Sample records for x-ray fluorescence sxf

  1. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell...

  2. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  3. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Obsidian Artifacts from Shoofly Ruin, Central Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, M. Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-RAY FLUORESCENCE (XRF) ANALYSIS OF OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS FROM62:426-437. SOUTHWEST XRF PAPER Table 1. X-ray fluorescence

  4. Archaeometrical studies using X-ray fluorescence methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauna, Catalina; Constantinescu, B.; Constantin, F.; Bugoi, R.; Stan, D.; Vasilescu, A. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, 077125, Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental analysis contributes to authentication (knowing the elemental composition and considering the information about the usual composition of the objects in different historical periods it can be established if the item is original or fake), provenance studies (minor and trace elements indicates ores origin and 'consequently' mines location), (relative) dating of archaeological objects (e.g. for painted items--the chemical recipes for pigments can offer information about the age of objects). The paper gives a general layout for the NIPNE Archaeometry Laboratory's applications using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), micro--Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (micro-PIXE), micro-Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-Ray Fluorescence (micro--SR-XRF) methods.

  5. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew [XIA LLC

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many â?? you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability weâ??d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDDâ??s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detectorâ??s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

  6. AUTOMATED ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS USING ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) method for the elementalnon-destructive nature of XRF is especially important whereconcentrations are measured in the XRF spectrometer and the

  7. Feasibility of x ray fluorescence for spent fuel safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Corey Ross [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mozin, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, Julia M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stafford, Alissa [TAMU; Charlton, William [TAMU

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel is necessary for many reasons, in particular to verify that diversion or other illicit activities have not occurred. Therefore, safeguarding the world's nuclear fuel is paramount to responsible nuclear regulation and public acceptance, but achieving this goal presents many difficulties from both a technical and economic perspective. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of NA-24 is funding a large collaborative effort between multiple laboratories and universities to improve spent nuclear fuel safeguards methods and equipment. This effort involves the current work of modeling several different nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Several are being researched, because no single NDA technique, in isolation, has the potential to properly characterize fuel assemblies and offer a robust safeguards measure. The insights gained from this research, will be used to down-select from the original set a few of the most promising techniques that complement each other. The goal is to integrate the selected instruments to create an accurate measurement system for fuel verification that is also robust enough to detect diversions. These instruments will be fabricated and tested under realistic conditions. This work examines one of the NDA techniques; the feasibility of using x ray emission peaks from Pu and U to gather information about their relative quantities in the spent fuel. X Ray Fluorescence (XRF), is unique compared to the investigated techniques in that it is the only one able to give the elemental ratio of Pu to U, allowing the possibility of a Pu gram quantity for the assembly to be calculated. XRF also presents many challenges, mainly its low penetration, since the low energy x rays of interest are effectively shielded by the first few millimeters of a fuel pin. This paper will explore the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code calculations of spent fuel x ray peaks. The MCNPX simulations will be benchmarked against measurements taken at Oak Ridge. Analysis of the feasibility of XRFs role in spent nuclear fuel safeguards efforts, particularly in the context of the overall NGSI effort will be discussed.

  8. Advances in the Detection of As in Environmental Samples Using Low Energy X-ray Fluorescence in a Scanning Transmission X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    X-ray emission (PIXE),4 or energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry in scanning or transmission XAdvances in the Detection of As in Environmental Samples Using Low Energy X-ray Fluorescence at high spatial resolution is needed in many areas of geobiochemistry and environmental science. Scanning

  9. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the application of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to characterize materials related to deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of contaminated facilities. Two portable XRF instruments manufactured by TN Spectrace were used in a technology evaluation as part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) held at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The LSDP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Are (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate innovative technologies or technology applications potentially beneficial to the D and D of contaminated facilities. The portable XRF technology offers several potential benefits for rapid characterization of facility components and contaminants, including significant cost reduction, fast turnaround time,a nd virtually no secondary waste. Field work for the demonstration of the portable XRF technology was performed from August 28--September 3, 1996 and October 30--December 13, 1996.

  10. Accretion, fluorescent X-ray emission and flaring magnetic structures in YSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Favata

    2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I present some recent developments on high-energy phenomena in YSOs, concentrating on the new evidence for accretion-induced X-ray emission in YSOs, for Fe 6.4 keV fluorescent emission from the disks of YSOs and for very long magnetic structures responsible for intense X-ray flares, likely connecting the star and the circumstellar disk.

  11. X-ray ptychography, fluorescence microscopy combo sheds new light...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advance required the high brightness of the APS as an X-ray source and points the way to advances that can be expected as it is planned to be increased a hundredfold in the...

  12. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Havrilla, George J. (Los Alamos, NM); Mann, Grace (Hong Kong, HK)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  13. Confocal X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Microscopy: A New Technique for the Nondestructive Compositional Depth Profiling of Paintings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    #12;Confocal X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Microscopy: A New Technique for the Nondestructive tools such as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) [4,5,6,7] and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) [3,8,9] to address the problem of compositional depth profiling of paintings. One XRF method consists of deducing

  14. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying, E-mail: liu.ying.48r@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya [Kyoto Prefectural Technology Center for Small and Medium Enterprises, Chudojiminami machi, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z?>?11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  15. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu; Gamboa, E. J. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Streit, J. [Schafer Corporation, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-? x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  16. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Obsidian Artifacts from AZ AA:8:20 (ASM), Southeastern Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, M. Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minerologist 62:426-437. SOUTHWEST XRF PAPER Tabl;o:. X-:'~vX-RAY FLUORESCENCE (XRF) ANALYSIS OF OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS FROM

  17. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  18. Three-dimensional x-ray fluorescence mapping of a gold nanoparticle-loaded phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Wang, Ge [Biomedical Imaging Cluster and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Biomedical Imaging Cluster and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose : X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising technique with sufficient specificity and sensitivity for identifying and quantifying features in small samples containing high atomic number (Z) materials such as iodine, gadolinium, and gold. In this study, the feasibility of applying XRF to early breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is studied using a novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) x-ray fluorescence mapping (XFM) of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded objects in a physical phantom at the technical level. Methods : All the theoretical analysis and experiments are conducted under the condition of using x-ray pencil beam and a compactly integrated x-ray spectrometer. The penetrability of the fluorescence x-rays from GNPs is first investigated by adopting a combination of BR12 with 70 mm/50 mm in thickness on the excitation/emission path to mimic the possible position of tumor goldin vivo. Then, a physical phantom made of BR12 is designed to translate in 3D space with three precise linear stages and subsequently the step by step XFM scanning is performed. The experimental technique named as background subtraction is applied to isolate the gold fluorescence from each spectrum obtained by the spectrometer. Afterwards, the attenuations of both the incident primary x-ray beam with energies beyond the gold K-edge energy (80.725 keV) and the isolated gold K{sub ?} fluorescence x-rays (65.99 –69.80 keV) acquired after background subtraction are well calibrated, and finally the unattenuated K{sub ?} fluorescence counts are used to realize mapping reconstruction and to describe the linear relationship between gold fluorescence counts and corresponding concentration of gold solutions. Results : The penetration results show that the goldK{sub ?} fluorescence x-rays have sufficient penetrability for this phantom study, and the reconstructed mapping results indicate that both the spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs within the designed BR12 phantom can be well identified and quantified. Conclusions : Although the XFM method in this investigation is still studied at the technical level and is not yet practical for routinein vivo mapping tasks with GNPs, the current penetrability measurements and phantom study strongly suggest the feasibility to establish and develop a 3D XFM system.

