides good structural integrity and a very high capacity for removal of the heat deposited by x-rays, electrons, or ions, with minimum attenuation of the desired beam. The window is cooled by providing microchannels therein through which a coolant is pumped. For example, the window may be made of silicon with etched microchannels therein and covered by a silicon member. A window made of silicon with a total thickness of 520 .mu.m transmits 96% of the x-rays at an energy of 60 keV, and the transmission is higher than 90% for higher energy photons.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

X-ray Diagnostics of Broad Absorption Line Quasar Geometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new generation of sensitive X-ray measurements are indicating that the existence of X-ray attenuation column densities, $N_{H}>10^{24}\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$ is quite common amongst broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs). This is significant to the geometry of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow. In particular, such an X-ray shield also shields equatorial accretion disk winds from the UV, thereby preventing high velocity equatorial outflows from being launched. By contrast, bipolar winds initiated by continuum radiation pressure from the funnel of a slim accretion disk flare outward (like a trumpet) and offer vastly different absorbing columns to the X-ray and UV emission which are emitted from distinct regions of the disk, $\\sim 6M$ and $\\sim 10M-40M$, respectively (where $M$ is the radius of the black hole). Recent numerical work indicates that it is also possible to launch bipolar outflows from the inner regions of a thin disk. The recent discovery with VLBI that the Galactic analog of a BALQSO, the X-ray binary Circinus X-1 (with high velocity P Cygni X-ray absorption lines) is viewed virtually along the radio jet axis (and therefore along the spin axis of the black hole and the normal to the accretion disk) has rekindled interest in the bipolar models of BALQSOs. We explore this possibility by studying the nearest BAL QSO, MRK 231. High resolution 2-D optical spectroscopy and VLBI mappings of the radio jet axis indicates that the BAL outflow is parallel to the parsec scale radio jet.

Brian Punsly; Sebastian Lipari

2005-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Exploring nanomagnetism with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic soft X-ray microscopy images magnetism in nanoscale systems with a spatial resolution down to 15nm provided by state-of-the-art Fresnel zone plate optics. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (X-MCD) is used as element-specific magnetic contrast mechanism similar to photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), however, with volume sensitivity and the ability to record the images in varying applied magnetic fields which allows to study magnetization reversal processes at fundamental length scales. Utilizing a stroboscopic pump-probe scheme one can investigate fast spin dynamics with a time resolution down to 70 ps which gives access to precessional and relaxation phenomena as well as spin torque driven domain wall dynamics in nanoscale systems. Current developments in zone plate optics aim for a spatial resolution towards 10nm and at next generation X-ray sources a time resolution in the fsec regime can be envisioned.

Fischer, P.; Kim, D.-H.; Mesler, B.L.; Chao, W.; Sakdinawat,A.E.; Anderson, E.H.

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

X-ray movies reveal insect flight, muscle motion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BioCAT BioCAT X-ray movies reveal insect flight, muscle motion Photo credit: Michael Dickinson Watching flies fly may not seem like high-tech science, but for researchers using the Western Hemisphere's most brilliant X-rays, from the Advanced Photon Source located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, it not only helps explain how insects fly but also may someday aid in understanding human heart function. The researchers, from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Caltech and the University of Vermont, merged two distinct technologies, intense X-ray beams and electronic flight simulators, to study how insect muscles can generate such extraordinary levels of power. The results are published in the the January 20,. 2005, issue of the journal Nature.

349

X-ray and Optical Filaments in M87  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare a very deep X-ray image of M87, at the center of the Virgo Cluster, to high-quality optical images of the low excitation emission-line gas in the same region. There are striking coincidences of detail between the two. We explore the possiblity that this represents a thermal interaction between hot gas at 10^7 K and warm gas at 10^4 K. We find two temperatures are present in the X-ray gas, with the lower more prevelant in the vicinity of the optical filaments. Electron conduction from the hot phase to the cooler one provides a quantitatively acceptable energy source for the optical filaments, and we show additionally that it can do so for the brightest X-ray cluster, Perseus. If operative, conduction in the presence of gas-rich galaxy mergers, may explain the presence of "cool cores" in clusters of galaxies.

William B. Sparks; Megan Donahue; Andres Jordan; Laura Ferrarese; Patrick Cote

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

350

X-ray transmissive debris shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

NIST X-Ray Transition Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with the International System of measurement ... titled "X-ray transition energies: new approach ... and by NIST's Systems Integration for Manufacturing ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

X-ray Line Profile Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Composite Materials · X-Ray Studies of Structural Effects Induced by Pulsed (30 Tesla), High Magnetic Fields at the Advanced Photon Source ...

353

NIST: X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST reserves the right to charge for these data in the ... ?/? and the mass energy-absorption coefficient ... The tables cover energies of the photon (x-ray ...

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

354

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray...

355

Hard X-Ray Quad Collimator  

Technology Development and Commercialization Division One of the best ways to obtain small?size x?ray beams for structural biology research is to ...

