Sample records for x-ray free-electron laser

  1. Terawatt x-ray free-electron-laser optimization by transverse electron distribution shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emma, C; Wu, J; Fang, K; Chen, S; Serkez, S; Pellegrini, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    33rd International Free Electron Laser Conference, Shanghai,TERAWATT X-RAY FREE-ELECTRON-LASER … Phys. Rev. ST Accel.23rd International Free Electron Laser Conference and 8th

  2. Fundamental physics at an X-ray free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ringwald

    2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers (FELs) have been proposed to be constructed both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called XFEL laboratory is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA. In addition to the immediate applications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, material science, and structural biology, X-ray FELs may be employed also to study some physics issues of fundamental nature. In this context, one may mention the boiling of the vacuum (Schwinger pair creation in an external field), horizon physics (Unruh effect), and axion production. We review these X-ray FEL opportunities of fundamental physics and discuss the necessary technological improvements in order to achieve these goals.

  3. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC; ,

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  4. X-ray amplification from a Raman Free Electron Laser I.A. Andriyash,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    X-ray amplification from a Raman Free Electron Laser I.A. Andriyash, E. d'Humi`eres, V 5107, F33400 Talence, France We demonstrate that a mm-scale free electron laser can operate in the X and health applications. Large scale X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) projects have been launched, and start

  5. Multicolor operation and spectral control in a gain-modulated x-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Physics of Free Electron Lasers (Springer, Berlin, [33]Gain-Modulated X-Ray Free-Electron Laser A. Marinelli, 1, *emission x-ray free-electron laser can be controlled by

  6. Pair Creation and an X-ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alkofer; M. B. Hecht; C. D. Roberts; S. M. Schmidt; D. V. Vinnik

    2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantum kinetic equation coupled to Maxwell's equation we study the possibility that focused beams at proposed X-ray free electron laser facilities can generate electric field strengths large enough to cause spontaneous electron-positron pair production from the QED vacuum. Our approach yields the time and momentum dependence of the single particle distribution function. Under conditions reckoned achievable at planned facilities, repeated cycles of particle creation and annihilation take place in tune with the laser frequency. However, the peak particle number density is insensitive to this frequency and one can anticipate the production of a few hundred particle pairs per laser period. Field-current feedback and quantum statistical effects are small and can be neglected in this application of non-equilibrium quantum mean field theory.

  7. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  8. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  9. Numerical simulations of X-rays Free Electron Lasers (XFEL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Antonelli; Agissilaos Athanassoulis; Zhongyi Huang; Peter A. Markowich

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation which arises as an effective single particle model in X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL). This equation appears as a first-principles model for the beam-matter interactions that would take place in an XFEL molecular imaging experiment in \\cite{frat1}. Since XFEL is more powerful by several orders of magnitude than more conventional lasers, the systematic investigation of many of the standard assumptions and approximations has attracted increased attention. In this model the electrons move under a rapidly oscillating electromagnetic field, and the convergence of the problem to an effective time-averaged one is examined. We use an operator splitting pseudo-spectral method to investigate numerically the behaviour of the model versus its time-averaged version in complex situations, namely the energy subcritical/mass supercritical case, and in the presence of a periodic lattice. We find the time averaged model to be an effective approximation, even close to blowup, for fast enough oscillations of the external field. This work extends previous analytical results for simpler cases \\cite{xfel1}.

  10. High-brightness X-ray free-electron laser with an optical undulator by pulse shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    codes: (140.2600) Free-electron lasers (FELs); (140.3300)The Development of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers,” IEEE J. Sel.and M.N. Rosenbluth, “Free-Electron Lasers with Variable

  11. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLAC, Redtail Conference Room (901-108) M. Altarelli, European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg, Germany The present status of the construction of the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser in...

  12. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  13. X-ray Free-Electron Lasers - Present and Future Capabilities [Invited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John; Ratner, John Arthur:a Daniel F.; White, William E.; /SLAC

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source is now in operation as an X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) user facility. It produces coherent pulses of 550-10,000 eV X-rays of duration adjustable from <10 fsto500 fs. Typical peak power is in excess of 20 GW. The facility will soon be joined by several X-ray FELs under construction around the world. This article will provide an abridged history of free-electron lasers, a description of some basic physics regarding free-electron laser light amplification, and an overview of the rapidly growing list of examples in which lasers will be used in the control and operation of X-ray FELs.

  14. Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an x-ray free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser (DFL) pumped by an x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL). The DFL under consideration is a Mg/SiC bi-layered Bragg reflector pumped by a single X-FEL bunch at 57.4 eV, stimulating the Mg L2,3 emission at 49 eV corresponding to the 3s-3d â??2p1/2,3/2 transition. Based on a model developed by Yariv and Yeh and an extended coupled-wave theory, we show that it would be possible to obtain a threshold gain compatible with the pumping provided by available X-FEL facilities.

  15. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zholents, K. Holdack, Free Electron Laser Conference, FEL06,26th International Free Electron Laser Conference, Trieste,27th International Free Electron Laser Conference, Stanford,

  16. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray free-electron laser C. Behrens1 , N. Gerasimova1 , Ch. Gerth1 , B. Schmidt1 , E.A. Schneidmiller1 , S, Ukraine (Dated: February 28, 2012) The successful operation of X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs), like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), makes unprecedented research

  17. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. -J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore »in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  18. Quantum effects with an X-ray free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Roberts; S. M. Schmidt; D. V. Vinnik

    2002-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum kinetic equation coupled with Maxwell's equation is used to estimate the laser power required at an XFEL facility to expose intrinsically quantum effects in the process of QED vacuum decay via spontaneous pair production. A 9 TW-peak XFEL laser with photon energy 8.3 keV could be sufficient to initiate particle accumulation and the consequent formation of a plasma of spontaneously produced pairs. The evolution of the particle number in the plasma will exhibit non-Markovian aspects of the strong-field pair production process and the plasma's internal currents will generate an electric field whose interference with that of the laser leads to plasma oscillations.

  19. Dominant Secondary Nuclear Photoexcitation with the X-ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas Gunst; Yuri A. Litvinov; Christoph H. Keitel; Adriana Pálffy

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The new regime of resonant nuclear photoexcitation rendered possible by x-ray free electron laser beams interacting with solid state targets is investigated theoretically. Our results unexpectedly show that secondary processes coupling nuclei to the atomic shell in the created cold high-density plasma can dominate direct photoexcitation. As an example we discuss the case of $^{93m}$Mo isomer depletion for which nuclear excitation by electron capture as secondary process is shown to be orders of magnitude more efficient than the direct laser-nucleus interaction. General arguments revisiting the role of the x-ray free electron laser in nuclear experiments involving solid-state targets are further deduced.

  20. High-gain X-ray free electron laser by beat-wave terahertz undulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chao; Hei, DongWei [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an City 710024 (China) [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an City 710024 (China); Institute of Energy, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Pellegrin, Claudio; Tantawi, Sami [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)] [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The THz undulator has a higher gain to realize a much brighter X-ray at saturation, compared with the optical undulator under the same undulator strength and beam quality. In order to fill the high-power THz gap and realize the THz undulator, two superimposed laser pulses at normal incidence to the electron-beam moving direction form an equivalent high-field THz undulator by the frequency difference to realize the high-gain X-ray Free electron laser. The pulse front tilt of lateral fed lasers is used to realize the electron-laser synchronic interaction. By PIC simulation, a higher gain and a larger X-ray radiation power by the beat wave THz undulator could be realized, compared with the optical undulator for the same electron beam parameters.

  1. Aerosol Imaging with a Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, Michael J.; /SLAC /LLNL, Livermore; Boutet, Sebastien; /SLAC; Chapman, Henry N.; /DESY /Hamburg U.; Marchesini, Stefano; /LBL, Berkeley; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry /LLNL, Livermore; Rohner, Urs; /LLNL, Livermore /TOFWERK AG; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; /LLNL, Livermore; Bajt, Sasa; /DESY; Woods, Bruce; /LLNL, Livermore; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Hajdu, Janos; /Uppsala U.; Schulz, Joachim; /DESY

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Lasers have long played a critical role in the advancement of aerosol science. A new regime of ultrafast laser technology has recently be realized, the world's first soft xray free electron laser. The Free electron LASer in Hamburg, FLASH, user facility produces a steady source of 10 femtosecond pulses of 7-32 nm x-rays with 10{sub 12} photons per pulse. The high brightness, short wavelength, and high repetition rate (>500 pulses per second) of this laser offers unique capabilities for aerosol characterization. Here we use FLASH to perform the highest resolution imaging of single PM2.5 aerosol particles in flight to date. We resolve to 35 nm the morphology of fibrous and aggregated spherical carbonaceous nanoparticles that existed for less than two milliseconds in vacuum. Our result opens the possibility for high spatialand time-resolved single particle aerosol dynamics studies, filling a critical technological need in aerosol science.

  2. Obtaining attosecond X-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, A.A.; Penn, G.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook, Vol- ume 6: Free Electron Lasers (North-Holland,spontaneous emission free electron laser A.A. Zholents, G.spontaneous emission free electron laser A. A. Zholents and

  3. Pair Production from Vacuum at the Focus of an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ringwald

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    There are definite plans for the construction of X-ray free electron lasers (FEL), both at DESY, where the so-called XFEL is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA, as well as at SLAC, where the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has been proposed. Such an X-ray laser would allow for high-field science applications: One could make use of not only the high energy and transverse coherence of the X-ray beam, but also of the possibility of focusing it to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. In this letter we discuss the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production). We find that if X-ray optics can be improved to approach the diffraction limit of focusing, and if the power of the planned X-ray FELs can be increased to the terawatt region, then there is ample room for an investigation of the Schwinger pair production mechanism.

  4. Boiling the Vacuum with an X-Ray Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ringwald

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers will be constructed in this decade, both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called TESLA XFEL laboratory uses techniques developed for the design of the TeV energy superconducting electron-positron linear accelerator TESLA. Such X-ray lasers may allow also for high-field science applications by exploiting the possibility to focus their beams to a spot with a small radius, hopefully in the range of the laser wavelength. Along this route one obtains very large electric fields, much larger than those obtainable with any optical laser of the same power. We consider here the possibility of obtaining an electric field so high that electron-positron pairs are spontaneously produced in vacuum (Schwinger pair production) and review the prospects to verify this non-perturbative production mechanism for the first time in the laboratory.

  5. The soft x-ray instrument for materials studies at the linac coherent light source x-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Rowen, M.; Holmes, M.; Messerschmidt, M.; Moeller, S.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Hays, G. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Heimann, P. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Soufli, R.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kelez, N. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Beye, M.; Gerken, N.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Wurth, W. [Institute for Experimental Physics and CFEL, University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft x-ray materials science instrument is the second operational beamline at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser. The instrument operates with a photon energy range of 480-2000 eV and features a grating monochromator as well as bendable refocusing mirrors. A broad range of experimental stations may be installed to study diverse scientific topics such as: ultrafast chemistry, surface science, highly correlated electron systems, matter under extreme conditions, and laboratory astrophysics. Preliminary commissioning results are presented including the first soft x-ray single-shot energy spectrum from a free electron laser.

  6. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, N.Duane; Starodub, Dimitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10 21 W/m2 can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wave-front sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, the paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  7. Ultrafast myoglobin structural dynamics observed with an X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Levantino, Matteo; Schirò, Giorgio; Lemke, Henrik Till; Cottone, Grazia; Glownia, James Michael; Zhu, Diling; Chollet, Mathieu; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Cupane, Antonio; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Light absorption can trigger biologically relevant protein conformational changes. The light induced structural rearrangement at the level of a photoexcited chromophore is known to occur in the femtosecond timescale and is expected to propagate through the protein as a quake-like intramolecular motion. Here we report direct experimental evidence of such ‘proteinquake’ observed in myoglobin through femtosecond X-ray solution scattering measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. An ultrafast increase of myoglobin radius of gyration occurs within 1 picosecond and is followed by a delayed protein expansion. As the system approaches equilibrium it undergoes damped oscillations withmore »a ~3.6-picosecond time period. Our results unambiguously show how initially localized chemical changes can propagate at the level of the global protein conformation in the picosecond timescale.« less

  8. Multiple pulse thermal damage thresholds of materials for x-ray free electron laser optics investigated with an ultraviolet laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; London, Richard A.; Bionta, Richard M.; Soufli, Regina; Ryutov, Dmitri; Shirk, Michael; Baker, Sherry L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94539 (United States); Smith, Patrick M.; Nataraj, Pradeep [Kovio, Inc., 1145 Sonora Court, Sunnyvale, California 94086 (United States)

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical elements to be used for x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) must withstand multiple high-fluence pulses. We have used an ultraviolet laser to study the damage of two candidate materials, crystalline Si and B{sub 4}C-coated Si, emulating the temperature profile expected to occur in optics exposed to XFEL pulses. We found that the damage threshold for 10{sup 5} pulses is {approx}20% to 70% lower than the melting threshold.

  9. Relativistic X-Ray Free Electron Lasers in the Quantum Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengt Eliasson; Padma Kant Shukla

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a nonlinear theory for relativistic X-ray free electron lasers in the quantum regime, using a collective Klein-Gordon (KG) equation (for relativistic electrons), which is coupled with the Maxwell-Poisson equations for the electromagnetic and electrostatic fields. In our model, an intense electromagnetic wave is used as a wiggler which interacts with a relativistic electron beam to produce coherent tunable radiation. The KG-Maxwell-Poisson model is used to derive a general nonlinear dispersion relation for parametric instabilities in three-space-dimensions, including an arbitrarily large amplitude electromagnetic wiggler field. The nonlinear dispersion relation reveals the importance of quantum recoil effects and oblique scattering of the radiation that can be tuned by varying the beam energy.

  10. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Università di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimäki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano – Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR – Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25–800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  11. Evidence of High Harmonics from Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation for Seeding X-ray Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodle, M.; /SLAC; ,

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Echo-enabled harmonic generation free electron lasers hold great promise for the generation of fully coherent radiation in x-ray wavelengths. Here we report the first evidence of high harmonics from the echo-enabled harmonic generation technique in the realistic scenario where the laser energy modulation is comparable to the beam slice energy spread. In this experiment, coherent radiation at the seventh harmonic of the second seed laser is generated when the energy modulation amplitude is about 2-3 times the slice energy spread. The experiment confirms the underlying physics of echo-enabled harmonic generation and may have a strong impact on emerging seeded x-ray free electron lasers that are capable of generating laserlike x rays which will advance many areas of science.

  12. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Experiment”, Free Electron Laser Conference, FEL06,from Shot-Noise, Free Electron Laser Conference FEL08for FERMI@elettra, Free Electron Laser Conference FEL07

  13. Subnanometer-Scale Measurements of the Interaction of Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Free-Electron-Laser Pulses with Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    lengths greater than 3 A° . This experiment demonstrates that with intense ultrafast pulses, structuralSubnanometer-Scale Measurements of the Interaction of Ultrafast Soft X-Ray Free-Electron-Laser Pulses with Matter Stefan P. Hau-Riege,1,* Henry N. Chapman,1 Jacek Krzywinski,2 Ryszard Sobierajski,2

  14. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corlett, John; Attwood, David; Byrd, John; Denes, Peter; Falcone, Roger; Heimann, Phil; Leemans, Wim; Padmore, Howard; Prestemon, Soren; Sannibale, Fernando; Schlueter, Ross; Schroeder, Carl; Staples, John; Venturini, Marco; Warwick, Tony; Wells, Russell; Wilcox, Russell; Zholent, Alexander; Adolphsen, Chris; Arthur, John; Bergmann, Uwe; Cai, Yunhai; Colby, Eric; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Fox, John; Frisch, Josef; Galayda, John; Hettel, Robert; Huang, Zhirong; Phinney, Nan; Rabedeau, Tom; Raubenheimer, Tor; Reis, David; Schmerge, John; Stöhr, Joachim; Stupakov, Gennady; White, Bill; Xiang, Dao

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Several recent reports have identified the scientific requirements for a future soft x-ray light source, and a high-repetition-rate free-electron laser (FEL) facility that is responsive to these requirements is now on the horizon. R&D in some critical areas is needed, however, to demonstrate technical performance, thus reducing technical risks and construction costs. Such a facility most likely will be based on a CW superconducting linear accelerator with beam supplied by a high-brightness, high-repetition-rate photocathode electron gun operating in CW mode, and on an array of FELs to which the accelerated beam is distributed, each operating at high repetition rate and with even pulse spacing. Dependent on experimental requirements, the individual FELs can be configured for either self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), seeded, or oscillator mode of operation, including the use of high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enhanced harmonic generation (EEHG), harmonic cascade, or other configurations. In this White Paper we identify the overall accelerator R&D needs, and highlight the most important pre-construction R&D tasks required to value-engineer the design configuration and deliverables for such a facility. In Section 1.4 we identify the comprehensive R&D ultimately needed. We identify below the highest-priority requirements for understanding machine performance and reduce risk and costs at this pre-conceptual design stage. Details of implementing the required tasks will be the subject of future evaluation. Our highest-priority R&D program is the injector, which must be capable of delivering a beam with bunches up to a nanocoulomb at MHz repetition rate and with normalized emittance {le} 1 mm {center_dot} mrad. This will require integrated accelerating structure, cathode, and laser systems development. Cathode materials will impact the choice of laser technology in wavelength and energy per pulse, as well as vacuum requirements in the accelerating structure. Demonstration experiments in advanced seeding techniques, such as EEHG, and other optical manipulations to enhance the FEL process are required to reduce technical risk in producing temporally coherent and ultrashort x-ray output using optical seed lasers. Success of EEHG in particular would result in reduced development and cost of laser systems and accelerator hardware for seeded FELs. With a 1.5-2.5 GeV linac, FELs could operate in the VUV-soft x-ray range, where the actual beam energy will be determined by undulator technology; for example, to use the lower energy would require the use of advanced designs for which undulator R&D is needed. Significant reductions in both unit costs and accelerator costs resulting from the lower electron beam energy required to achieve lasing at a particular wavelength could be obtained with undulator development. Characterization of the wakefields of the vacuum chambers in narrow-gap undulators will be needed to minimize risk in ability to deliver close to transform limited pulses. CW superconducting RF technology for an FEL facility with short bunches at MHz rate and up to mA average current will require selection of design choices in cavity frequency and geometry, higher order mode suppression and power dissipation, RF power supply and distribution, accelerating gradient, and cryogenics systems. R&D is needed to define a cost and performance optimum. Developments in laser technology are proceeding at rapid pace, and progress in high-power lasers, harmonic generation, and tunable sources will need to be tracked.

  15. Mode-Locked Multichromatic X-Rays in a Seeded Free-Electron Laser for Single-Shot X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, Dao; Ding, Yuantao; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the promise of generating gigawatt mode-locked multichromatic x rays in a seeded free-electron laser (FEL). We show that, by using a laser to imprint periodic modulation in electron beam phase space, a single-frequency coherent seed can be amplified and further translated to a mode-locked multichromatic output in an FEL. With this configuration the FEL output consists of a train of mode-locked ultrashort pulses which span a wide frequency gap with a series of equally spaced sharp lines. These gigawatt multichromatic x rays may potentially allow one to explore the structure and dynamics of a large number of atomic states simultaneously. The feasibility of generating mode-locked x rays ranging from carbon K edge ({approx}284 eV) to copper L{sub 3} edge ({approx}931 eV) is confirmed with numerical simulation using the realistic parameters of the linac coherent light source (LCLS) and LCLS-II. We anticipate that the mode-locked multichromatic x rays in FELs may open up new opportunities in x-ray spectroscopy (i.e. resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, time-resolved scattering and spectroscopy, etc.).

  16. Development, characterization and experimental performance of x-ray optics for the LCLS free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Pivovaroff, M J; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Gullikson, E M; Mc Carville, T J; Stefan, P M; Aquila, A L; Ayers, J; McKernan, M A; Bionta, R M

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript discusses the development of reflective optics for the x-ray offset mirror systems of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), a 0.15-1.5 nm free-electron laser (FEL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The unique properties (such as the high peak brightness) of the LCLS FEL beam translate to strict limits in terms of materials choice, thus leading to an x-ray mirror design consisting of a reflective coating deposited on a silicon substrate. Furthermore, the physics requirements for these mirrors result in stringent surface figure and finish specifications that challenge the state-of-the-art in x-ray substrate manufacturing, thin film deposition, and metrology capabilities. Recent experimental results on the development, optimization, and characterization of the LCLS soft x-ray mirrors are presented in this manuscript, including: precision surface metrology on the silicon substrates, and the development of boron carbide reflective coatings with reduced stress and thickness variation < 0.14 nm rms across the 175-mm clear aperture area of the LCLS soft x-ray mirrors.

  17. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Undulator of a Free Electron Laser. Electrons tra- verseand et al. “X-ray free-electron lasers”. In: Journal ofiii List of Tables iv 1 The Free Electron Laser (FEL)

  18. Focus characterization at an X-ray free-electron laser by coherent scattering and speckle analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sikorski, Marcin; Song, Sanghoon; Schropp, Andreas; Seiboth, Frank; Feng, Yiping; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Chollet, Matthieu; Lemke, Henrik T.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray focus optimization and characterization based on coherent scattering and quantitative speckle size measurements was demonstrated at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Its performance as a single-pulse free-electron laser beam diagnostic was tested for two typical focusing configurations. The results derived from the speckle size/shape analysis show the effectiveness of this technique in finding the focus' location, size and shape. In addition, its single-pulse compatibility enables users to capture pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in focus properties compared with other techniques that require scanning and averaging.

  19. Microscopic linear liquid streams in vacuum: Injection of solvated biological samples into X-ray free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doak, R. B.; DePonte, D. P.; Nelson, G.; Camacho-Alanis, F.; Ros, A.; Spence, J. C. H.; Weierstall, U. [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States); Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1504 (United States)

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic linear liquid free-streams offer a means of gently delivering biological samples into a probe beam in vacuum while maintaining the sample species in a fully solvated state. By employing gas dynamic forces to form the microscopic liquid stream (as opposed to a conventional solid-walled convergent nozzle), liquid free-streams down to 300 nm diameter have been generated. Such 'Gas Dynamic Virtual Nozzles' (GDVN) are ideally suited to injecting complex biological species into an X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) to determine the structure of the biological species via Serial Femtosecond Crystallography (SFX). GDVN injector technology developed for this purpose is described.

  20. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director] [SLAC Director

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  1. The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free Electron Laser at SLAC ( Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Drell, Persis [SLAC Director

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. SLAC National Laboratory Director Persis Drell gives a keynote talk on "The Turn-on of LCLS: the X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SLAC" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011

  2. A camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-X-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Alameda, J; Woods, B; Frank, M; Bogan, M J; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Hajdu, J; Shapiro, D

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser. The camera consists of a laterally-graded multilayer mirror which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter both for wavelength and angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from non-sample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates on to a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beamstop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the FLASH FEL (i.e. between 6 nm and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32 nm, 16 nm, 13.5 nm, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH free-electron laser with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance.

  3. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wavelength seed, and ultrafast pulses. Understanding gainedlasers to produce ultrafast x-ray pulses at the ALS in a “is home to the PULSE Institute for ultrafast energy science,

  4. VISA: A Milestone on the Path Towards X-Ray Free Electron Lasers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    duration of 100 to 1000 times shorter. We can, however, be confident that the X-ray SASE-FEL, by opening to our exploration a totally new range of physical parameters, will lead to...

  5. Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. We have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.

  6. Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. Wemore »have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.« less

  7. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zastrau, Ulf; Foerster, Eckhart; Galtier, Eric Ch; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Heimann, Philipp; Marschner, Heike; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Wehrhan, Ortrud; Lee, Hae Ja

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution $\\Delta E/E = 1.1\\cdot 10^{-4}$ and wave-number resolution of $\\Delta k/k = 3\\cdot 10^{-3}$, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to $5.2/$\\AA\\ in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34\\% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418~eV/$13.5\\,\\mu$m agrees with predictions within 1.3\\%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic HAPG spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1~eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  8. Bent crystal spectrometer for both frequency and wavenumber resolved x-ray scattering at a seeded free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zastrau, Ulf, E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Fletcher, Luke B.; Galtier, Eric Ch.; Gamboa, Eliseo; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Heimann, Philipp; Nagler, Bob; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Förster, Eckhart [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Marschner, Heike; Wehrhan, Ortrud [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a cylindrically curved GaAs x-ray spectrometer with energy resolution ?E/E = 1.1 ×?10{sup ?4} and wave-number resolution of ?k/k = 3 ×?10{sup ?3}, allowing plasmon scattering at the resolution limits of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free-electron laser. It spans scattering wavenumbers of 3.6 to 5.2/Å in 100 separate bins, with only 0.34% wavenumber blurring. The dispersion of 0.418 eV/13.5??m agrees with predictions within 1.3%. The reflection homogeneity over the entire wavenumber range was measured and used to normalize the amplitude of scattering spectra. The proposed spectrometer is superior to a mosaic highly annealed pyrolytic graphite spectrometer when the energy resolution needs to be comparable to the LCLS seeded bandwidth of 1 eV and a significant range of wavenumbers must be covered in one exposure.

  9. Damage Threshold of Platinum Coating used for Optics for Self-Seeding of Soft X-ray Free Electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krzywinski, Jacek; Cocco, Daniele; Moeller, Stefan; Ratner, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the experimental damage threshold of platinum coating on a silicon substrate illuminated by soft x-ray radiation at grazing incidence angle of 2.1 deg. The coating was the same as the blazed grating used for the soft X-ray self-seeding optics of the Linac Coherent Light Source free electron laser. The irradiation condition was chosen such that the absorbed dose was similar to the maximum dose expected for the grating. The expected dose was simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation in non-homogenous media. The experiment was performed at 900 eV photon energy for both single pulse and multi-shot conditions. We have not observed single shot damage. This corresponds to a single shot damage threshold being higher than 3 J/cm2. The multiple shot damage threshold measured for 10 shots and about 600 shots was determined to be 0.95 J/cm2 and 0.75 J/cm2 respectively. The damage threshold occurred at an instantaneous dose which is higher that the melt dose of platinum.

  10. Experimental Demonstration of a Soft X-ray Self-seeded Free-electron Laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratner, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Abela, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Amann, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Behrens, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bohler, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bouchard, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Bostedt, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Boyes, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chow, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cocco, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Decker, F. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ding, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Eckman, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Emma, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fairley, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Feng, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Field, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flechsig, U. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Gassner, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Heimann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kelez, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Krzywinski, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lutman, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marinelli, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marcus, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Moeller, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Morton, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nuhn, H. D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rodes, N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlotter, W. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Serkez, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Stevens, T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Turner, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Walz, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Welch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has added self-seeding capability to the soft x-ray range using a grating monochromator system. We report demonstration of soft x-ray self-seeding with a measured resolving power of 2000-5000, wavelength stability of 10-4, and an increase in peak brightness by a factor of 2-5 across the photon energy range of 500-1000 eV. By avoiding the need for a monochromator at the experimental station, the self-seeded beam can deliver as much as 50 fold higher brightness to users.

  11. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definitionmore »of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.« less

  12. Free-Electron Laser Generation of VUV and X-Ray Radiation using a Conditioned Beam and Ion-Channel Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, L.-H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a) Accelerator Conditioner Free-Electron Laser L ---~>~ . Free Electron Laser Conference, Santain the Proceedings Free-Electron Laser Generation of VUV and

  13. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17,Time-Delay X-ray Holography

  14. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Laser Conference, Trieste, Italy (2004) p. 558. 11.Committees of: Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy Pohang Light

  15. Low-Charge, Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Driven with an X-Band Injector and Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; Limborg-Deprey, Cecile; Raubenheimer, Tor; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam's longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end) is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms), low-charge (10 pC) electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters), which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  16. FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, W.B.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1984). Colson, W. B. , "Free electron laser theory," Ph.D.aspects of the free electron laser," Laser Handbook i,Quant. Elect. Bendor Free Electron Laser Conference, Journal

  17. Theoretical computation of the polarization characteristics of an X-ray Free-Electron Laser with planar undulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radiation pulses from an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (XFEL) with a planar undulator, which are mainly polarized in the horizontal direction, exhibit a suppression of the vertical polarization component of the power at least by a factor $\\lambda_w^2/(4 \\pi L_g)^2$, where $\\lambda_w$ is the length of the undulator period and $L_g$ is the FEL field gain length. We illustrate this fact by examining the XFEL operation under the steady state assumption. In our calculations we considered only resonance terms: in fact, non resonance terms are suppressed by a factor $\\lambda_w^3/(4 \\pi L_g)^3$ and can be neglected. While finding a situation for making quantitative comparison between analytical and experimental results may not be straightforward, the qualitative aspects of the suppression of the vertical polarization rate at XFELs should be easy to observe. We remark that our exact results can potentially be useful to developers of new generation FEL codes for cross-checking their results.