  19. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  20. Hard X-rays and Fluorescent Iron Emission from the Embedded Infrared Cluster in NGC 2071

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen L. Skinner; Audrey E. Simmons; Marc Audard; Manuel Guedel

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first results of XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the infrared cluster lying near the NGC 2071 reflection nebula in the Orion B region. This cluster is of interest because it is one of the closest regions known to harbor embedded high-mass stars. We report the discovery of hard X-ray emission from the dense central NGC 2071-IR subgroup which contains at least three high-mass young stellar objects (NGC 2071 IRS-1, IRS-2, and IRS-3). A prominent X-ray source is detected within 1 arcsecond of the infrared source IRS-1, which is thought to drive a powerful bipolar molecular outflow. The X-ray spectrum of this source is quite unusual compared to the optically thin plasma spectra normally observed in young stellar objects (YSOs). The spectrum is characterized by a hard broad-band continuum plus an exceptionally broad emission line at approximately 6.4 keV from neutral or near-neutral iron. The fluorescent Fe line likely originates in cold material near the embedded star (i.e. a disk or envelope) that is irradiated by the hard heavily-absorbed X-ray source.

  1. Evaluation of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer for Zirconium-Thickness Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn Moore

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Evaluation Report provides details of preliminary testing/experiments performed using a handheld X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The analyzer will be utilized in upcoming fuel-foil-rolling optimization studies at the INL. The studies are being performed in support of DOE’s Office of Global Threat Reduction -- Reactor Conversion Subprogram. Details of the equipment used, operating parameters, and measurement results are provided in this report.

  2. A method of measuring gold nanoparticle concentrations by x-ray fluorescence for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Di; Li Yuhua; Wong, Molly D.; Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper reports a technique that enables the quantitative determination of the concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) through the accurate detection of their fluorescence radiation in the diagnostic x-ray spectrum. Methods: Experimentally, x-ray fluorescence spectra of 1.9 and 15 nm GNP solutions are measured using an x-ray spectrometer, individually and within chicken breast tissue samples. An optimal combination of excitation and emission filters is determined to segregate the fluorescence spectra at 66.99 and 68.80 keV from the background scattering. A roadmap method is developed that subtracts the scattered radiation (acquired before the insertion of GNP solutions) from the signal radiation acquired after the GNP solutions are inserted. Results: The methods effectively minimize the background scattering in the spectrum measurements, showing linear relationships between GNP solutions from 0.1% to 10% weight concentration and from 0.1% to 1.0% weight concentration inside a chicken breast tissue sample. Conclusions: The investigation demonstrated the potential of imaging gold nanoparticles quantitatively in vivo for in-tissue studies, but future studies will be needed to investigate the ability to apply this method to clinical applications.

  3. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  4. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  5. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometry Sensitivity Excitation Sources 12 16 Spectrometers and Detectors SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING Health Effects of Welding THE PORTABLE X ? RAY FLUORESCENCE SURVEY METER METHODOLOGY RESULTS DISCUSSION OF RESULTS CAELUS I QblS RECQvfvt... Appendix C Basic Principle of AAS VITA Page 65 66 67 68 76 84 V1 11 LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. Transitions giving x-radiation 2. Fluorescent yield 3. Interaction of x-rays with matter 4. Particle size effects on x-ray intensity. . . 15 5...

  6. Reverse engineering the ancient ceramic technology based on X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sciau, Philippe; Leon, Yoanna; Goudeau, Philippe; Fakra, Sirine C.; Webb, Sam; Mehta, Apurva

    2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analyses of ancient ceramic cross-sections aiming at deciphering the different firing protocols used for their production. Micro-focused XRF elemental mapping, Fe chemical mapping and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy were performed on pre-sigillata ceramics from southern Gaul, and terra Sigillata vessels from Italy and southern Gaul. Pieces from the different workshops and regions showed significant difference in the starting clay material, clay conditioning and kiln firing condition. By contrast, sherds from the same workshop exhibited more subtle differences and possible misfirings. Understanding the precise firing conditions and protocols would allow recreation of kilns for various productions. Furthermore, evolution and modification of kiln design would shed some light on how ancient potters devised solutions to diverse technological problems they encountered.

  7. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  8. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Obsidian Artifacts from the Grand Canal, Casa Buena, and Pueblo Grande Hohokam Sites, Central Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, M. Steven

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    62:426-437. SOUTHWEST XRF PAPER Table 1. X-ray fluorescencet. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE (XRF) ANALYSIS OF OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTSSt- Figure 1. Ternary plot of XRF net intensity ratios for

  9. A dosimetry study for a K-fluorescent x-ray system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Travis Newton

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spectra from a Si(Li) semi-conductor radiation detector. The spectrum for the copper target indicated a considerable amount of scattered radiation from thc target, as compared to that produced by the other targets. Lip thcrmoluminesccnt dosimeters (TLD... of ionizing radiation detectors. The photon response of many detectors varies with the incident photon energy, especially in the 10-100 keV energy region. The proper choice of K-fluorescent X-ray radiators enables one to make very accurate energy...

  10. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

  11. Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard test method for determination of uranium or gadolinium (or both) in gadolinium oxide-uranium oxide pellets or by X-ray fluorescence (XRF)

  12. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Obsidian Artifacts from the Spur Cross Ranch Site, AZ U:1:12 (ASU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, M. Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE (XRF) ANALYSIS OF OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS62:426-437. SOUTHWEST XRF PAPER C_' Table 1. INTEGRATED

  13. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degueldre, Claude, E-mail: claude.degueldre@psi.ch; Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O? lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg?¹) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (~0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am³? species within an [AmO?]¹³? coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix. - Graphical abstract: Americium LIII XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 ?m×300 ?m beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO? matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: • Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. • The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). • In the sample, the Am³? face an AmO?¹³?coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O? matrix. • The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix.

  14. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging and elemental mapping from biological samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Rao; M Swapna; R Cesareo; A Brunetti; T Akatsuka; T Yuasa; T Takeda; G Gigante

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study utilized the new hard X-ray microspectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS, BNL, USA, for elemental mapping. This facility provided the primary beam in a small spot of the order of {approx}10 {mu}m, for focussing. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, the synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescent intensities for Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ti and Cu were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The sample is scanned in a 'step-and-repeat' mode for fast elemental mapping measurements and generated elemental maps at 8, 10 and 12 keV, from a small animal shell (snail). The accumulated trace elements, from these biological samples, in small areas have been identified. Analysis of the small areas will be better suited to establish the physiology of metals in specific structures like small animal shell and the distribution of other elements.

  16. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  17. Uranium and plutonium solution assays by transmission-corrected x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, R W; Ruhter, W D; Rudenko, V; Sirontinin, A; Petrov, A A

    1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have refined and tested a previously developed x-ray fluorescence analysis technique for uranium and plutonium solutions that compensates for variations in the absorption of the exciting gamma rays and fluorescent x-rays. We use {sup 57}Co to efficiently excite the K lines of the elements, and a mixed {sup 57}Co plus {sup 153}Gd transmission source to correct for variations in absorption. The absorption correction is a unique feature of our technique. It is possible to accurately calibrate the system with a single solution standard. There does not need to be a close match in composition (i.e., absorption) between the standard(s) and solutions to be analyzed. Specially designed equipment incorporates a planar intrinsic germanium detector, excitation and transmission radioisotopes, and specimen holder. The apparatus can be inserted into a rubber glove of a glovebox, keeping the apparatus outside and the solutions inside the glovebox, thereby protecting the user and the equipment from possible contamination. An alternate design may be used in chemical reprocessing plants, providing continuous monitoring, by measuring the trans-actinides through stainless steel piping. This technique has been tested at the Bochvar Research Institute of Inorganic Materials in Moscow for possible use in the Russian complex of nuclear facilities. This is part of a cooperative program between laboratories in the United States and Russia to strengthen systems of nuclear materials protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A). A part of this program is to accurately measure and track inventories of materials, thus the need for good non-destructive analytical techniques such as the one described here.