356

Structural Characterization of Doped GaSb Single Crystals by X-ray Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We characterized GaSb single crystals containing different dopants (Al, Cd and Te), grown by the Czochralski method, by x-ray topography and high angular resolution x-ray diffraction. Lang topography revealed dislocations parallel and perpendicular to the crystal's surface. Double-crystal GaSb 333 x-ray topography shows dislocations and vertical stripes than can be associated with circular growth bands. We compared our high-angular resolution x-ray diffraction measurements (rocking curves) with the findings predicted by the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction. These measurements show that our GaSb single crystals have a relative variation in the lattice parameter ({Delta}d/d) on the order of 10{sup -5}. This means that they can be used as electronic devices (detectors, for example) and as x-ray monochromators.

Honnicke, M.G.; Mazzaro, I.; Manica, J.; Benine, E.; M da Costa, E.; Dedavid, B. A.; Cusatis, C.; Huang, X. R.

2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

X-Ray Multilayer Database from the LBL Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

An important activity of the Center for X-ray Optics (CXRO) is research on x-ray mirrors and their use in optical devices to focus and deflect x-ray beams. The two kinds of mirrors most widely used are glancing incidence reflectors and multilayer coatings. The X-Ray Multilayer Database is based on the results of surveys taken at the biennial Physics of X-Ray Multilayer Structures conferences. It contains measured x-ray reflectances reported for various multilayers. The database is provided as a service to the x-ray and multilayer research communities and is intended to reflect the state-of-the-art in multilayer x-ray mirrors. (Specialized Interface)

358

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.10.Re 1. Introduction Mendelevium (Z=101) and Lawrencium (Z=103) isotopes have been dis- covered nearly isotopes have been studied so far using prompt gamma- ray spectroscopy: the neutron-odd 253No [9

Meagher, Mary

359

Materials Analysis by Soft x-ray Scanning Transmission X-ray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Optical and X-ray Imaging Techniques for Material Characterization.

360

Optimal focusing for a linac-based hard x-ray source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In spite of having a small average beam current limit, a linac can have features that make it attractive as an x-ray source: high energy, ultralow emittance and energy spread, and flexible beamline optics. Unlike a storage ring, in which an (undulator) radiation source is necessarily short and positioned at an electron beam waist, in a linac the undulator can be long and the electron beam can be adjusted to have a (virtual) waist far downstream toward the x-ray target. Using a planned CEBAF beamline as an example, this paper shows that a factor of 2000 in beam current can be overcome to produce a monochromatic hard x-ray source comparable with, or even exceeding, the performance of an x-ray line at a third generation storage ring. Optimal electron beam focusing conditions for x-ray flux density and brilliance are derived, and are verified by simulations using the SRW code.

Liu, C.; Krafft, G.; Talman, R.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electron-Heated Target Temperature Measurements in Petawatt Laser Experiments Based on Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging and Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three independent methods (XUV spectroscopy, imaging at 68 eV and 256 eV) have been used to measure planar target rear surface plasma temperature due to heating by hot electrons. The hot electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser plasma interactions using the 150 J, 0.5 ps Titan laser. Soft x-ray spectroscopy in the 50-400 eV region and imaging at the 68 eV and 256 eV photon energies were used to determine the rear surface temperature of planar CD targets. Temperatures were found to be in the 60-150 eV range, with good agreement between the three diagnostics.

Ma, T; Beg, F; Macphee, A; Chung, H; Key, M; Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Hatchett, S; Akli, K; Stephens, R; Chen, C; Freeman, R; Link, A; Offermann, D; Ovchinnikov, V; VanWoerkom, L; Zhang, B

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Silicon Fresnel zone plates for high heat load X-ray microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique to produce diffractive X-ray lenses optimized for high heat load applications is demonstrated. The lenses are made from single crystal silicon membranes, which have uniform thermal conductivity and homogeneous thermal expansion. Silicon Fresnel ... Keywords: Electron beam lithography, Fresnel zone plate, Reactive ion etching, X-ray microscopy

J. Vila-Comamala; K. Jefimovs; J. Raabe; B. Kaulich; C. David

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Pu electronic structure and photoelectron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic structure of PuCoGa{sub 5}, Pu metal, and PuO{sub 2} is explored using photoelectron spectroscopy. Ground state electronic properties are inferred from temperature dependent photoemission near the Fermi energy for Pu metal. Angle-resolved photoemission details the energy vs. crystaJ momentum landscape near the Fermi energy for PuCoGa{sub 5} which shows significant dispersion in the quasiparticle peak near the Fermi energy. For the Mott insulators AnO{sub 2}(An = U, Pu) the photoemission results are compared against hybrid functional calculations and the model prediction of a cross over from ionic to covalent bonding is found to be reasonable.