  18. X-ray-optical cross-correlator for gas-phase experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schorb, S.; Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M.; Bionta, M. R.; Coffee, R. N.; Swiggers, M.; Carron, S.; Castagna, J.-C.; Bozek, J. D.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schlotter, W. F.; Bostedt, C. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gorkhover, T. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Erk, B.; Boll, R.; Schmidt, C.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max-Planck Advanced-Study-Group at CFEL, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut f. med. Forschung, Jahnstr. 29, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rouzee, A. [Max-Born-Institut, Max-Born-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-optical pump-probe experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) have so far been limited to a time resolution of 280 fs fwhm due to timing jitter between the accelerator-based free-electron laser (FEL) and optical lasers. We have implemented a single-shot cross-correlator for femtosecond x-ray and infrared pulses. A reference experiment relying only on the pulse arrival time information from the cross-correlator shows a time resolution better than 50 fs fwhm (22 fs rms) and also yields a direct measurement of the maximal x-ray pulse length. The improved time resolution enables ultrafast pump-probe experiments with x-ray pulses from LCLS and other FEL sources.

  19. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-Wiggler Free-Electron-Laser Oscillat.ion. Phys. :_.The Los Alamos Free Electron Laser: Accelerator Perfoemance.First Operation of a Free-Electron Laser. Phys . __ Rev~.

  20. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Technical DesignSimulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadbandcoherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be

  1. Using X-ray free-electron lasers for probing of complex interaction dynamics of ultra-intense lasers with solid matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kluge, T., E-mail: t.kluge@hzdr.de; Huang, L. G.; Metzkes, J.; Bussmann, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Gutt, C. [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Universität Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Schramm, U.; Cowan, T. E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., D-01328 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the potential of X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) to advance the understanding of complex plasma dynamics by allowing for the first time nanometer and femtosecond resolution at the same time in plasma diagnostics. Plasma phenomena on such short timescales are of high relevance for many fields of physics, in particular in the ultra-intense ultra-short laser interaction with matter. Highly relevant yet only partially understood phenomena become directly accessible in experiment. These include relativistic laser absorption at solid targets, creation of energetic electrons and electron transport in warm dense matter, including the seeding and development of surface and beam instabilities, ambipolar expansion, shock formation, and dynamics at the surfaces or at buried layers. In this paper, we focus on XFEL plasma probing for high power laser matter interactions based on quantitative calculations using synthesized data and evaluate the feasibility of various imaging and scattering techniques with special focus on the small angle X-ray scattering technique.

  2. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  3. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the visible free- electron laser oscillator experiment”,based VUV and X-ray free electron lasers”, Appl. Phys. BDesign of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-

  4. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    074401. Kramer D. et al. , 2004, The BESSY Soft X-ray FreeTechnical Design Report, BESSY, Berlin http://www.bessy.de.Project [Moncton et al. ], BESSY FEL [Kramer et al. ], LBNL

  5. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 023407 (2013) Multiphoton above-threshold ionization in superintense free-electron x-ray laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . INTRODUCTION With the recent development of free-electron lasers (FELs), particularly the "fourthPHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 023407 (2013) Multiphoton above-threshold ionization in superintense free-electron successfully used to investigate the multiphoton processes of a hydrogen atom exposed to superintense free-electron

  6. Catalac free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalac free electron laser using a rf linac (catalac) which acts as a catalyst to accelerate an electron beam in an initial pass through the catalac and decelerate the electron beam during a second pass through the catalac. During the second pass through the catalac, energy is extracted from the electron beam and transformed to energy of the accelerating fields of the catalac to increase efficiency of the device. Various embodiments disclose the use of post linacs to add electron beam energy extracted by the wiggler and the use of supplementary catalacs to extract energy at various energy peaks produced by the free electron laser wiggler to further enhance efficiency of the catalac free electron laser. The catalac free electron laser can be used in conjunction with a simple resonator, a ring resonator or as an amplifier in conjunction with a master oscillator laser.

  7. A CW normal-conductive RF gun for free electron laser and energy recovery linac applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baptiste, Kenneth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bessy Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser, ISBN 3-9809534-0-26th International Free Electron Laser Conference, Trieste,Proceedings of 21st Free-Electron Laser Conference (FEL’99),

  8. Towards simultaneous measurements of electronic and structural properties in ultra-fast x-ray free electron laser absorption spectroscopy experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gaudin, J.; Fourment, C.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Galtier, E.; Harmand, M.; Leguay, P. M.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; et al

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapidly growing ultrafast science with X-ray lasers unveils atomic scale processes with unprecedented time resolution bringing the so called “molecular movie” within reach. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one of the most powerful x-ray techniques providing both local atomic order and electronic structure when coupled with ad-hoc theory. Collecting absorption spectra within few x-ray pulses is possible only in a dispersive setup. We demonstrate ultrafast time-resolved measurements of the LIII-edge x-ray absorption near-edge spectra of irreversibly laser excited Molybdenum using an average of only few x-ray pulses with a signal to noise ratio limited only by the saturation level ofmore »the detector. The simplicity of the experimental set-up makes this technique versatile and applicable for a wide range of pump-probe experiments, particularly in the case of non-reversible processes.« less

  9. Accelerator Design Study for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kur, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Phase Diagnostics, SLAC Report LCLS-TN-00-12. Emma P.al. 2009, First Results of the LCLS Laser-Heater System, PACLinac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) Conceptual Design Report,

  10. Multiphoton above-threshold ionization in superintense free-electron x-ray laser fields: Beyond the dipole approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Zhongyuan; Chu, Shih-I

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    been used to study multiphoton ionization processes of a hydrogen atom interacting with XUV laser fields [11,12]. It is shown that the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) are quite different from those of the dipole approximation when the pulse... the dipole ones for laser pulses with a duration of five OCs [11]. This approach has also been used to investigate the multiphoton ionization processes of a hydrogen atom in excited states [13] and a hydrogen molecular ion H2+ [14]. The predicted PADs...

  11. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  12. Femtosecond Xray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard Xray Free Electron Laser: Application to Spin Crossover Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Femtosecond Xray Absorption Spectroscopy at a Hard Xray Free Electron Laser: Application to Spin Rennes 1, F35042, Rennes, France ABSTRACT: X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) deliver short ( operated in femtosecond laser slicing mode15 ). The development of new X-ray facilities such as X-ray free

  13. Free-Electron Laser FLASH Injector Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg FLASH Injector Laser Laser 1 Laser 2 Next steps Siegfried | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg Laser 1 System Overview fround trip A 541 (2005) 467­477 #12;Siegfried Schreiber | FLASH Meeting | 16-Nov-2009 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser

  14. Free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high gain, single-pass free electron laser formed of a high brilliance electron injector source, a linear accelerator which imparts high energy to the electron beam, and an undulator capable of extremely high magnetic fields, yet with a very short period. The electron injector source is the first stage (gap) of the linear accelerator or a radial line transformer driven by fast circular switch. The linear accelerator is formed of a plurality of accelerating gaps arranged in series. These gaps are energized in sequence by releasing a single pulse of energy which propagates simultaneously along a plurality of transmission lines, each of which feeds the gaps. The transmission lines are graduated in length so that pulse power is present at each gap as the accelerated electrons pass therethrough. The transmission lines for each gap are open circuited at their ends. The undualtor has a structure similar to the accelerator, except that the transmission lines for each gap are substantially short circuited at their ends, thus converting the electric field into magnetic field. A small amount of resistance is retained in order to generate a small electric field for replenishing the electron bunch with the energy lost as it traverses through the undulator structure.

  15. Diffraction Properties of Periodic Lattices under Free Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajkovic, I.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Quevedo, W. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschentscher, T. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany); Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tolkiehn, M. [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Techert, S. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this Letter, we report the pioneering use of free electron laser radiation for the investigation of periodic crystalline structures. The diffraction properties of silver behenate single nanocrystals (5.8 nm periodicity) with the dimensions of 20 nmx20 nmx20 {mu}m and as powder with grain sizes smaller than 200 nm were investigated with 8 nm free electron laser radiation in single-shot modus with 30 fs long free electron laser pulses. This work emphasizes the possibility of using soft x-ray free electron laser radiation for these crystallographic studies on a nanometer scale.

  16. Circular free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kurnit, Norman A. (Santa Fe, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high efficiency, free electron laser utilizing a circular relativistic electron beam accelerator and a circular whispering mode optical waveguide for guiding optical energy in a circular path in the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator such that the circular relativistic electron beam and the optical energy are spatially contiguous in a resonant condition for free electron laser operation. Both a betatron and synchrotron are disclosed for use in the present invention. A free electron laser wiggler is disposed around the circular relativistic electron beam accelerator for generating a periodic magnetic field to transform energy from the circular relativistic electron beam to optical energy.

  17. Isochronous Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berz, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the los alamos free- electron laser. IEEE Journal of1: A schematic layout of a free electron laser. Figure 2: ABeamIines for Free Electron Lasers M. Berz July 1990

  18. Hole Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL", theseTwelfth International Free Electron Laser Conference, Paris,Coupling Resonator for Free Electron Lasers M. Xie and K. -

  19. Rf Feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which use rf feedback to enhance efficiency. Rf energy is extracted from an electron beam by decelerating cavities and returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to lower the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  20. FREE-ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the electric field of the radiation, this energy-exchangewhere the electric field of the radiation would The energydue to the electric field of the laser radiation, but in

  1. Laser Phase Errors in Seeded Free Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, D.; Fry, A.; Stupakov, G.; White, W.; /SLAC

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Harmonic seeding of free electron lasers has attracted significant attention as a method for producing transform-limited pulses in the soft x-ray region. Harmonic multiplication schemes extend seeding to shorter wavelengths, but also amplify the spectral phase errors of the initial seed laser, and may degrade the pulse quality and impede production of transform-limited pulses. In this paper we consider the effect of seed laser phase errors in high gain harmonic generation and echo-enabled harmonic generation. We use simulations to confirm analytical results for the case of linearly chirped seed lasers, and extend the results for arbitrary seed laser envelope and phase.

  2. Inner-Shell Multiple Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules With an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Studied By Coincident Ion Momentum Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erk, B. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Foucar, L. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Rudek, B. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Epp, S. W. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Cryle, M. [Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Bostedt, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Schorb, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Technical Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Optic and Atomic Physics; Bozek, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Rouzee, A. [Max Born Inst., Berlin (Germany); Hundertmark, A. [Max Born Inst., Berlin (Germany); Marchenko, T. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Paris (France); Simon, M. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Paris (France); Filsinger, F. [Fritz Haber Inst. for Max Planck Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany); Christensen, L. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; De, S. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Trippel, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Hamburg (Germany); Küpper, J. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) and Univ. of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Physics, Center for Ultrafast Imaging; Stapelfeldt, H. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Wada, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan), Dept. of Physical Science; Ueda, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). IMRAM; Swiggers, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Messerschmidt, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Schröter, C. D. [Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Moshammer, R. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlichting, I. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Ullrich, J. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); National Institute for Physics and Technology, Braunschweig (Germany); Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionization and fragmentation of two selenium containing hydrocarbon molecules, methylselenol (CH3SeH) and ethylselenol (C2H5SeH), by intense (>1017 W cm-2 ) 5 fs x-ray pulses with photon energies of 1.7 and 2 keV has been studied by means of coincident ion momentum spectroscopy. Measuring charge states and ion kinetic energies, we find signatures of charge redistribution within the molecular environment. Furthermore, by analyzing fragment ion angular correlations, we can determine the laboratory-frame orientation of individual molecules and thus investigate the fragmentation dynamics in the molecular frame. This allows distinguishing protons originating from different molecular sites along with identifying the reaction channels that lead to their emission.

  3. Inner-Shell Multiple Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules With an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Studied By Coincident Ion Momentum Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erk, B.; Rolles, D.; Foucar, L.; Rudek, B.; Epp, S. W.; Cryle, M.; Bostedt, C.; Schorb, S.; Bozek, J.; Rouzee, A.; et al

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionization and fragmentation of two selenium containing hydrocarbon molecules, methylselenol (CH3SeH) and ethylselenol (C2H5SeH), by intense (>1017 W cm-2 ) 5 fs x-ray pulses with photon energies of 1.7 and 2 keV has been studied by means of coincident ion momentum spectroscopy. Measuring charge states and ion kinetic energies, we find signatures of charge redistribution within the molecular environment. Furthermore, by analyzing fragment ion angular correlations, we can determine the laboratory-frame orientation of individual molecules and thus investigate the fragmentation dynamics in the molecular frame. This allows distinguishing protons originating from different molecular sites along with identifying the reactionmore »channels that lead to their emission.« less

  4. Performance study of a soft X-ray harmonic generation FEL seeded with an EUV laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullans, M.; Wurtele, J.S.; Penn, G.; Zholents, A.A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Harmonic Generation FEL Seeded with an EUV Laser PulseX-ray harmonic generation FEL seeded with an EUV laser pulseof a free electron laser (FEL) using a low-power extreme

  5. Achromatic and Isochronous Electron Beam Transport for Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengtsson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamlines for Free Electron Lasers," LBL-28880 Preprint (Thirteenth mtemational Free Electron Laser Conference, SantaTransport for Tunable Free Electron Lasers 1. Bengtsson and

  6. Three Dimensioanl Free Electron Laser Dispersion Relation Including Betatron Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-Dimensional Free Electron Laser Dispersion RelationInternational Free Electron Laser Conference, Santa Fe, NM,International Free Electron Laser Conference, held in Santa

  7. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime employs free electron lasers (FELs) with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate Many proposed x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are designed to produce radiation starting from

  8. Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods A. Wolski, G. Penn, A. Sessler, and J. Wurtele*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Beam conditioning for free electron lasers: Consequences and methods A. Wolski, G. Penn, A. Sessler cases [VISA, a soft x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), LCLS, and a ``Greenfield'' FEL] are examined short-wavelength free-electron lasers (FELs) demands electron beams with very small transverse emittance

  9. Laser Heater and seeded Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dattoli, G; Sabia, E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the effect of laser heater on a seeded Free Electron Laser. We develop a model embedding the effect of the energy modulation induced by the heater with those due to the seeding. The present analysis is compatible with the experimental results obtained at FERMI displaying secondary maxima with increasing heater intensity. The treatment developed in the paper confirms and extends previous analyses and put in evidence further effects which can be tested in future experiments.

  10. Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Targets Fat April 10, 2006 Free-Electron Laser Scientists Rox Anderson, right, and Free-Electron Laser Scientist Steve Benson, left, discuss laser beam...

  11. EIGENMODE ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL GUIDING IN FREE ELECTRON LASERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers", Department ofGuided Mode Solutions in Free Electron Lasers", "High GainResonator in Free Electron Lasers", to be published. P.

  12. An Efficient Microwave Power Source: Free-electron Laser Afterburner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Block diagram of the free-electron laser afterburner. The2. The particular free-electron laser afterburner with aMicrowave Power Source: Free-Electron Laser Afterburner c.

  13. The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnagopal, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser S. Krishnagopal, G.414 The Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Laser S. Krishnagopal, G.of Multi-Cavity Free-Electron Lasers Parameters A(,um) '

  14. Resonator Modes in High Gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Guiding in Free Electron Lasers", Department ofModes in High Gain Free Electron Lasers M. Xie. D.A.O.International Free Electron Laser Conference. Naples. FL.

  15. Hole-Coupled Resonators Tunable Infrared Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Free Electron Laser Conference, Kobe, Japan,in Mark III Free Electron Laser", These Proceedings. B.Ozcan and R.H, Pantell, "Free Electron Laser in a Confocal

  16. Resurrection of beam conditioning for free electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Ming

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    t z , Undulators and Free-Electron Lasers, (Clarendon Press,a fatal flaw in a Free Electron Laser ( F E L ) beamO N Operation of free electron lasers in shorter wavelength

  17. Free-Electron Lasers: Present Status and Future Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1977). C. Brau, "Free-Electron Lasers", Science 239, 115 (T. Marshall, "Free-Electron Lasers", MacMillan (1985);C Brau, "Free- Electron Lasers", Academic Press (1990). W.B.

  18. Combination free electron and gaseous laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rockwood, Stephen D. (Los Alamos, NM); Stein, William E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple laser having one or more gaseous laser stages and one or more free electron stages. Each of the free electron laser stages is sequentially pumped by a microwave linear accelerator. Subsequently, the electron beam is directed through a gaseous laser, in the preferred embodiment, and in an alternative embodiment, through a microwave accelerator to lower the energy level of the electron beam to pump one or more gaseous lasers. The combination laser provides high pulse repetition frequencies, on the order of 1 kHz or greater, high power capability, high efficiency, and tunability in the synchronous production of multiple beams of coherent optical radiation.

  19. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  20. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duris, J. P.; Musumeci, P.; Li, R. K.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL) scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  1. Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, Claudio (UCLA) [UCLA

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

  2. Design Alternatives for a Free Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, K; Bosch, R A; Eisert, D; Fisher, M V; Green, M A; Keil, R G; Kleman, K J; Kulpin, J G; Rogers, G C; Wehlitz, R; Chiang, T; Miller, T J; Lawler, J E; Yavuz, D; Legg, R A

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Wisconsin-Madison is continuing design efforts for a vacuum ultraviolet/X-ray Free Electron Laser facility. The design incorporates seeding the FEL to provide fully coherent photon output at energies up to {approx}1 keV. The focus of the present work is to minimize the cost of the facility while preserving its performance. To achieve this we are exploring variations in the electron beam driver for the FEL, in undulator design, and in the seeding mechanism. Design optimizations and trade-offs between the various technologies and how they affect the FEL scientific program will be presented.

  3. Two-element free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.; Yariv, A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction between the electrons and the radiation in a free-electrons laser leads to a shift and a spread of the electron velocity distribution. The electron dynamics of a two-element system are studied in the small signal region. It is found that the efficiency and gain can be increased through introduction of an adjustable drift distance between two identical wigglers.

  4. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  5. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  6. Chaos in free electron laser oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bruni; R. Bachelard; D. Garzella; G. L. Orlandi; M. E. Couprie

    2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The chaotic nature of a storage-ring Free Electron Laser (FEL) is investigated. The derivation of a low embedding dimension for the dynamics allows the low-dimensionality of this complex system to be observed, whereas its unpredictability is demonstrated, in some ranges of parameters, by a positive Lyapounov exponent. The route to chaos is then explored by tuning a single control parameter, and a period-doubling cascade is evidenced, as well as intermittence.

  7. Inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; Campisi, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We first describe the basic physical properties of an inverse free-electron laser and make an estimate of the order of magnitude of the accelerating field obtainable with such a system; then apply the general ideas to the design of an actual device and through this example we give a more accurate evaluation of the fundamental as well as the technical limitations that this acceleration scheme imposes.

  8. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasmaA design of a compact free-electron laser (FEL), generatingare considered. Keywords: Free-electron laser, laser-plasma

  9. Transverse Coherence of a VUV Free Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transverse Coherence of a VUV Free Electron Laser Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades des The transverse coherence is of paramount importance for many applications of a free electron laser (FEL). In this thesis, the first direct measurement of the transverse coherence of a free electron laser at vacuum

  10. A PLASMA CHANNEL BEAM CONDITIONER FOR A FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    A PLASMA CHANNEL BEAM CONDITIONER FOR A FREE ELECTRON LASER G. Penn , A.M. Sessler, J.S. Wurtele of free electron lasers (FELs) can be dramatically improved. Under certain con- ditions, the FEL can transverse action and energy, has been shown to be advantageous for free electron laser (FEL) performance [1

  11. Macro-temporal structure of storage ring free electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    997 Macro-temporal structure of storage ring free electron lasers P. Elleaume Département de laser. Abstract. 2014 I derive simple dimensionless equations governing the storage ring free electron Ring Free Electron Laser (1) (S.R.L.), the S.R.L. was thought to be pseudo-continuous except for some

  12. How Can X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Aide Solar Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are from optimized on structural, energetic and dynamic parameters. Intense X-ray pulses from synchrotrons and X-ray free electrons lasers coupled with ultrafast lasers...

  13. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  14. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast x-ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Byrd, J.M.; Schoenlein, R.; Zholents, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  15. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ([lambda] = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1[sub w1] = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ([approximately] 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1[sub w2] = 1.8 [minus] 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ([approximately] 9%) of electrons to [approximately] 1MeV.

  16. An inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser was configured as an autoaccelerator to test the principle of accelerating electrons by stimulated absorption of radiation ({lambda} = 1.65mm) by an electron beam (750kV) traversing an undulator. Radiation is produced in the first section of a constant period undulator (1{sub w1} = 1.43cm) and then absorbed ({approximately} 40%) in a second undulator, having a tapered period (1{sub w2} = 1.8 {minus} 2.25cm), which results in the acceleration of a subgroup ({approximately} 9%) of electrons to {approximately} 1MeV.

  17. Free Electron Lasers using `Beam by Design'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, J R; McNeil, B W J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been proposed in the literature to improve Free Electron Laser output by transforming the electron phase-space before entering the FEL interaction region. By utilising `beam by design' with novel undulators and other beam changing elements, the operating capability of FELs may be further usefully extended. This paper introduces two new such methods to improve output from electron pulses with large energy spreads and the results of simulations of these methods in the 1D limit are presented. Both methods predict orders of magnitude improvements to output radiation powers.

  18. Free electron laser with masked chicane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Dinh C. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser (FEL) is provided with an accelerator for outputting electron beam pulses; a buncher for modulating each one of the electron beam pulses to form each pulse into longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons; and a wiggler for generating coherent light from the longitudinally dispersed bunches of electrons. The electron beam buncher is a chicane having a mask for physically modulating the electron beam pulses to form a series of electron beam bunches for input to the wiggler. In a preferred embodiment, the mask is located in the chicane at a position where each electron beam pulse has a maximum dispersion.

  19. Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Whitney; George Neil

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of 100 kilowatts (kW) of directed energy from an airborne tactical platform has proved challenging due to the size and weight of most of the options that have been considered. However, recent advances in Free-Electron Lasers appear to offer a solution along with significant tactical advantages: a nearly unlimited magazine, time structures for periods from milliseconds to hours, radar like functionality, and the choice of the wavelength of light that best meets mission requirements. For an Airborne Tactical Free-Electron Laser (ATFEL) on a platforms such as a Lockheed C-130J-30 and airships, the two most challenging requirements, weight and size, can be met by generating the light at a higher harmonic, aggressively managing magnet weights, managing cryogenic heat loads using recent SRF R&D results, and using FEL super compact design concepts that greatly reduce the number of components. The initial R&D roadmap for achieving an ATFEL is provided in this paper. Performing this R&D is expected to further reduce the weight, size and power requirements for the FELs the Navy is currently developing for shipboard applications, as well as providing performance enhancements for the strategic airborne MW class FELs. The 100 kW ATFEL with its tactical advantages may prove sufficiently attractive for early advancement in the queue of deployed FELs.

  20. LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe (Linac Coherent Light Source) [Linac Coherent Light Source

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.

  1. Analogy between free electron laser and channeling by crystal planes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Artru

    2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The trapping of electrons in the ponderomotive potential wells, which governs a free electron laser or inverse free electron laser at high gain, is analogous to the channeling of charged particles by atomic planes of a crystal. A bent crystal is analogous to a period-tapered free electron laser. This analogy is different from the well-known one between channeling and undulator radiations.

  2. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronization of ultrafast x-ray pulses produced in theAccurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  3. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the collaboration's FEL experiment (image not actual size). Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser explores promise of carbon nanotubes By James Schultz January 27, 2003...

  4. High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser (IFEL) Accelerator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gradient High energy gain Inverse Free Electron Laser P. Musumeci UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy On Behalf of the RUBICON collaboration ATF user meeting, BNL, October 6...

  5. Rippled beam free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser amplifier provides a scalloping annular electron beam that interacts with the axial electric field of a TM.sub.0n mode. A waveguide defines an axial centerline and, a solenoid arranged about the waveguide produces an axial constant magnetic field within the waveguide. An electron beam source outputs a annular electron beam that interacts with the axial magnetic field to have an equilibrium radius and a ripple radius component having a variable radius with a ripple period along the axial centerline. An rf source outputs an axial electric field that propagates within the waveguide coaxial with the electron beam and has a radial mode that interacts at the electron beam at the equilibrium radius component of the electron beam.

  6. An extreme ultraviolet Michelson interferometer for experiments at free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, Vinzenz; Fuchs, Silvio; Paulus, Gerhard G.; Zastrau, Ulf [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Blinne, Alexander [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany)] [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Feigl, Torsten [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Albert-Einstein-Straße 7, 07745 Jena (Germany)] [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Albert-Einstein-Straße 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Kämpfer, Tino; Rödel, Christian; Uschmann, Ingo; Wünsche, Martin; Förster, Eckhart [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany) [Institute of Optics and Quantum Electronics, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz Institute, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Michelson interferometer for 13.5 nm soft x-ray radiation. It is characterized in a proof-of-principle experiment using synchrotron radiation, where the temporal coherence is measured to be 13 fs. The curvature of the thin-film beam splitter membrane is derived from the observed fringe pattern. The applicability of this Michelson interferometer at intense free-electron lasers is investigated, particularly with respect to radiation damage. This study highlights the potential role of such Michelson interferometers in solid density plasma investigations using, for instance, extreme soft x-ray free-electron lasers. A setup using the Michelson interferometer for pseudo-Nomarski-interferometry is proposed.

  7. TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM OF NOVOSIBIRSK FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM OF NOVOSIBIRSK FREE ELECTRON LASER B.A.Gudkov, P.A.Selivanov, V all sensors are recorded to the database every 30 seconds. INTRODUCTION A high-power free electron laser (FEL), based on the microtron-recuperator[1], is under construction now at Budker Institute

  8. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Strauss, Moshe (Omer, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  9. Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an X-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an X-FEL Jean feedback laser (DFL) pumped by an x- ray free electron laser (X-FEL). The DFL under consideration is a Mg/SiC bi-layered Bragg reflector pumped by a single X-FEL bunch at 57.4 eV, stimulating the Mg L2

  10. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  11. Part 2: Coherent emission from Free Electron Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lawr, Whit. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp, high-order harmonic...

  12. Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

  13. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  14. Exact and variational solutions of 3D Eigenmodes in high gain Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motz, Undulators and Free-Electron Lasers, (Clarendon Press,in High . Gain Free Electron Lasers MingXie Accelerator andin High Gain Free Electron Lasers Ming Xie Accelerator and

  15. Physically Transparent Formulation of a Free-Electron Laser in the Linear Gain Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in High-Gain, High-Power Free-Electron Lasers: Physics andFormulation of a Free-Electron Laser in the Linear GainFormulation of a Free-Electron Laser in the Linear Gain

  16. Design Overview of a Highly Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelfth International Free Electron Laser Conference, Paris,Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL K. -J. Kim, M.Stable Infrared Free Electron Laser at LBL* K. -J. Kim, M.

  17. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the 11th International Free-Electron Laser Conference, Nuc!.A Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator30418 Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  18. Sensitivity Studies of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarahan, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proc. 12th Int. Free Electron Laser Conf. , Nuel. Instr. andof a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser G. Rangarajan and A.of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Govindan Rangarajan

  19. THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR A HIGH-GRADIENT ACCELERATING STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    18-23, 1982 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FOR AAC03-76SF00098 THE FREE ELECTRON LASER AS A POWER SOURCE FORVariable Parameter Free Electron Laser", to be pub 1 i shed

  20. The Evolution and Limits of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers". In the sentenceBandwidth in Free Electron Lasers K. -J. Kim November 1990of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers* Kwang-Je Kim

  1. A NEW VERSION OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER TWO BEAM ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation in Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",Power 35 GHz Testing of a Free-Electron Laser and Two-BeamA New Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  2. Discrete Cavity Model of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangarajan, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 1991 Free Electron Laser Conference, Santaof a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser G. Rangarajan, A.of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Govindan Rangarajan

  3. The Evolution and Limits of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers". In the sentenceBandwidth in Free Electron Lasers K. -J. Kim November 1990of Spectral Bandwidth in Free Electron Lasers* Kwang-Je Kim

  4. Sensitivity of nonlinear harmonic generation to electron beam quality in free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jr. , Principles of Free-electron Lasers (Chapman & Hall,experiment," in Free Electron Laser Challenges II, Harold E.Beam Quality in Free-Electron Lasers* Sandra G . Biedron*f,

  5. Macroparticle Theory of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takayama, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Motz, Undulators and Free-Electron Laser (Clarendon Press,of a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Acceleratorof a Standing Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

  6. FREE ELECTRON LASERS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF INFRARED AND MILLIMETER WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hughes Low-Voltage Free-Electron Laser Program," in Proc.of the 1985 Free Electron Laser Conference, Lake Tahoe,Mark III Infrared Free-Electron Laser," in Proc. of the 1985

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF THE PARAMETERS OF A STORAGE RING FOR A HIGH POWER XUV FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A.M. Sessler. 'free Electron Laser . LBL -l 8905 (JanuaryFOR A HIGH POWER XUV FREE ELECTRON LASER. A. Jackson, J.for a High Power XUV Free Electron Laser," (LBL'19771, June,

  8. Stability of Resonator Configurations in the Presence of Free-Electron Laser Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnagopal, S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R.H.Pantell, 'The Free-Electron Laser In A ConfocalInternational Free-Electron Laser Conference, Kobe, Japan,in the Presence of Free-Electron Laser Interactions S.