  18. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Jacob N.; Miara, Lincoln J.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Woicik, Joseph C.; Basu, Soumendra N.; Ludwig, Karl F.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commonly, SOFCs are operated at high temperatures (above 800°C). At these temperatures expensive housing is needed to contain an operating stack as well as coatings to contain the oxidation of the metallic interconnects. Lowering the temperature of an operating device would allow for more conventional materials to be used, thus lowering overall cost. Understanding the surface chemical states of cations in the surface of the SOFC cathode is vital to designing a system that will perform well at lower temperatures. The samples studied were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM-20) was grown on YSZ and NGO (neodymium gallate). The films on YSZ have a fiber texture. LSM-20 on NGO is heteroepitaxial. Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF-6428) films were grown on LAO and YSZ with a GDC barrier layer. Total X-ray Reflection Fluorescence (TXRF) was used to depth profile the samples. In a typical experiment, the angle of the incident beam is varied though the critical angle. Below the critical angle, the x-ray decays as an evanescent wave and will only penetrate the top few nanometers. TXRF experiments done on LSM films have suggested strontium segregates to the surface and form strontium enriched nanoparticles (1). It should be pointed out that past studies have focused on 30% strontium A-site doping, but this project uses 20% strontium doped lanthanum manganite. XANES and EXAFS data were taken as a function of incoming angle to probe composition as a function of depth. XANES spectra can be difficult to analyze fully. For other materials density functional theory calculations compared to near edge measurements have been a good way to understand the 3d valence electrons (2).

  19. Investigation of measuring hazardous substances in printed circuit boards using the micro-focus X-ray fluorescence screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, M L; Fakhrtdinov, R; Grigoriev, M; Quan, B S; Le, Z C; Roshchupkin, D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Printed circuit boards (PCBs) are widely used in most electrical and electronic equipments or products. Hazardous substances such as Pb, Hg, Cd, etc, can be present in high concentrations in PCBs and the degradation and release of these substances poses a huge threat to humans and the environment. To investigation the chemical composition of PCBs in domestic market of China, a practical micro-focus X-ray fluorescence system is setup to make the elements analysis, especially for detecting hazardous substances. Collimator is adopted to focus the X-ray emitted from X-ray tube. BRUKER X-ray detector with proportional counter is used to detect the emitted fluorescence from the PCB samples. Both single layer PCB samples and double layers PCB samples made of epoxy glass fiber are purchased from the domestic market of China. Besides, a MC55 wireless communication module made by SIEMENS in Germany is used as the reference material. Experimental results from the fluorescence spectrums of the testing points of PCB sampl...

  20. Attenuation Correction of L-shell X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Liu; Bo, Ma; Qing, Xu; Lingtong, Yan; Li, Li; Songlin, Feng; Xiangqian, Feng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography(XFCT) is a prevalent experimental technique which is utilized to investigate the spatial distribution of elements in sample. The sensitivity of L-shell XFCT of some elements is lower than that of K-shell XFCT. However, the image reconstruction for this technique has much more problems than that of transmission tomography, one of which is self-absorption. In the present work, a novel strategy was developed to deal with such problems. But few researches are concerned on attenuation correction of L-shell XFCT that are essential to get accurate reconstructed image. We make use of the known quantities and the unknown elemental concentration of interest to express the unknown attenuation maps. And then the attenuation maps are added in the contribution value of the pixel in MLEM reconstruction method. Results indicate that the relative error is less than 14.1%, which is proved this method can correct L-shell XFCT very well.

  1. Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation and Its Effects on Elemental Distributions in Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Cells in X-Ray Fluorescence Microanalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Qiaoling; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Deng, Junjing; Mak, Rachel; Moonier, Nena; et al

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with xray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologicallymore »important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultravioletirradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results.« less

  2. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson,, K. K.; Sanders,, R. W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  3. anomalous x-ray fluorescence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  4. Reverse engineering the ancient ceramic technology based on X-ray fluorescence spectromicroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciau, Philippe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results of X-ray ?uorescence (XRF) microprobe analyses ofproduction. Micro-focused XRF elemental mapping, Fe chemicalas shown in Fig. 1. Micro-XRF and mXANES measurements were

  5. In-situ stoichiometry determination using x-ray fluorescence generated by reflection-high-energy-electron-diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenan, Cameron; Chandril, Sandeep; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Myers, T. H. [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge in the stoichiometric growth of complex oxide compounds is the control of the relative compositions of the constituent materials. A potential avenue for compositional analysis during growth is the use of x-ray fluorescence generated during reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements. Using this technique, relative compositions of Y and Mn in molecular beam epitaxy grown YMnO{sub 3} samples were studied. Comparing the results with Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy suggests that the technique has the potential for real-time analysis of elemental fluxes and stoichiometry control during sample growth.

  6. SU-E-I-67: X-Ray Fluorescence for Energy Response Calibration of a Photon Counting Detector: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Ziemer, B; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of energy calibration and energy response characterization of a photon counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was done to investigate the influence of various geometric components on the x-ray fluorescence measurement. Different materials, sizes, and detection angles were simulated using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package. Simulations were conducted using 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The fluorescence material was placed 300 mm away from both the x-ray source and the detector. For angular dependence measurement, the distance was decreased to 30 mm to reduce the simulation time. Compound materials, containing silver, barium, gadolinium, hafnium, and gold in cylindrical shape, were simulated. The object size varied from 5 to 100 mm in diameter. The angular dependence of fluorescence and scatter were simulated from 20° to 170° with an incremental step of 10° to optimize the fluorescence to scatter ratio. Furthermore, the angular dependence was also experimentally measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., MA) to validate the simulation results. Results: The detection angle between 120° to 160° resulted in more optimal x-ray fluorescence to scatter ratio. At a detection angle of 120°, the object size did not have a significant effect on the fluorescence to scatter ratio. The experimental results of fluorescence angular dependence are in good agreement with the simulation results. The K? and K? peaks of five materials could be identified. Conclusion: The simulation results show that the x-ray fluorescence procedure has the potential to be used for detector energy calibration and detector response characteristics by using the optimal system geometry.

  7. Development of scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope with spatial resolution of 30 nm using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Sano, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Yabashi, M.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K. [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a high-spatial-resolution scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope (SXFM) using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. As a result of two-dimensional focusing tests at BL29XUL of SPring-8, the full width at half maximum of the focused beam was achieved to be 50x30 nm{sup 2} (VxH) under the best focusing conditions. The measured beam profiles were in good agreement with simulated results. Moreover, beam size was controllable within the wide range of 30-1400 nm by changing the virtual source size, although photon flux and size were in a trade-off relationship. To demonstrate SXFM performance, a fine test chart fabricated using focused ion beam system was observed to determine the best spatial resolution. The element distribution inside a logo mark of SPring-8 in the test chart, which has a minimum linewidth of approximately 50-60 nm, was visualized with a spatial resolution better than 30 nm using the smallest focused x-ray beam.

  8. X-ray crystal structure and properties of Phanta, a weakly fluorescent photochromic GFP-like protein

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paul, Craig Don; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J.; Close, Devin W.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Prescott, Mark

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (?F, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (?F, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ?F, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants,more »whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution.« less

  9. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, via Marzolo 1, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Meneghini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze, via della Vasca Navale 84, Universita di Roma TRE, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  10. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for the elemental analysis of plutonium-bearing materials for the materials disposition program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voit, S.L.; Boerigter, S.T.; Rising, T.L.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) program will disposition about 50 MT of plutonium in the next century. Both of the alternative technologies for disposition, MOX Fuel and Immobilization require knowledge of the incoming composition to 1--5 wt%. Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) systems, a common elemental analysis technology with a variety of industrial applications and commercial vendors, can readily achieve this level of characterization. Since much of the excess plutonium will be packaged in a long-term storage container as part of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) program to stabilize plutonium-bearing materials, the characterization system must be implemented during the packaging process. The authors describe a preliminary design for the integration of the WDXRF system into the packaging system to be used at the Rocky Flats site. The Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (PuSPS), coupled with the WDXRF characterization system will provide MD with stabilized plutonium-bearing excess material that can be more readily fed to an immobilization facility. The overall added expense to the MD program of obtaining analytical information after materials have been packaged in long-term storage containers could far exceed the expense of implementing XRF analysis during the packaging process.