Joyce, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Kevin S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, Jeremy N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kennison, John A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roy, Lindsay E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scuseria, G. E. [RICE UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography  

SciTech Connect

Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

Blumberg, L.N.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler  

SciTech Connect

A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

366

Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Ions using X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopy of K-shell transitions in highly charged heavy ions, like hydrogen-like uranium, has the potential to yield information about quantum electrodynamics (QED) in extremely strong nuclear fields as well as tests of the standard model, specifically parity violation in atomic systems. These measurements would represent the 'holy grail' in high-Z atomic spectroscopy. However, the current state-of-the-art detection schemes used for recording the K-shell spectra from highly charged heavy ions does not yet have the resolving power to be able to attain this goal. As such, to push the field of high-Z spectroscopy forward, new detectors must be found. Recently, x-ray calorimeter spectrometers have been developed that promise to make such measurements. In an effort to make the first steps towards attaining the 'holy grail', measurements have been performed with two x-ray calorimeter spectrometers (the XRS/EBIT and the ECS) designed and built at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The calorimeter spectrometers have been used to record the K-shell spectra of highly charged ions produced in the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. Measurements performed with the XRS/EBIT calorimeter array found that the theoretical description of well-above threshold electron-impact excitation cross sections for hydrogen-like iron and nickel ions are correct. Furthermore, the first high-resolution spectrum of hydrogen-like through carbon-like praseodymium ions was recorded with a calorimeter. In addition, the new high-energy array on the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) was used to resolve the K-shell x-ray emission spectrum of highly charged xenon ions, where a 40 ppm measurement of the energy of the K-shell resonance transition in helium-like xenon was achieved. This is the highest precision result, ever, for an element with such high atomic number. In addition, a first-of-its-kind measurement of the effect of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) on electron-impact excitation cross sections was performed. This measurement found that for theoretical electron-impact excitation cross sections to fit with experimental data the GBI needs to be taken into account.

Thorn, D B

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

X-ray astronomy in the new Millenium. A Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent X-ray observations have had a major impact on topics ranging from protostars to cosmology. They have also drawn attention to important and general physical processes that currently limit our understanding of thermal and nonthermal X-ray sources. These include unmeasured atomic astrophysics data (wavelengths, oscillator strengths etc.), basic hydromagnetic processes (e.g. shock structure, reconnection), plasma processes (such as electron-ion equipartition and heat conduction) and radiative transfer (in disks and accretion columns). Progress on these problems will probably come from integrative studies that draw upon observations, throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, of different classes of source. X-ray observations are also giving a new perspective on astronomical subjects, like the nature of galactic nuclei and the evolution of stellar populations. They are contributing to answering central cosmological questions including the measurement of the matter content of the universe, understanding its overall luminosity density, describing its chemical evolution and locating the first luminous objects. X-ray astronomy has a healthy future with several international space missions under construction and in development.

Roger Blandford

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

An X-ray Polarimeter for Constellation-X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarimetry remains a largely unexploited technique in observational X-ray astronomy which could provide insight in the study of the strong gravity and magnetic fields at the core of the Constellation-X observational program. Adding a polarization capability to the Constellation-X instrumentation would be immensely powerful. It would make Constellation the first space observatory to simultaneously measure all astrophysically relevant parameters of source X-ray photons; their position (imaging), energy (spectroscopy), arrival time (timing), and polarization. Astrophysical polarimetry requires sensitive well-calibrated instruments. Many exciting objects are extra-galactic (i.e. faint) and may have small polarization. Recent advances in efficiency and bandpass make it attractive to consider a polarimetry Science Enhancement Package for the Constellation-X mission.

K. Jahoda; K. Black; P. Deines-Jones; J. E. Hill; T. Kallman; T. Strohmayer; J. H. Swank

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

X-ray absorption studies of battery materials  

SciTech Connect

X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is ideal for {ital in}{ital situ} studies of battery materials because both the probe and signal are penetrating x rays. The advantage of XAS being element specific permits investigation of the environment of a constituent element in a composite material. This makes it very powerful for studying electrode additives and corrosion of individual components of complex metal hydride alloys. The near edge part of the spectrum (XANES) provides information on oxidation state and site symmetry of the excited atom. This is particularly useful in study of corrosion and oxidation changes in cathode materials during charge/discharge cycle. Extended fine structure (EXAFS) gives structural information. Thus the technique provides both chemical and structural information. Since XAS probes only short range order, it can be applied to study of amorphous electrode materials and electrolytes. This paper discusses advantages and limitations of the method, as well as some experimental aspects.

McBreen, J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

APS Bending Magnet X-rays and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with Irradiation of Nd-Fe-B Permanent Magnets with APS Bending Magnet X-rays and 60 Co γ-rays J. Alderman and P.K. Job APS Operations Division Advanced Photon Source J. Puhl Ionizing Radiation Division National Institute of Standards and Technology June 2000 Table of Contents Introduction Radiation-Induced Demagnetization of Permanent Magnets Resources Required γ-ray Irradiation Results and Analysis of γ-ray Irradiation X-ray Irradiation Results and Analysis of X-ray Irradiation Summary and Conclusions Acknowledgements References Tables and Figures Introduction The Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as other third-generation synchrotron light sources, uses permanent magnets in the insertion devices to produce x-rays for scientific

371

X-ray image intensifier phosphor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Y/sub 1-x/Gd/sub x/.PO$sub 4$:Tb$sup 3+$ is an effective phosphor for use in X-ray intensifier screens and in nuclear radiation detection systems.

D' Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

World's First Hard X-ray Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCLS is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Its highly focused beam, which arrives in staccato bursts a few quadrillionths of a second long, allows researchers to probe complex,...

373

X-ray grid-detector apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

374

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods To be held as part of SPIE. http:spie.orgOP318 August 28-29, 2013; San Diego, California, USA...

375

Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy: A new ``looking glass`` into coal chemical structure  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the use of scanning transmission x-ray microscopy to spatially map the chemistry of aromatic and aliphatic carbon functionalities in coal to a resolution of less than 0.1 {mu}m. Localized x-ray absorption spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K absorption edge was also used to facilitate analysis of variations in fundamental chemistry at maceral interfaces and within maceral boundaries.

Botto, R.E.; Cody, G.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

X-Ray Scattering Group, Condensed Matter Physics & Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY Beamline X1A2 - Soft x-ray diffraction and nano-imaging Beamline X17 - X-ray powder diffraction Beamline X22C - Resonant x-ray...

377

X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

Cominsky, L

2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

X-ray spectral states of microquasars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the origin of the dramatically different X-ray spectral shapes observed in the Low Hard State (LHS: dominated by thermal comptonisation) and the High Soft State (HSS: dominated by the accretion disc thermal emission and non-thermal comptonisation in the corona). We present numerical simulations using a new code accounting for the so-called synchrotron boiler effect. These numerical simulations when compared to the data allow us to constrain the magnetic field and temperature of the hot protons in the corona. For the hard state of Cygnus X-1 we find a magnetic field below equipartition with radiation, suggesting that the corona is not powered through magnetic field dissipation (as assumed in most accretion disc corona models). On the other hand, our results also point toward proton temperatures that are substantially lower than typical temperatures of the ADAF models. Finally, we show that in both spectral states Comptonising plasma could be powered essentially through power-law acceleration of non-thermal electrons, which are then partly thermalised by the synchrotron and Coulomb boiler. This suggests that, contrary to current beliefs, the corona of the HSS and that of the LHS could be of very similar nature. The differences between the LHS and HSS coronal spectra would then be predominantly caused by the strong disc soft cooling emission which is present in the HSS and absent in the LHS.

Julien Malzac; Renaud Belmont

2008-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) | Stanford Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Small Angle X-ray Scattering for Materials Science Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a well-established characterization method for microstructure investigations in various materials. It probes electron density differences to give information about structural inhomogeneities from the near atomic scale (1 nm) to the micron scale (1 000 nm). The method involves measuring the scattered X-ray intensity as a function of (typically small) scattering angles and is generally performed in transmission. SAXS is used to characterize the size scale of inhomogeneities (e.g. pores, inclusions, second phase regions) in polymer blends, micro-emulsions, geological materials, bones, cements and ceramics. Instrumentation

380

Carbon nanotube based microfocus field emission x-ray source for microcomputed tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microcomputed tomography is now widely used for in vivo small animal imaging for cancer studies. Achieving high imaging quality of live objects requires the x-ray source to have both high spatial and temporal resolutions. Preliminary studies have shown that carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source has significant intrinsic advantages over the conventional thermionic x-ray tube including better temporal resolution and programmability. Here we report the design and characterization of a CNT based field emission x-ray source that also affords a high spatial resolution. The device uses modified asymmetric Einzel lenses for electron focusing and an elliptical shaped CNT cathode patterned by photolithography. Stable and small isotropic x-ray focal spot sizes were obtained.

Liu Zejian; Yang Guang; Lee, Yueh Z.; Bordelon, David; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray spectroscopy electron" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

382

Copper Ridges Nearly Double X-ray Sensor Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physics Letters,* can measure X-ray energies with an ... X-rays and measure the energy based on ... by NASA and the NIST Office of Microelectronics ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beamlines Divisions Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering The Inelastic X-ray and Nuclear Resonant Scattering group...

384

X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Characterization of the Electronic and Chemical Structure at the Thin Film Solar Cell Interfaces: June 2005 -- June 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study using photoelectron spectroscopy, inverse photoemission, and X-ray absorption and emission to derive the electronic structure of interfaces in CIGSS and CdTe thin-film solar cells.