  9. Phase stability of a standing-wave free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharp, W.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser", proceeding of theCoupled-Cavity Free- Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser W. M. Sharp Lawrence

  10. Longitudinally Coherent Single-Spike Radiation from a Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Gabriel Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Free Electron Laser Operation . . . . . . . . . Undulatorfitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-modes in high-gain free-electron lasers,” Phys. Rev. ST

  11. Hard x-ray or gamma ray laser by a dense electron beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Son, S. [18 Caleb Lane, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Joon Moon, Sung [8 Benjamin Rush Ln., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense electron beam propagating through a laser undulator can radiate a coherent x-ray or gamma ray. This lasing scheme is studied with the Landau damping theory. The analysis suggests that, with currently available physical parameters, coherent gamma rays of up to 50 keV can be generated. The electron quantum diffraction suppresses the free electron laser action, which limits the maximum radiation.

  12. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharlemann, Ernst T. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  13. Free electron laser using Rf coupled accelerating and decelerating structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, Charles A. (Los Alamos, NM); Swenson, Donald A. (Los Alamos, NM); Boyd, Jr., Thomas J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser and free electron laser amplifier using beam transport devices for guiding an electron beam to a wiggler of a free electron laser and returning the electron beam to decelerating cavities disposed adjacent to the accelerating cavities of the free electron laser. Rf energy is generated from the energy depleted electron beam after it emerges from the wiggler by means of the decelerating cavities which are closely coupled to the accelerating cavities, or by means of a second bore within a single set of cavities. Rf energy generated from the decelerated electron beam is used to supplement energy provided by an external source, such as a klystron, to thereby enhance overall efficiency of the system.

  14. Jefferson Lab's upgraded Free-Electron Laser produces first ligh...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Navy's goals and expectations and we expect no less from the upgraded FEL." The Free-Electron Laser upgrade project is funded by the Department of Defense's Office of...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - High Gradient Inverse Free Electron Laser...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hi h G di t Hi h i High Gradient High energy gain Inverse Free Electron Laser at BNL P. Musumeci UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy ATF user meeting April 2-3 2009 Outline...

  16. Single electron beam rf feedback free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brau, C.A.; Stein, W.E.; Rockwood, S.D.

    1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser system and electron beam system for a free electron laser which uses rf feedback to enhance efficiency are described. Rf energy is extracted from a single electron beam by decelerating cavities and energy is returned to accelerating cavities using rf returns, such as rf waveguides, rf feedthroughs, resonant feedthroughs, etc. This rf energy is added to rf klystron energy to reduce the required input energy and thereby enhance energy efficiency of the system.

  17. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  18. Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    989 Results of the free electron laser oscillation experiments on the ACO storage ring P. Elleaume. Abstract. 2014 A storage ring free-electron laser oscillator has been operated above threshold at a visible] or from a free electron laser. The free electron laser (F.E.L.) is a very promising source of coherent

  19. democrite-00023911,version1-18Mar2005 Analogy between free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    democrite-00023911,version1-18Mar2005 Analogy between free electron laser and channeling by crystal, which governs a free electron laser or inverse free electron laser at high gain, is analogous-tapered free electron laser. This analogy is different from the well-known one between channeling and undulator

  20. Ultrafast time dynamics studies of periodic lattices with free electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quevedo, W.; Busse, G.; Hallmann, J.; More, R.; Petri, M.; Rajkovic, I. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Krasniqi, F.; Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschentscher, T. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22671 Hamburg (Germany); Stojanovic, N.; Duesterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Tolkiehn, M. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Techert, S. [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed that radiation from free electron laser (FEL) at Hamburg (FLASH) can be used for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiments based on the near-infrared (NIR) pump/FEL probe scheme. Here, investigation probing the ultrafast structural dynamics of periodic nano-crystalline organic matter (silver behenate) with such a scheme is reported. Excitation with a femtosecond NIR laser leads to an ultrafast lattice modification which time evolution has been studied through the scattering of vacuum ultraviolet FEL pulses. The found effect last for 6 ps and underpins the possibility for studying nanoperiodic dynamics down to the FEL source time resolution. Furthermore, the possibility of extending the use of silver behenate (AgBh) as a wavelength and temporal calibration tool for experiments with soft x-ray/FEL sources is suggested.

  1. Resonator design for a visible wavelength free-electron laser (*)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhowmik, A.; Lordi, N. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Ben-Zvi, I.; Gallardo, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design requirements for a visible wavelength free-electron laser being developed at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented along with predictions of laser performance from 3-D numerical simulations. The design and construction of the optical resonator, its alignment and control systems are also described. 15 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Two-dimensional optimization of free-electron-laser designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, D.; Haas, R.A.

    1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers are described that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a synchronous electron at an optimal transverse radius r > 0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  3. Two-dimensional optimization of free electron laser designs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA); Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Off-axis, two-dimensional designs for free electron lasers that maintain correspondence of a light beam with a "synchronous electron" at an optimal transverse radius r>0 to achieve increased beam trapping efficiency and enhanced laser beam wavefront control so as to decrease optical beam diffraction and other deleterious effects.

  4. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482487 Anomalous free electron laser interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel Abstract Free electron lasers (FELs) are considered, typically, as fast: 41.60 Cr Keywords: Free electron laser 1. Introduction Free electron lasers (FELs) and cyclotronNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482­487 Anomalous free electron

  5. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA); Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  6. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  7. Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the soft x-ray range and down to 15 nm in the multi keV range. For use at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, diffractive optics must be capable of withstanding extreme...

  8. Metal Photocathodes for Free Electron Laser Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    uSXRD orientation map of the LCLS Photocathode. The field ofimage of the center of the LCLS photocathode. The horizontalsize of the laser spot in LCLS. The image was taken with a

  9. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes a free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped.

  10. Wiggler plane focusing in a linear free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1988-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron laser apparatus that provides a magnetic centering force to turn or focus a non-axial electron toward the longitudinal axis as desired. The focusing effect is provided by wiggler magnet pole faces that are approximately parabolically shaped. 5 figs.

  11. Strongly aligned gas-phase molecules at Free-Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kierspel, Thomas; Mullins, Terry; Robinson, Joseph; Aquila, Andy; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard; Boll, Rebecca; Boutet, Sébastien; Bucksbaum, Philip; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Fry, Alan; Hunter, Mark; Koglin, Jason E; Liang, Mengning; Mariani, Valerio; Morgan, Andrew; Natan, Adi; Petrovic, Vladimir; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Schnorr, Kirsten; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Stern, Stephan; Thøgersen, Jan; Yoon, Chun Hong; Wang, Fenglin; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a novel experimental implementation to strongly align molecules at full repetition rates of free-electron lasers. We utilized the available in-house laser system at the coherent x-ray imaging beamline at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Chirped laser pulses, i. e., the direct output from the regenerative amplifier of the Ti:Sa chirped pulse amplification laser system, were used to strongly align 2,5-diiodothiophene molecules in a molecular beam. The alignment laser pulses had pulse energies of a few mJ and a pulse duration of 94 ps. A degree of alignment of $\\left$ = 0.85 was measured, limited by the intrinsic temperature of the molecular beam rather than by the available laser system. With the general availability of synchronized chirped-pulse-amplified near-infrared laser systems at short-wavelength laser facilities, our approach allows for the universal preparation of molecules tightly fixed in space for experiments with x-ray pulses.

  12. A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Richard Allen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionized state or the physical processes occurring 15 in a high temperature plasma. There are many advantages to the use of the vacuum spark as an x-ray source; the simplicity of the machine is one. The x-ray output is within the range usable for x-ray... spark apparatus ha- been studied here to determine its applicability to x-ray lithography. A capacitor which stored approximately 3 KJ supplied most of the energy for the plasma. A Nd-YAG laser was used to supply electrons and metallic atoms...

  13. Simulation of free-electron lasers seeded with broadband radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajlekov, Svetoslav; Fawley, William; Schroeder, Carl; Bartolini, Riccardo; Hooker, Simon

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The longitudinal coherence of free-electron laser (FEL) radiation can be enhanced by seeding the FEL with high harmonics of an optical laser pulse. The radiation produced by high-harmonic generation (HHG), however, has a fast-varying temporal profile that can violate the slowly varying envelope approximation and limited frequency window that is employed in conventional free-electron laser simulation codes. Here we investigate the implications of violating this approximation on the accuracy of simulations. On the basis of both analytical considerations and 1D numerical studies, it is concluded that, for most realistic scenarios, conventional FEL codes are capable of accurately simulating the FEL process even when the seed radiation violates the slowly varying envelope approximation. We additionally discuss the significance of filtering the harmonic content of broadband HHG seeds.

  14. Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense lasers promise to extend this down to femtosecond timescales. The process by which free-electron lasers of the free-electron laser saturation length, and the generation of nonlinear harmonics13 at 54 nm and 32 nm

  15. Broadband photoacoustic spectroscopy using a free-electron laser J. Gomez Rivasa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprik, Rudolf

    Broadband photoacoustic spectroscopy using a free-electron laser J. Go´mez Rivasa) and R. Sprikb generated by a free-electron laser, we demonstrate the capabilities of this sort of laser to perform demonstrate that the pulsed structure of a free-electron laser FEL might be used for sensitive PA spectroscopy

  16. A Proof-of-Principle Echo-enabled Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser Experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pernet, Pierre-Louis; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne /SLAC

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs), new methods have been developed to extend capabilities at short wavelengths beyond Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). In particular, seeding of a FEL allows for temporal control of the radiation pulse and increases the peak brightness by orders of magnitude. Most recently, Gennady Stupakov and colleagues at SLAC proposed a new technique: Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG). Here a laser microbunches the beam in an undulator and the beam is sheared in a chicane. This process is repeated with a second laser, undulator and chicane. The interplay between these allows a seeding of the X-ray laser up to the 100th harmonic of the first laser. After introducing the physics of FELs and the EEHG seeding technique, we describe contributions to the experimental effort. We will present detailed studies of the experiment including the choice of parameters and their optimization, the emittance effect, spontaneous emission in the undulators, the second laser phase effect, and measurements of the jitter between RF stations. Finally, the status and preliminary results of the Echo-7 experiment will be outlined.

  17. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating the shortest wavelength laboratory x-ray laser, below 4.5 nm and operating in the water window, by using the high-energy capability of the Titan laser.

  18. Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner , R.L. Byer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    Microstructure-based laser-driven free-electron laser T. Plettner Ã, R.L. Byer E.L. Ginzton-synchronous with the electron beam. This allows for an undulator period that is much greater than the laser wavelength. Due and therefore lead to a very compact free-electron-based radiation device. & 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  19. FREE ELECTRON LASER FOR SIBERIAN CENTRE FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL RESEARCH: THE CONTROL SYSTEM FOR THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    FREE ELECTRON LASER FOR SIBERIAN CENTRE FOR PHOTOCHEMICAL RESEARCH: THE CONTROL SYSTEM of the Siberian Branch of RAS. Abstract. A control system for the magnetic system of the free electron laser (FEL

  20. Free-electron laser scientist is one of two newly elected American...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steve Benson Steve Benson of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) group was recently selected as a 2002 Fellow of the American Physical Society Free-electron laser scientist is one of two...

  1. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-drive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fastto the laser driver, making such a source ideal for ultra-

  2. Chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser vacuum accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V. (Dublin, CA); Baldis, Hector A. (Pleasanton, CA); Landahl, Eric C. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirped pulse inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) vacuum accelerator for high gradient laser acceleration in vacuum. By the use of an ultrashort (femtosecond), ultrahigh intensity chirped laser pulse both the IFEL interaction bandwidth and accelerating gradient are increased, thus yielding large gains in a compact system. In addition, the IFEL resonance condition can be maintained throughout the interaction region by using a chirped drive laser wave. In addition, diffraction can be alleviated by taking advantage of the laser optical bandwidth with negative dispersion focusing optics to produce a chromatic line focus. The combination of these features results in a compact, efficient vacuum laser accelerator which finds many applications including high energy physics, compact table-top laser accelerator for medical imaging and therapy, material science, and basic physics.

  3. Frequency shifting in free-electron lasers G. Shvets and J. S. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Frequency shifting in free-electron lasers G. Shvets and J. S. Wurtele Plasma Fusion Center 1993; accepted 30 September 1993) Frequency shifting in free-electron laser (FEL) oscillators investigation. Free- electron laser sources have been proposed' with an ex- tremely tight requirement

  4. Title of Document: EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE JEFFERSON LAB FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: EMITTANCE MEASUREMENTS OF THE JEFFERSON LAB FREE ELECTRON LASER USING, such as the ones that power Free Electron Lasers (FEL), require high quality (low emittance) beams for efficient to Free Electron Lasers............................................ 4 1.2.1 Basic Principles of an FEL

  5. THE VUV FREE ELECTRON LASER BASED ON THE TESLA TEST FACILITY AT DESY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE VUV FREE ELECTRON LASER BASED ON THE TESLA TEST FACILITY AT DESY J. Rossbach, for the TESLA FEL Collaboration Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, 22603 Hamburg , Germany Abstract A Free-Electron Laser exceptionally well suited for a short-wavelength Free-Electron Laser: Excellent beam quality, mandatory

  6. Bart Faatz | FLASH Seminar | 9-Nov-2010 Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bart Faatz | FLASH Seminar | 9-Nov-2010 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg Lasing at 4.x nm »First at 4.45 »First at 4.6 »First at 4.12 #12;FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg FLASH SASE-2010 FLASH. Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg The new FLASH layout 315 m Bunch Compressor Bypass

  7. Competing instabilities in the circular free-electron laser Yasushi Kawai and Hirobumi Saito

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Competing instabilities in the circular free-electron laser Yasushi Kawai and Hirobumi Saito free-electron laser (FEL) is developed. A matrix dispersion relation, which includes coupling between of the amplitudes of TE and TM modes are presented. I. INTRODUCTION The free-electron laser (FEL) has the potential

  8. SHORT-WAVELENGTH, SINGLE-PASS FREE-ELECTRON LASERS J. Rossbach, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHORT-WAVELENGTH, SINGLE-PASS FREE-ELECTRON LASERS J. Rossbach, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany in demonstration of high power gain at single- pass free-electron lasers operating in the wavelength range from in the undulator. Eq. (1) exhibits two main advantages of the free-electron laser: the free tunability

  9. Theoretical Examination of Transfer Cavities in a Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govil, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",A.M. Sessler, "The Free-Electron Laser as a Power Source for

  10. Common Analysis of the Relativistic Klystron and the Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the standing-wave free-electron laser on the same footingSessler, A.M. , "The Free Electron Laser as a Power SourceNew Version of a Free Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator",

  11. Two-Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the Standing-wave Free-electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeleyof a standing-wave free-electron laser," Lawrence Berkeley

  12. Calculation of 3-D Free Electron Laser Gain: Comparison with Simulation and Generalization to Elliptical Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Y.-H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculation of 3-D Free Electron Laser Gain: Comparison withInternational Free Electron Laser Conference, Kobe, Japan,relation for the free electron laser (FEL) gain in the

  13. Reversible electron beam heating for suppression of microbunching instabilities at free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrens, Christopher; Xiang, Dao

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of microbunching instabilities due to the compression of high-brightness electron beams at existing and future X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) results in restrictions on the attainable lasing performance and renders beam imaging with optical transition radiation impossible. The instability can be suppressed by introducing additional energy spread, i.e., "heating" the electron beam, as demonstrated by the successful operation of the laser heater system at the Linac Coherent Light Source. The increased energy spread is typically tolerable for self-amplified spontaneous emission FELs but limits the effectiveness of advanced FEL schemes such as seeding. In this paper, we present a reversible electron beam heating system based on two transverse deflecting radio-frequency structures (TDSs) in front and behind a magnetic bunch compressor chicane. The additional energy spread will be introduced in the first TDS, which suppresses the microbunching instability, and then will be eliminated in the second T...

  14. Reliable before-fabrication forecasting of expected surface slope distributions for x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Yekaterina V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of x-ray optics for the LCLS free-electron laser,” Proc.beamlines and diagnostics at LCLS,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods A

  15. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  16. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field...

  17. Generation of ultrashort radiation pulses by injection locking a regenerative free-electron-laser amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Generation of ultrashort radiation pulses by injection locking a regenerative free-electron-laser 12609-5 PACS number s : 41.60.Cr, 42.60.Da I. INTRODUCTION AND MOTIVATION The free-electron laser FEL demonstrate how a steady-state train of ultrashort radiation pulses can be produced utilizing a new free-electron

  18. Slippage effect on energy modulation in seeded free-electron lasers with frequency chirped seed laser pulses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Chao; Deng, Haixiao; Wang, Guanglei; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Xiang, Dao

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron lasers (FELs) seeded with external lasers hold great promise for generating high power radiation with nearly transform-limited bandwidth in the soft x-ray region. However, it has been pointed out that the initial seed laser phase error will be amplified by the frequency up-conversion process, which may degrade the quality of the output radiation produced by a harmonic generation scheme. In this paper, theoretical and simulation studies on frequency chirp amplification in seeded FEL schemes with slippage effect taken into account are presented. It is found that the seed laser imperfection experienced by the electron beam can be significantly smoothed by the slippage effect in the modulator when the slippage length is comparable to the seed laser pulse length. This smoothing effect allows one to preserve the excellent temporal coherence of seeded FELs in the presence of large frequency chirp in the seed laser. Our studies show that the tolerance on frequency chirp in the seed laser for generating nearly transform-limited soft x-ray pulses in seeded FELs is much looser than previously thought and fully coherent radiation at nanometer wavelength may be reached with current technologies.

  19. Compact two-beam push-pull free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutton, Andrew (Yorktown, VA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-compact free electron laser comprising a pair of opposed superconducting cavities that produce identical electron beams moving in opposite directions such that each set of superconducting cavities accelerates one electron beam and decelerates the other electron beam. Such an arrangement, allows the energy used to accelerate one beam to be recovered and used again to accelerate the second beam, thus, each electron beam is decelerated by a different structure than that which accelerated it so that energy exchange rather than recovery is achieved resulting in a more compact and highly efficient apparatus.

  20. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Shinn, Michelle [Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Schaaf, Peter [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, FG Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 10 05 65, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  1. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, J.

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions. 4 figs.

  2. A Free-Electron Laser in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -K. Fung; J. Kuijpers

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radius ($ approx 10 :{km}$). For different sets of parameters, coherent emission is generated by bunches of beam electrons in the radio domain, with bandwidths of 3 GHz. Pulse power often reached $10^{13} :{W}$, which corresponds with brightness temperature of $10^{30} :{K}$. The duration of these pulses is of the order of nanoseconds. In the context of pulsar radio emission, our results indicate that the laser can produce elementary bursts of radiation which build up the observed microstructures of a few tens of microseconds duration. The process is sensitive mostly to the beam particles energy, number density and the background magnetic field, but much less so to the transverse wave parameters. We demonstrate that the operation of a free-electron laser with a transverse electromagnetic wiggler in the pulsar magnetosphere occurs preferably at moder ate Lorentz factors $ gamma geq 100$, high beam density $n gtrsim 0.1 n_{textrm{GJ}}(r_ ast)$ where $n_{textrm{GJ}}(r_ ast)$ is the Goldrei ch-Julian density at a stellar radius $r_ ast$, and finally, at large altitude where the background magnetic field is low $B_0 leq 10^{-2} textrm{T}$.

  3. Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond pulses with high repetition rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Anne

    Pulsed laser deposition with a high average power free electron laser: Benefits of subpicosecond average power Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Free Electron Laser. The combination of the free electron laser leads to very different plasma emission and produces films with high quality

  4. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, H.; Neil, G.R.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical has been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, collinear with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM{sub 10} mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron. 4 figs.

  5. Beam conditioner for free electron lasers and synchrotrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongxiu (Williamsburg, VA); Neil, George R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused optical is been used to introduce an optical pulse, or electromagnetic wave, colinearly with the electron beam in a free electron laser or synchrotron thereby adding an axial field component that accelerates the electrons on the radial outside of the distribution of electrons in the electron beam. This invention consists of using the axial electrical component of a TEM.sub.10 mode Gaussian beam in vacuum to condition the electron beam and speed up the outer electrons in the beam. The conditioning beam should possess about the same diameter as the electron beam. The beam waist of the conditioning wave must be located around the entrance of the undulator longitudinally to have a net energy exchange between the electrons in the outer part of the distribution and the conditioning wave owing to the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam. By accelerating the outer electrons, the outer and core electrons are caused to stay in phase. This increases the fraction of the electron beam energy that is converted to light thereby improving the efficiency of conversion of energy to light and therefore boosting the power output of the free electron laser and synchrotron.

  6. Measurements of the LCLS Laser Heater and its impact on the x-ray FEL Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhirong; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F.-J.; Ding, Y.; Dowell, D.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hays, G.; Hering, Ph.; Iverson, R.; Loos, H.; Miahnahri, A.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Stupakov, G.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; White, W.; Wu, J.; Xiang, D.

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The very bright electron beam required for an x-ray free-electron laser (FEL), such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), is susceptible to a microbunching instability in the magnetic bunch compressors, prior to the FEL undulator. The uncorrelated electron energy spread in the LCLS can be increased by an order of magnitude to provide strong Landau damping against the instability without degrading the FEL performance. To this end, a 'laser-heater' system has been installed in the LCLS injector, which modulates the energy of a 135-MeV electron bunch with an IR laser beam in a short undulator, enclosed within a four-dipole chicane. In this paper, we report detailed measurements of laser heater-induced energy spread, including the unexpected self-heating phenomenon when the laser energy is very low. We discuss the suppression of the microbunching instability with the laser heater and its impact on the x-ray FEL performance. We also present the analysis of these experimental results and develop a three-dimensional longitudinal space charge model to explain the self-heating effect.

  7. Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  8. Design considerations for the free-electron laser with the self...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Design considerations for the free-electron laser with the self-seeding and current-enhanced SASE 1 Alexander Zholents Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory...

  9. A wide bandwidth free-electron laser with mode locking using current modulation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kur, E.; Dunning, D. J.; McNeil, B. W. J.; Wurtele, J.; Zholents, A. A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); (Univ. of California at Berkeley); (Univ. of Strathclyde); (STFC Daresbury Lab.); (LBNL)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new scheme for mode locking a free-electron laser amplifier is proposed based on electron beam current modulation. It is found that certain properties of the original concept, based on the energy modulation of electrons, are improved including the spectral brightness of the source and the purity of the series of short pulses. Numerical comparisons are made between the new and old schemes and between a mode-locked free-electron laser and self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser. Illustrative examples using a hypothetical mode-locked free-electron laser amplifier are provided. The ability to generate intense coherent radiation with a large bandwidth is demonstrated.

  10. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR MAGNET POWER SUPPLIES FOR NOVOSIBIRSK FREE ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    CONTROL SYSTEM FOR MAGNET POWER SUPPLIES FOR NOVOSIBIRSK FREE ELECTRON LASER Yu.M.Velikanov, V, the software tools for power supply diagnostics are described. INTRODUCTION A high-power free electron laser electron laser (FEL) is described. The characteristics and structure of the power supply system

  11. XUV free-electron laser-based projection lithography systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newnam, B.E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-electron laser sources, driven by rf-linear accelerators, have the potential to operate in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral range with more than sufficient average power for high-volume projection lithography. For XUV wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm, such sources will enable the resolution limit of optical projection lithography to be extended from 0.25 {mu}m to 0.05{mu}m and with an adequate total depth of focus (1 to 2 {mu}m). Recent developments of a photoinjector of very bright electron beams, high-precision magnetic undulators, and ring-resonator cavities raise our confidence that FEL operation below 100 nm is ready for prototype demonstration. We address the motivation for an XUV FEL source for commercial microcircuit production and its integration into a lithographic system, include reflecting reduction masks, reflecting XUV projection optics and alignment systems, and surface-imaging photoresists. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  12. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirian, N. S. [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  13. Free-Electron Laser-Powered Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, S; Edwards, D T; van Tol, J; Ramian, G; Han, S; Sherwin, M S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that have resisted all other techniques in structural biology. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the development of quantum information processors. Like nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), EPR spectroscopy becomes more powerful at high magnetic fields and frequencies, and with excitation by coherent pulses rather than continuous waves. However, the difficulty of generating sequences of powerful pulses at frequencies above 100 GHz has, until now, confined high-power pulsed EPR to magnetic fields of 3.5 T and below. Here we demonstrate that ~1 kW pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL) can power a pulsed EPR spectrometer at 240 GHz...

  14. Wiggler, undulator, and free-electron laser-radiation sources development at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, H.; Krinsky, S.; Luccio, A.; Pellegrini, C.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is presented of the special radiation sources development at the NSLS for incorporation in a 2.5 GeV X-ray storage ring and a 700 MeV vuv storage ring. This includes a superconducting high field multipole wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 0.5A; a permanent magnet wiggler, lambda/sub c/ = 2.0A; a maximum photon energy undulator (5 to 7 keV); an undulator for a soft X-ray line or continuum spectrum and a free electron laser source tunable in the 2500 to 4500A region. Source characteristics and status of development are given. In addition, the incorporation of a backscattered Compton photon source is being studied and relevant parameters are presented.

  15. Monte Carlo study for optimal conditions in single-shot imaging with femtosecond x-ray laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jaehyun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense x-ray pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable the unveiling of atomic structure in material and biological specimens via ultrafast single-shot exposures. As the radiation is intense enough to destroy the sample, a new sample must be provided for each x-ray pulse. These single-particle delivery schemes require careful optimization, though systematic study to find such optimal conditions is still lacking. We have investigated two major single-particle delivery methods: particle injection as flying objects and membrane-mount as fixed targets. The optimal experimental parameters were searched for via Monte Carlo simulations to discover that the maximum single-particle hit rate achievable is close to 40%.

  16. Electron bunch energy and phase feed-forward stabilization system for the Mark V RF-linac free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadmack, M. R.; Kowalczyk, J. M. D.; Lienert, B. R.; Madey, J. M. J.; Szarmes, E. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Jacobson, B. T. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, California 90404 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An amplitude and phase compensation system has been developed and tested at the University of Hawai'i for the optimization of the RF drive system to the Mark V free-electron laser. Temporal uniformity of the RF drive is essential to the generation of an electron beam suitable for optimal free-electron laser performance and the operation of an inverse Compton scattering x-ray source. The design of the RF measurement and compensation system is described in detail and the results of RF phase compensation are presented. Performance of the free-electron laser was evaluated by comparing the measured effects of phase compensation with the results of a computer simulation. Finally, preliminary results are presented for the effects of amplitude compensation on the performance of the complete system.

  17. Fourier analysis of X-ray micro-diffraction profiles to characterize laser shock peened metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    .L., 1950. The effect of cold-work distortion on X-ray pat- terns. Journal of Applied Physics 21, 595LSP need to be further studied from the measured X-ray micro-diffraction profile. Broadening of X-rayFourier analysis of X-ray micro-diffraction profiles to characterize laser shock peened metals

  18. Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser Facility preliminary design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, I. [ed.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, the Preliminary Design Report (PDR) for the Brookhaven Ultraviolet Free Electron Laser (UV FEL) facility, describes all the elements of a facility proposed to meet the needs of a research community which requires ultraviolet sources not currently available as laboratory based lasers. Further, for these experiments, the requisite properties are not extant in either the existing second or upcoming third generation synchrotron light sources. This document is the result of our effort at BNL to identify potential users, determine the requirements of their experiments, and to design a facility which can not only satisfy the existing need, but have adequate flexibility for possible future extensions as need dictates and as evolving technology allows. The PDR is comprised of three volumes. In this, the first volume, background for the development of the proposal is given, including descriptions of the UV FEL facility, and representative examples of the science it was designed to perform. Discussion of the limitations and potential directions for growth are also included. A detailed description of the facility design is then provided, which addresses the accelerator, optical, and experimental systems. Information regarding the conventional construction for the facility is contained in an addendum to volume one (IA).

  19. A Free-Electron Laser in the Pulsar Magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuijpers, P K F J

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied systematically the free-electron laser in the context of high brightness pulsar radio emission. In this paper, we have numerically examined the case where a transverse electromagnetic wave is distorting the motion of a relativistic electron beam while travelling over one stellar radius ($ approx 10 :{km}$). For different sets of parameters, coherent emission is generated by bunches of beam electrons in the radio domain, with bandwidths of 3 GHz. Pulse power often reached $10^{13} :{W}$, which corresponds with brightness temperature of $10^{30} :{K}$. The duration of these pulses is of the order of nanoseconds. In the context of pulsar radio emission, our results indicate that the laser can produce elementary bursts of radiation which build up the observed microstructures of a few tens of microseconds duration. The process is sensitive mostly to the beam particles energy, number density and the background magnetic field, but much less so to the transverse wave parameters. We demonstrate that th...