  11. X-ray fluorescence investigation of surface lead in the Pilot Plant Complex, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, K.L.; O`Neill, H.J.; Parks, J.E.; Rueda, J.F.; Schneider, J.F.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results and findings from a field measurement program undertaken in the Pilot Plant Complex (PPC) at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to address the potential contamination of the PPC structures with lead in paint. A portable x-ray fluorescence device was used to measure the lead loading at approximately 1,000 locations on painted surfaces in the PPC buildings. The device performed well, although external calibration was necessary for accurate results. The principal conclusion is that the amount of lead present in all the buildings examined presents no regulatory waste disposal problems. The analysis showed that the estimated lead concentration in the amount of rubble expected from each building is far below the regulatory limit, even assuming that all the lead present would be leached during the test procedure (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The level of confidence for this conclusion exceeds 95%. The frequency distributions of the data were markedly skewed; the most probable values were quite low, but significant tails were detected. Evidence for at least three different sub-populations of lead loading values was found, and no simple curve is adequate to describe the observed distributions.

  12. Characterization of the Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanoparticles Using X-ray Absorption and Emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaverka, A M

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Resolving open questions regarding transport in nanostructures can have a huge impact on a broad range of future technologies such as light harvesting for energy. Silicon has potential to be used in many of these applications. Understanding how the band edges of nanostructures move as a function of size, surface termination and assembly is of fundamental importance in understanding the transport properties of these materials. In this thesis work I have investigated the change in the electronic structure of silicon nanoparticle assemblies as the surface termination is changed. Nanoparticles are synthesized using a thermal evaporation technique and sizes are determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). By passivating the particles with molecules containing alcohol groups we are able to modify the size dependent band edge shifts. Both the valence and conduction bands are measured using synchrotron based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) techniques. Particles synthesized via recrystallization of amorphous silicon/SiO{sub 2} multilayers of thicknesses below 10 nm are also investigated using the synchrotron techniques. These samples also show quantum confinement effects but the electronic structure is different from those synthesized via evaporation methods. The total bandgap is determined for all samples measured. The origins of these differences in the electronic structures are discussed.

  13. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORE~ SURVEY METER FOR TIIE QUANTITATIVE DEPERMINATI(gq OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by MARY CATHERINE FEHRENBACHER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A%M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1984 MAJOR SUBJECI': INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE EVALUATION OF A PORTABLE X-RAY FLUORES~ SURVEY METER FOR THE QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATIGN OF TRACE METALS IN WELDING FIJvtES A THESIS by h...

  14. AugEX: AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY SPECTROMETER ON CHANDRAYAAN-2 ROVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bapat, Bhas

    for determining elemental composition which have a space heritage X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Particle-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) Expected Advantage: cover low Z elements with higher sensitivity than XRF or PIXE. ACHARYA-ray absorption or charged particle bombardment X-ray emission induced by X-ray absorption: XRF X-ray emission

  15. Dissimilar behavior of technetium and rhenium in borosilicate waste glass as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukens, Wayne W.; McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy with a relativeuncertainty of 4%. XRF analyses utilized an ARL 9400X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with XRF composition values

  16. Fluorescence-type Monochromatic X-ray Beam-position Monitor with High-spatial Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Phil S. [Experimental Facility Division, NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Siddons, D. Peter [Experimental Systems, NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a fluorescence-type monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high-spatial resolution for end-station experiments at the initial project beamlines of the NSLS-II. We designed a ring array of multi-segmented Si PIN-junction photodiodes to use as a position sensor. Further, we integrated a low-noise charge-preamplification HERMES4 ASIC chip into an electronic readout system for photon-counting application. A series of precision measurements to characterize electronically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise from the detector system is sufficiently low to meet our stringent requirements. Using a Gaussian beam, we parametrically modeled the optimum working distance to ensure the detector's best performance. Based upon the results from the parametric modeling, prototypes of the next versions of the X-BPM are being developed. In this paper, we describe the methodology for developing the new compact monochromatic X-ray BPM, including its instrumentation, detector modeling, and future plan.

  17. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xiquian [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pan, Huilin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Zhou, Yongning [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Northrup, Paul [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Bak, Seongmin [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, Mingzhao [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk University-Seoul, Department of Energy and Materials Engineering, (Republic of Korea); Qu, Deyang [Univ. of Massachusetts at Boston, Dept. of Chemistry, MA (United States); Liu, Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, Richland, WA (United States); Wu, Tianpin [Argonne National Laboratory, X-ray Science Division, Lemont, IL (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density Li–S batteries (2600 W h kg?¹) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during charge–discharge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 < x ? 8). It is reported that the long-chain polysulfides can be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called “shuttle effect” is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the Li–S batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some Li–S cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of Li–S batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in Li–S batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in Li–S cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in Li–S battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of Li–S batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the Li–S cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the Li–S reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding Li–S chemistry and designing effective strategies for Li–S batteries.

  18. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xiquian; Pan, Huilin; Zhou, Yongning; Northrup, Paul; Xiao, Jie; Bak, Seongmin; Liu, Mingzhao; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Qu, Deyang; Liu, Jun; et al

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density Li–S batteries (2600 W h kg?¹) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during charge–discharge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 more »be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called “shuttle effect” is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the Li–S batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some Li–S cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of Li–S batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in Li–S batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in Li–S cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in Li–S battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of Li–S batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the Li–S cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the Li–S reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding Li–S chemistry and designing effective strategies for Li–S batteries.« less

  19. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., qmax/qmin approx=lO0.

  20. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  1. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  2. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence analysis for non-destructive determination of In and Ga depth profiles in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorber films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streeck, C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany) [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Brunken, S.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Weber, A.; Schock, H.-W.; Mainz, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany)] [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Gerlach, M.; Hönicke, P.; Lubeck, J.; Pollakowski, B.; Unterumsberger, R.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr.2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Herzog, C.; Kanngießer, B. [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut für Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of highly efficient thin film solar cells involves band gap engineering by tuning their elemental composition with depth. Here we show that grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXRF) analysis using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and well-characterized instrumentation is suitable for a non-destructive and reference-free analysis of compositional depth profiles in thin films. Variation of the incidence angle provides quantitative access to the in-depth distribution of the elements, which are retrieved from measured fluorescence intensities by modeling parameterized gradients and fitting calculated to measured fluorescence intensities. Our results show that double Ga gradients in Cu(In{sub 1?x},Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} can be resolved by GIXRF.

  3. A detailed pore characterization in 2D and 3D by means of optical and fluorescence microscopy combined with high-resolution X-ray CT.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    combined with high-resolution X-ray CT. Research Unit: Sedimentary Geology and Engineering Geology Topic about oil reservoirs, aquifers, building stone weathering). In the past, the pore network was mainly/or laboratory work: Precise sampling of the geological material. Petrographical research with optical

  4. arXiv:astro-ph/0612563v119Dec2006 Hard X-rays and Fluorescent Iron Emission from the Embedded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guedel, Manuel

    results of XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the infrared cluster lying near the NGC 2071 reflection nebula winds. One of the closest regions known to contain young high-mass stars is the infrared cluster near (Anthony-Twarog 1982; Brown et al. 1994). Near-infrared observations by Lada et al. (1991) revealed more

  5. X-ray induced optical reflectivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Durbin, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The change in optical reflectivity induced by intense x-ray pulses can now be used to study ultrafast many body responses in solids in the femtosecond time domain. X-ray absorption creates photoelectrons and core level holes subsequently filled by Auger or fluorescence processes, and these excitations ultimately add conduction and valence band carriers that perturb optical reflectivity.Optical absorption associated with band filling and band gap narrowing is shown to explain the basic features found in recent measurements on an insulator (silicon nitride, Si3N4), a semiconductor(gallium arsenide,GaAs), and a metal (gold,Au), obtained with ?100 fs x-ray pulses at 500-2000 eV and probed with 800 nm laser pulses. In particular GaAs exhibits an abrupt drop in reflectivity, persisting only for a time comparable to the x-ray excitation pulse duration, consistent with prompt band gap narrowing.