Heske, C.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Modeling energy dependence of the inner-shell x-ray emission produced by femtosecond-pulse laser irradiation of xenon clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We employ the Los Alamos suite of atomic physics codes to model the inner-shell x-ray emission spectrum of xenon and compare results with those obtained via high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy of xenon clusters irradiated by 30 fs Ti:Sa laser pulses. We find that the commonly employed configuration average approximation breaks down and significant spin-orbit splitting necessitates a detailed level accounting. Additionally, we reproduce an interesting spectral trend for a series of experimental spectra taken with varying pulse energy for fixed pulse duration. To simulate the experimental measurements at increasing beam energies, we find that spectral modeling requires an increased hot electron fraction, but decreased atomic density and bulk electron temperature. We believe these latter conditions to be a result of partial cluster destruction due to the increased energy in the laser prepulse.

Colgan, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ANALYSIS AND MITIGATION OF X-RAY HAZARD GENERATED FROM HIGH INTENSITY LASER-TARGET INTERACTIONS  

SciTech Connect

Interaction of a high intensity laser with matter may generate an ionizing radiation hazard. Very limited studies have been made, however, on the laser-induced radiation protection issue. This work reviews available literature on the physics and characteristics of laser-induced X-ray hazards. Important aspects include the laser-to-electron energy conversion efficiency, electron angular distribution, electron energy spectrum and effective temperature, and bremsstrahlung production of X-rays in the target. The possible X-ray dose rates for several femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser systems used at SLAC, including the short pulse laser system for the Matter in Extreme Conditions Instrument (peak power 4 TW and peak intensity 2.4 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) were analysed. A graded approach to mitigate the laser-induced X-ray hazard with a combination of engineered and administrative controls is also proposed.

Qiu, Rui

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Edge-enhanced imaging obtained with very broad energy band x-rays  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that edge-enhancement effects are produced when objects, in contact with the x-ray detector, are imaged by using very broad x-ray spectra. Radiographs of thin Al objects have been obtained with a table-top synchrotron source which generates x-rays in the energy range from a few kilo-electron-volts up to 6 MeV. Edge-enhancement effects arise from the combination of x-ray absorption (kilo-electron-volt part of the spectrum) and secondary particle emission (mega-electron-volt part of the spectrum) within the sample. The exact contribution of absorption and emission profiles in the edge-enhanced images has been calculated via Monte Carlo simulation.

Taibi, A.; Cardarelli, P.; Di Domenico, G.; Marziani, M.; Gambaccini, M. [Department of Physics, University of Ferrara, INFN Section of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Hanashima, T. [Photon Production Laboratory Ltd., 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Yamada, H. [Synchrotron Light Life Science Center, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Computational Simulations of High Intensity X-Ray Matter Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Free electron lasers have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity short pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1-10 keV energy range. For example, the Linac Coherent Light Source at Stanford is being designed to produce an output intensity of 2 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} in a 230 fs pulse. These sources will open the door to many novel research studies. However, the intense x-ray pulses may damage the optical components necessary for studying and controlling the output. At the full output intensity, the dose to optical components at normal incidence ranges from 1-10 eV/atom for low-Z materials (Z < 14) at photon energies of 1 keV. It is important to have an understanding of the effects of such high doses in order to specify the composition, placement, and orientation of optical components, such as mirrors and monochromators. Doses of 10 eV/atom are certainly unacceptable since they will lead to ablation of the surface of the optical components. However, it is not precisely known what the damage thresholds are for the materials being considered for optical components for x-ray free electron lasers. In this paper, we present analytic estimates and computational simulations of the effects of high-intensity x-ray pulses on materials. We outline guidelines for the maximum dose to various materials and discuss implications for the design of optical components.

London, R A; Rionta, R; Tatchyn, R; Roessler, S

2001-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

THz Pump and X-Ray Probe Development at LCLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on measurements of broadband, intense, coherent transition radiation at terahertz frequencies, generated as the highly compressed electron bunches in Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) pass through a thin metal foil. The foil is inserted at 45{sup o} to the electron beam, 31 m downstream of the undulator. The THz emission passes downward through a diamond window to an optical table below the beamline. A fully compressed 350-pC bunch produces up to 0.5 mJ in a nearly half-cycle pulse of 50 fs FWHM with a spectrum peaking at 10 THz. We estimate a peak field at the focus of over 2.5 GV/m. A 20-fs Ti:sapphire laser oscillator has recently been installed for electro-optic measurements. We are developing plans to add an x-ray probe to this THz pump, by diffracting FEL x rays onto the table with a thin silicon crystal. The x rays would arrive with an adjustable time delay after the THz. This will provide a rapid start to user studies of materials excited by intense single-cycle pulses and will serve as a step toward a THz transport line for LCLS-II.