  20. TESLA-FEL Report 2004-08 LINAC BASED FREE-ELECTRON LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA-FEL Report 2004-08 1 LINAC BASED FREE-ELECTRON LASER J. Rossbach Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany Abstract A basic treatment of the principle of the linac-driven free-electron laser (FEL) is given. The first part of the paper describes the FEL in low-gain approximation, and in the second part the high

  1. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R A; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A; Baker, S L; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; Nietubyc, R; Pelka, J B; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Juha, L; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Koptyaev, S; Velyhan, A; Krasa, J; Kuba, J; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wabnitz, H; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Stojanovic, N; Zastrau, U; Tronnier, A; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We exposed samples of B4C, amorphous C, chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD)-diamond C, Si, and SiC to single 25 fs-long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up to 2.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The samples were chosen as candidate materials for x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) optics. We found that the threshold for surface-damage is on the order of the fluence required for thermal melting. For larger fluences, the crater depths correspond to temperatures on the order of the critical temperature, suggesting that the craters are formed by two-phase vaporization [1]. XFELs have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity ultrashort pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1 to 10 keV regime. The expected high output fluence and short pulse duration pose significant challenges to the optical components, including radiation damage. It has not been possible to obtain direct experimental verification of the expected damage thresholds since appropriate x-ray sources are not yet available. FLASH has allowed us to study the interaction of high-fluence short-duration photon pulses with materials at the shortest wavelength possible to date. With these experiments, we have come closer to the extreme conditions expected in XFEL-matter interaction scenarios than previously possible.

  2. XTREME OPTICS: the behavior of cavity optics for the Jefferson Lab free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle D. Shinn; Christopher Behre; Stephen Benson; David Douglas; Fred Dylla; Christopher Gould; Joseph Gubeli; David Hardy; Kevin Jordan; George Neil; and Shukui Zhanga

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The cavity optics within high power free-electron lasers based on energy-recovering accelerators are subjected to extreme conditions associated with illumination from a broad spectrum of radiation, often at high irradiances. This is especially true for the output coupler, where absorption of radiation by both the mirror substrate and coating places significant design restrictions to properly manage heat load and prevent mirror distortion. Besides the fundamental lasing wavelength, the mirrors are irradiated with light at harmonics of the fundamental, THz radiation generated by the bending magnets downstream of the wiggler, and x-rays produced when the electron beam strikes accelerator diagnostic components (e.g., wire scanners and view screens) or from inadvertent beam loss. The optics must reside within high vacuum at ~ 10-8 Torr and this requirement introduces its own set of complications. This talk discusses the performance of numerous high reflector and output coupler optics assemblies and provides a detailed list of lessons learned gleaned from years of experience operating the Upgrade IR FEL, a 10 kW-class, sub-ps laser with output wavelength from 1 to 6 microns.

  3. Analysis of \\v{C}erenkov free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalkal, Yashvir

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of a \\v{C}erenkov free-electron laser (FEL) driven by a flat electron beam. In this system, an electron beam travelling close to a dielectric slab placed at the top of an ideal conductor interacts with the co-propagating electromagnetic surface mode. The surface mode arises due to singularity in the reflectivity of the dielectric slab for the incident evanescent wave. Under suitable conditions, the surface mode grows as a result of interaction with the electron beam. We show that the interaction of the surface mode with the co-propagating electron beam can be rigorously understood by analyzing the singularity in the reflectivity. Using this approach, we set up coupled Maxwell-Lorentz equations for the system, in analogy with conventional undulator based FELs. We solve these equations analytically in the small signal regime to obtain formulae for the small signal gain, and the spatial growth rate. Saturation behaviour of the system is analyzed by solving these equations numerically in th...

  4. Free electron properties of metals under ultrafast laser-induced electron-phonon nonequilibrium: a first-principles study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Free electron properties of metals under ultrafast laser-induced electron-phonon nonequilibrium modelled based on the free electron classical theory, the free electron number is a key parameter. However or delocalized electronic states, temperature dependent free electron numbers are evaluated for a series

  5. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oliva, E [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Lu, L [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Nejdl, J [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Proux, C [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique] [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique; Le, T. T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Dunn, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ros, D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Zeitoun, Philippe [École Polytechnique] [École Polytechnique; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  6. IEEEJOURNAL OF QUANTUMELECTRONICS, VOL. QE-21,NO. 7, JULY 1985 831 High-Gain Free Electron Lasers Using Induction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    IEEEJOURNAL OF QUANTUMELECTRONICS, VOL. QE-21,NO. 7, JULY 1985 831 High-Gain Free Electron Lasers, AND J. S. WURTELE Abstract-High-power free electron lasers (FEL's) can be realized using induction. INTRODUCTION THE free electron laser (FEL)[11 can produce coherent radiation at wavelengths from

  7. An Infrared Free Electron Laser System for the Proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL Based on a 500 MHz Superconducting Linac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Free Electron Laser Conference, Kobe, Japan,2 i An Infrared Free Electron Laser System for the ProposedDE93 004723 AN INFRARED FREE ELECTRON LASER SYSTEM FOR THE

  8. Design of a Superconducting Linear Accelerator for an Infrared Free Electron Laser of the Proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    see "An Infrared Free-Electron Laser for CDRL," LBL Pub-FOR AN INFRARED FREE ELECTRON LASER OF 1HE PROPOSED CHEMICALFOR AN INFRARED FREE ELECTRON LASER OF THE PROPOSED CHEMICAL

  9. Two Dimensional Simulation Analysis of the First Sections of a Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing-wave free-electron laser two-beam accelerator,"of a standing-wave free electron laser," Nucl. Instr. anda standing-wave free-electron laser," Proc. SPIE Conference

  10. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  11. Efficiency enhancement of a two-beam free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouhani, M. H.; Maraghechi, B.; Saberi, H. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A local and nonlinear simulation of two-beam and tapered free-electron laser (FEL) is presented self-consistently. The slippage of the electromagnetic wave with respect to the electron beam is ignored and the relativistic electron beams are assumed to be cold. The fundamental resonance and the third harmonic radiation of the beam with lower energy are considered, in which the third harmonic is at the fundamental resonance of the beam with higher energy. The wiggler field is set to decrease linearly when the radiation of the third harmonic saturates. The optimum starting point of tapering and the slope of the reduction in the amplitude of wiggler are found by successive run of the code. Using the slowly varying envelope approximation, a set of nonlinear equations is derived which describes this system. These equations are solved numerically by the Runge-Kutta method. This method can be used to improve the efficiency of the two-beam FEL in the extreme ultraviolet and x-ray regions of spectrum.

  12. Beam energy distribution influences on density modulation efficiency in seeded free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guanglei; Deng, Haixiao; Zhang, Weiqing; Wu, Guorong; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang; Yang, Xueming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam energy spread at the entrance of undulator system is of paramount importance for efficient density modulation in high-gain seeded free-electron lasers (FELs). In this paper, the dependences of high harmonic micro-bunching in the high-gain harmonic generation (HGHG), echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) and phase-merging enhanced harmonic generation (PEHG) schemes on the electron energy spread distribution are studied. Theoretical investigations and multi-dimensional numerical simulations are applied to the cases of uniform and saddle beam energy distributions and compared to a traditional Gaussian distribution. It shows that the uniform and saddle electron energy distributions significantly enhance the performance of HGHG-FELs, while they almost have no influence on EEHG and PEHG schemes. A numerical example demonstrates that, with about 84keV RMS uniform and/or saddle slice energy spread, the 30th harmonic radiation can be directly generated by a single-stage seeding scheme for a soft x-ray FEL f...

  13. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Augustoni, Arnold L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gerardo, James B. (Albuquerque, NM); Raymond, Thomas D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser.

  14. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Augustoni, A.L.; Gerardo, J.B.; Raymond, T.D.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography is disclosed. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser. 8 figs.

  15. High-Gain Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Laser at Saturation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gain Harmonic Generation Free-Electron Laser at Saturation T. Shaftan 1 , M. Babzien 1 , I. Ben-Zvi 1 , S. G. Biedron 2 , L. F. DiMauro 1 , A. Doyuran 1 , J.N. Galayda 2 , E....

  16. Jefferson Lab's Free-Electron Laser Joins With Others in New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Free-Electron Laser Joins With Others in New Research Venture NEWPORT NEWS, VA, April 29, 2009 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will...

  17. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingth Lomonosov1

  18. Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

  19. Correspondence: Email: shinn@jlab.org; Telephone: 757 269 7565; FAX: 757 269 5519 High Average Power Free-Electron Lasers -A New Laser Source for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Free-Electron Lasers - A New Laser Source for Materials Processing Michelle D. Shinn Thomas the status of our DOD-funded project to upgrade the FEL to 10 kW in the mid IR. Keywords: Free-electron laser, one type of laser can meet these requirements: a free-electron laser (FEL) using a superconducting

  20. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  1. Free Electron Laser Nitriding of Metals: From basis physics to industrial applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapin, Gerd

    Accelerator Facility, Free Electron Laser Group, Newport News, VA 23606, USA Abstract Titanium was laser-liquid interface energy and the strain. Further in- vestigations showed that the dendritic growth is beginning treatment, laser nitriding, titanium PACS: 81.65.Lp, 52.50.Jm, 61.80.Ba, 76.80.+y 1 Introduction Titanium

  2. X-ray conversion of ultra-short laser pulses on a solid sample: Role of electron waves excited in the pre-plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baffigi, F., E-mail: federica.baffigi@ino.it; Cristoforetti, G.; Fulgentini, L.; Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, CNR Campus, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat silicon samples were irradiated with 40 fs, 800?nm laser pulses at an intensity at the best focus of 2·10{sup 18} Wcm{sup ?2}, in the presence of a pre-plasma on the sample surface. X-ray emission in the spectral range from 2 to 30?keV was detected inside and outside the plane of incidence, while varying pre-plasma scale length, laser intensity, and polarization. The simultaneous detection of 2? and 3?/2 emission allowed the contributions to the X-ray yield to be identified as originating from laser interaction with either the near-critical density (n{sub c}) region or with the n{sub c}/4 region. In the presence of a moderate pre-plasma, our measurements reveal that, provided the pre-plasma reaches a scale-length of a few laser wavelengths, X-ray emission is dominated by the contribution from the interaction with the under dense plasma, where electron plasma waves can grow, via laser stimulated instabilities, and, in turn, accelerate free electrons to high energies. This mechanism leads also to a clear anisotropy in the angular distribution of the X-ray emission. Our findings can lead to an enhancement of the conversion efficiency of ultra short laser pulses into X-rays.

  3. annular beam free-electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and X-ray regions is predicted. KeywordsFree-electron laser, Higher energy beam, Lower energy beam, Two-beam M. Zahedian; B. Maraghechi; M. H. Rouhani 6 Analytic model of...

  4. Electron beam transport in gas-loaded free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yariv, S.; Friedland, L. (Center for Plasma Physics, Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel (IL))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of the presence of helical wiggler and axial guide magnetic fields on the quality of the electron beam in a gas-loaded free-electron laser are investigated. The electron velocity space diffusion theory in the free-electron laser is developed and tested in Monte Carlo simulations. The theory is applied in estimating the collisional limitations on the interaction length of the laser. It is shown that two competing effects related to collisions cause the gain loss in gas-loaded free-electron lasers, i.e., (a) the growing phase mismatch between the electrons and the wave and (b) the destruction of the coherent transverse helical beam motion. The second effect dominates in the absence of the guide field, provided the wiggler field strength is sufficiently small.

  5. BUDKER INP FREE ELECTRON LASER FACILITY CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    BUDKER INP FREE ELECTRON LASER FACILITY ­ CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS * O.A.Shevchenko# , V electron laser (FEL) facility at Budker INP is being developed for more than 15 years. It is based.G.Tcheskidov, N.A.Vinokurov, M.G.Vlasenko, P.D.Vobly, V.N.Volkov, BINP, Novosibirsk, Russia Abstract The free

  6. Navy Breaks World Record With Futuristic Free-Electron Laser...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    foxnews.comscitech20110218navy-breaks-world-record-futuristic-laser-getting-real Submitted: Sunday, February 20, 2011...

  7. Using the X-FEL to photo-pump X-ray laser transitions in He-like Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Rohringer, N

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive because of the difficulty of finding a strong resonant pump line. With the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we use the X-FEL at 1174 eV to photo-pump the singly excited 1s2p state of He-like Ne to the doubly excited 2p3p state and model gain on the 2p3p-2p2s transition at 175 eV and the 2p3p-1s3p transition at 1017 eV. One motivation for studying this scheme is to explore possible quenching of the gain due to strong non-linear coupling effects from the intense X-FEL beam We compare this scheme with photo-pumping the He-like Ne ground state to the 1s3p singly excited state followed by lasing on the 3p-2s and 3d-2p transitions at 158 and 151 eV. Experiments are being planned at LCLS to study these laser processes and coherent quantum effects.

  8. Two-colour generation in a chirped seeded Free-Electron Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahieu, B; Castronovo, D; Danailov, M B; Demidovich, A; De Ninno, G; Di Mitri, S; Fawley, W M; Ferrari, E; Fröhlich, L; Gauthier, D; Giannessi, L; Mahne, N; Penco, G; Raimondi, L; Spampinati, S; Spezzani, C; Svetina, C; Trovò, M; Zangrando, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the experimental demonstration of a method for generating two spectrally and temporally separated pulses by an externally seeded, single-pass free-electron laser operating in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral range. Our results, collected on the FERMI@Elettra facility and confirmed by numerical simulations, demonstrate the possibility of controlling both the spectral and temporal features of the generated pulses. A free-electron laser operated in this mode becomes a suitable light source for jitter-free, two-colour pump-probe experiments.

  9. Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacGowan, Brian J. (Livermore, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (El Granada, CA); Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulses of short duration (32). An ultraviolet or X-ray laser pulse of long duration (12) is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier (28), by a streaming plasma (22) that is produced by illuminating a solid target (16, 18) with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation (20). The short pulse of ultraviolet or X-ray laser radiation (32), which may be amplified to high power (40, 42), is separated out by passage through a slit aperture (30) in the opaque barrier (28).

  10. Method and apparatus for producing durationally short ultraviolet or x-ray laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Trebes, J.E.

    1987-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus is disclosed for producing ultraviolet or x- ray laser pulses of short duration. An ultraviolet or x-ray laser pulse of long duration is progressively refracted, across the surface of an opaque barrier, by a streaming plasma that is produced by illuminating a solid target with a pulse of conventional line focused high power laser radiation. The short pulse of ultraviolet or x-ray laser radiation, which may be amplified to high power, is separated out by passage through a slit aperture in the opaque barrier.

  11. Standoff detection of hidden objects using backscattered ultra-intense laser-produced x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuwabara, H. [IHI Corporation, 1, Shin-Nakahara-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)] [IHI Corporation, 1, Shin-Nakahara-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Mori, Y.; Kitagawa, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsucho, Nishiku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)] [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsucho, Nishiku, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan)

    2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-intense laser-produced sub-ps X-ray pulses can detect backscattered signals from objects hidden in aluminium containers. Coincident measurements using primary X-rays enable differentiation among acrylic, copper, and lead blocks inside the container. Backscattering reveals the shapes of the objects, while their material composition can be identified from the modification methods of the energy spectra of backscattered X-ray beams. This achievement is an important step toward more effective homeland security.

  12. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemann, Christoph

    2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  13. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hattne, Hattne

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Diffraction patterns from thermolysin microcrystals and one dark run, collected in December 2011. This data was used for metrology calibration and general cctbx.xfel development.

  14. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007). 41. P. Emma for the LCLS commissioning team, PAC2009Test Facility for the LCLS”, SLAC-TN-07-005, (2007). John N.Professional/Academic Director, LCLS Strategic Projects

  15. Design Studies for a VUV--Soft X-ray Free-Electron Laser Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bunch arrival time in the LCLS, and another system that willFERMI@Elettra and 100 fs for LCLS, both requiring about 200-

  16. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser (CXIDB ID 3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, H. N.

    The diffraction pattern of this entry corresponds to the one shown in **figure 2a** of the corresponding citation.

  17. Accurate macromolecular structures using minimal measurements from X-ray free-electron lasers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hattne, Hattne

    Diffraction patterns from thermolysin microcrystals and one dark run, collected in December 2011. This data was used for metrology calibration and general cctbx.xfel development.

  18. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced Light Source Accelerator Physics Group - LBNLlasers. Studied accelerator physics issues associated withInstructor: o Fund. of Accelerator Physics and Technology,

  19. De novo protein crystal structure determination from X-ray free-electron laser data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barends, Thomas, R.M.

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) data of microcrystals of a lysozyme gadolinium derivative. The data was used to demonstrate de-novo phasing by single anomalous dispersion.

  20. De novo protein crystal structure determination from X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Barends, Thomas, R.M.

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) data of microcrystals of a lysozyme gadolinium derivative. The data was used to demonstrate de-novo phasing by single anomalous dispersion.

  1. R&D for a Soft X-Ray Free Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staples, John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CW superconducting RF (SCRF) linac technology, and opticalCollider and the DOE-funded SCRF R&D program. SLAC can apply

  2. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser (CXIDB ID 19)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Martin, A. V.

    This data was collected as part of the same experiment as the data deposited in [ID16](id-16.html). Experiment details are given in [Loh, N.D. et al.](http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11222)

  3. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park the sample explodes and turns into a plasma. Here we report the first experimental demonstration-resolution scattering signals for such samples in conventional experiments11,12 . Damage is caused by energy deposited

  4. The World's First Free-Electron X-ray Laser | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings for Specific U.S.TheTheFirst

  5. VISA: A Milestone on the Path Towards X-Ray Free Electron Lasers | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize Available Resources Print As soonof

  6. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser: A Progress Report | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand Water |1Benefits ofEffects

  7. Absorbed XFEL dose in the components of the LCLS X-Ray Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, S

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We list the materials that are anticipated to be placed into the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) beam line, their positions, and the absorbed dose, and compare this dose with anticipated damage thresholds.

  8. Master-Oscillator-Power-Amplifier (MOPA) Laser Sources Used as Drive Lasers for Photoinjectors for High-Gain, Free Electron Lasers (FELs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    for High-Gain, Free Electron Lasers (FELs) By David Leonard Demske Scholarly paper submitted In partial Milchberg #12;- 1 - Abstract The realization of extremely high gain, and high power in Free Electron Lasers laser arrangements to extract electron bunches from photocathodes. The performance of FELs depends

  9. Modelling dynamics of samples exposed to free-electron-laser radiation with Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beata Ziaja; Antonio R. B. de Castro; Edgar Weckert; Thomas Moeller

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply Boltzmann equations for modelling the radiation damage in samples irradiated by photons from free electron laser (FEL). We test this method in a study case of a spherically symmetric xenon cluster irradiated with VUV FEL photons. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of the Boltzmann method for describing the complex and non-equilibrium dynamics of samples exposed to FEL radiation.

  10. Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    1 Technical Report Ultrafast X-ray Science at the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source Kelly J. Gaffney ultrafast phenomena. These techniques involve excitation of a sample with an ultrafast laser pump pulse, USA The ultrafast, high brightness x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources of the future have

  11. ABSTRACT FINAL ID: SM13B-2055 TITLE: Whistler amplification: a free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    ABSTRACT FINAL ID: SM13B-2055 TITLE: Whistler amplification: a free electron laser in the Earth on the similarities between free electron lasers (FELs) and whistler mode emissions, we present here a new set in the Earth's magnetosphere that arise due to the interaction of whistler waves with radiation belt electrons

  12. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  13. Status of the Los Alamos Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the initial oscillator experiments were completed last year, the Los Alamos FEL has undergone some major modifications and additions in preparation for the next set of experiments. The laser performance is projected to be substantially enhanced, the rf energy-recovery technique will be demonstrated, and FEL physics measurements will be expanded. The accelerator is now being tuned with very promising performance. The above experiments will be completed during the next year.

  14. Absolute x-ray yields from laser-irradiated germanium-doped low-density aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Satcher, J. H.; May, M. J.; Poco, J. F.; Sorce, C. M.; Colvin, J. D.; Hansen, S. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Moon, S. J.; Davis, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Primout, M.; Babonneau, D. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique-Direction des Application Militaires (CEA/DAM), Ile-de-France, F91297 Arpajon (France); Coverdale, C. A.; Beutler, D. E. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The x-ray yields from laser-irradiated germanium-doped ultra-low-density aerogel plasmas have been measured in the energy range from sub-keV to {approx_equal}15 keV at the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The targets' x-ray yields have been studied for variation in target size, aerogel density, laser pulse length, and laser intensity. For targets that result in plasmas with electron densities in the range of {approx_equal}10% of the critical density for 3{omega} light, one can expect 10-11 J/sr of x rays with energies above 9 keV, and 600-800 J/sr for energies below 3.5 keV. In addition to the x-ray spectral yields, the x-ray temporal waveforms have been measured and it is observed that the emitted x rays generally follow the delivered laser power, with late-time enhancements of emitted x-ray power correlated with hydrodynamic compression of the hot plasma. Further, the laser energy reflected from the target by plasma instabilities is found to be 2%-7% of the incident energy for individual beam intensities {approx_equal}10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The propagation of the laser heating in the target volume has been characterized with two-dimensional imaging. Source-region heating is seen to be correlated with the temporal profile of the emitted x-ray power.

  15. Absolute X-Ray Yields From Laser-Irradiated Ge-Doped Low-Density Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K B; Satcher, J H; May, M J; Poco, J F; Sorce, C M; Colvin, J D; Hansen, S B; MacLaren, S A; Moon, S J; Davis, J F; Girard, F; Villette, B; Primout, M; Babonneau, D; Coverdale, C A; Beutler, D E

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the OMEGA laser (Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester) to measure the X-ray yields from laser-irradiated germanium-doped ultra-low-density aerogel plasmas in the energy range from sub-keV to {approx} 15 keV. They have studied the targets X-ray yields with variation in target size, aerogel density, laser pulse length and laser intensity. For targets that result in plasmas with electron densities in the range of {approx} 10% of the critical density for 3{omega} light, one can expect 10-11 J/sr of X-rays with energies above 9 keV, and 600-800 J/sr for energies below 3.5 keV. In addition to the X-ray spectral yields, they have measured the X-ray temporal waveforms and found that the emitted X rays generally follow the delivered laser power, with late-time enhancements of emitted X-ray power correlated with hydrodynamic compression of the hot plasma. Also, they find the laser energy reflected from the target by plasma instabilities to be 2-7% of the incident energy for individual beam intensities {approx} 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. They also have characterized the propagation of the laser heating in the target volume with two-dimensional imaging. They find the source-region heating to be correlated with the temporal profile of the emitted X-ray power.

  16. Invited Article: Coherent imaging using seeded free-electron laser pulses with variable polarization: First results and research opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capotondi, F.; Pedersoli, E.; Mahne, N.; Menk, R. H.; Passos, G.; Raimondi, L.; Svetina, C.; Sandrin, G.; Kiskinova, M. [FERMI, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Zangrando, M. [FERMI, Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali - TASC, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Bajt, S.; Barthelmess, M.; Fleckenstein, H.; Chapman, H. N. [CFEL-DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Schulz, J. [European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, 22761 Hamburg (Germany); Bach, J.; Froemter, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Schleitzer, S.; Mueller, L.; Gutt, C. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    FERMI-Elettra, the first vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) using by default a 'seeded' scheme, became operational in 2011 and has been opened to users since December 2012. The parameters of the seeded FERMI FEL pulses and, in particular, the superior control of emitted radiation in terms of spectral purity and stability meet the stringent requirements for single-shot and resonant coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) experiments. The advantages of the intense seeded FERMI pulses with variable polarization have been demonstrated with the first experiments performed using the multipurpose experimental station operated at the diffraction and projection imaging (DiProI) beamline. The results reported here were obtained with fixed non-periodic targets during the commissioning period in 2012 using 20-32 nm wavelength range. They demonstrate that the performance of the FERMI FEL source and the experimental station meets the requirements of CDI, holography, and resonant magnetic scattering in both multi- and single-shot modes. Moreover, we present the first magnetic scattering experiments employing the fully circularly polarized FERMI pulses. The ongoing developments aim at pushing the lateral resolution by using shorter wavelengths provided by double-stage cascaded FERMI FEL-2 and probing ultrafast dynamic processes using different pump-probe schemes, including jitter-free seed laser pump or FEL-pump/FEL-probe with two color FEL pulses generated by the same electron bunch.

  17. Observation of pulsed x-ray trains produced by laser-electron Compton scatterings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakaue, Kazuyuki; Washio, Masakazu [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Araki, Sakae; Fukuda, Masafumi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Omori, Tsunehiko; Taniguchi, Takashi; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Urakawa, Junji [KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Sasao, Noboru [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray generation based on laser-electron Compton scattering is one attractive method to achieve a compact laboratory-sized high-brightness x-ray source. We have designed, built, and tested such a source; it combines a 50 MeV multibunch electron linac with a mode-locked 1064 nm laser stored and amplified in a Fabry-Perot optical cavity. We directly observed trains of pulsed x rays using a microchannel plate detector; the resultant yield was found to be 1.2x10{sup 5} Hz in good agreement with prediction. We believe that the result has demonstrated good feasibility of linac-based compact x-ray sources via laser-electron Compton scatterings.

  18. Self-Induced Harmonic Generation in a Storage-Ring Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Ninno, G. [University of Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Allaria, E.; Danailov, M. B.; Diviacco, B.; Ferianis, M.; Karantzoulis, E.; Spezzani, C.; Trovo, M. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Coreno, M. [TASC-INFM National Laboratory, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Chowdhury, S. [Xerox Research Center, Webster, New York (United States); Curbis, F. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); University of Trieste (Italy); Longhi, E. C. [Diamond Light Source, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Pinayev, I. V.; Litvinenko, V. N. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States)

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam is a valuable way to overcome the present limitations of conventional lasers and synchrotron radiation light sources. The typical scheme has electrons, directly from a linac, in a single-pass interaction with a laser pulse in the presence of a static undulator magnetic field. We demonstrate that a storage-ring free-electron laser can also achieve harmonic generation (down to 36.5 nm), presenting both experimental and theoretical results, and offer a reliable interpretation of the peculiar underlying physical processes involved.

  19. Effects of free-electron-laser field fluctuations on the frequency response of driven atomic resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. M. Nikolopoulos; P. Lambropoulos

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of field fluctuations on the total yields of Auger electrons, obtained in the excitation of neutral atoms to a core-excited state by means of short-wavelength free-electron-laser pulses. Beginning with a self-contained analysis of the statistical properties of fluctuating free-electron-laser pulses, we analyse separately and in detail the cases of single and double Auger resonances, focusing on fundamental phenomena such as power broadening and ac Stark (Autler-Townes) splitting. In certain cases, field fluctuations are shown to influence dramatically the frequency response of the resonances, whereas in other cases the signal obtained may convey information about the bandwidth of the radiation as well as the dipole moment between Auger states.

  20. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  1. Time-dependent simulation of prebunched one and two-beam free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirian, N. S., E-mail: najmeh.mirian@ipm.ir [School of Particle and Accelerator Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Post code 19395-5531 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Post code 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Post code 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the slippage effects on prebunched free electron laser. A technique for the simulation of time dependent free electron lasers (FEL) to model the slippage effects is introduced, and the slowly varying envelope approximation in both z and t is used to illustrate the temporal behaviour in the prebunched FEL. Slippage effect on prebunched two-beam FEL is compared with the one-beam modeling. The evaluation of the radiation pulse energy, thermal and phase distribution, and radiation pulse shape in one-beam and two-beam modeling is studied. It was shown that the performance is considerably undermined when the slippage time is comparable to the pulse duration. However, prebunching reduces the slippage. Prebunching also leads to the radiation pulse with a single smooth spike.

  2. Ablation of solids using a femtosecond extreme ultraviolet free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stojanovic, N.; Linde, D. von der; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Zastrau, U.; Perner, F.; Foerster, E.; Sobierajski, R.; Nietubyc, R.; Jurek, M.; Klinger, D.; Pelka, J.; Krzywinski, J.; Juha, L; Cihelka, J.; Velyhan, A.; Koptyaev, S.; Hajkova, V.; Chalupsky, J.; Kuba, J.; Tschentscher, T. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstrasse 1, 47048 Duisburg (Germany); Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, FSU Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Institute of Physics, PAS, Al. Lotnikov 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Institute of Physics, ASCR, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University, 115 19 Prague (Czech Republic); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22605 Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The ablation of solids by high energy femtosecond pulses from an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free electron laser has been investigated using picosecond optical imaging. The time-resolved measurements are supplemented by an analysis of the permanent structural surface modifications. Compared with femtosecond optical excitation, distinct differences in the material response are found which are attributed to the increased penetration depth of the XUV radiation and the absence of any absorption nonlinearities.

  3. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, V. V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, andwas performed in support of the AMO/LCLS project at SLAC. *Coherent Light Source (LCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL)

  4. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, V. V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, andLCLS) x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at the Stanford LinearKB mirrors used at the SLAC/FEL AMO beamline. Two mirrors

  5. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 528 (2004) 1518 First lasing at the high-power free electron laser at Siberian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -power free electron laser at Siberian center for photochemistry research E.A. Antokhin, R.R. Akberdin, V in April 2003 on a high-power free electron laser (FEL) constructed at the Siberian Center. 2. Accelerator­recuperator Full-scale Novosibirsk free electron laser is to be based on multi

  6. Vol. 6, No. 5/May 1989/J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 977 Application of a two-color free-electron laser to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Vol. 6, No. 5/May 1989/J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 977 Application of a two-color free-electron laser, 1989 The possible applications of a free-electron laser (FEL), which would be modified to produce two of conversations with H. A.Schwettman and T. I. Smith, wediscussed the possible uses of free-electron lasers (FEL

  7. International Congeress on Plasma Physics, Nice, France, 25-29 October 2004 Chaotic particle dynamics in free-electron lasers with coaxial wiggler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    dynamics in free-electron lasers with coaxial wiggler B. Farokhi and S. Mobarakabadi Islamic Azad University of Arak, Arak, Iran The motion of a relativistic test electron in a free-electron laser orbits. Earlier investigations of chaos in free ­ electron lasers have focused on chaotic behavior

  8. A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Richard Allen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was 50 cm. Obviously, this type of configurat, ion is totally impractical for a step and repeat system. Synchrotron radiation is being considered as an x-ray lithography source. Many laboratories are experi- menting with synchrotron sources. Also... for production of submicron geometries and improvements needed is presented. 1v ACKNOWLEDGMENT This thesis was made possible through the assistance of a number of people. Huang Wei Ling helped gather much of the data presented in this thesis. She also...