  6. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  7. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination VI: Quantitative elemental analysis by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence nanoimaging of eight impact features in aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    -ray fluorescence nanoimaging of eight impact features in aerogel Alexandre S. SIMIONOVICI1* , Laurence LEMELLE2

  8. Abundance and Charge State of Implanted Solar Wind Transition Metals in Individual Apollo 16 and 17 Lunar Soil Plagioclase Grains Determined In Situ Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitts, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M. (NIU); (UofC)

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report (1) a new method for determining the relative abundances in situ of Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni in implanted solar wind in individual Apollo 16 and 17 lunar plagioclases via synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and (2) the charge states of these metals. By virture of its mass alone, the Sun provides a representative composition of the solar system and can be used as a background against which to gauge excesses or deficiencies of specific components. One way of sampling the Sun is by measuring solar wind implanted ions in lunar soil grains. Such measurements are valuable because of their long exposure ages which compliment shorter time scale collections, such as those obtained by the Genesis spacecraft. Kitts et al. sought to determine the isotopic composition of solar Cr by analyzing the solar wind implanted into plagioclase grains from Apollo 16 lunar soils. The isotopic composition of the solar wind bearing fraction was anomalous and did not match any other known Cr isotopic signature. This could only be explained by either (1) an enrichment in the solar wind of heavy Cr due to spallation in the solar atmosphere or (2) that the Earth and the various parent bodies of the meteorites are distinct from the Sun and must have formed from slightly different mixes of presolar materials. To help resolve this issue, we have developed a wholly independent method for determining the relative abundances of transition metals in the solar wind implanted in individual lunar soil grains. This method is based on in situ abundance measurements by microbeam x-ray fluorescence in both the implantation zone and bulk grains using the synchrotron x-ray microprobe at the Advanced Photon Source (GSECARS sector 13) at Argonne National Laboratory. Here, we report results for Apollo 16 and 17 plagioclase grains. Additionally, a micro-XANES technique was used to determine charge states of the implanted Cr, Mn, Fe and Ni.

  9. In situ synchrotron based x-ray techniques as monitoring tools for atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devloo-Casier, Kilian, E-mail: Kilian.DevlooCasier@Ugent.be; Detavernier, Christophe; Dendooven, Jolien [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ludwig, Karl F. [Physics Department, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a thin film deposition technique that has been studied with a variety of in situ techniques. By exploiting the high photon flux and energy tunability of synchrotron based x-rays, a variety of new in situ techniques become available. X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are reviewed as possible in situ techniques during ALD. All these techniques are especially sensitive to changes on the (sub-)nanometer scale, allowing a unique insight into different aspects of the ALD growth mechanisms.

  10. X-ray beam finder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  11. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-Ray Diagnostics X-Ray

  12. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  13. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  14. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  15. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  16. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  17. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H. (Berkeley, CA); Legros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Madden, Norm W. (Livermore, CA); Goulding, Fred (Lafayette, CA); Landis, Don (Pinole, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  18. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  19. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  20. Materials Chemistry and Physics 100 (2006) 3840 X-ray irradiation induced degradation of cellulose nitrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Abstract Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry was previously proposed to measure energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. For that method, a reference silver nitrate-ray energy is high enough to avoid total a

  1. The color of X-rays Spectral X-ray computed tomography using energy sensitive pixel detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schioppa, Enrico Junior

    Energy sensitive X-ray imaging detectors are produced by connecting a semiconductor sensor to a spectroscopic pixel readout chip. In this thesis, the applicability of such detectors to X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is studied. A prototype Medipix based silicon detector is calibrated using X-ray fluorescence. The charge transport properties of the sensor are characterized using a high energy beam of charged particles at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN). Monochromatic X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are used to determined the energy response function. These data are used to implement a physics-based CT projection operator that accounts for the transmission of the source spectrum through the sample and detector effects. Based on this projection operator, an iterative spectral CT reconstruction algorithm is developed by extending an Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) method. Subsequently, a maximum likelihood based algo...

  2. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  3. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  4. SMB, X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorption

  5. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  6. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  7. ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on...

  8. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  9. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  10. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

  11. APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed APS X-rays Reveal Picasso's Secret OCTOBER 15, 2012 Bookmark and Share X-rays reveal that Picasso's "Old Guitarist," at...

  12. Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridriksson, Joel Karl

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

  13. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Cheng-Jun, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zhang, Bangmin [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); Venkatesan, T. [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore) [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

  14. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  15. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  16. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  17. X-ray spectroscopy of low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juett, Adrienne Marie, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present high-resolution X-ray grating spectroscopy of neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) using instruments onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission (XMM-Newton). The first ...

  18. Extending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Jianwei "John"

    , the radiation damage. While the radiation damage problem can be mitigated somewhat by using cryogenic techniques resolution without serious radiation damage to the specimens. Although X-ray crystallography becomesExtending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray Microscopy Without X-ray Optics

  19. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast x-ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Byrd, J.M.; Schoenlein, R.; Zholents, A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  20. X-ray holography of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solem, J.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author reviews the reasons for x-ray imaging of biological specimens and the techniques presently being used for x-ray microscopy. The author points out the advantages of x-ray holography and the difficulties of obtaining the requisite coherence with conventional sources. The author discusses the problems of radiation damage and the remarkable fact that short pulse x-ray sources circumvent these problems and obtain high-resolution images of specimens in the living state. Finally, the author reviews some of the efforts underway to develop high-intensity coherent x-ray sources for the laboratory. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  2. Techniques for synchronization of X-Ray pulses to the pump laser in an ultrafast X-Ray facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corlett, J.N.; Doolittle, L.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wilcox, R.; Zholents, A.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronization of ultrafast x-ray pulses produced in theAccurate timing of ultrafast x-ray probe pulses emitted fromOF X-RAY PULSES TO THE PUMP LASER IN AN ULTRAFAST X-RAY

  3. Controlling X-rays With Light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glover, Ernie; Hertlein, Marcus; Southworth, Steve; Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Kanter, Elliot; Krassig, B.; Varma, H.; Rude, Bruce; Santra, Robin; Belkacem, Ali; Young, Linda

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafast x-ray science is an exciting frontier that promises the visualization of electronic, atomic and molecular dynamics on atomic time and length scales. A largelyunexplored area of ultrafast x-ray science is the use of light to control how x-rays interact with matter. In order to extend control concepts established for long wavelengthprobes to the x-ray regime, the optical control field must drive a coherent electronic response on a timescale comparable to femtosecond core-hole lifetimes. An intense field is required to achieve this rapid response. Here an intense optical control pulse isobserved to efficiently modulate photoelectric absorption for x-rays and to create an ultrafast transparency window. We demonstrate an application of x-ray transparencyrelevant to ultrafast x-ray sources: an all-photonic temporal cross-correlation measurement of a femtosecond x-ray pulse. The ability to control x-ray/matterinteractions with light will create new opportunities at current and next-generation x-ray light sources.

  4. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  5. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spielman, Rick B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  6. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  7. X-ray populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

  8. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); DiCicco, Darrell S. (Plainsboro, NJ); Hirschberg, Joseph G. (Coral Gables, FL); Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ); Sathre, Robert (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  9. Relativistic Effects on Reflection X-ray Spectra of AGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Khee-Gan; /University Coll. London; Fuerst, Steven V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Brandwardi-Raymond, Graziella; Wu, Kinwah; Crowley, Oliver; /University Coll. London

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the reflection component of the X-ray spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and shown that they can be significantly modified by the relativistic motion of the accretion flow and various gravitational effects of the central black hole. The absorption edges in the reflection spectra suffer severe energy shifts and smearing. The degree of distortion depends on the system parameters, and the dependence is stronger for some parameters such as the inner radius of the accretion disk and the disk viewing inclination angles. The relativistic effects are significant and are observable. Improper treatment of the reflection component of the X-ray continuum in spectral fittings will give rise to spurious line-like features, which will mimic the fluorescent emission lines and mask the relativistic signatures of the lines.