Fisher, Alan S; /SLAC, LCLS; Durr, Hermann; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Lindenberg, Aaron; Stanford U., Materials Sci.Dept.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Reis, David; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Dept. Appl. Phys.; Frisch, Josef; Loos, Henrik; Petree, Mark; /SLAC, LCLS; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Fuchs, Matthias; /SLAC, PULSE; Ghimire, Shambhu; /SLAC, PULSE; Goodfellow, John; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

Sub-Picosecond X-Ray Pulses Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Workshop on the Interactions of Intense Sub-Picosecond X-Ray International Workshop on the Interactions of Intense Sub-Picosecond X-Ray Pulses with Matter (SLAC, January 23-24, 1997) During the last five years studies have been conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg concerning the feasibility of driving an Angstrom-wavelength Free-Electron Laser (FEL) with a high energy rf linac. Recent promising advances in linac, rf gun, and insertion device technologies make it seem likely that such a device can be constructed. The output radiation predicted for this type of source will be characterized by full transverse coherence, extreme pulse brevity (~50-100 fs), high peak power (10-100 GW), and very high unfocused peak power density (0.4-4.1013

392

LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On  

SciTech Connect

On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.

Bergmann, Uwe [Linac Coherent Light Source

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented.

Tranquada,J.M.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A New Measurement of Kaonic Hydrogen X rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $\\bar{K}N$ system at threshold is a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD, especially for the explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Therefore, we have measured the $K$-series x rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and have determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the $1s$ atomic state. As x-ray detectors, we used large-area silicon drift detectors having excellent energy and timing resolution, which were developed especially for the SIDDHARTA experiment. The shift and width were determined to be $\\epsilon_{1s} = -283 \\pm 36 \\pm 6 {(syst)}$ eV and $\\Gamma_{1s} = 541 \\pm 89 {(stat)} \\pm 22 {(syst)}$ eV, respectively. The new values will provide vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ultrafast three-dimensional x-ray computed tomography  

SciTech Connect

X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a well established visualization technique in medicine and nondestructive testing. However, since CT scanning requires sampling of radiographic projections from different viewing angles, common CT systems with mechanically moving parts are too slow for dynamic imaging, for instance of multiphase flows or live animals. Here, we introduce an ultrafast three-dimensional x-ray CT method based on electron beam scanning, which achieves volume rates of 500 s{sup -1}. Primary experiments revealed the capability of this method to recover the structure of phase boundaries in gas-solid and gas-liquid two-phase flows, which undergo three-dimensional structural changes in the millisecond scale.

Bieberle, Martina; Barthel, Frank; Hampel, Uwe [Institute of Safety Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01328 Dresden (Germany); Menz, Hans-Juergen; Mayer, Hans-Georg [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems, University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

396

Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Nuclear transitions induced by synchrotron x-rays.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss two rare but interesting processes by which synchrotron x-rays with energies up to about 100 keV may be used to induce nuclear transitions. In the NEET (Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition) process, an intense x-ray beam is employed to make vacancies, e.g. K-holes, in the atoms of a specific nuclear isotope. When a vacancy is filled by an electronic transition from a higher atomic level, there is some probability that instead of the usual x-ray or Auger emission, the nucleus of the atom itself will be excited. This is then followed by a nuclear decay exhibiting characteristic gamma-rays or other types of radiation, with time delays typical of the nuclear states involved. The probability for NEET increases when the energies of the atomic and the nuclear transitions become close. We address some theoretical aspects of the process and describe experimental efforts to observe it in {sup 189}Os and {sup 197}Au. The second process to be discussed is the possibility of ''triggering'' the decay of a nuclear isomer by irradiation with an x-ray beam. We focus on the case of the 31-year, 2.4-MeV, 16+ isomer of {sup 178}Hf. There has been speculation that if one could isolate gram quantities, say, of this isomer and then have the capability to accelerate its decay in a controlled way, one would have a powerful triggerable source of enormous energy. This could be used to generate explosions, for rapid irradiations, or for more general energy-storage applications, depending on the rate of energy release. We describe attempts to observe this process.

Gemmell, D. S.

2002-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

398

X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

399

Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing X-ray Dopant Site Determination in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Utilizing X-ray Absorption Techniques Monday, September 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Dr. Vanessa Pool The dopant behavior of spinels has been investigated for over half a century and yet new insight into this class of materials is still being made today. In this work, the question of dopant site preference is explored for the nanoparticle regime. Iron oxide nanoparticles have numerous exciting applications. To realize these applications, controlling the preferred dopant site and valence within the host material is important. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) are element specific techniques with magnetic contrast that give insights into the material composition. Using both

400

Molecular orientation in soft matter thin films studied by resonant soft X-ray reflectivity  

SciTech Connect

We present a technique to study depth profiles of molecular orientation in soft matter thin films with nanometer resolution. The method is based on dichroism in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity using linear s- and p-polarization. It combines the chemical sensitivity of Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to specific molecular bonds and their orientation relative to the polarization of the incident beam with the precise depth profiling capability of X-ray reflectivity. We demonstrate these capabilities on side chain liquid crystalline polymer thin films with soft X-ray reflectivity data at the carbon K edge. Optical constants of the anisotropic refractive index ellipsoid were obtained from a quantitative analysis using the Berreman formalism. For films up to 50 nm thickness we find that the degree of orientation of the long axis exhibits no depth variation and isindependent of the film thickness.