  9. Soft x-ray generation in gases with an ultrashort pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditmire, T.R.

    1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation of soft x-ray production resulting from the interaction of intense near infra-red laser radiation with gases is presented in this thesis. Specifically, soft x-ray generation through high order harmonic generation or exploiting intense inverse bremsstrahlung heating is examined. Most of these studies are conducted with femtosecond, terawatt class Cr:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (LiSAF) laser, though results derived from studies with other laser systems are presented as well. The majority of this work is devoted to experimental investigations, however, theoretical and computational models are developed to interpret the data. These studies are motivated by the possibility of utilizing the physics of intense laser/matter interactions as a potential compact source of bright x-rays. Consequently, the thrust of many of the experiments conducted is aimed at characterizing the x-rays produced for possible use in applications. In general, the studies of this manuscript fall into three categories. First, a unique 130 fs, 8 TW laser that is based on chirped pulse amplification, is described, and its performance is evaluated. The generation of x-rays through high order harmonics is then discussed with emphasis on characterizing and optimizing harmonic generation. Finally, the generation of strong, incoherent x-ray radiation by the intense irradiation of large (>1,000 atom) clusters in gas jets, is explored. The physics of laser energy absorption by clusters illuminated with intensities of 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} is considered in detail. X-ray spectroscopy of the hot plasmas that result from the irradiation of the clusters is conducted, and energy transport and kinetics issues in these plasmas are discussed.

  10. Few-Photon Multiple Ionization of Ne and Ar by Strong Free-Electron-Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshammer, R.; Jiang, Y. H.; Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Schroeter, C. D.; Luedemann, S.; Zrost, K.; Dorn, A.; Ferger, T.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L.; Titze, J.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Fischer, D. [Atomic Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova University Centrum, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Weber, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Zouros, T. J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Duesterer, S. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Few-photon multiple ionization of Ne and Ar atoms by strong vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses from the free-electron laser at Hamburg was investigated differentially with the Heidelberg reaction microscope. The light-intensity dependence of Ne{sup 2+} production reveals the dominance of nonsequential two-photon double ionization at intensities of I<6x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} and significant contributions of three-photon ionization as I increases. Ne{sup 2+} recoil-ion-momentum distributions suggest that two electrons absorbing ''instantaneously'' two photons are ejected most likely into opposite hemispheres with similar energies.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF NEW MID-INFRARED ULTRAFAST LASER SOURCES FOR COMPACT COHERENT X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling Backus

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we proposed to develop laser based mid-infrared lasers as a potentially robust and reliable source of ultrafast pulses in the mid-infrared region of the spectrum, and to apply this light source to generating bright, coherent, femtosecond-to-attosecond x-ray beams.

  12. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  13. Enhancement of x-ray line emission from plasmas produced by short high-intensity laser double pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpouch, Jiri

    Enhancement of x-ray line emission from plasmas produced by short high-intensity laser double.25.Os, 52.65. y I. INTRODUCTION The advanced technology of short pulse lasers now pro- vides on experimental conditions. The enhancement of x-ray yield by short laser prepulses has been reported in several

  14. Induction linac-driven free-electron lasers: Status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosnitz, D.

    1987-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high repetition rate and low single-pass gain inherent in an rf-driven Free Electron Laser (FEL) dictate that the laser system be configured as an oscillator. This allows the laser's electric field to build up over many passes around a high Q cavity. By way of contrast, the high-current capability of the Induction Linac (IL) system permits high single-pass optical gain, but the relatively low duty factor precludes oscillator operation; the pulses are neither long enough nor often enough to permit a field to accumulate in a cavity. The IL is thus configured as a MOPA (master oscillator/power amplifier) with a conventional laser serving as the MO. This report concentrates on the status of IL-driven FEL research at LLNL and gives a description of several applications for the high-peak-power radiation produced by an induction linac FEL.

  15. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 407 (1998) 34--39 Ginzburg--Landau model for a free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a free-electron laser: from single mode to spikes C.S. Ng*, A. Bhattacharjee Department of Physics rights reserved. The possibility that a free-electron laser (FEL) can produce a powerful and coherent and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA Abstract Single-mode operation of a free-electron

  16. aluminium laser ablation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation, FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) provides ultra-intense femtosecond radiation and laser optics: UV, XUV, and X-ray lasers; (140.2600) Lasers and laser optics:...

  17. Bessel spatial profile of a soft x-ray laser beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, F.; Sebban, S.; Ribiere, M.; Gautier, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Lambert, G.; Goddet, J.-Ph.; Burgy, F.; Valentin, C.; Rousse, A. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA Paristech/Ecole Polytechnique/CNRS, UMR 7639, F-91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Maynard, G. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, Universite Paris Sud/CNRS, UMR 8578, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report far-field profile measurements of an optical-field-ionized high-order harmonic-seeded soft x-ray laser. We show that the beam transverse profile can be controlled between a regular Gaussian shape and a Bessel profile exhibiting several rings via the infrared laser pump intensity. These experimental data are supported by a complete numerical modeling including a two-dimensional plasma amplifier simulation and a two-level soft x-ray amplification using a Maxwell-Bloch treatment. This model takes into account the experimental high-order harmonic wavefront and intensity before it is numerically amplified.

  18. Threshold conditions for lasing of a free electron laser oscillator with longitudinal electrostatic wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sepehri Javan, N. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, P.O. Box 179, Ardabil, 56199-11367 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The system of the nonlinear non-stationary equations describing spatial-temporal dynamics of the amplitudes of an ondulator radiation and a space-charge wave of a relativistic electron beam in the resonator is obtained. A free electron laser resonator with longitudinal electrostatic wiggler is considered. In the linear approximation, the threshold conditions of lasing for Raman and Compton regimes under excitation of forward and backward electromagnetic wave are achieved. In the various physical situations, the variation of the minimum length of the resonator with the amplitude of wiggler, density of electron beam, and with the reflection coefficients of resonator's mirrors is investigated.

  19. Single-shot measurement of free-electron laser polarization at SDUV-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Lie; Zhang, Tong; Feng, Chao; Chen, Jianhui; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Shen, Lei; Zhang, Wenyan; Yao, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Bo; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter (DOAP) for measuring the polarization state of free-electron laser (FEL) pulse is described. The incident FEL beam is divided into four separate beams, and four Stokes parameters can be measured in a single-shot. In the crossed-planar undulators experiment at Shanghai deep ultraviolet FEL test facility, this DOAP instrument constructed in house responses accurately and timely while the polarization-state of fully coherent FEL pulses are switched, which is helpful for confirming the crossed-planar undulators technique for short-wavelength FELs.

  20. Integrated Numerical Experiments (INEX) and the Free-Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thode, L.E.; Chan, K.C.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; McKee, J.; Ostic, J.; Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong coupling of subsystem elements, such as the accelerator, wiggler, and optics, greatly complicates the understanding and design of a free electron laser (FEL), even at the conceptual level. Given the requirements for high-performance FELs, the strong coupling between the laser subsystems must be included to obtain a realistic picture of the potential operational capability. To address the strong coupling character of the FEL the concept of an Integrated Numerical Experiment (INEX) was proposed. Unique features of the INEX approach are consistency and numerical equivalence of experimental diagnostics. The equivalent numerical diagnostics mitigates the major problem of misinterpretation that often occurs when theoretical and experimental data are compared. The INEX approach has been applied to a large number of accelerator and FEL experiments. Overall, the agreement between INEX and the experiments is very good. Despite the success of INEX, the approach is difficult to apply to trade-off and initial design studies because of the significant manpower and computational requirements. On the other hand, INEX provides a base from which realistic accelerator, wiggler, and optics models can be developed. The Free Electron Laser Physical Process Code (FELPPC) includes models developed from INEX, provides coupling between the subsystems models and incorporates application models relevant to a specific trade-off or design study.

  1. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  2. Overview of the ARGOS X-ray framing camera for Laser MegaJoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trosseille, C., E-mail: clement.trosseille@cea.fr; Aubert, D.; Auger, L.; Bazzoli, S.; Brunel, P.; Burillo, M.; Chollet, C.; Jasmin, S.; Maruenda, P.; Moreau, I.; Oudot, G.; Raimbourg, J.; Soullié, G.; Stemmler, P.; Zuber, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Beck, T. [CEA, DEN, CADARACHE, F-13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gazave, J. [CEA, DAM, CESTA, F-33116 Le Barp (France)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissariat à l’Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives has developed the ARGOS X-ray framing camera to perform two-dimensional, high-timing resolution imaging of an imploding target on the French high-power laser facility Laser MegaJoule. The main features of this camera are: a microchannel plate gated X-ray detector, a spring-loaded CCD camera that maintains proximity focus in any orientation, and electronics packages that provide remotely-selectable high-voltages to modify the exposure-time of the camera. These components are integrated into an “air-box” that protects them from the harsh environmental conditions. A miniaturized X-ray generator is also part of the device for in situ self-testing purposes.

  3. Time-resolved soft x-ray spectra from laser-produced Cu plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, K V; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A; May, M J; Purvis, M A; Scott, H A; Schneider, M B

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated from a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terrawatt (COMET) laser. A variable spaced grating spectrometer coupled to an x-ray streak camera measured soft x-ray emission (800-1550 eV) from the back of the copper target to characterize the bulk heating of the target. Radiation hydrodynamic simulations were modeled in 2-dimensions using the HYDRA code. The target conditions calculated by HYDRA were post-processed with the atomic kinetics code CRETIN to generate synthetic emission spectra. A comparison between the experimental and simulated spectra indicates the presence of specific ionization states of copper and the corresponding electron temperatures and ion densities throughout the laser-heated copper target.

  4. Bright tunable femtosecond x-ray emission from laser irradiated micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Tong-Pu, E-mail: tongpu@nudt.edu.cn; Hu, Li-Xiang; Yin, Yan; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yang, Xiao-Hu [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Luo, Wen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Pukhov, Alexander [Institut für Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that bright femtosecond X-rays can be obtained by irradiating a moderate laser onto a helium micro-droplet. The laser ponderomotive force continuously sweeps electrons from the droplets and accelerates them forward. The electrons exposed in the outrunning laser field oscillate transversely and emit photons in the forward direction. The total flux of photons with energies above 1?keV is as high as 10{sup 9}/shot which is about 10-fold enhancement compared with betatron oscillation under similar laser conditions. The maximum achieved peak brightness is up to 10{sup 21} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW. By adjusting laser and droplet parameters, we can get tunable X-rays with required brightness and energy.

  5. Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M. Berrill,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Pump pulse-width dependence of grazing-incidence pumped transient collisional soft-x-ray lasers M 2007 The output energy dependence of high repetition rate grazing incidence pumped Ni-like Mo, Ni-like Ag, and Ne-like Ti transient collisional soft x-ray lasers on the duration of the pump pulse

  6. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  7. X-ray streak camera diagnostics of picosecond laser-plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobble, J.A.; Fulton, R.D.; Jones, L.A.; Kyrala, G.A.; Schappert, G.T.; Taylor, A.J.; Wahlin, E.K.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray streak camera is used to diagnose a laser-produced Al plasma with time resolution of {approximately}10 ps. A streak record of filtered emission and a time-integrated transmission grating spectrum reveal that the plasma radiation is dominated by emission from He- and H-like resonance lines. 11 refs.

  8. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantke, Max, F.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  9. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  10. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hantke, Max, F.

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  11. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  12. Nanofocusing of soft X-ray laser pulses with Fresnel zone plate and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    x Nanofocusing of soft X-ray laser pulses with Fresnel zone plate and its applications 699220056 #12;#12;i keep the faith #12;ii 200 0.16 (Fresnel zone plate) X 100.3 ................................................ 37 40 #12;1 1.1 NA X X (Fresnel zone plate) X (Fresnel zone plate) X #12;2 1

  13. fLasHThe Free-Electron Laser new technologies for new science: Soon X-ray free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , how molecular machines really work. Accelerators | photon Science | particle physics Deutsches in the accel- erator tunnel. The photon beam transport system in the hall delivers the FEL pulses ­ as short the feasibility of a superconducting linear electron-positron collider for elementary particle phy- sics

  14. Experimental demonstration of longitudinal beam phase space linearizer in a free-electron laser facility by corrugated structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Haixiao; Feng, Chao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Xingtao; Lan, Taihe; Feng, Lie; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xiaoqing; Yao, Haifeng; Shen, Lei; Li, Bin; Zhang, Junqiang; Li, Xuan; Fang, Wencheng; Wang, Dan; Couprie, Marie-emmanuelle; Lin, Guoqiang; Liu, Bo; Gu, Qiang; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Zhentang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of residual linear energy chirp and intrinsic nonlinear energy curvature in the relativistic electron beam from radiofrequency linear accelerator is of paramount importance for efficient lasing of a high-gain free-electron laser. Recently, it was theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the longitudinal wakefield excited by the electrons itself in the corrugated structure allows for precise control of the electron beam phase space. In this Letter, we report the first utilization of a corrugated structure as beam linearizer in the operation of a seeded free-electron laser driven by a 140 MeV linear accelerator, where a gain of ~10,000 over spontaneous emission was achieved at the second harmonic of the 1047 nm seed laser, and a free-electron laser bandwidth narrowing by about 50% was observed, in good agreement with the theoretical expectations.

  15. Overview Of Control System For Jefferson Lab`s High Power Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofler, A. S.; Grippo, A. C.; Keesee, M. S.; Song, J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the current plans for the control system for Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility`s (Jefferson Lab`s) Infrared Free Electron Laser (FEL) are presented. The goals for the FEL control system are fourfold: (1) to use EPICS and EPICS compatible tools, (2) to use VME and Industry Pack (IPs) interfaces for FEL specific devices such as controls and diagnostics for the drive laser, high power optics, photocathode gun and electron-beam diagnostics, (3) to migrate Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) technologies to VME when possible, and (4) to use CAMAC solutions for systems that duplicate CEBAF technologies such as RF linacs and DC magnets. This paper will describe the software developed for FEL specific devices and provide an overview of the FEL control system.

  16. Status report on Jefferson Lab`s high-power infrared free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, C.L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser to produce tunable, continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting accelerator will drive the laser, and a transport lattice will recirculate the beam back through the accelerator for energy recovery. Space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends will be present, and the machine is instrumented to study these phenomena during commissioning. The wiggler and optical cavity are conventional; however, significant analysis and testing was needed to ensure mirror heating at 1 kW of outcoupled power would not impede performance. The FEL is being installed in its own facility, and installation will be finished in Fall 1997. This paper surveys the machine, the status of its construction, and plans for its commissioning.

  17. Start-to-end modelling of a mode-locked optical klystron free electron laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunning, D. J.; Thompson, N. R. [University of Strathclyde (SUPA), Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Mc Neil, B. W. J. [University of Strathclyde (SUPA), Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Williams, P. H. [ASTeC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A free electron laser (FEL) in a mode-locked optical klystron (MLOK) configuration is modelled using start-to-end simulations that simulate realistic electron beam acceleration and transport before input into a full three-dimensional FEL simulation code. These simulations demonstrate that the MLOK scheme is compatible with the present generation of radiofrequency accelerator designs. A train of few-optical cycle pulses is predicted with peak powers similar to those of the equivalent conventional FEL amplifier. The role of electron beam energy modulation in these results is explained and the limitations of some simulation codes discussed. It is shown how seeding the FEL interaction using a High Harmonic seed laser can improve the coherence properties of the output.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study of free-free electron-helium scattering in a CO2 laser field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Experimental and theoretical study of free-free electron-helium scattering in a CO2 laser field D.1088/0953-4075/43/2/025203 #12;Free-free e- ­He scattering 2 1. Introduction Laser assisted electron-atom scattering has been.fr Abstract. Free-free transitions during the scattering of electrons by helium in the presence

  19. Application of soft X-ray lasers for probing high density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R. [and others

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reliability and characteristics of collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers make them ideal for a wide variety of plasma diagnostics. These systems now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {Angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ps pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup -4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this paper we will describe the use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Using an x-ray laser and a multilayer mirror imaging system we have studied hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1-2 {mu}m spatial resolution. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beamsplitters we have constructed and used a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {Angstrom} to probe 1-3 mm size laser produced plasmas with peak electron densities of 4 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. A comparison of our results with computer simulations will be presented.

  20. Attosecond Thomson-scattering x-ray source driven by laser-based electron acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, W. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China) [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhuo, H. B.; Yu, T. P. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Ma, Y. Y. [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China) [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Song, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. C. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China)] [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of producing attosecond x-rays through Thomson scattering of laser light off laser-driven relativistic electron beams is investigated. For a ?200-as, tens-MeV electron bunch produced with laser ponderomotive-force acceleration in a plasma wire, exceeding 10{sup 6} photons/s in the form of ?160 as pulses in the range of 3–300 keV are predicted, with a peak brightness of ?5 × 10{sup 20} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1% bandwidth). Our study suggests that the physical scheme discussed in this work can be used for an ultrafast (attosecond) x-ray source, which is the most beneficial for time-resolved atomic physics, dubbed “attosecond physics.”.

  1. Frontiers in X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Young

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

  2. Multipurpose modular experimental station for the DiProI beamline of Fermi-Elettra free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersoli, Emanuele; Capotondi, Flavio; Cocco, Daniele; Kaulich, Burkhard; Menk, Ralf H.; Locatelli, Andrea; Mentes, Tevfik O.; Spezzani, Carlo; Sandrin, Gilio; Bacescu, Daniel M.; Kiskinova, Maya [Fermi, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Zangrando, Marco [Fermi, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); IOM CNR, Laboratorio TASC, SS 14 - km 163.5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam [Photon Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Barty, Anton; Schulz, Joachim; Gumprecht, Lars [Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Chapman, Henry N. [Centre for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); University of Hamburg, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Nelson, A. J.; Frank, Matthias [Physical and Life Sciences, LLNL, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a compact modular apparatus with a flexible design that will be operated at the DiProI beamline of the Fermi-Elettra free electron laser (FEL) for performing static and time-resolved coherent diffraction imaging experiments, taking advantage of the full coherence and variable polarization of the short seeded FEL pulses. The apparatus has been assembled and the potential of the experimental setup is demonstrated by commissioning tests with coherent synchrotron radiation. This multipurpose experimental station will be open to general users after installation at the Fermi-Elettra free electron laser in 2011.

  3. High-power rf-pulsed modulators for the Los Alamos free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, W.J.D.; Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Keffeler, D.R.; Hornkohl, J.O.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the rf-driven free-electron laser (FEL) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, there are two pulsed-power rf modulators as sources for two tandem, side-coupled 20-MeV linear accelerators. The rf power used to control the cavity fields is supplied by two 5.5-MW modulating anode klystrons operating at a center frequency of 1300.2 MHz. The modulation of the 125 kV klystron is achieved by using a triode switch tube that provides a pulse width up to 300 ..mu..s and a pulse repetition rate up to 10 Hz. This paper describes the present configuration of these two duplicate systems and presents plans for meeting the requirements of future rf FEL experiments at Los Alamos. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Spatial and temporal coherence properties of single free-electron laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, A; Mancuso, A P; Gerasimova, N; Yefanov, O M; Gulden, J; Gorniak, T; Senkbeil, T; Sakdinawat, A; Liu, Y; Attwood, D; Dziarzhytski, S; Mai, D D; Treusch, R; Weckert, E; Salditt, T; Rosenhahn, A; Wurth, W; Vartanyants, I A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental characterization of the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) at a wavelength of 8.0 nm is presented. Double pinhole diffraction patterns of single femtosecond pulses focused to a size of about 10 microns by 10 microns were measured. A transverse coherence length of 6.2 microns in the horizontal and 8.7 microns in the vertical direction was determined from the most coherent pulses. Using a split and delay unit the coherence time of the pulses produced in the same operation conditions of FLASH was measured to be 1.75 fs. From our experiment we estimated the degeneracy parameter of the FLASH beam to be on the order of $10^{10}$ to $10^{11}$, which exceeds the values of this parameter at any other source in the same energy range by many orders of magnitude.

  5. Single-electron analysis of the space-charge effect in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, C.; Yariv, A.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact treatment of the space-charge effect in the single-electron analysis of a free-electron laser is presented to calculate its small-signal gain. With the inclusion of the repulsive force between electrons, it is found that the trajectory of an electron can be solved from a generalized equation which includes a space-charge term. The results show the gain is saturated with decreasing growth rate due to high electron density. The radiation frequency is found to increase with the electron density and approach the value at plasma resonance. The condition ..omega../sub p/L/c=..pi.. clearly defines the boundary between the noninteracting and the collective regime of an electron beam, where w/sub p/ is the plasma frequency, L is the device length, and c is the light velocity in vacuum.

  6. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perucchi, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); INSTM UdR Trieste-ST, Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Area Science Park, I-34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lupi, S. [CNR-IOM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'La Sapienza', P.le Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Roma (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  7. Chaos in an ion-channel free-electron laser with realistic helical wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghavi, Amin [Department of Applied Science, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic behavior of an electron motion in a free-electron laser with realistic helical wiggler and ion-channel guiding is studied using Poincare surface-of-section maps. The effects of a realistic electron beam density on chaotic electron dynamics are investigated by considering an electron beam with Gaussian density profile in radial distance. The effects of self-fields on chaotic electron dynamics are investigated for different Gaussian beam parameters, and the results are compared with those of uniform electron beam. It is shown that the electron chaotic behavior can be controlled by changing the Gaussian beam parameter. Also, the chaotic behavior can be controlled by increasing the ion-channel and/or the electron beam densities.

  8. Standing-Wave Free-Electron Laser Two-Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Andrew M.; Whittum, D.H.; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Sharp, W.M.; Makowski, M.A.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free-electron laser (FEL) two-beam accelerator (TBA) is proposed, in which the FEL interaction takes place in a series of drive cavities, rather than in a waveguide. Each drive cavity is 'beat-coupled' to a section of the accelerating structure. This standing-wave TBA is investigated theoretically and numerically, with analyses included of microwave extraction, growth of the FEL signal through saturation, equilibrium longitudinal beam dynamics following saturation, and sensitivity of the microwave amplitude and phase to errors in current and energy. It is found that phase errors due to current jitter are substantially reduced from previous versions of the TBA. Analytic scalings and numerical simulations are used to obtain an illustrative TBA parameter set.

  9. Applications of free electron lasers and synchrotrons in industry and research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, William A. [Dept. of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation sources have had a profound effect on both science and technology from their beginnings decades ago as parasitic operations on accelerators for high energy physics. Now the general area of photon science has opened up new experimental techniques which have become the mainstay tools of materials science, surface physics, protein crystallography, and nanotechnology. With the promise of ultra-bright beams from the latest generation of storage rings and free electron lasers with full coherence, the tools of photon science promise to open a new area of mesoscale science and technology as well as prove to be a disruptive wildcard in the search for sustainable energy technologies. This review will survey a range of applications and explore in greater depth the potential applications to EUV lithography and to technologies for solar energy.

  10. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW`s) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  11. Acceleration of electrons using an inverse free electron laser auto- accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wernick, I.K.; Marshall, T.C.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data from our study of a device known as the inverse free electron laser. First, numerical simulations were performed to optimize the design parameters for an experiment that accelerates electrons in the presence of an undulator by stimulated absorption of radiation. The Columbia free electron laser (FEL) was configured as an auto-accelerator (IFELA) system; high power (MW's) FEL radiation at {approximately}1.65 mm is developed along the first section of an undulator inside a quasi-optical resonator. The electron beam then traverses a second section of undulator where a fraction of the electrons is accelerated by stimulated absorption of the 1.65 mm wavelength power developed in the first undulator section. The second undulator section has very low gain and does not generate power on its own. We have found that as much as 60% of the power generated in the first section can be absorbed in the second section, providing that the initial electron energy is chosen correctly with respect to the parameters chosen for the first and second undulators. An electron momentum spectrometer is used to monitor the distribution of electron energies as the electrons exit the IFELA. We have found; using our experimental parameters, that roughly 10% of the electrons are accelerated to energies as high as 1100 keV, in accordance with predictions from the numerical model. The appearance of high energy electrons is correlated with the abrupt absorption of millimeter power. The autoaccelerator configuration is used because there is no intense source of coherent power at the 1.65 mm design wavelength other than the FEL.

  12. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma accelerated beamsbetween the short- pulse laser generating the electron beamscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  13. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasma accelerator at the LBNL LOASIS facility”, in: Proc.electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma-accelerator ?National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator, whose

  14. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    XPLOTGIN, Technical Report LBNL-49625, Lawrence BerkeleyLASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR AT THE LBNL LOASIS FACILITY,” inelectron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

  15. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 27 SEPTEMBER 2009 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1404 Laser-driven soft-X-ray undulator source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sources of X-ray radiation. They constitute invaluable tools for a broad range of research1 ; however, their dependence on large- scale radiofrequency electron accelerators means that only a few of these sources exist-laboratory scale. Here, we demonstrate the generation of soft-X-ray undulator radiation with laser

  16. X-ray pump optical probe cross-correlation study of GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durbin, S.M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R. (Purdue); (UC)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect - X-ray induced optical opacity - for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical cross-correlator for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.

  17. Tunable fluid-loaded free-electron laser in the low-electron-energy and long-wavelength extreme R. Drori and E. Jerby*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    Tunable fluid-loaded free-electron laser in the low-electron-energy and long-wavelength extreme R-4 PACS number s : 52.75.Ms, 33.20.Bx, 41.60.Cr, 84.40.Az I. INTRODUCTION In free-electron lasers FELs 1, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel Received 1 October 1998 A tunable fluid-loaded free-electron

  18. FREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    two orders-of-magnitude. Two techniques offering the potential to cool high- energy hadron beamsFREE ELECTRON LASERS AND HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING* Vladimir N. Litvinenko, BNL, Upton, Long Island, NY, USA# Yaroslav S. Derbenev, TJNAF, Newport News, VA, USA) Abstract Cooling intense high

  19. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-For the ultra-high currents of the laser plasma accelerated

  20. Recirculating accelerator driver for a high-power free-electron laser: A design overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, C.L. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab is building a free-electron laser (FEL) to produce continuous-wave (cw), kW-level light at 3-6 {mu}m wavelength. A superconducting linac will drive the laser, generating a 5 mA average current, 42 MeV energy electron beam. A transport lattice will recirculate the beam back to the linac for deceleration and conversion of about 75% of its power into rf power. Bunch charge will range up to 135 pC, and bunch lengths will range down to 1 ps in parts of the transport lattice. Accordingly, space charge in the injector and coherent synchrotron radiation in magnetic bends come into play. The machine will thus enable studying these phenomena as a precursor to designing compact accelerators of high-brightness beams. The FEL is scheduled to be installed in its own facility by 1 October 1997. Given the short schedule, the machine design is conservative, based on modifications of the CEBAF cryomodule and MIT-Bates transport lattice. This paper surveys the machine design.

  1. Free-electron laser driven by the LBNL laser-plasma accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, C. B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kA are generated. The ultra-short laser-plasma acceleratedscale laser-plasma accelerator that produces ultra-short (

  2. Phase-matched generation of coherent soft and hard X-rays using IR lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Popmintchev, Tenio V.; Chen, Ming-Chang; Bahabad, Alon; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase-matched high-order harmonic generation of soft and hard X-rays is accomplished using infrared driving lasers in a high-pressure non-linear medium. The pressure of the non-linear medium is increased to multi-atmospheres and a mid-IR (or higher) laser device provides the driving pulse. Based on this scaling, also a general method for global optimization of the flux of phase-matched high-order harmonic generation at a desired wavelength is designed.

  3. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.

  4. Breakthrough: X-ray Laser Captures Atoms and Molecules in Action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. Just two years after turning on in 2009, breakthrough science is emerging from the LCLS at a rapid pace. A recent experiment used the X-rays to create and probe a 2-million-degree piece of matter in a controlled way for the first time-a significant leap toward understanding the extreme conditions found in the hearts of stars and giant planets, and a finding which could further guide research into nuclear fusion, the mechanism that powers the sun. Upcoming experiments will investigate the fundamental, atomic-scale processes behind such phenomena as superconductivity and magnetism, as well as peering into the molecular workings of photosynthesis in plants.