  10. X-ray spectroscopy of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, Miriam Ilana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I present work spanning a variety of topics relating to neutron star lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and utilize spectral information from X-ray observations to further our understanding of these sources. ...

  11. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  12. X-ray source populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensitive, high-resolution X-ray observations allow the study of populations of X-ray sources, in the luminosity range of Galactic X-ray binaries, in galaxies as distant as 20-30 Mpc. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, providing a direct probe of the evolved binary component of different stellar populations. The study of the X-ray populations of E and S0 galaxies has revamped the debate on the formation and evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and on the role of globular clusters in these processes. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar populations, the amount of sources in star forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Short-lived, luminous, high-mass binaries (HMXBs) dominate these young populations. The most luminous sources in these systems are the debated ULXs, which have been suggested to be ~100-1000 Msol black holes, but could alternatively include a number of binaries with stellar mass black holes. Very soft sources have also been discovered in many galaxies and their nature is currently being debated. Observations of the deep X-ray sky, and comparison with deep optical surveys, are providing the first evidence of the X-ray evolution of galaxies.

  13. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. (Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium)); Vis, R.D. (Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States)); Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Bowen, D.K. (Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  14. Comparison of synchrotron x-ray microanalysis with electron and proton microscopy for individual particle analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.H.; van Langevelde, F.; Adams, F.C. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium); Vis, R.D. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sutton, S.R.; Rivers, M.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bowen, D.K. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the evaluation of the use of synchrotron/radiation induced x-ray fluorescences ({mu}-SRXRF) as implemented at two existing X-ray microprobes for the analysis of individual particles. As representative environmental particulates, National Institutes of Science and Technology (NIST) K227, K309, K441 and K961 glass microspheres were analyzed using two types of X-ray micro probes: the white light microprobe at beamline X26A of the monochromatic (15 keV) X-ray microprobe at station 7.6 of the SRS. For reference, the particles were also analyzed with microanalytical techniques more commonly employed for individual particles analysis such as EPMA and micro-PIXE.

  15. Fat to Muscle Ratio Measurements with Dual Energy X Ray Absorbtiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, A; Broadbent, C; Zhong, J; Dilmanian, A; Zafonte, F; Zhong, Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  16. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, A.; Zhong, Z.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fatmore »to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.« less

  17. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  18. Earth X-ray albedo for cosmic X-ray background radiation in the 1--1000 keV band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Churazov; S. Sazonov; R. Sunyaev; M. Revnivtsev

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present calculations of the reflection of the cosmic X-ray background (CXB) by the Earth's atmosphere in the 1--1000 keV energy range. The calculations include Compton scattering and X-ray fluorescent emission and are based on a realistic chemical composition of the atmosphere. Such calculations are relevant for CXB studies using the Earth as an obscuring screen (as was recently done by INTEGRAL). The Earth's reflectivity is further compared with that of the Sun and the Moon -- the two other objects in the Solar system subtending a large solid angle on the sky, as needed for CXB studies.

  19. ASCA Discovery of Diffuse 6.4 keV Emission Near the Sgr C Complex: A New X-ray Reflection Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Murakami; K. Koyama; M. Tsujimoto; Y. Maeda; M. Sakano

    2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ASCA discovery of diffuse hard X-ray emission from the Sgr C complex with its peak in the vicinity of the molecular cloud core. The X-ray spectrum is characterized by a strong 6.4-keV line and large absorption. These properties suggest that Sgr C is a new X-ray reflection nebula which emits fluorescent and scattered X-rays via irradiation from an external X-ray source. We found no adequately bright source in the immediate Sgr C vicinity to fully account for the fluorescence. The irradiating source may be the Galactic nucleus Sgr A*, which was brighter in the past than it is now as is suggested from observations of the first X-ray reflection nebula Sgr B2.

  20. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for a Berea Sandstone: Resolution Effect. Using X-Ray Computed Tomography in Pore Structure Characterization for...

  1. Manipulating X-rays with Tiny Mirrors | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for controlling X-rays. MEMS, or microelectromechanical systems, allow shrinking the optics to the microscale creating ultrafast devices for reflecting X-rays at precise times...

  2. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    temperature ambient (plastic windows) 5 Radiography - Monochromatic x-rays - Absorption of x-rays by the fuel - Ensemble averaged (flux limited) - Room temperature ambient...

  3. Fuel Injection and Spray Research Using X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by ECN using several different techniques - Silicone molds (Valencia) - X-ray absorption tomography (CAT) - X-Ray phase contrast imaging (Argonne) - Microscopy (Sandia) ...

  4. Columbia University X-Ray Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University X-Ray Measurements of the Levitated Dipole Experiment J. L. Ellsworth, J. Kesner MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center D.T. Garnier, A.K. Hansen, M.E. Mauel Columbia University

  5. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field...

  6. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  7. X-ray grid-detector apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

  8. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  9. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

  10. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  11. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  12. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  13. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  14. X-ray-induced electronic structure change in CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gretarsson, H.; Kim, Young-June [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada); Kim, Jungho; Casa, D.; Gog, T. [CMC-XOR, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Choi, K. R. [l-PEM, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, S. W. [l-PEM, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); R-CEM and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of CuIr{sub 2}S{sub 4} is investigated using various bulk-sensitive x-ray spectroscopic methods near the Ir L{sub 3} edge: resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the partial fluorescence yield mode, and resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy. A strong RIXS signal (0.75 eV) resulting from a charge-density-wave gap opening is observed below the metal-insulator transition temperature of 230 K. The resultant modification of electronic structure is consistent with the density functional theory prediction. In the spin- and charge-dimer disordered phase induced by x-ray irradiation below 50 K, we find that a broad peak around 0.4 eV appears in the RIXS spectrum.

  15. Discovery of Extremely Embedded X-ray Sources in the R Coronae Australis Star Forming Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Hamaguchi; Michael F. Corcoran; Rob Petre; Nicholas E. White; Beate Stelzer; Ko Nedachi; Naoto Kobayashi; Alan T. Tokunaga

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    With the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories, we detected two extremely embedded X-ray sources in the R Corona Australis (R CrA) star forming core, near IRS 7. These sources, designated as XB and XA, have X-ray absorption columns of ~3e23 cm-2 equivalent to AV ~180 mag. They are associated with the VLA centimeter radio sources 10E and 10W, respectively. XA is the counterpart of the near-infrared source IRS 7, whereas XB has no K-band counterpart above 19.4 mag. This indicates that XB is younger than typical Class I protostars, probably a Class 0 protostar or in an intermediate phase between Class 0 and Class I. The X-ray luminosity of XB varied between 29X-ray brightness by a factor of two in 30 ksec during an XMM-Newton observation. The XMM-Newton spectra indicate emission from a hot plasma with kT ~3-4 keV and also show fluorescent emission from cold iron. Though the X-ray spectrum from XB is similar to flare spectra from Class I protostars in luminosity and temperature, the light curve does not resemble the lightcurves of magnetically generated X-ray flares because the variability timescale of XB is too long and because variations in X-ray count rate were not accompanied by variations in spectral hardness. The short-term variation of XB may be caused by the partial blocking of the X-ray plasma, while the month-long flux enhancement may be driven by mass accretion.