Mezger, Markus; Jerome, Blandine; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Valvidares, Manuel; Gullikson, Eric; Giglia, Angelo; Mahne, Nicola; Nannarone, Stefano

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the local structure and oxygen ion conduction mechanism in (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})O{sub 3-{delta}}  

SciTech Connect

To study the local structure and oxygen ion conduction mechanism in (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) as a function of the oxygen partial pressure (P(O{sub 2})), in situ the Co and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was measured at elevated temperatures of 900 and 1000 K. The reduction of the Co and Fe valence, i.e., the oxygen content (3-{delta}) in LSCF, followed the change of P(O{sub 2}) from 1 to 10{sup -4} atm during{approx}4000 s. The quantitative analysis of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that the Fe valence was higher than the Co valence at oxidative condition ({delta} Almost-Equal-To 0) in LSCF. Whereas the Co valence decreased more than the Fe valence after reduction of P(O{sub 2}) at both 900 and 1000 K. From the relaxation plots of the valence and the oxygen content (3-{delta}) for Co and Fe after changing P(O{sub 2}), we successfully determined D{sub chem} and E{sub a} of an oxygen ion migration around Co and Fe in LSCF. A structural model with and without oxygen vacancies and an oxygen ion conduction mechanism for LSCF are proposed based on these results. - Graphical abstract: A structural model with and without oxygen vacancies, and the oxygen ion conduction mechanism of LSCF were speculated. In other words, oxygen vacancies would form more preferentially around Co than Fe from the results of in situ XAS analysis during reduction, and oxygen ions needs to pass through at the vicinity of Fe from the results of D{sub chem} and E{sub a}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the oxygen ion conduction mechanism in (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using in situ X-ray absorption for study of valence and oxygen diffusion coefficient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen vacancies should be preferentially localized around Co in LSCF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of the dynamics parameters for Co and Fe are close to each other.

Itoh, Takanori, E-mail: tknitoh@seimichemical.co.jp [AGC SeimiChemical Co., Ltd., 3-2-10 Chigasaki, Chigasaki City, Kanagawa 253-8585 (Japan); Nakayama, Masanobu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya-city, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

Wang Sigen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui [Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Schreiber, Eric C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Zhou, Otto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Curriculum of Applied and Materials Sciences, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Chang, Sha [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Beam based calibration of X-ray pinhole camera in SSRF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) contains a 3.5-GeV storage ring serving as a national X-ray synchrotron radiation user facility characterized by a low emittance and a low coupling. The stability and quality of the electron beams are monitored continuously by an array of diagnostics. In particular, an X-ray pinhole camera is employed in the diagnostics beamline of the ring to characterize the position, size, and emittance of the beam. The performance of the measurement of the transverse electron beam size is given by the width of the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray pinhole camera. Typically the point spread function of the X-ray pinhole camera is calculated via analytical or numerical method. In this paper we will introduce a new beam based calibration method to derive the width of the PSF online.

Leng, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Man-Zhou; Chen, Zhi-Chu; Chen, Jie; Ye, Kai-Rong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Beam based calibration of X-ray pinhole camera in SSRF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) contains a 3.5-GeV storage ring serving as a national X-ray synchrotron radiation user facility characterized by a low emittance and a low coupling. The stability and quality of the electron beams are monitored continuously by an array of diagnostics. In particular, an X-ray pinhole camera is employed in the diagnostics beamline of the ring to characterize the position, size, and emittance of the beam. The performance of the measurement of the transverse electron beam size is given by the width of the point spread function (PSF) of the X-ray pinhole camera. Typically the point spread function of the X-ray pinhole camera is calculated via analytical or numerical method. In this paper we will introduce a new beam based calibration method to derive the width of the PSF online.

Yong-Bin Leng; Guo-Qing Huang; Man-Zhou Zhang; Zhi-Chu Chen; Jie Chen; Kai-Rong Ye

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

High-efficiency high-energy Ka source for the critically-required maximum illumination of x-ray optics on Z using Z-petawatt-driven laser-breakout-afterburner accelerated ultrarelativistic electrons LDRD .  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Science of Extreme Environments LDRD program, a <2 year theoretical- and computational-physics study was performed (LDRD Project 130805) by Guy R Bennett (formally in Center-01600) and Adam B. Sefkow (Center-01600): To investigate novel target designs by which a short-pulse, PW-class beam could create a brighter K{alpha} x-ray source than by simple, direct-laser-irradiation of a flat foil; Direct-Foil-Irradiation (DFI). The computational studies - which are still ongoing at this writing - were performed primarily on the RedStorm supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque site. The motivation for a higher efficiency K{alpha} emitter was very clear: as the backlighter flux for any x-ray imaging technique on the Z accelerator increases, the signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios improve. This ultimately allows the imaging system to reach its full quantitative potential as a diagnostic. Depending on the particular application/experiment this would imply, for example, that the system would have reached its full design spatial resolution and thus the capability to see features that might otherwise be indiscernible with a traditional DFI-like x-ray source. This LDRD began FY09 and ended FY10.