  5. Investigation of the electron trajectories and gain regimes of the whistler pumped free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarinia, F.; Jafari, S. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A free-electron laser (FEL) scheme, which employs the whistler wave as a slow electromagnetic wave wiggler, was studied theoretically. Subjected to the transverse fields of whistler wave wiggler, the beam electrons are the source of the energy needed to produce electromagnetic radiation. The strength and the period of the wiggler field depend on the parameters of the magnetoplasma medium. This configuration has a higher tunability by controlling the plasma density, on top of the {gamma}-tunability of the conventional FELs. The theory of linear gain and electron trajectories was presented and four groups (I, II, III, and IV) of electron orbits were found in the presence of an axial guide magnetic field. Using perturbation analysis, it is found that these groups of orbits were stable except small regions of group I and IV orbits. The function {Phi} which determines the rate of change of axial velocity with beam energy was also derived. In the case in which {Phi}<0 represents a negative-mass regime in which the axial velocity accelerates as the electrons lose energy. Numerical solutions showed that by increasing the cyclotron frequency, the gain for group I and III orbits increased, while a gain decrement was obtained for group II and IV orbits.

  6. Rapid development of a measurement and control system for the Advanced Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, W.L. Jr.; May, M.W.; Kozubal, A.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) is being used to develop a measurement and control system for the Advanced Free-Electron laser (AFEL) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. EPICS is an integrated system of applications development tools and a distributed run time environment that supports an input-output database, a graphical operator interface, sequential control through state'' definition, data archiving, data analysis, and fault management. It is very advantageous in terms of both time and system integrity to be able to perform much of the control system development before the actual hardware for the AFEL is in place. Using the EPICS applications tools, we are developing prototype measurements and controls that can be directly transferred to the AFEL during installation and commissioning. This is possible due primarily to three aspects of EPICS. First we can easily model physical systems with the state notation language. Second, we can simulate input and output channels with soft'' database channels, which are created using the database configuration tool. Third, we can easily build and modify operator interface screens with the display editor. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Efficiency enhancement of nonlinear odd harmonics in thermal free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazouband, F.; Maraghechi, B. [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, 15875-4413 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of axial energy spread on the radiation of third harmonic is studied in the free electron laser with planar wiggler and ion-channel guiding. Spread in the longitudinal momentum and so in the initial energy of electron beam, without any spread in the transverse velocity, is assumed in the form of Gaussian distribution function. The technique that is employed is a one-dimensional and steady-state simulation. A set of self consistent nonlinear differential equations that describes the system is solved numerically by Runge-Kutta method. Due to the sensitivity of harmonics to thermal effects, gain improvement of third harmonic radiation is achieved by using ion-channel guiding technique and efficiency enhancement is applied by tapering the magnetic field of wiggler to optimize radiation. The bunching parameter of the electron beam is also studied. It is found that the growth of the magnitude of the bunching parameter that is caused by the ponderomotive wave stops before the saturation point of the radiation. This means that ponderomotive wave saturates at a shorter distance compared to the radiation.

  8. 5 (Upgradable to 25 keV) Free Electron Laser (FEL) Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, R C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility utilizing a recirculated Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) linear accelerator (linac) provides the opportunity to achieve about five times greater photon energy than an unrecirculated linac of similar cost. > A 4 GeV SRF, cw, electron linac can be used to drive an FEL producing 5 keV photons. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, a Department of Energy (DOE) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) laboratory, proposes to utilize a 4 GeV unrecirculated, SRF, linac in a segment of existing linac tunnel. > For an initial investment similar to that of the proposed SLAC strategy, a recirculated SRF linac system could deliver the 4 GeV electrons for photon energies of 5 keV and provide an upgrade path to photon energies of 25 keV. > Further support amounting to about a third of the initial investment would provide upgrade funds for additional SRF linac and cryogenic capacity sufficient to provide electron energies appropriate for 25 keV photons matching the European XFEL.

  9. Ultra hard x rays from krypton clusters heated by intense laser fields R. C. Issac,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Ultra hard x rays from krypton clusters heated by intense laser fields R. C. Issac,a) G. Vieux, B of ultrashort laser pulses with krypton clusters at intensity up to 1.3 1018 Wcm 2 has been investigated. This is ascribed to the presence of a hot electron population, similar to that found in laser­solid interactions

  10. Investigations of laser-induced damages in fused silica optics using x-ray laser interferometric microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margarone, D.; Rus, B.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Mocek, T.; Homer, P.; Polan, J.; Stupka, M. [Department of X-ray Lasers/PALS Centre, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, 18221 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Lagron, J. C.; Ros, D. [LIXAM, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Danson, C.; Hawkes, S. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel x-ray laser (XRL) application, aimed at understanding the microscopic effects involved in formation of laser-induced damage in optical materials exposed to high-power sub-ns laser pulses, is presented. Standard fused silica substrates with permanent damage threshold below 20 J/cm{sup 2}, when irradiated by 438 nm laser pulses, were probed in situ by a neonlike zinc XRL at 21.2 nm. The probing beamline employed a double Lloyd's mirror x-ray interferometer, used in conjunction with an imaging mirror to achieve magnification of {approx}8. In conjunction with an array of in situ optical diagnostics, the main question addressed is whether the damage on the rear surface of the beamsplitter is transient or permanent. The second issue, examined by both the x-ray interferometric microscopy and the optical diagnostics, is whether a local rear-surface modification is associated with nonlinear effects such as self-focusing or filamentation of the damaging laser beam in the bulk.

  11. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, D. (comp.)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  12. An infrared free-electron laser for the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. Design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, D. [comp.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a free-electron laser (FEL) proposed as part of the Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL), a user facility that also incorporates several advanced lasers of conventional design and two beamlines for the ALS. The FEL itself addresses the needs of the chemical sciences community for a high-brightness, tunable source covering a broad region of the infrared spectrum -- from 3 to 50 {mu}m. All of these sources, together with a variety of sophisticated experimental stations, will be housed in a new building to be located adjacent to the ALS. The radiation sources can be synchronized to permit powerful two-color, pump-probe experiments that will further our fundamental understanding of chemical dynamics at the molecular level, especially those aspects relevant to practical issues in combustion chemistry. The technical approach adopted in this design makes use of superconducting radiofrequency (SCRF) accelerating structures. The primary motivation for adopting this approach was to meet the user requirement for wavelength stability equal to one part in 10{sup 4}. Previous studies concluded that a wavelength stability of only one part in 10{sup 3} could be achieved with currently available room-temperature technology. In addition, the superconducting design operates in a continuous-wave (cw) mode and hence offers considerably higher average optical output power. It also allows for various pulse-gating configurations that will permit simultaneous multiuser operations. A summary of the comparative performance attainable with room-temperature and superconducting designs is given. The FEL described in this report provides a continuous train of 30-ps micropulses, with 100{mu}J of optical energy per micropulse, at a repetition rate of 6.1 MHz. The device can also deliver pulses at a cw repetition rate of 12.2 MHz, with a peak power of 50 {mu}J per micropulse. 70 ref.

  13. Scaling relations and parameters for 1 Angstrom FEL. [Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, L.H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Free Electron Laser (FEL) holds great promise as a tunable source of coherent radiation. At the present, the shortest wavelength achieved by an FEL is 2500 {Angstrom}. However, as recent progress in the development of laser driven photocathode electron guns has provided electron beams with lower and lower emittance and higher and higher current, it has become clear that FEL's with much shorter wavelength can be achieved. An FEL operating below 1000 {Angstrom} will yield important advances in fields such as photochemistry, atomic and molecular physics. An FEL with wavelength of 30 {Angstrom} will bring new era to the development of holography of living cells. And, if an FEL with 1 {Angstrom} wavelength can be developed, its impact on solid physics, molecular biology, and many other fields can hardly be exaggerated. We first describe our electron distribution model: a waterbag transverse phase space distribution and a Gaussian energy distribution. This model is widely used in simulations, and is rather close to reality. Then we describe the dispersion relation derived from the Vlasov-Maxwell equations, and its solution, expressed in scaled form. We compare the variational approximation with several simulation codes. Then we compare with exact results which we have derived for a parallel electron beam with finite beam size and energy spread. We explain the scaling relations, and give examples to show how system parameters scale when the FEL wavelength is reduced. Then, applying these scaling relations, we derive a list of preliminary system parameters for a 1 {Angstrom} FEL. As an example, we apply our analytical calculation to optimize one set of parameters derived from the scaling relations. Finally, as a conclusion we discuss the implication of the list of parameters for a 1{Angstrom} FEL. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Schoenlein

    2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    July 7, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science

  15. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bob Schoenlein

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 7, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science

  16. Table-top transient collisional excitation x-ray laser research at LLNL: Status June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J., LLNL

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a status report of transient collisional excitation x-ray laser experiments at LLNL during June 1997 that have the advantage of being conducted on a table-top. Two laser drivers with modest energy {approximately}6 J are used in the scheme: a long {approximately}1 ns pulse to preform and ionize the plasma followed by a short {approximately}1 ps pulse to produce the excitation and population inversion. The beams are co-propagated and focused using a combination of a cylindrical lens and paraboloid to a line of {approximately}70 {micro}m x 12.5 mm dimensions. High repetition rates approaching 1 shot/3 min. allow typically in excess of 50 target shots in a day. Various slab targets have been irradiated and we report preliminary results for x-ray laser gain in 3p-3s J=0-1 Ne-like Ti and Fe transitions where gains as high as 24 cm{sup -1} and gL products of {approximately}15 have been observed.

  17. Multicolor operation and spectral control in a gain-modulated x-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent Light Source (LCLS, at SLAC) [1], SACLA (RIKEN) [experimental demonstration at LCLS. FIG. 1 (color online).demonstrated experimentally at LCLS. The experimental beam

  18. Multicolor operation and spectral control in a gain-modulated x-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRL 111, 134801 (2013) PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS week ending2013 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS PRL 111, 134801 (2013) where uPHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS PRL 111, 134801 (2013) i u expði u

  19. A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Albert H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jorgenson, H. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mares, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oades, Kevin [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Kemshall, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Thomas, Philip [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Young, Trevor [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Pederson, Neal [VI Control Systems

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  20. Proposed Laser-driven, Dielectric Microstructure Few-cm Long Undulator for Attosecond Coherent X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plettner, T; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents the concept of an all-dielectric laser-driven undulator for the generation of coherent X-rays. The proposed laser-driven undulator is expected to produce internal deflection forces equivalent to a several-Tesla magnetic field acting on a speed-of-light particle. The key idea for this laser-driven undulator is its ability to provide phase synchronicity between the deflection force and the electron beam for a distance that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The potential advantage of this undulator is illustrated with a possible design example that assumes a small laser accelerator which delivers a 2 GeV, 1 pC, 1 kHz electron bunch train to a 10 cm long, 1/2 mm period laser-driven undulator. Such an undulator could produce coherent X-ray pulses with {approx}10{sup 9} photons of 64 keV energy. The numerical modeling for the expected X-ray pulse shape was performed with GENESIS, which predicts X-ray pulse durations in the few-attosecond range. Possible applications for nonlinear electromagnetic effects from these X-ray pulses are briefly discussed.

  1. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  2. High-Resolved X-ray Spectra of Hollow Atoms in a Femtosecond Laser-Produced Solid Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    High-Resolved X-ray Spectra of Hollow Atoms in a Femtosecond Laser-Produced Solid Plasma A. Ya and interpreted for the ¢rst time. It is shown that such spectra were generated by multicharged hollow ions-ray spectra of nano- and subnanosecond laser produced plasmas were intensively investigated during the last 20

  3. Performance study of a soft X-ray harmonic generation FEL seeded with an EUV laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Performance study of a soft X-ray harmonic generation FEL seeded with an EUV laser pulse M. Gullans electron laser (FEL) using a low-power extreme ultraviolet (EUV) pulse as an input seed is investigated generation schemes. It is found that, for reasonable beam parameters, robust FEL performance can be obtained

  4. Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kublak, G.D.; Richardson, M.C.

    1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10{sup 11}--10{sup 12} watts/cm{sup 2}) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10--30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle. 5 figs.

  5. Cluster beam targets for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kublak, Glenn D. (124 Turquoise Way, Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550); Richardson, Martin C. (CREOL

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for producing extreme ultra violet (EUV) and soft x-ray radiation from an ultra-low debris plasma source are disclosed. Targets are produced by the free jet expansion of various gases through a temperature controlled nozzle to form molecular clusters. These target clusters are subsequently irradiated with commercially available lasers of moderate intensity (10.sup.11 -10.sup.12 watts/cm.sup.2) to produce a plasma radiating in the region of 0.5 to 100 nanometers. By appropriate adjustment of the experimental conditions the laser focus can be moved 10-30 mm from the nozzle thereby eliminating debris produced by plasma erosion of the nozzle.

  6. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France)] [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech—CNRS UMR7639—École Polytechnique ParisTech, Chemin de la Hunière, 91761 Palaiseau (France); Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  7. Synthesis of highly oriented TiN coatings by free electron laser processing of titanium in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettore Carpene; Michelle D. Shinn; Peter Schaaf

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium was irradiated in pure nitrogen gas by means of a free electron laser. The treatment resulted in the formation of -TiNx layers, with surface stoichiometry of x {approx} 1. Under certain circumstances the nitride phase showed an almost perfect crystallographic texture with the delta-TiNx(200) planes parallel to the irradiated surface, and well aligned dendrites growing normal to the surface. The mechanism of the dendritic alignment and the origin of the texture correlate with the existence of a solidification front starting at the surface, which is very peculiar for laser surface treatments. This phenomenon is explained with the help of numerical simulations.

  8. Spectral-phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction applied to seeded extreme-ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahieu, Benoît; De Ninno, Giovanni; Dacasa, Hugo; Lozano, Magali; Rousseau, Jean-Philippe; Zeitoun, Philippe; Garzella, David; Merdji, Hamed

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a setup for complete characterization of femtosecond pulses generated by seeded free-electron lasers (FEL's) in the extreme-ultraviolet spectral region. Two delayed and spectrally shifted replicas are produced and used for spectral phase interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER). We show that it can be achieved by a simple arrangement of the seed laser. Temporal shape and phase obtained in FEL simulations are well retrieved by the SPIDER reconstruction, allowing to foresee the implementation of this diagnostic on existing and future sources. This will be a significant step towards an experimental investigation and control of FEL spectral phase.

  9. Streaked spectrometry using multilayer x-ray-interference mirrors to investigate energy transport in laser-plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stradling, G.L.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Henke, B.L.; Campbell, E.M.; Mead, W.C.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of energy in laser-produced plasmas is scrutinized by devising spectrally and temporally identifiable characteristics in the x-ray emission history which identify the heat-front position at various times in the heating process. Measurements of the relative turn-on times of these characteristics show the rate of energy transport between various points. These measurements can in turn constrain models of energy transport phenomena. We are time-resolving spectrally distinguishable subkilovolt x-ray emissions from different layers of a disk target to examine the transport rate of energy into the target. A similar technique is used to measure the lateral expansion rate of the plasma spot. A soft x-ray streak camera with 15-psec temporal resolution is used to make the temporal measurements. Spectral discrimination of the incident signal is provided by multilayer x-ray interference mirrors.

  10. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  11. X-Ray Radiation Measurements With Photodiodes In Plasmas Generated By 1017 W/Cm2 Intensity Krf Excimer Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racz, E.; Foeldes, I. B. [KFKI RMKI, EURATOM Association, P.O.Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Ryc, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were carried out using a prepulse-free hybrid KrF excimer-dye laser system (700fs pulse duration, 248nm wavelength, 15mJ pulse energy). The intensity of the p-polarized, focused laser beam was 1.5{center_dot}1017 W/cm2. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and x-rays from solid state laser plasmas were generated in the laser-plasma interaction of subpicosecond laser pulses of nonrelativistic laser intensities. An x-ray sensitive FLM photodiode (ITE, Warsaw) was used to detect x-rays between 1-19 keV in front of the targets. The diode was filtered by a 4{mu}m Al foil. The dependence of the x-ray flux on laser intensity and the angular distribution of x-rays for aluminum and copper targets in the half space of the front side of the targets were investigated.

  12. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  13. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Yajiang; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  14. Spatio-temporal coherence of free-electron laser radiation in the extreme ultraviolet determined by a Michelson interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, V.; Rödel, C.; Zastrau, U., E-mail: ulf.zastrau@uni-jena.de [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Brenner, G.; Düsterer, S.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Harmand, M.; Przystawik, A.; Redlin, H.; Toleikis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Döppner, T.; Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Fletcher, L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Förster, E. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Glenzer, S. H.; Lee, H. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hartley, N. J. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kazak, L.; Komar, D.; Skruszewicz, S. [Institut für Physik, Universität Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); and others

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A key feature of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from free-electron lasers (FELs) is its spatial and temporal coherence. We measured the spatio-temporal coherence properties of monochromatized FEL pulses at 13.5?nm using a Michelson interferometer. A temporal coherence time of (59±8) fs has been determined, which is in good agreement with the spectral bandwidth given by the monochromator. Moreover, the spatial coherence in vertical direction amounts to about 15% of the beam diameter and about 12% in horizontal direction. The feasibility of measuring spatio-temporal coherence properties of XUV FEL radiation using interferometric techniques advances machine operation and experimental studies significantly.

  15. Traces on ion yields and electron spectra of Ar inner-shell hollow states with Free-Electron Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, A O G; Emmanouilidou, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the formation by Free-Electron-Laser radiation of Ar hollow states with two or three inner-shell holes. We find that even charged Ar ion states can be more populated than odd charged Ar ion states. This depends on the pulse intensity and the number of energetically accessible inner- shell holes. Fully accounting for fine structure, we demonstrate that one electron spectra bare the imprints of Ar hollow states with two inner-shell holes. Moreover, we show how the Auger spectra of these hollow states can be extracted from two-electron coincidence spectra.

  16. X-ray lasers and methods utilizing two component driving illumination provided by optical laser means of relatively low energy and small physical size

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (El Granada, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10), and related methodology, are disclosed wherein an X-ray laser target (12) is illuminated with a first pulse of optical laser radiation (14) of relatively long duration having scarcely enough energy to produce a narrow and linear cool plasma of uniform composition (38). A second, relatively short pulse of optical laser radiation (18) is uniformly swept across the length, from end to end, of the plasma (38), at about the speed of light, to consecutively illuminate continuously succeeding portions of the plasma (38) with optical laser radiation having scarcely enough energy to heat, ionize, and invert them into the continuously succeeding portions of an X-ray gain medium. This inventive double pulse technique results in a saving of more than two orders of magnitude in driving optical laser energy, when compared to the conventional single pulse approach.

  17. Quantum coherence in the dynamical excitation, ionization, and decaying of neon gas induced by X-ray laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yongqiang; Dong, Wenpu; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a large scale quantum master equation approach to describe dynamical processes of practical open quantum systems driven by both coherent and stochastic interactions by including more than one thousand true states of the systems, motivated by the development of highly bright and fully coherent lasers in the X-ray wavelength regime. The method combines the processes of coherent dynamics induced by the X-ray laser and incoherent relaxations due to spontaneous emissions, Auger decays, and electronic collisions. As examples, theoretical investigation of {\\it real} coherent dynamics of inner-shell electrons of a neon gas, irradiated by a high-intensity X-ray laser with a full temporal coherence, is carried out with the approach. In contrast to the rate equation treatment, we find that coherence can suppress the multiphoton absorptions of a neon gas in the ultra-intense X-ray pulse, due to coherence-induced Rabi oscillations and power broadening effects. We study the influence of coherence on ionization p...

  18. Frequency response of an atomic resonance driven by weak free-electron-laser fluctuating pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G M Nikolopoulos; P Lambropoulos

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent experiments pertaining to the interaction of weak SASE-FEL pulses with atoms and molecules, we investigate the conditions under which such interactions can be described in the framework of a simple phase-diffusion model with decorrelated atom-field dynamics. The nature of the fluctuations that are inevitably present in SASE-FEL pulses is shown to play a pivotal role in the success of the decorrelation. Our analysis is performed in connection with specific recent experimental results from FLASH in the soft X-ray regime.

  19. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kirian, Richard A.; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Schulz, Joachim; DePonte, Daniel P.; Weierstall, Uwe; Doak, R. Bruce; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme; Lomb, Lukas; Coppola, Nicola; Shoeman, Robert L.; Epp, Sascha W.; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Holl, Peter; Liang, Mengning; Barthelmess, Miriam; Caleman, Carl; Boutet, Sebastien; Bogan, Michael J.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Bostedt, Christoph; Bajt, Sasa; Gumprecht, Lars; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Schmidt, Carlo; Homke, Andre; Reich, Christian; Pietschner, Daniel; Struder, Lothar; Hauser, Gunter; Gorke, Hubert; Ullrich, Joachim; Herrmann, Sven; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe; Messerschmidt, Marc; Bozek, John D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Frank, Matthias; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Starodub, Dmitri; Williams, Garth J.; Hajdu, Janos; Timneanu, Nicusor; Seibert, M. Marvin; Andreasson, Jakob; Rocker, Andrea; Jonsson, Olof; Svenda, Martin; Stern, Stephan; Nass, Karol; Andritschke, Robert; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Krasniqi, Faton; Bott, Mario; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Grotjohann, Ingo; Holton, James M.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Neutze, Richard; Marchesini, Stefano; Fromme, Raimund; Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Andersson, Inger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Potdevin, Guillaume; Graafsma, Heinz; Nilsson, Bjorn; Spence, John C. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction ‘snapshots’ are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals (~200?nm to 2??m in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.

  20. Characterization and Application of Hard X-Ray Betatron Radiation Generated by Relativistic Electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnell, Michael; Uschmann, Ingo; Jansen, Oliver; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity for compact table-top x-ray sources with higher brightness, shorter wavelength and shorter pulse duration has led to the development of complementary sources based on laser-plasma accelerators, in contrast to conventional accelerators. Relativistic interaction of short-pulse lasers with underdense plasmas results in acceleration of electrons and in consequence in the emission of spatially coherent radiation, which is known in the literature as betatron radiation. In this article we report on our recent results in the rapidly developing field of secondary x-ray radiation generated by high-energy electron pulses. The betatron radiation is characterized with a novel setup allowing to measure the energy, the spatial energy distribution in the far-field of the beam and the source size in a single laser shot. Furthermore, the polarization state is measured for each laser shot. In this way the emitted betatron x-rays can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to retrieve very subtle information of t...

  1. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  2. August 15, 1999 / Vol. 24, No. 16 / OPTICS LETTERS 1115 Generation of millijoule-level soft-x-ray laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 15, 1999 / Vol. 24, No. 16 / OPTICS LETTERS 1115 Generation of millijoule-level soft of the brightest soft-x-ray sources to date. 1999 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 140.7240, 140.3280, 140 of soft-x-ray pulses that result from the generation of high-order harmonics of optical lasers

  3. High-Harmonic Inverse-Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800 nm Christopher M. S. Sears, Eric R. Colby, Benjamin M. Cowan, Robert H. Siemann, and James E. Spencer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    High-Harmonic Inverse-Free-Electron-Laser Interaction at 800 nm Christopher M. S. Sears, Eric R observation of a higher-order inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) interaction. Interaction at the fourth, fifth require electron bunches shorter than the laser wavelength. Current rf injectors for linear accelerators

  4. Statistical mechanics and Vlasov equation allow for a simplified hamiltonian description of single pass free electron laser saturated dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Antoniazzi; Yves Elskens; Duccio Fanelli; Stefano Ruffo

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduced Hamiltonian formulation to reproduce the saturated regime of a single pass free electron laser, around perfect tuning, is here discussed. Asymptotically, $N\\_m$ particles are found to organize in a dense cluster, that evolves as an individual massive unit. The remaining particles fill the surrounding uniform sea, spanning a finite portion of phase space, approximately delimited by the average momenta $\\omega\\_+$ and $\\omega\\_-$. These quantities enter the model as external parameters, which can be self-consistently determined within the proposed theoretical framework. To this aim, we make use of a statistical mechanics treatment of the Vlasov equation, that governs the initial amplification process. Simulations of the reduced dynamics are shown to successfully capture the oscillating regime observed within the original $N$-body picture.

  5. axial free-electron laser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but works at shortof the development of electron tubes and atomic lasers. Theyelectron energy and using higher harmonics, and efficiencies of 60% were common. While the Motz...

  6. alamos free-electron laser: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but works at shortof the development of electron tubes and atomic lasers. Theyelectron energy and using higher harmonics, and efficiencies of 60% were common. While the Motz...

  7. Rietveld X-ray diffraction analysis of nanostructured rutile films of titania prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murugesan, S. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Kuppusami, P., E-mail: pk@igcar.gov.in [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rietveld powder X-ray diffraction analysis of the rutile films of titanium oxide prepared by pulsed laser deposition was carried out. The crystallite size increased with increase of substrate temperature, while the strain showed a reverse trend. The films synthesized at temperature {>=}573 K showed that the crystal structure was almost close to that of bulk rutile structure. The influence of the substrate temperature on the lattice parameters and oxygen coordinates were also studied in the present work.

  8. Internal-conversion process in superintense ultrashort x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kis, Daniel; Kalman, Peter; Keszthelyi, Tamas; Szivos, Janos [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Nuclear Technics, Department of Nuclear Energy, Muegyetem rkpt. 9, H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Institute of Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Budafoki ut 8. F. I. I. 10, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electron-nucleus interaction in a super-intense few-cycle x-ray pulse is investigated. The super-intense few-cycle x-ray pulse-induced internal conversion (IC) process is discussed in detail. The x-ray laser-pulse induced IC coefficient is calculated, and in particular, it is derived in the case of a pulse of Gaussian shape and for a bound-free electron transition. The IC coefficient of the IC process induced by a super-intense few-cycle soft-x-ray laser pulse in the case of the {sup 99m}Tc isomer is determined numerically. The results obtained for the IC coefficient show significant carrier angular frequency, carrier-envelope phase, and pulse-length dependencies. The infinite pulse-length limit and experimental aspects are also discussed.

  9. Design of a free-electron laser driven by the LBNLlaser-plasma-accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, C.B.; Fawley, W.M.; Montgomery, A.L.; Robinson, K.E.; Gruner, F.; Bakeman, M.; Leemans, W.P.

    2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the design and current status of a compactfree-electron laser (FEL), generating ultra-fast, high-peak flux, VUVpulses driven by a high-current, GeV electron beam from the existingLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser-plasma accelerator,whose active acceleration length is only a few cm. The proposedultra-fast source would be intrinsically temporally synchronized to thedrive laser pulse, enabling pump-probe studies in ultra-fast science withpulse lengths of tens of fs. Owing to the high current (&10 kA) ofthe laser-plasma-accelerated electron beams, saturated output fluxes arepotentially greater than 1013 photons/pulse. Devices based both on SASEand high-harmonic generated input seeds, to reduce undulator length andfluctuations, are considered.

  10. Demonstration of Successful X-ray Thomson Scattering Using Picosecond K-(alpha) X-ray Sources for the Characterization of Dense Heated Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Lee, H J; Doeppner, T; Falcone, R; Glenzer, S; Morse, E C

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the first successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering experiment from solid density plasmas for use as a diagnostic in determining the temperature, density, and ionization state of warm dense matter with picosecond resolution. The development of this source as a diagnostic and stringent requirements for successful K-{alpha} x-ray Thomson scattering are addressed. Data for the experimental techniques described in this paper [1] suggest the capability of single shot characterization of warm dense matter and the ability to use this scattering source at future Free Electron Lasers (FEL) where comparable scattering signal levels are predicted.

  11. Cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy for diagnostics of high harmonics of the extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser light source at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.-J.; Fukuzawa, H.; Pruemper, G.; Ueda, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Okunishi, M.; Shimada, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Motomura, K.; Saito, N. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); National Metrology Institute of Japan, AIST, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Iwayama, H.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Rudenko, A. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany); Ullrich, J. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Max Planck Advanced Study Group, CFEL, D-22607, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck-Insitut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Czasch, A.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Nagasono, M.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M. [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); and others

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectroscopy apparatus dedicated to the experiments using the extreme-ultraviolet light pulses at the free-electron laser facility, SPring-8 Compact SASE Source test accelerator, in Japan and used it to measure spatial distributions of fundamental, second, and third harmonics at the end station.

  12. An infrared free electron laser system for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL based on a 500 MHz superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.J.; Byrns, R.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Donahue, R.; Edighoffer, J.; Gough, R.; Hoyer, E.; Leemans, W.; Staples, J.; Taylor, B.; Xie, M.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new design of the Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) at LBL. The design and choice of parameters are dictated by the unique requirements of the CDRL scientific program. The accelerator system is based on the 500 MHz superconducting cavity technology to achieve a wavelength stability of 10{sup {minus}4}.

  13. An infrared free electron laser system for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL based on a 500 MHz superconducting linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.J.; Byrns, R.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Donahue, R.; Edighoffer, J.; Gough, R.; Hoyer, E.; Leemans, W.; Staples, J.; Taylor, B.; Xie, M.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new design of the Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) for the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) at LBL. The design and choice of parameters are dictated by the unique requirements of the CDRL scientific program. The accelerator system is based on the 500 MHz superconducting cavity technology to achieve a wavelength stability of 10[sup [minus]4].