  16. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  17. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  18. Nonlinear X-ray Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Matthias; Chen, Jian; Ghimire, Shambhu; Shwartz, Sharon; Kozina, Michael; Jiang, Mason; Henighan, Thomas; Bray, Crystal; Ndabashimiye, Georges; Bucksbaum, P H; Feng, Yiping; Herrmann, Sven; Carini, Gabriella; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Kenney, Christopher; Guillet, Serge; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, Marvin; Moeller, Stefan; Hastings, Jerome B; Reis, David A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray scattering is a weak linear probe of matter. It is primarily sensitive to the position of electrons and their momentum distribution. Elastic X-ray scattering forms the basis of atomic structural determination while inelastic Compton scattering is often used as a spectroscopic probe of both single-particle excitations and collective modes. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are unique tools for studying matter on its natural time and length scales due to their bright and coherent ultrashort pulses. However, in the focus of an XFEL the assumption of a weak linear probe breaks down, and nonlinear light-matter interactions can become ubiquitous. The field can be sufficiently high that even non-resonant multiphoton interactions at hard X-rays wavelengths become relevant. Here we report the observation of one of the most fundamental nonlinear X-ray-matter interactions, the simultaneous Compton scattering of two identical photons producing a single photon at nearly twice the photon energy. We measure scattered...

  19. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

  20. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  1. Radiographic X-Ray Pulse Jitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitton, C. V., Good, D. E., Henderson, D. J., Hogge, K. W.

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources. Major components of the machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 60-ns. Each source has the following x-ray parameters: 1-mm-diameter spot size, 4-rad at 1 m, 50-ns full width half max. The x-ray pulse is measured with PIN diode detectors. The sources were developed to produce high resolution images on single-shot, high-value experiments. For this application it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. X-ray pulse jitter is a key metric for analysis of reproducibility. We will give measurements of x-ray jitter for each machine. It is expected that x-ray pulse jitter is predominantly due to PFL switch jitter, and therefore a correlation of the two will be discussed.

  2. Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer

    2001-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High amplitude, nearly coherent X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts were discovered with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in early 1996. Spectral and timing evidence strongly supports the conclusion that these oscillations are caused by rotational modulation of the burst emission and that they reveal the spin frequency of neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries, a long sought goal of X-ray astronomy. Studies carried out over the past year have led to the discovery of burst oscillations in four new sources, bringing to ten the number with confirmed burst oscillations. I review the status of our knowledge of these oscillations and indicate how they can be used to probe the physics of neutron stars. For a few burst oscillation sources it has been proposed that the strongest and most ubiquitous frequency is actually the first overtone of the spin frequency and hence that two nearly antipodal hot spots are present on the neutron star. This inference has important implications for both the physics of thermonuclear burning as well as the mass - radius relation for neutron stars, so its confirmation is crucial. I discuss recent attempts to confirm this hypothesis for 4U 1636-53, the source for which a signal at the putative fundamental (290 Hz) has been claimed.

  3. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    , Chicago, IL 60637, USA 3 Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source and School of Applied and EngineeringX-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336­342 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www to establish a breakthrough in high-resolution, simultaneous area mapping of multiple trace elements

  4. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high of these batteries for commercial use. The two primary obstacles are the solubility of long chain lithium

  5. X-Ray Data from the X-Ray Data Booklet Online

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thompson, Albert C.; Attwood, David T.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.; Robinson, Arthur L.; Underwood, James H.; Kim, Kwang-Je; Kirz, Janos; Lindau, Ingolf; Pianetta, Piero; Winick, Herman; Williams, Gwyn P.; Scofield, James H.

    The original X-Ray Data Booklet, published in 1985, became a classic reference source. The online version has been significantly revised and updated to reflect today's science. Hundreds of pages of authoritative data provide the x-ray properties of elements, information on synchrotron radiation, scattering processes, optics and detectors, and other related calculations, formulas, and data tables.

  6. BRUKER ADVANCED X-RAY SOLUTIONS TOTAL REFLECTION X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    digestion. Analysis and quantification In general all elements starting from Sodium up to Uranium (excl. Niobium, Molybde- num and Technetium) can be analyzed by the S2 PICOFOX (Figure 4.). TXRF analysis

  7. Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, J.; Lockwood, G.; Selph, M; Shope, S.; Wehlburg, J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bomb Detection Using Backscattered X-rays* Currently the most common method to determine the contents of a package suspected of containing an explosive device is to use transmission radiography. This technique requires that an x-ray source and film be placed on opposite sides of the package. This poses a problem if the pachge is placed so that only one side is accessible, such as against a wall. There is also a threat to persomel and property since exTlosive devices may be "booby trapped." We have developed a method to x-ray a paclage using backscattered x-rays. This procedure eliminates the use of film behind the target. All of the detection is done from the same side as the source. When an object is subjected to x-rays, some of them iare scattered back towards the source. The backscattenng of x-rays is propordoml to the atomic number (Z) of the material raised to the 4.1 power. This 24"' dependence allows us to easily distinguish between explosives, wires, timer, batteries, and other bomb components. Using transmission radiography-to image the contents of an unknown package poses some undesirable risks. The object must have an x-ray film placed on the side opposite the x-ray source; this cannot be done without moving the package if it has been placed firmly against a wall or pillar. Therefore it would be extremely usefid to be able to image the contents of a package from only one side, without ever having to disturb the package itself. where E is the energy of the incoming x-ray. The volume of x-rays absorbed is important because it is, of course, directly correlated to the intensity of x-mys that will be scattered. Most of the x-rays that scatter will do so in a genemlly forward direction; however, a small percentage do scatter in a backward direction. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the various fates of x-rays directed into an object. The package that was examined in this ex~enment was an attache case made of pressed fiberboardwith a vinyl covering. It was approxirmtely 36 cm wide by 51 cm long by 13 cm deep. The case was placed on an aluminum sheet under the x-ray source. Because of the laborato~ setup, the attache case was rastered in the y-coordinate direction, while the x-ray source mstered in the x-coordinate direction. However, for field use, the x-ray source would of course raster in both the x- and y-coordinate directions, while the object under interrogation would remain stationary and undisturbed. A mobile system for use by law enforcement agencies or bomb disposal squads needs to be portable and somewhat durable. A 300 kV x-ray source should be sufficient for the task requirements and can be mounted on a mobile system. A robotic carriage could be used to transport the x-ray source and the CCD camera to the proximity of the suspect package. The controlling and data analyzing elements of the system' could then be maintained at a &tie distance from the possible explosive. F@re 8 shows a diagram of a conceptual design of a possible system for this type of use. The use of backscattered x-rays for interrogation of packages that may contain explosive devices has been shown to be feasible inthelaboratory. Usinga 150kVx-ray source anddetectors consisting of plastic scintillating material, all bomb components including the wiring were detectable. However, at this time the process requires more time than is desirable for the situations in which it will most likely be needed. Further development of the technology using CCD cameras, rather than the plastic stint illator detectors, shows promise of leading to a much faster system, as well as one with better resolution. Mounting the x- ray source and the CCD camera on a robotic vehicle while keeping the controlling and analyzing components and the opemting personnel a safe distance away from the suspect package will allow such a package to be examined at low risk to human life.

  8. Frontiers in X-Ray Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linda Young

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The year 2010 marked the fiftieth anniversary of the optical laser and the first anniversary of the world's first hard x-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. This exciting, new accelerator-based source of x-rays provides peak brilliances roughly a billion times greater than currently available from synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne, and thus explores a qualitatively different parameter space. This talk will describe the first experiments at the LCLS aimed at understanding the nature of high intensity x-ray interactions, related applications in ultrafast imaging on the atomic scale and sketch nascent plans for the extension of both linac and storage-ring based photon sources.

  9. The X-ray/submillimetre link

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Almaini

    2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that most of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) is produced by a vast, hitherto undetected population of obscured AGN. Deep X-ray surveys with Chandra and XMM will soon test this hypothesis. Similarly, recent sub-mm surveys with SCUBA have revealed an analogous population of exceptionally luminous, dust-enshrouded {\\em star-forming} galaxies at high redshift. There is now growing evidence for an intimate link between these obscured populations. There are currently large uncertainties in the models, but several independent arguments lead to the conclusion that a significant fraction of the SCUBA sources ($10-30% $) will contain quasars. Recent observational studies of SCUBA survey sources appear to confirm these predictions, although the relative roles of AGN and star-forming activity in heating the dust are unclear. Forthcoming surveys combining X-ray and sub-mm observations will provide a very powerful tool for disentangling these processes.