Sefkow, Adam B.; Bennett, Guy R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

408

Auger line shape and electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis of amorphous, microcrystalline, and. beta. -SiC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) line shape analysis of the Si-{ital L}{sub 23}{ital VV} and C-{ital KLL} peaks has been performed in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) on Hg-sensitized photodeposited amorphous and microcyrstalline SiC films. Mixtures of SiH{sub 4}/CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3} and SiH{sub 4}/(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SiH{sub 2} with helium or hydrogen dilution were used for the depositions. AES line shape and EELS analyses were also performed on {beta}-SiC for comparison. Quantitative bulk compositional analysis to determine the Si and C concentrations in these films was performed with an electron microprobe (EMPA) using x-ray wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). AES and EELS results reveal the predominant Si--C bonding and relative crystallinity in the films as a function of deposition parameters, which includes the gas mixture, pressure, and H{sub 2}/He dilution. These parameters determine the H radical flux during growth, which leads to changes in the film structure.

Nelson, A.J.; Mason, A.R.; Swartzlander, A.B.; Kazmerski, L.L. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, CO (USA)); Saxena, N.; Fortmann, C.M.; Russell, T.W.F. (Institute of Energy Conversion, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Photoionization-pumped, Ne II, x-ray laser studies project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The energetics of this pumping scheme are shown. Short-pulse (50 to 100 ps) laser irradiation of an appropriate x-ray flashlamp medium generates broad-band emission in the range of 300 to 800 eV which preferentially photoionizes Ne to the /sup 2/S state of Ne II creating an inversion at approximately 27 eV. Although this approach does not depend on precise spectral overlap between the x-ray pump radiation and the medium to be pumped, it does require that the x-ray medium remain un-ionized prior to photoionization by the soft x-ray emission. Well-controlled focus conditions are required to ensure that the x-ray medium is not subjected to electron or x-ray preheat prior to irradiation by the soft x-ray source. The magnitude of the population inversion is predicted to be critically dependent upon rapid photoionization of the two states; therefore, ultra-short pulse irradiation of the laser flashlamps is required.

Richardson, M.C.; Hagelstein, P.L.; Eckart, M.J.; Forsyth, J.M.; Gerrassimenko, M.; Soures, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The Soft-X-Ray Spectral Shape of X-Ray-Weak Seyferts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(I) We observed eight Seyfert~2s and two X--ray--weak Seyfert~1/QSOs with the ROSAT PSPC, and one Seyfert~2 with the ROSAT HRI. These targets were selected from the Extended 12\\um\\ Galaxy Sample. (II) Both Seyfert~1/QSOs vary by factors of 1.5---2. The photon indices steepen in the more luminous state, consistent with the variability being mainly due to the softest X--rays, which are confined to a size of less than a parsec. (III) Both the Seyfert~2s and Seyfert~1/QSOs are best fit with a photon index of $\\Gamma\\sim3$, which is steeper than the canonical value of $\\Gamma\\sim1.7$ measured for X--ray--strong Seyferts by ROSAT and at higher energies. Several physical explanations are suggested for the steeper slopes of X--ray--weak objects. (IV) We observed one Seyfert~2, NGC~5005, with the ROSAT HRI, finding about 13\\% of the soft X--rays to come from an extended component. This and other observations suggest that different components to the soft X--ray spectrum of some, if not all, X--ray--weak Seyferts may come from spatially distinct regions.

Brian Rush; Matthew A. Malkan

1995-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sharper Focusing of Hard X-rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharper Focusing of Hard X-rays FROM: Physics News Update Number 773 #1, April 12, 2006, by Phil Schewe and Ben Stein Note: This text has been slightly modified from the original. Sharper focusing of hard x-rays has been achieved with a device developed at Argonne National Lab. Because of their high energy, x-rays are hard to focus: they can be reflected from a surface but only at a glancing angle (less than a tenth of a degree); they can be refracted but the index of refraction is very close to 1, so that making efficient lenses becomes a problem; and they can be diffracted, but the relatively thick, variable pitch grating required for focusing is tricky to achieve. The Argonne device is of the diffraction type, and it consists of a stack of alternating layers of metal and silicon, made by depositing progressively thicker layers. When the x-rays fall on such a structure, nearly edge-on, what they see is a grating (called a linear zone plate) consisting of a sort of bar-code pattern.

412

Multiple wavelength x-ray monochromators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

Steinmeyer, P.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Multiple wavelength x-ray monochromators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

Steinmeyer, P.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Massively parallel X-ray scattering simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although present X-ray scattering techniques can provide tremendous information on the nano-structural properties of materials that are valuable in the design and fabrication of energy-relevant nano-devices, a primary challenge remains in the analyses ...

Abhinav Sarje; Xiaoye S. Li; Slim Chourou; Elaine R. Chan; Alexander Hexemer

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415