  14. VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Guenter

    VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers. For FEL visitors, this generally means covering the basic guidelines/tasks below. The FEL management loosely defines a "visitor

  15. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  16. Laser plasma cryogenic target on translating substrate for generation of continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amano, Sho [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To generate continuously repetitive EUV and soft X-ray pulses with various wavelengths from laser-produced plasmas, a one-dimensionally translating substrate system with a closed He gas cryostat that can continuously supply various cryogenic targets for ?10 Hz laser pulses has been developed. The system was successfully operated at a lowest temperature of 15 K and at a maximum up-down speed of 12 mm/s. Solid Ar, Kr, and Xe layers were formed, and their growth rates and the laser crater sizes on them were studied. By optimization of the operational parameters in accordance with our design rule, it was shown that stable output power was achieved continuously from the plasma emission at frequencies of 1–10 Hz. The average soft X-ray and EUV powers obtained were 19 mW at 3.2 nm, 33 mW at 10.0 nm, and 66 mW at 10.8 nm, with 10% bandwidths, from the Ar, Kr, and Xe solid targets, respectively, with a laser power of 1 W. We will be able to achieve higher frequencies using a high beam quality laser that produces smaller craters, and can expect higher powers. Although only Ar, Kr, and Xe gases were tested in this study, the target system achieved a temperature of 15 K and can thus solidify almost all target gases, apart from H and He, and can continuously supply the solid target. The use of various target materials will enable expansion of the EUV and soft X-ray emission wavelength range.

  17. Enhanced water window x-ray emission from in situ formed carbon clusters irradiated by intense ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarty, U.; Rao, B. S.; Arora, V.; Upadhyay, A.; Singhal, H.; Naik, P. A.; Chakera, J. A.; Mukherjee, C.; Gupta, P. D. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 Madhya Pradesh (India)] [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452 013 Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced water window x-ray emission (23–44 Å) from carbon clusters, formed in situ using a pre-pulse, irradiated by intense (I > 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) ultra-short laser pulse, is demonstrated. An order of magnitude x-ray enhancement over planar graphite target is observed in carbon clusters, formed by a sub-ns pre-pulse, interacting with intense main pulse after a delay. The effect of the delay and the duration of the main pulse is studied for optimizing the x-ray emission in the water window region. This x-ray source has added advantages of being an efficient, high repetition rate, and low debris x-ray source.

  18. Electron beam magnetic switch for a plurality of free electron lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for forming and utilizing a sequence of electron beam segments, each of the same temporal length (substantially 15 nsec), with consecutive beams being separated by a constant time interval of the order of 3 nsec. The beam sequence is used for simultaneous inputs to a plurality of wiggler magnet systems that also accept the laser beams to be amplified by interaction with the co-propagating electron beams. The electron beams are arranged substantially in a circle to allow proper distribution of and simultaneous switching out of the beam segments to their respective wiggler magnets.

  19. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 APRIL 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1638 Laser-driven amplification of soft X-rays by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    -resolved laser spectroscopy. Ultra-short pulses can be directly generated with lasers and the wavelength range--it is necessary to extend the wavelength range into the X-ray regime while preserving the ultra-short pulseARTICLES PUBLISHED ONLINE: 18 APRIL 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NPHYS1638 Laser-driven amplification

  20. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; et al

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  1. High-resolution ab initio Three-dimensional X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Marchesini, S; Noy, A; Cui, C; Howells, M R; Rosen, R; He, H; Spence, J H; Weierstall, U; Beetz, T; Jacobsen, C; Shapiro, D

    2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging non-periodic isolated objects at resolutions only limited, in principle, by the largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate X-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the 3D diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a non-periodic object. We also construct 2D images of thick objects with infinite depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution using X-ray undulator radiation, and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at X-ray free-electron laser sources.

  2. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

  3. (Cd,Mn)Te detectors for characterization of x-ray emissions generated during laser-driven fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross,A.S.; Knauer, J. P.; Mycielski, A.; Kochanowska, D.; Wiktowska-Baran, M.; Jakiela, R.; Domagala, J.; Cui, Y.; James, R.; Sobolewski, R.

    2008-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our measurements of (Cd,Mn)Te photoconductive detectors (PCDs), fabricated for the goal of measuring both the temporal and spectral dependences of X-ray emissions generated from laser-illuminated targets during the inertial confinement fusion experiments. Our Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te (x = 0.05) single crystals, doped with V, were grown using a vertical Bridgman method and, subsequently, annealed in Cd for the highest resistivity ({approx}10{sup 10} {Omega}cm) and a good mobility-lifetime product ({approx}10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V). The 1-mm- and 2.3-mm-thick detectors were placed in the same housing as two 1-mm-thick diamond PCDs. All devices were pre-screened by a 7.6-mm-thick Be X-ray filter with a frequency cutoff of 1 keV. The incident shots from the OMEGA laser were 1-ns-long square pulses with energies ranging from 2.3 kJ to 22.6 kJ, and the PCDs were biased with 5000 V/cm. The response amplitudes and rise times of our (Cd,Mn)Te PCDs were comparable with the diamond detector performance, while the decay times were 4 to 10 times longer and in the 2-5 ns range. We observed two X-ray emission events separated by 1.24 ns. The first was identified as caused by heating of the target and creating a hot corona, while the second one was from the resulting compressed core. For comparison purposes, our testing was performed using {approx}1 keV X-ray photons, optimal for the diamond PCD. According to the presented simulations, however, at X-ray energies >10 keV diamond absorption efficiency drops to <50%, whereas for (Cd,Mn)Te the drop occurs at {approx}100 keV with near perfect, 100% absorption, up to 50 keV.

  4. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  5. Observing heme doming in myoglobin with femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopya)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Levantino, M.; Lemke, H. T.; Schirò, G.; Glownia, M.; Cupane, A.; Cammarata, M.

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report time-resolved X-ray absorption measurements after photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin performed at the LCLS X-ray free electron laser with nearly 100 fs (FWHM) time resolution. Data at the Fe K-edge reveal that the photoinduced structural changes at the heme occur in two steps, with a faster (~70 fs) relaxation preceding a slower (~400 fs) one. We tentatively attribute the first relaxation to a structural rearrangement induced by photolysis involving essentially only the heme chromophore and the second relaxation to a residual Fe motion out of the heme plane that is coupled to the displacement of myoglobin F-helix.

  6. The photon analysis, delivery, and reduction system at the FERMI-Elettra free electron laser user facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zangrando, M. [Laboratorio TASC INFM-CNR, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Abrami, A.; Cudin, I.; Fava, C.; Galimberti, A.; Godnig, R.; Giuressi, D.; Rumiz, L.; Sergo, R.; Svetina, C.; Cocco, D. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Bacescu, D. [CELLS-ALBA, E-08290 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L. [Laboratorio LUXOR INFM-CNR, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FERMI-Elettra free electron laser (FEL) user facility is currently under construction at the Sincrotrone Trieste laboratory in Trieste (Italy). It will cover the wavelength range from 100 to about 5 nm in the fundamental and 3 or 1 nm using the third harmonic. We report the layout of the photon beam diagnostics section, the radiation transport system to the experimental area, and the photon beam distribution system. Due to the peculiar characteristics of the emitted FEL radiation (high peak power, short pulse length, and statistical variation of the emitted intensity and distribution), the realization of the diagnostics system is particularly challenging. The end users are interested in parameters such as the radiation pulse intensity and spectral distribution, as well as in the possibility to attenuate the intensity. In order to accomplish these tasks, a photon analysis, delivery, and reduction system is now under development and construction and is presented here. This system will work on-line producing pulse-resolved information and will let users keep track of the photon beam parameters during the experiments.

  7. Study of beam transverse properties of a thermionic electron gun for application to a compact THz free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Tongning, E-mail: TongningHu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Qin, Bin; Tan, Ping; Chen, Qushan; Yang, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Pei, Yuanji, E-mail: TongningHu@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: yjpei@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Ji [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel thermionic electron gun adopted for use in a high power THz free electron laser (FEL) is proposed in this paper. By optimization of the structural and radiofrequency (RF) parameters, the physical design of the gun is performed using dynamic calculations. Velocity bunching is used to minimize the bunch's energy spread, and the dynamic calculation results indicate that high quality beams can be provided. The transverse properties of the beams generated by the gun are also analyzed. The novel RF focusing effects of the resonance cavity are investigated precisely and are used to establish emittance compensation, which enables the injector length to be reduced. In addition, the causes of the extrema of the beam radius and the normalized transverse emittance are analyzed and interpreted, respectively, and slice simulations are performed to illustrate how the RF focusing varies along the bunch length and to determine the effects of that variation on the emittance compensation. Finally, by observation of the variations of the beam properties in the drift tube behind the electron gun, prospective assembly scenarios for the complete THz-FEL injector are discussed, and a joint-debugging process for the injector is implemented.

  8. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenlein, Robert (Deputy Director, Advanced Light Source) [Deputy Director, Advanced Light Source

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science.

  9. Using Lasers and X-rays to Reveal the Motion of Atoms and Electrons (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Schoenlein, Robert [Deputy Director, Advanced Light Source

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: The ultrafast motion of atoms and electrons lies at the heart of chemical reactions, advanced materials with exotic properties, and biological processes such as the first event in vision. Bob Schoenlein, Deputy Director for Science at the Advanced Light Source, will discuss how such processes are revealed by using laser pulses spanning a millionth of a billionth of a second, and how a new generation of light sources will bring the penetrating power of x-rays to the world of ultrafast science.

  10. High-energy x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion plasmas at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Hammel, B.A. [and others

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-keV x-ray microscopy will be an important laser-produced plasma diagnostic at future megajoule facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF).In preparation for the construction of this facility, we have investigated several instrumentation options in detail, and we conclude that near normal incidence single spherical or toroidal crystals may offer the best general solution for high-energy x-raymicroscopy at NIF and at similar large facilities. Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes using multi-layer mirrors may also be good secondary options, particularly if apertures are used to increase the band-width limited field of view.

  11. Ablation by short optical and X-ray laser pulses N.A. Inogamova, S.I. Anisimova, V.V. Zhakhovskyb,c, A.Ya. Faenovb,d, Yu.V. Petrova,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Ablation by short optical and X-ray laser pulses N.A. Inogamova, S.I. Anisimova, V.V. Zhakhovskyb. Keywords: Short pulse laser ablation, EUV and X-ray laser ablation of LiF, material strength defined in laser experiment 1. INTRODUCTION Short pulse OL and XRL are important for practical applications

  12. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  13. Development of an adaptable coherent x-ray diffraction microscope with the emphasis on imaging hydrated specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Daewoong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaehyun; Shimada, Hiroki; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Sunam; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Gallagher-Jones, Marcus [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a versatile coherent x-ray diffraction microscope capable of imaging biological specimens in solution. The microscope is a flexible platform accommodating various conditions, from low vacuum (10{sup ?2} Pa) to helium gas filled ambient pressure. This flexibility greatly expands the application area, from in situ materials science to biology systems in their native state, by significantly relaxing restrictions to the sample environment. The coherent diffraction microscope has been used successfully to image a yeast cell immersed in buffer solution. We believe that the design of this coherent diffraction microscope can be directly adapted to various platforms such as table top soft x-ray laser, synchrotron x-ray sources, and x-ray free electron laser with minor relevant adjustments.

  14. Self-field effects on instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi, E-mail: mohsenpour@umz.ac.ir; Rezaee Rami, Omme Kolsoum [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron lasers (FEL) play major roles in the Raman Regime, due to the charge and current densities of the beam self-field. The method of perturbation has been applied to study the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. A dispersion relation for two-stream free electron lasers with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field has been found. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to investigate the influence of self-fields on the FEL coupling and the two-stream instability. It was found that self-fields can produce very large effects on the FEL coupling, but they have almost negligible effects on two-stream instability.

  15. Mode couplings in a two-stream free-electron laser with a helical wiggler and an ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi, E-mail: mohsenpour@umz.ac.ir; Alirezaee, Hajar [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the method of perturbation has been applied to obtain the dispersion relation (DR) of a two-stream free-electron laser (FEL) with a helical wiggler and an ion-channel with all relativistic effects on waves. This DR has been solved numerically to find the unstable modes and their growth rate. Numerical solutions of DR show that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream free-electron laser. In group II orbits, with relatively large wiggler induced velocities, new couplings are found. The effect of the velocity difference of the two electron beams on the instabilities has also been investigated in this study. Moreover, the effect of the ion-channel density on the maximum growth rate of FEL resonance has been analyzed.

  16. Characterisation of a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray source produced from a high intensity laser for high areal density object radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtois, C.; Compant La Fontaine, A.; Bazzoli, S.; Bourgade, J. L.; Gazave, J.; Lagrange, J. M.; Landoas, O.; Dain, L. Le; Pichoff, N. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Edwards, R.; Aedy, C. [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE Plc., Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Mastrosimone, D.; Pien, G.; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of an experiment to characterise a MeV Bremsstrahlung x-ray emission created by a short (<10 ps) pulse, high intensity (1.4 × 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser are presented. X-ray emission is characterized using several diagnostics; nuclear activation measurements, a calibrated hard x-ray spectrometer, and dosimeters. Results from the reconstructed x-ray energy spectra are consistent with numerical simulations using the PIC and Monte Carlo codes between 0.3 and 30 MeV. The intense Bremsstrahlung x-ray source is used to radiograph an image quality indicator (IQI) heavily filtered with thick tungsten absorbers. Observations suggest that internal features of the IQI can be resolved up to an external areal density of 85 g/cm{sup 2}. The x-ray source size, inferred by the radiography of a thick resolution grid, is estimated to be approximately 400 ?m (full width half maximum of the x-ray source Point Spread Function)

  17. 9/16/11 11:18 PMAPS -53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics -Event ...stler amplification: a free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere Page 1 of 2http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/DPP11/Event/153292

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    amplification: a free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere Page 1 of 2http amplification: a free electron laser in the Earth's magnetosphere 4:24 PM­4:36 PM Preview Abstract Authors: A of the whistler wave. Based on the similarities between free electron lasers (FELs) and whistler mode emissions

  18. Role of multilayer-like interference effects on the transient optical response of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} films pumped with free-electron laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casolari, F.; Giangrisostomi, E. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Trieste, via A. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Kiskinova, M. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Mincigrucci, R. [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, SS 14 - km 163.5, I-34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray/optical cross-correlation methods are attracting increasing interest for exploring transient states of matter using ultrashort free-electron laser (FEL) pulses. Our paper shows that in such studies the difference in the penetration depth of the FEL-pump and the infrared (IR) probe pulses become important, in particular, when exploring the changes in the optical properties of solid targets. We discuss the role of interference effects, using a phenomenological model with excited and unperturbed slabs. The reliability of this model was experimentally verified by measuring the transient optical response of free-standing and silicon (Si) supported silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) films, simultaneously in reflection and transmission, using s- and p-polarized IR light. The changes in the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} optical refractive index, induced by the FEL pulses, have fully been described in the frame of the proposed model. The experimental results confirm that the differences, observed in the FEL-induced transient reflectance and transmittance of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} targets with different thicknesses, arise from multilayer-like interferometric phenomena.

  19. Damage threshold and focusability of mid-infrared free-electron laser pulses gated by a plasma mirror with nanosecond switching pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Nakajima, Takashi; Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a pulse train structure of an oscillator-type free-electron laser (FEL) results in the immediate damage of a solid target upon focusing. We demonstrate that the laser-induced damage threshold can be significantly improved by gating the mid-infrared FEL pulses with a plasma mirror. Although the switching pulses we employ have a nanosecond duration which does not guarantee the clean wavefront of the gated FEL pulses, the high focusability is experimentally confirmed through the observation of spectral broadening by a factor of 2.1 when we tightly focus the gated FEL pulses onto the Ge plate.

  20. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron...

  1. X-ray pulse preserving single-shot optical cross-correlation method for improved experimental temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beye, M. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Krupin, O. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); European XFEL GmbH, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Hays, G.; Jong, S. de; Lee, S.; Coffee, R.; Holmes, M. R.; Fry, A. R.; White, W. E.; Bostedt, C.; Schlotter, W. F. [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Reid, A. H. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rupp, D. [Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Lee, W.-S.; Scherz, A. O. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Chuang, Y.-D. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cryan, J. P.; Glownia, J. M. [PULSE, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Foehlisch, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Durr, H. A. [SIMES, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the relative arrival time between an optical pulse and a soft x-ray pulse from a free-electron laser. This femtosecond cross-correlation measurement was achieved by observing the change in optical reflectivity induced through the absorption of a fraction of the x-ray pulse. The main x-ray pulse energy remained available for an independent pump-probe experiment where the sample may be opaque to soft x-rays. The method was employed to correct the two-pulse delay data from a canonical pump-probe experiment and demonstrate 130 {+-} 20 fs (FWHM) temporal resolution. We further analyze possible timing jitter sources and point to future improvements.

  2. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of coherent transition radiation generated at a plasma-and G. Fubiani, “Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedW. P. Leemans, “Synchrotron radiation from electron beams in

  3. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  4. Narrowband inverse Compton scattering x-ray sources at high laser intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seipt, D; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Narrowband x- and gamma-ray sources based on the inverse Compton scattering of laser pulses suffer from a limitation of the allowed laser intensity due to the onset of nonlinear effects that increase their bandwidth. It has been suggested that laser pulses with a suitable frequency modulation could compensate this ponderomotive broadening and reduce the bandwidth of the spectral lines, which would allow to operate narrowband Compton sources in the high-intensity regime. In this paper we, therefore, present the theory of nonlinear Compton scattering in a frequency modulated intense laser pulse. We systematically derive the optimal frequency modulation of the laser pulse from the scattering matrix element of nonlinear Compton scattering, taking into account the electron spin and recoil. We show that, for some particular scattering angle, an optimized frequency modulation completely cancels the ponderomotive broadening for all harmonics of the backscattered light. We also explore how sensitive this compensation ...

  5. Single photon ionization of van der Waals clusters with a soft x-ray laser: ,,CO2...n and ,,CO2...n,,H2O...m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Single photon ionization of van der Waals clusters with a soft x-ray laser: ,,CO2...n and ,,CO2...n 2006; published online 20 October 2006 Pure neutral CO2 n clusters and mixed CO2 n H2O m clustersV. The distribution of pure CO2 n clusters decreases roughly exponentially with increasing cluster size. During

  6. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dell'Angela, M.; Anniyev, T.; Beye, M.; Coffee, R.; Föhlisch, A.; Gladh, J.; Kaya, S.; Katayama, T.; Krupin, O.; Nilsson, A.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  7. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K. W., E-mail: khill@pppl.gov; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, J. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/?E of order 10?000 and spatial resolution better than 10 ?m. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  8. Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction From Two-Dimensional Protein Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B.; Hunter, Mark; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Chu, Kaiqin; Graf, Alexander; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Padeste, Celestino; Pardini, Tommaso; Pedrini, Bill; Segelke, Brent; Seibert, M. M.; Spence , John C.; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Lane, Steve M.; Li, Xiao-Dan; Schertler, Gebhard; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals using an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). To date it has not been possible to acquire x-ray diffraction from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permits a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy methodology at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we observed Bragg diffraction to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples that were maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  9. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaria, Enrico

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    49625-Rev. 1 (also SLAC Rpt. LCLS-TN-04-3) Fawley W M 2006wavelength FELs (e.g. , FLASH, LCLS, SCSS, XFEL, SPARX) have

  10. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaria, Enrico

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    colleagues at Sincrotrone Trieste and elsewhere working onF-TN-07/12 (Sincrotrone Trieste) [11] Boscolo I and Stagno VF Parmigiani 1,3 Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A. , Trieste (

  11. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaria, Enrico

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. Svetina, S. Tazzari, M. Zangrando and A. Zholents. C.A 445 59 [25] Svetina, C, Zangrando M, Bianco A, and Cocco D

  12. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaria, Enrico

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of diluted system, and EIS, dedicated to Elastic Scattering.to the Timer part of the EIS beamline (at whose beginning athe LDM, DIPROI or Timex-EIS beamlines that share a number

  13. Set-up for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction using a femtosecond laser-plasma keV x-ray-source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    -ray-source C. Blome, K. Sokolowski-Tinten* , C. Dietrich, A. Tarasevitch, D. von der Linde Inst. for Laser. Tarasevitch, D. von der Linde Abstract. A short-pulse 4.51keV Ti K femtosecond laser-plasma driven hard x

  14. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c) Inverse pole figure during heating. Pressure is 27.8 GPa.2006): Double-sided laser heating system at HPCAT for in-taken during a 5 minute heating period. Pressure is 27.8

  15. Transient lattice dynamics in fs-laser-excited semiconductors probed by ultrafast x-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    K. Sokolowski-Tinten , M. Horn von Hoegen, D. von der Linde Inst. for Laser- and Plasmaphysics Hannover, Germany #12;K. Sokolowski-Tinten, M. Horn von Hoegen, D. von der Linde, A. Cavalleri, C.W. Siders

  16. Comment on “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L. [Università di Milano-INFN, Via Celoria, 16 Milano (Italy)] [Università di Milano-INFN, Via Celoria, 16 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that in the equation for the electron distribution evolution during Thomson/Compton or undulator radiation used in the paper: “Competition between coherent emission and broadband spontaneous emission in the quantum free electron laser” by G. R. M. Robb and R. Bonifacio [Phys. Plasmas 20, 033106 (2013)], the weight function should be the distribution of the number of emitted photons and not the photon energy distribution. Nevertheless, the considerations expressed in this comment do not alter the conclusions drawn in the paper in object.

  17. Wavefront Analysis of Nonlinear Self-Amplified Spontaneous-Emission Free-Electron Laser Harmonics in the Single-Shot Regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachelard, R.; Chubar, O.; Mercere, P.; Idir, M.; Couprie, M.E.; Lambert, G.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Kimura, H.; Ohashi, H.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Nagasono, M.; Hara, T. and Ishikawa, T.

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The single-shot spatial characteristics of the vacuum ultraviolet self-amplified spontaneous emission of a free electron laser (FEL) is measured at different stages of amplification up to saturation with a Hartmann wavefront sensor. We show that the fundamental radiation at 61.5 nm tends towards a single-mode behavior as getting closer to saturation. The measurements are found in good agreement with simulations and theory. A near diffraction limited wavefront was measured. The analysis of Fresnel diffraction through the Hartmann wavefront sensor hole array also provides some further insight for the evaluation of the FEL transverse coherence, of high importance for various applications.

  18. Spectral encoding method for measuring the relative arrival time between x-ray/optical pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bionta, M. R., E-mail: mina.bionta@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse (France); The Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Hartmann, N. [The Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstr. 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Weaver, M.; French, D.; Glownia, J. M.; Bostedt, C.; Chollet, M.; Ding, Y.; Fritz, D. M.; Fry, A. R.; Krzywinski, J.; Lemke, H. T.; Messerschmidt, M.; Schorb, S.; Zhu, D.; White, W. E. [The Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Nicholson, D. J. [The Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Cryan, J. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Baker, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kane, D. J. [Mesa Photonics, LLC., 1550 Pacheco St., Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 (United States); and others

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of few femtosecond x-ray light sources brings promise of x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments that can measure chemical and structural changes in the 10–100 fs time regime. Widely distributed timing systems used at x-ray Free-Electron Laser facilities are typically limited to above 50 fs fwhm jitter in active x-ray/optical synchronization. The approach of single-shot timing measurements is used to sort results in the event processing stage. This has seen wide use to accommodate the insufficient precision of active stabilization schemes. In this article, we review the current technique for “measure-and-sort” at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The relative arrival time between an x-ray pulse and an optical pulse is measured near the experimental interaction region as a spectrally encoded cross-correlation signal. The cross-correlation provides a time-stamp for filter-and-sort algorithms used for real-time sorting. Sub-10 fs rms resolution is common in this technique, placing timing precision at the same scale as the duration of the shortest achievable x-ray pulses.

  19. Optimized Kalpha x-ray flashes from femtosecond-laser-irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, W.; Nicoul, M.; Shymanovich, U.; Tarasevitch, A.; Zhou, P.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Linde, D. von der; Masek, M.; Gibbon, P.; Teubner, U. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Fachbereich Technik, Abt. Naturwiss. Technik, Bereich Photonik, Fachhochschule Oldenburg/Ostfriesland/Wilhelmshaven, University of Applied Sciences, Constantiaplatz 4, 26723 Emden (Germany) and Institut fuer Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg, 26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the generation of ultrashort Kalpha pulses from plasmas produced by intense femtosecond p-polarized laser pulses on Copper and Titanium targets. Particular attention is given to the interplay between the angle of incidence of the laser beam on the target and a controlled prepulse. It is observed experimentally that the Kalpha yield can be optimized for correspondingly different prepulse and plasma scale-length conditions. For steep electron-density gradients, maximum yields can be achieved at larger angles. For somewhat expanded plasmas expected in the case of laser pulses with a relatively poor contrast, the Kalpha yield can be enhanced by using a near-normal-incidence geometry. For a certain scale-length range (between 0.1 and 1 times a laser wavelength) the optimized yield is scale-length independent. Physically this situation arises because of the strong dependence of collisionless absorption mechanisms - in particular resonance absorption - on the angle of incidence and the plasma scale length, giving scope to optimize absorption and hence the Kalpha yield. This qualitative description is supported by calculations based on the classical resonance absorption mechanism and by particle-in-cell simulations. Finally, the latter simulations also show that even for initially steep gradients, a rapid profile expansion occurs at oblique angles in which ions are pulled back toward the laser by hot electrons circulating at the front of the target. The corresponding enhancement in Kalpha yield under these conditions seen in the present experiment represents strong evidence for this suprathermal shelf formation effect.

  20. Efficient laser-induced 6-8 keV x-ray production from iron oxide aerogel and foil-lined cavity targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, F.; Kay, J. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Kane, J.; May, M.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J.; Gammon, S.; Satcher, J. H. Jr.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Villette, B.; Girard, F.; Reverdin, C. [CEA DAM DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Sorce, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); University of Rochester - Laboratory for Laser Energetics, 250 E. River Rd, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Jaquez, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of new iron-based laser-driven x-ray sources has been tested at the OMEGA laser facility for production of x rays in the 6.5-8.5 keV range. Two types of targets were experimentally investigated: low-density iron oxide aerogels (density 6-16 mg/cm{sup 3}) and stainless steel foil-lined cavity targets (steel thickness 1-5 {mu}m). The targets were irradiated by 40 beams of the OMEGA laser (500 J/beam, 1 ns pulse, wavelength 351 nm). All targets showed good coupling with the laser, with <5% of the incident laser light backscattered by the resulting plasma in all cases (typically <2.5%). The aerogel targets produced T{sub e}=2 to 3 keV, n{sub e}=0.12-0.2 critical density plasmas yielding a 40%-60% laser-to-x-ray total conversion efficiency (CE) (1.2%-3% in the Fe K-shell range). The foil cavity targets produced T{sub e}{approx} 2 keV, n{sub e}{approx} 0.15 critical density plasmas yielding a 60%-75% conversion efficiency (1.6%-2.2% in the Fe K-shell range). Time-resolved images illustrate that the volumetric heating of low-density aerogels allow them to emit a higher K-shell x-ray yield even though they contain fewer Fe atoms. However, their challenging fabrication process leads to a larger shot-to-shot variation than cavity targets.

  1. Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Neil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceElectron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facil- ity

  2. Study of strain propagation in laser irradiated silicon crystal by time-resolved diffraction of K-{alpha} x-ray probe of different photon energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, V.; Bagchi, S.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D. [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Gupta, M.; Gupta, A.; Chaddah, P. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Indore 452 001 (India)

    2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study on the time resolved x-ray diffraction from laser shocked silicon crystal, carried out using a 10 TW Ti:sapphire laser system, is presented. The characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-ray line radiation generated by 45 fs laser produced plasmas of two different target materials (iron and copper) is used as the probe, whereas the stretched pulse of sub-nanosecond duration (pump), derived from the same laser, is used to compress the sample. The use of x-ray probe of different photon energies yields information about the strain over a greater crystal depth. The dynamics of the strain propagation is inferred by monitoring the evolution of rocking curve width of the shocked sample at different time delays between the pump and the probe pulse. The shock velocity deduced from these measurements is {approx}10{sup 6} cm/s, consistent with the sound velocity in bulk silicon. The maximum elastic compression observed is 0.4%, indicating a pressure of 0.8 GPa.

  3. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibi, M., E-mail: habibi.physics@gmail.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Shirvan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Shirvan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghamari, F. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Khorramabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Khorramabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam.

  4. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  5. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  6. Low-energy x-ray and electron physics and applications to diagnostics development for laser-produced plasma research. Final report, April 30, 1980-April 29, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henke, B.L.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes a collaborative extension of an ongoing research program in low-energy x-ray and electron physics into particular areas of immediate need for the diagnostics of plasmas as involved in laser-produced fusion research. It has been for the continued support for one year of a post-doctoral research associate and for three student research assistants who have been applied to the following specific efforts: (1) the continuation of our research on the absolute characterization of x-ray photocathode systems for the 0.1 to 10 keV photon energy region. The research results were applied collaboratively to the design, construction and calibration of photocathodes for time-resolved detection with the XRD and the streak and framing cameras; (2) the design, construction and absolute calibration of optimized, bolt-on spectrographs for the absolute measurement of laser-produced plasma spectra.

  7. High K-alpha X-ray Conversion Efficiency From Extended Source Gas Jet Targets Irradiated by Ultra Short Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N L; Constantin, C; Collette, A; Dewald, E; Froula, D; Glenzer, S H; Kritcher, A; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Niemann, C

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute laser conversion efficiency to K{sub {alpha}}-like inner shell x-rays (integrated from K{sub {alpha}} to K{sub {beta}}) is observed to be an order of magnitude higher in argon gas jets than in solid targets due to enhanced emission from higher ionization stages following ultra short pulse laser irradiation. Excluding the higher ionization stages, the conversion efficiency to near-cold K{sub {alpha}} is the same in gas jets as in solid targets. These results demonstrate that gas jet targets are bright, high conversion efficiency, high repetition rate, debris-free multi-keV x-ray sources for spectrally resolved scattering and backlighting of rapidly evolving dense matter.

  8. Architecture and Bloch-Maxwell modelling of multi-mJ 100 fs fully-coherent soft X-ray laser based on X-ray CPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeitoun, Ph.; Oliva, E.; Fajardo, M.; Cheriaux, G.; Le, T. T. T.; Li, L.; Pitman, M.; Ros, D.; Sebban, S.; Velarde, P. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-PariesTech, CNRS, Ecole Poluytehcnique-PariesTech, chemin d ela huniere, Palaiseau (France); Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-PariesTech, CNRS, Ecole Poluytehcnique-PariesTech, chemin d ela huniere, Palaiseau (France); GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-PariesTech, CNRS, Ecole Poluytehcnique-PariesTech, chemin d ela huniere, Palaiseau (France); CLUPS, EA4127, Bat 106, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-PariesTech, CNRS, Ecole Poluytehcnique-PariesTech, chemin d ela huniere, Palaiseau (France); Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    By seeding amplifying plasmas pumped with the so-called Transient collisionnal excitation scheme, the amplified pulse seems to be limited to an energy of several 10's of {mu}J. Aiming to attain several mJ, we study the seeding of plasma pumped by long laser pulse. Thanks to our time-dependent Maxwell-Bloch code, we demonstrate that direct seeding with femtosecond pulse is inefficient. We also study the amplification of pulse train with the drawback of re-synchronizing the pulses. We proposed and studied the amplification of high harmonic seed stretched by a grating pair, amplified finally compressed. We consider off-axis diffraction on the gratings for maximizing their efficiency. Considering the phase deformation induced by the amplification and the spectral narrowing the final pulse is 230 fs in duration and 5 mJ.

  9. 2011 X-Ray Science Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Colby, College. Waterville, ME)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Stephenson

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 Gordon Research Conference on X-ray Science will feature forefront x-ray-based science enabled by the rapid improvements in synchrotron and x-ray laser sources. Across the world, x-ray sources are playing an increasingly important role in physics, materials, chemistry, and biology, expanding into ever broadening areas of science and engineering. With the first hard x-ray free electron laser source beginning operation and with other advanced x-ray sources operational and planned, it is a very exciting and pivotal time for exchange ideas about the future of x-ray science and applications. The Conference will provide the forum for this interaction. An international cast of speakers will illuminate sessions on ultrafast science, coherence, imaging, in situ studies, extreme conditions, new developments in optics, sources, and detectors, inelastic scattering, nanoscience, life science, and energy sciences. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of these areas, and will provide a venue for young scientists entering a career in x-ray research to present their research in poster format, hold discussions in a friendly setting, and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Some poster presenters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with ample time for discussion as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, will provide an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to exchange ideas about forefront x-ray techniques and will promote cross-fertilization between the various research areas represented.

  10. Amplified short-wavelength light scattered by relativistic electrons in the laser-induced optical lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andriyash, I A; Malka, V; d'Humières, E; Balcou, Ph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scheme of the XUV/X-ray free electron laser based on the optical undulator created by two overlapped transverse laser beams is analyzed. A kinetic theoretical description and an ad hoc numerical model are developed to account for the finite energy spread, angular divergence and the spectral properties of the electron beam in the optical lattice. The theoretical findings are compared to the results of the one- and three-dimensional numerical modeling with the spectral free electron laser code PLARES.

  11. VOLUME 82, NUMBER 13 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 29 MARCH 1999 Ginzburg-Landau Model and Single-Mode Operation of a Free-Electron Laser Oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    and Single-Mode Operation of a Free-Electron Laser Oscillator C. S. Ng and A. Bhattacharjee Department) It is shown that the radiation field in a long-pulse, low-gain free-electron laser oscillator obeys-9007(99)08757-8] PACS numbers: 41.60.Cr, 42.65.Tg, 52.35.Mw In a free-electron laser (FEL) oscillator, the intensity

  12. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  13. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  14. Recoil-Ion Momentum Distributions for Two-Photon Double Ionization of He and Ne by 44 eV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, A.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L.; Havermeier, T.; Smolarski, M.; Schoessler, S.; Cole, K.; Schoeffler, M.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Kurka, M.; Ergler, Th.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Jiang, Y. H.; Voitkiv, A.; Najjari, B.; Luedemann, S.; Schroeter, C. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kheifets, A. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Duesterer, S. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recoil-ion momentum distributions for two-photon double ionization of He and Ne (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}=44 eV) have been recorded with a reaction microscope at FLASH (the free-electron laser at Hamburg) at an intensity of {approx}1x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} exploring the dynamics of the two fundamental two-photon-two-electron reaction pathways, namely, sequential and direct (or nonsequential) absorption of the photons. We find strong differences in the recoil-ion momentum patterns for the two mechanisms pointing to the significantly different two-electron emission dynamics and thus provide serious constraints for theoretical models.

  15. Instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi; Mehrabi, Narges [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersion relation of a two-stream free-electron laser (TSFEL) with a one-dimensional helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field is studied. Also, all relativistic effects on the space-charge wave and radiation are considered. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to find the unstable interaction among the all wave modes. Numerical calculations show that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream FEL. The effect of the velocity difference of the two electron beams on the two-stream instability and the FEL resonance is investigated. The maximum growth rate of FEL resonance is investigated numerically as a function of the axial magnetic field.

  16. Design of a superconducting linear accelerator for an Infrared Free Electron Laser of the proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory at LBL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Byrns, R.; Donahue, R.; Edighoffer, J.; Gough, R.; Hoyer, E.; Kim, K.J.; Leemans, W.; Staples, J.; Taylor, B.; Xie, M.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator complex has recently been designed at LBL as part of an Infrared Free Electron Laser facility in support of a proposed Chemical Dynamics Research Laboratory. We will outline the choice of parameters and design philosophy, which are strongly driven by the demand of reliable and spectrally stable operation of the FEL for very special scientific experiments. The design is based on a 500 MHz recirculating superconducting electron linac with highest energy reach of about 60 MeV. The accelerator is injected with beams prepared by a specially designed gun-buncher system and incorporates a near-isochronous and achromatic recirculation line tunable over a wide range of beam energies. The stability issues considered to arrive at the specific design will be outlined.

  17. Experimental Verification of the Chemical Sensitivity of Two-Site Double Core-Hole States Formed by an X-ray FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salen, P; Schmidt, H T; Thomas, R D; Larsson, M; Feifel, R; Piancastelli, M N; Fang, L; Murphy, B; Osipov, T; Berrah, N; Kukk, E; Ueda, K; Bozek, J D; Bostedt, C; Wada, S; Richter, R; Feyer, V; Prince, K C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed X-ray two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (XTPPS) using the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) in order to study double core-hole (DCH) states of CO2, N2O and N2. The experiment verifies the theory behind the chemical sensitivity of two-site (ts) DCH states by comparing a set of small molecules with respect to the energy shift of the tsDCH state and by extracting the relevant parameters from this shift.

  18. Morphology, microstructure, stress and damage properties of thin film coatings for the LCLS x-ray mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Baker, S L; Robinson, J C; Gullikson, E M; McCarville, T J; Pivovaroff, M J; Stefan, P; Hau-Riege, S P; Bionta, R

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and properties of reflective coatings for the x-ray offset mirror systems of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron laser (FEL) are discussed in this manuscript. The uniquely high instantaneous dose of the LCLS FEL beam translates to strict limits in terms of materials choice, thus leading to an x-ray mirror design consisting of a reflective coating deposited on a silicon substrate. Coherent wavefront preservation requirements for these mirrors result in stringent surface figure and finish specifications. DC-magnetron sputtered B{sub 4}C and SiC thin film coatings with optimized stress, roughness and figure properties for the LCLS x-ray mirrors are presented. The evolution of microstructure, morphology, and stress of these thin films versus deposition conditions is discussed. Experimental results on the performance of these coatings with respect to FEL damage are also presented.

  19. Soft X-ray laser using pumping of 3P and 4P levels of He-like and H-like ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray laser method and apparatus are disclosed for producing coherent radiation at, for example, energies of at least 40 eV, using Be-like Cr, N-like Ni, He-like Na, B-like Cr, Be-like Mn or similar multiply ionized species to pump appropriate high energy transitions in He-like or H-like N, O, F, C or rare gases, with associated laser transition gains of 4-50 cm[sup [minus]1]. 8 figs.

  20. Soft x-ray laser using pumping of 3P and 4P levels of He-like and H-like ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.

    1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray laser method and apparatus for producing coherent radiation at, for example, energies of 40 to 189 eV, using Be-like Cr, N-like Ni, He-like Na, B-like Cr, Be-like Mn or similar multiply ionized species to pump appropriate high energy transitions in He-like or H-like rare gases or N, O, F, or C gases, with associated laser transition gains of 20 to 50 cm/sup -1/.

  1. Transverse Coherence of the LCLS X-Ray Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-amplifying spontaneous radiation free-electron lasers, such as the LCLS or the European X-FEL, rely on the incoherent, spontaneous radiation as the seed for the amplifying process. Though this method overcomes the need for an external seed source one drawback is the incoherence of the effective seed signal. The FEL process allows for a natural growth of the coherence because the radiation phase information is spread out within the bunch due to slippage and diffraction of the radiation field. However, at short wavelengths this spreading is not sufficient to achieve complete coherence. In this presentation we report on the results of numerical simulations of the LCLS X-ray FEL. From the obtained radiation field distribution the coherence properties are extracted to help to characterize the FEL as a light source.

  2. Combining THz laser excitation with resonant soft X-ray scattering at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Joshua J.; Dakovski, Georgi L.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Hwang, Harold Y.; Zarem, Alex; Schlotter, William F.; Moeller, Stefan; Minitti, Michael P.; Staub, Urs; Johnson, Steven; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of new instrumentation at the Linac Coherent Light Source for conducting THz excitation experiments in an ultra high vacuum environment probed by soft X-ray diffraction. This consists of a cantilevered, fully motorized mirror system which can provide 600 kV cm?¹ electric field strengths across the sample and an X-ray detector that can span the full Ewald sphere with in-vacuum motion. The scientific applications motivated by this development, the details of the instrument, and spectra demonstrating the field strengths achieved using this newly developed system are discussed.

  3. X-rays only when you want them: Report on Pseudo-single-bunch...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speaker: David Robin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Program Description Laser pump - x-ray probe experiments require control over the x-ray pulse pattern and timing. Such...

  4. IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 27, NO. 12. DECEMBER 1991 2691 Applications of Infrared Free-Electron Lasers: Basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    IEEE JOURNAL OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 27, NO. 12. DECEMBER 1991 2691 Applications of Infrared. Fayer Invited Paper Abstract-Applications of tunable infrared (IR) picosecond (ps) pulses generated- heating are suggested. I. INTRODUCTION REE-ELECTRON lasers (FEL's) have developed Frapidly in the last 15

  5. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Balewski; J. Bernauer; W. Bertozzi; J. Bessuille; B. Buck; R. Cowan; K. Dow; C. Epstein; P. Fisher; S. Gilad; E. Ihloff; Y. Kahn; A. Kelleher; J. Kelsey; R. Milner; C. Moran; L. Ou; R. Russell; B. Schmookler; J. Thaler; C. Tschalär; C. Vidal; A. Winnebeck; S. Benson; C. Gould; G. Biallas; J. R. Boyce; J. Coleman; D. Douglas; R. Ent; P. Evtushenko; H. C. Fenker; J. Gubeli; F. Hannon; J. Huang; K. Jordan; R. Legg; M. Marchlik; W. Moore; G. Neil; M. Shinn; C. Tennant; R. Walker; G. Williams; S. Zhang; M. Freytsis; R. Fiorito; P. O'Shea; R. Alarcon; R. Dipert; G. Ovanesyan; T. Gunter; N. Kalantarians; M. Kohl; I. Albayrak; M. Carmignotto; T. Horn; D. S. Gunarathne; C. J. Martoff; D. L. Olvitt; B. Surrow; X. Lia; R. Beck; R. Schmitz; D. Walther; K. Brinkmann; H. Zaunig

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  6. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M., E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lu, Jian [Department of Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, Hui [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the L?{sub 1}- and L?{sub 2}-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus x-ray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.

  7. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balewski, Jan; Bernauer, J.; Bertozzi, William; Bessuille, Jason; Buck, B.; Cowan, Ray; Dow, K.; Epstein, C.; Fisher, Peter; Gilad, Shalev; Ihloff, Ernest; Kahn, Yonatan; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelsey, J.; Milner, Richard; Moran, C.; Ou, Longwu; Russell, R.; Schmookler, Barak; Thaler, J.; Tschalar, C.; Vidal, Christopher; Winnebeck, A.; Benson, Stephen [JLAB; Gould, Christopher [JLAB; Biallas, George [JLAB; Boyce, James [JLAB; Coleman, James [JLAB; Douglas, David [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fenker, Howard [JLAB; Gubeli, Joseph [JLAB; Hannon, Fay [JLAB; Huang, Jia [JLAB; Jordan, Kevin [JLAB; Legg, Robert [JLAB; Marchlik, Matthew [JLAB; Moore, Steven [JLAB; Neil, George [JLAB; Shinn, Michelle D [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher [JLAB; Walker, Richard [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Freytsis, M.; Fiorito, Ralph; O'Shea, P.; Alarcon, Ricardo; Dipert, R.; Ovanesyan, G.; Gunter, Thoth; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kohl, M.; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Gunarathne, D. S.; Martoff, C. J.; Olvitt, D. L.; Surrow, Bernd; Lia, X.; Beck, Reinhard; Schmitz, R.; Walther, D.; Brinkmann, K.; Zaunig, H.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  8. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  9. Comparison of natural and forced amplification regimes in plasma-based soft-x-ray lasers seeded by high-order harmonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliva, Eduardo; Zeitoun, Philippe; Lambert, Guillaume; Sebban, Stephane [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, ENSTA ParisTech, Ecole Polytechnique Paris Tech, CNRS, UMR 7639, F-91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Fajardo, Marta [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Ros, David [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et Plasmas, Universite Paris Sud 11, Orsay (France); Velarde, Pedro [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The amplification of high-order harmonics (HOH) in a plasma-based amplifier is a multiscale, temporal phenomenon that couples plasma hydrodynamics, atomic processes, and HOH electromagnetic fields. We use a one-dimensional, time-dependent Maxwell-Bloch code to compare the natural amplification regime and another regime where plasma polarization is constantly forced by the HOH. In this regime, a 10-MW (i.e., 100 times higher than current seeded soft x-ray laser power), 1.5-{mu}J, 140-fs pulse free from the parasitic temporal structures appearing on the natural amplification regime can be obtained.

  10. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

  11. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Jastrow, U.; Jurani?, P.; Kreis, S.; Gerken, N.; Richter, M.; Arp, U.; Feng, Y.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray opticalmore »elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.« less

  12. Availability Performance and Considerations for LCLS X-Ray FEL at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, W.B.; Brachmann, A.; Colocho, W.; Stanek, M.; Warren, J.; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) is an X-ray Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. LCLS has been in operation since spring 2009, and it has completed its 3rd user run. LCLS is the first in its class of X-ray FEL user facilities, and presents different availability challenges compared to storage ring light sources. This paper presents recent availability performance of the FEL as well as factors to consider when defining the operational availability figure of merit for user runs. During LCLS [1] user runs, an availability of 95% has been set as a goal. In run III, LCLS photon and electron beam systems achieved availabilities of 94.8% and 96.7%, respectively. The total availability goal can be distributed among subsystems to track performance and identify areas that need attention in order to maintain and improve hardware reliability and operational availability. Careful beam time accounting is needed to understand the distribution of down time. The LCLS complex includes multiple experimental hutches for X-ray science, and each user program has different requirements of a set of parameters that the FEL can be configured to deliver. Since each user may have different criteria for what is considered 'acceptable beam', the quality of the beam must be considered to determine the X-ray beam availability.

  13. High resolution x-ray lensless imaging by differential holographic encoding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, D.; Guizar-Sicairos, M.; Wu, B.; Scherz, A.; Acremann, Y.; Tylisczcak, T.; Fischer, P.; Friedenberger, N.; Ollefs, K.; Farle, M.; Fienup, J. R.; Stohr, J.

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers (X-FEL{sub s}) will soon offer femtosecond pulses of laterally coherent x-rays with sufficient intensity to record single-shot coherent scattering patterns for nanoscale imaging. Pulse trains created by splitand-delay techniques even open the door for cinematography on unprecedented nanometer length and femtosecond time scales. A key to real space ultrafast motion pictures is fast and reliable inversion of the recorded reciprocal space scattering patterns. Here we for the first time demonstrate in the x-ray regime the power of a novel technique for lensless high resolution imaging, previously suggested by Guizar-Sicairos and Fienup termed holography with extended reference by autocorrelation linear differential operation, HERALD0. We have achieved superior resolution over conventional x-ray Fourier transform holography (FTH) without sacrifices in SNR or significant increase in algorithmic complexity. By combining images obtained from individual sharp features on an extended reference, we further show that the resolution can be even extended beyond the reference fabrication limits. Direct comparison to iterative phase retrieval image reconstruction and images recorded with stateof- the-art zone plate microscopes is presented. Our results demonstrate the power of HERALDO as a favorable candidate for robust inversion of single-shot coherent scattering patterns.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy of buried layer foils irradiated with an ultra high intensity short pulse laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sophia Nan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hot dense matter in short-pulse laser-plasma interactionof hot dense matter in short-pulse laser-plasma interactiona better picture of short pulse laser produced plasmas can

  15. X-ray spectroscopy of buried layer foils irradiated with an ultra high intensity short pulse laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sophia Nan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing, while the latter, also known as then CPA technique, has been instrumental in pushing laser

  16. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short coherent X-ray radiation by controlling the fraction of the beam that can be properly unchirped using a few-cycle laser

  17. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolutiona)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bitter, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Efthimion, P. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA; Lu, Jian [Department of Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China; Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Chen, Hui [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging the L?1- and L?2-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus xray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.

  18. A new spectrometer design for the x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas with high (sub-ns) time resolutiona)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Efthimion, P. C.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Pablant, N.; Lu, Jian; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, Hui

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new type of x-ray crystal spectrometer, which can be used in combination with gated x-ray detectors to obtain spectra from laser-produced plasmas with a high (sub-ns) time resolution. The spectrometer consists of a convex, spherically bent crystal, which images individual spectral lines as perfectly straight lines across multiple, sequentially gated, strip detectors. Since the Bragg-reflected rays are divergent, the distance between detector and crystal is arbitrary, so that this distance can be appropriately chosen to optimize the experimental arrangement with respect to the detector parameters. The spectrometer concept was verified in proof-of-principle experiments by imaging themore »L?1- and L?2-lines of tungsten, at 9.6735 and 9.96150 keV, from a micro-focus xray tube with a tungsten target onto a two-dimensional pixilated Pilatus detector, using a convex, spherically bent Si-422 crystal with a radius of curvature of 500 mm.« less

  19. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  20. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Er, Ali Oguz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States); Tang, Jau, E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Research Center for Applied Sciences Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rentzepis, Peter M., E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267?nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ?, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

  1. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or “probe-pump-probe”) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F,more »in a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.« less

  2. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

  3. Elemental content of enamel and dentin after bleaching of teeth (a comparative study between laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imam, H. [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, NILES, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)] [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, NILES, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Ahmed, Doaa [Department of Restorative Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)] [Department of Restorative Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt); Eldakrouri, Ashraf [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, NILES, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt) [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, NILES, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Department of Optometry and Vision Science, College of Applied Medical Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The elemental content of the superficial and inner enamel as well as that of dentin was analyzed using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of bleached and unbleached tooth specimens. It is thus clear from the spectral analysis using both the LIBS and XPS technique that elemental changes (though insignificant within the scopes of this study) of variable intensities do occur on the surface of the enamel and extend deeper to reach dentin. The results of the LIBS revealed a slight reduction in the calcium levels in the bleached compared to the control specimens in all the different bleaching groups and in both enamel and dentin. The good correlation found between the LIBS and XPS results demonstrates the possibility of LIBS technique for detection of minor loss in calcium and phosphorus in enamel and dentin.

  4. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  5. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  6. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  7. Modeling of ns and ps laser-induced soft X-ray sources using nitrogen gas puff target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrba, P., E-mail: vrba@ipp.cas.cz [Institute of Plasma Physics, Academy of Sciences, Za Slovankou 3, Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vrbova, M. [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, CTU in Prague, Sitna 3105, Kladno 2 (Czech Republic); Zakharov, S. V. [EPPRA sas, Villebon/Yvette (France); Zakharov, V. S. [EPPRA sas, Villebon/Yvette (France); KIAM RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas puff laser plasma is studied as a source of water window radiation with 2.88?nm wavelength, corresponding to quantum transition 1s{sup 2} ? 1s2p of helium-like nitrogen ions. Spatial development of plasma induced by Nd:YAG laser beam is simulated by 2D Radiation-Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic code Z*. The results for nitrogen gas layer (0.72?mm thickness, 1?bar pressure) and two different laser pulses (600 mJ/7?ns and 525 mJ/170 ps), corresponding to the experiments done in Laser Laboratory Gottingen are presented.

  8. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  9. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  10. Laser-Free RF-Gun as a Combined Source of Thz and Ps-Sub-Ps X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agustsson, R. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Boucher, S. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Finn, O. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Hartzell, J. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Ruelas, M. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Smirnov, A.V. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Storms, S. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Ning, Z. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Murokh, A. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Campese, T. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Faillace, L. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Verma, A. [RadiaBeam Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (US); Kim, Y. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (US); Buaphad, P. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (US); Andrews, A. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); Berls, B. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); Eckman, C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); Folkman, K. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); Knowles-Swingle, A. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); O’Neill, C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); Smith, M. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Pocatello, ID (US); Grandsaert, T. [European Spalation Source, Lund (Sweden); van der Geer, B. [Pulsar Physics, Eindhoven (Netherlands); de Loos, M. [Pulsar Physics, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Berg, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Sereno, N.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Sun, Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Zholents, A.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent, mm-sub-mm-wave source driven by a RF electron gun is proposed for wide research applications as well as auxiliary inspection and screening, safe imaging, cancer diagnostics, surface defectoscopy, and enhanced time-domain spectroscopy. It allows generation of high peak and average THz-sub-THz radiation power provided by beam pre-bunching and chirping in the RF gun followed by microbunching in magnetic compressor, and resonant Cherenkov radiation of an essentially flat beam in a robust, ~inch-long, planar, mm-sub-mm gap structure. The proof-of-principle has been successfully demonstrated in Phase I on a 5 MeV beam of L-band thermionic injector of Idaho Accelerator Center. The system can also deliver an intense, ps-sub-ps bursts of low-to-moderate dose of relativistic electrons and X-ray radiation produced by the same beam required for pulsed radiolysis as well as to enhance screening efficiency, throughput and safety.

  11. Laser-Free RF-Gun as a Combined Source of Thz and Ps-Sub-Ps X-Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agustsson, R.; Boucher, S.; Finn, O.; Hartzell, J.; Ruelas, M.; Smirnov, A.V.; Storms, S.; Ning, Z.; Murokh, A.; Campese, T.; et al

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent, mm-sub-mm-wave source driven by a RF electron gun is proposed for wide research applications as well as auxiliary inspection and screening, safe imaging, cancer diagnostics, surface defectoscopy, and enhanced time-domain spectroscopy. It allows generation of high peak and average THz-sub-THz radiation power provided by beam pre-bunching and chirping in the RF gun followed by microbunching in magnetic compressor, and resonant Cherenkov radiation of an essentially flat beam in a robust, ~inch-long, planar, mm-sub-mm gap structure. The proof-of-principle has been successfully demonstrated in Phase I on a 5 MeV beam of L-band thermionic injector of Idaho Accelerator Center. Themore »system can also deliver an intense, ps-sub-ps bursts of low-to-moderate dose of relativistic electrons and X-ray radiation produced by the same beam required for pulsed radiolysis as well as to enhance screening efficiency, throughput and safety.« less

  12. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provided by UV pulses derived from an ultrafast laser. Dueultrafast dynamics using a single synchrotron x-ray pulse.

  13. X-ray spectroscopy of buried layer foils irradiated with an ultra high intensity short pulse laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sophia Nan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short Pulse Laser by Sophia Nan Chen Doctor of Philosophy inEngineering Physics) by Sophia Nan Chen Committee in charge:Tynan The dissertation of Sophia Nan Chen is approved, and

  14. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity.Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4), a semiconductor(gallium arsenide,GaAs), and a metal (gold,Au), obtained with ?100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  15. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; /SLAC; ,

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  16. Ultra-Short Electron Bunch and X-Ray Temporal Diagnostics with an X-Band Transverse Deflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC; Behrens, C.; /DESY

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of ultra-short electron bunches on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), generation of sub-ten femtosecond X-ray pulses is possible, and some efforts have been put into both ultra-short electron and X-ray beam diagnostics. Here we propose a single-shot method using a transverse rf deflector (X-band) after the undulator to reconstruct both the electron bunch and X-ray temporal profiles. Simulation studies show that about 1 fs (rms) time resolution may be achievable in the LCLS and is applicable to a wide range of FEL wavelengths and pulse lengths. The jitter, resolution and other related issues will be discussed. The successful operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), with its capability of generating free-electron laser (FEL) X-ray pulses from a few femtoseconds (fs) up to a few hundred fs, opens up vast opportunities for studying atoms and molecules on this unprecedented ultrashort time scale. However, tremendous challenges remain in the measurement and control of these ultrashort pulses with femtosecond precision, for both the electron beam (e-beam) and the X-ray pulses. For ultrashort e-beam bunch length measurements, a standard method has been established at LCLS using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) deflector, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as {approx} 10 fs rms. However, the e-beam with low charges of 20 pC at LCLS, which is expected to be less than 10 fs in duration, is too short to be measured using this transverse deflector. The measurement of the electron bunch length is helpful in estimating the FEL X-ray pulse duration. However, for a realistic beam, such as that with a Gaussian shape or even a spiky profile, the FEL amplification varies along the bunch due to peak current or emittance variation. This will cause differences between the temporal shape or duration of the electron bunch and the X-ray pulse. Initial experiments at LCLS have revealed that characterization of the X-ray pulse duration on a shot-by-shot basis is critical for the interpretation of the data. However, a reliable x-ray pulse temporal diagnostic tool is not available so far at the LCLS. We propose a novel method in this paper to characterize the FEL X-ray pulse duration and shape. A transverse rf deflector is used in conjunction with an e-beam energy spectrometer, located after the FEL undulator. By measuring the difference in the e-beam longitudinal phase space between FEL-on and FEL-off, we can obtain the time-resolved energy loss and energy spread induced from the FEL radiation, allowing the FEL X-ray temporal shape to be reconstructed.

  17. Observations of laser induced magnetization dynamics in Co/Pd multilayers with coherent x-ray scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,12 Using a 5.12 MHz repetition rate Ti:Sapphire laser phase locked to the revolution clock (1.28 MHz from a multi-domain ground state, the magnetization is uniformly reduced after excitation by an intense of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3670305] The magnetization of excited states define the operation processes

  18. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  19. High resolution soft x-ray spectroscopy of low Z K-shell emission from laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Magee, E W; Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Hansen, S B; Moon, S J; Brown, G V; Gu, M; Beiersdorfer, P; Purvis, M A

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A large radius, R = 44.3 m, High Resolution Grating Spectrometer (HRGS) with 2400 line/mm variable line spacing has been designed for laser-produced plasma experiments conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility. The instrument has been run with a low-noise, charge-coupled device detector to record high signal-to-noise spectra in the 10-50 {angstrom} wavelength range. The instrument can be run with a 10-20 {micro}m wide slit to achieve the best spectral resolving power, approaching 1000 and similar to crystal spectrometers at 12-20 {angstrom}, or in slitless operation with a small symmetrical emission source. We describe preliminary spectra emitted from various H-like and He-like low Z ion plasmas heated by 100-500 ps (FWHM), 527 nm wavelength laser pulses. This instrument can be developed as a useful spectroscopy platform relevant to laboratory-based astrophysics as well as high energy density plasma studies.

  20. Photonic laser-driven accelerator for GALAXIE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naranjo, B.; Ho, M.; Hoang, P.; Putterman, S.; Valloni, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B. [UCLA Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and development of an all-dielectric laser-driven accelerator to be used in the GALAXIE (GV-per-meter Acce Lerator And X-ray-source Integrated Experiment) project's compact free-electron laser. The approach of our working design is to construct eigenmodes, borrowing from the field of photonics, which yield the appropriate, highly demanding dynamics in a high-field, short wavelength accelerator. Topics discussed include transverse focusing, power coupling, bunching, and fabrication.