  10. X-ray atlas of rheumatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dihlmann, W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This atlas comprises instructive X-rays of the various inflammatory rheumatic joint diseases in all stages at the extremities and the spinal column. In addition, the complex pattern of the wide range of arthroses, also known as degenerative rheumatic disease is included. Besides the instructive pointers to X-ray diagnosis, the book is also a guide to differential diagnosis. Hence, this book is actually an X-ray atlas of joint diseases in general. Selected Contents: Introduction: What Does ''Rheumatism'' Actually Mean./Radiographic Methodology in Rheumatic Diseases of the Locomotor System/The Mosaic of Arthritis/Adult Rheumatoid Arthritis/Seronegative Spondylarthritis/Classic Collagen Diseases/Enthesiopathies/Gout-Pseudogout

  11. Combined microstructure x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayers are man-made microstructures which vary in depth and are now of sufficient quality to be used as x-ray, soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet optics. Gratings are man-made in plane microstructures which have been used as optic elements for most of this century. Joining of these two optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical microstructures to form combined microstructure optical elements has the potential for greatly enhancing both the throughput and the resolution attainable in these spectral ranges. The characteristics of these new optic elements will be presented and compared to experiment with emphasis on the unique properties of these combined microstructures. These results reported are general in nature and not limited to the soft x-ray or extreme ultraviolet spectral domains and also apply to neutrons. 19 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. X-ray reflectivity and surface roughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ocko, B.M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the advent of high brightness synchrotron radiation sources there has been a phenomenal growth in the use of x-rays as a probe of surface structure. The technique of x-ray reflectivity is particularly relevant to electrochemists since it is capable of probing the structure normal to an electrode surface in situ. In this paper the theoretical framework for x-ray reflectivity is reviewed and the results from previous non-electrochemistry measurements are summarized. These measurements are from the liquid/air interface (CCl/sub 4/), the metal crystal vacuum interface (Au(100)), and from the liquid/solid interface(liquid crystal/silicon). 34 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Facilities and techniques for x-ray diagnostic calibration in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Wittmayer, F.J.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been a pioneer in the field of x-ray diagnostic calibration for more than 20 years. We have built steady state x-ray sources capable of supplying fluorescent lines of high spectral purity in the 100-eV to 100-keV energy range, and these sources have been used in the calibration of x-ray detectors, mirrors, crystals, filters, and film. This paper discusses our calibration philosophy and techniques, and describes some of our x-ray sources. Examples of actual calibration data are presented as well.

  14. Dynamical x-ray diffraction from an icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kycia, S.

    1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Primary extinction effects in diffraction from single grains of Al-Pd- Mn, and presumably many other FCI alloys, may be significant and should be corrected for prior to use of diffraction data in structural determinations. Probes based on dynamical diffraction effects, such as x-ray standing wave fluorescence, multiple beam interference, and x-ray transmission topographs, may now be used to study the bulk and surface structure of some quasicrystals. The observation of dynamical diffraction from icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn is a striking confirmation of the fact that quasicrystals can present a degree of structural perfection comparable to that found in the best periodic intermetallic crystals.

  15. X-ray absorption in GaGdN: A study of local structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Criado, G.; Sans, J. A.; Susini, J. [Experiments Division, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043-Grenoble (France); Sancho-Juan, O.; Cantarero, A. [Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, P.O. Box 22085, 46071-Valencia (Spain); Garro, N. [Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, P.O. Box 22085, 46071-Valencia (Spain); Fundacio General de la Universitat de Valencia, P.O. Box 22085, 46071-Valencia (Spain); Roever, M.; Mai, D.-D.; Bedoya-Pinto, A.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A. [IV. Physikalisches Institut and Virtual Institute of Spin Electronics (VISel), Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we report on the incorporation of dilute Gd amounts into GaN films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A combination of x-ray fluorescence with x-ray absorption spectroscopic techniques enabled us to examine not only the distribution of rare earth atoms in the GaN matrix but also the short-range structural order. Our results show Gd atoms in a trivalent state with tetrahedral coordination, thus substituting Ga in the wurtzite GaN structure.

  16. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Yong [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Wilder, Julie [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Hutt, Julie A. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Padilla, Mabel T. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM; Gott, Katherine M. [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  17. Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

  18. Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

    2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

  19. X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-Ray

  20. Bandpass x-ray diode and x-ray multiplier detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, C.L.

    1982-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An absorption-edge of an x-ray absorption filter and a quantum jump of a photocathode determine the bandpass characteristics of an x-ray diode detector. An anode, which collects the photoelectrons emitted by the photocathode, has enhanced amplification provided by photoelectron-multiplying means which include dynodes or a microchannel-plate electron-multiplier. Suppression of undesired high frequency response for a bandpass x-ray diode is provided by subtracting a signal representative of energies above the passband from a signal representative of the overall response of the bandpass diode.

  1. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  2. Femtosecond X-ray protein nanocrystallography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Fromme, Petra; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kirian, Richard A.; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Schulz, Joachim; DePonte, Daniel P.; Weierstall, Uwe; Doak, R. Bruce; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Martin, Andrew V.; Schlichting, Ilme; Lomb, Lukas; Coppola, Nicola; Shoeman, Robert L.; Epp, Sascha W.; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Foucar, Lutz; Kimmel, Nils; Weidenspointner, Georg; Holl, Peter; Liang, Mengning; Barthelmess, Miriam; Caleman, Carl; Boutet, Sebastien; Bogan, Michael J.; Krzywinski, Jacek; Bostedt, Christoph; Bajt, Sasa; Gumprecht, Lars; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Schmidt, Carlo; Homke, Andre; Reich, Christian; Pietschner, Daniel; Struder, Lothar; Hauser, Gunter; Gorke, Hubert; Ullrich, Joachim; Herrmann, Sven; Schaller, Gerhard; Schopper, Florian; Soltau, Heike; Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe; Messerschmidt, Marc; Bozek, John D.; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Frank, Matthias; Hampton, Christina Y.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Starodub, Dmitri; Williams, Garth J.; Hajdu, Janos; Timneanu, Nicusor; Seibert, M. Marvin; Andreasson, Jakob; Rocker, Andrea; Jonsson, Olof; Svenda, Martin; Stern, Stephan; Nass, Karol; Andritschke, Robert; Schroter, Claus-Dieter; Krasniqi, Faton; Bott, Mario; Schmidt, Kevin E.; Wang, Xiaoyu; Grotjohann, Ingo; Holton, James M.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Neutze, Richard; Marchesini, Stefano; Fromme, Raimund; Schorb, Sebastian; Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Andersson, Inger; Hirsemann, Helmut; Potdevin, Guillaume; Graafsma, Heinz; Nilsson, Bjorn; Spence, John C. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction ‘snapshots’ are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals (~200?nm to 2??m in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.

  3. Catalog of supersoft X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Greiner

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog comprises an up-to-date (December 1999) list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s), binary supersoft X-ray sources. This electronic version (including the accompannying Web-pages) supersedes the printed version of Greiner (1996).

  4. Rise time measurement for ultrafast X-ray pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Weber, Franz A. (Oakland, CA); Moon, Stephen J. (Tracy, CA)

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  5. Rise Time Measurement for Ultrafast X-Ray Pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celliers, Peter M.; Weber, Franz A.; Moon, Stephen J.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump-probe scheme measures the rise time of ultrafast x-ray pulses. Conventional high speed x-ray diagnostics (x-ray streak cameras, PIN diodes, diamond PCD devices) do not provide sufficient time resolution to resolve rise times of x-ray pulses on the order of 50 fs or less as they are being produced by modern fast x-ray sources. Here, we are describing a pump-probe technique that can be employed to measure events where detector resolution is insufficient to resolve the event. The scheme utilizes a diamond plate as an x-ray transducer and a p-polarized probe beam.

  6. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  7. X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.

    1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

  8. A novel instrument for quantitative nanoanalytics involving complementary X-ray methodologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubeck, J.; Beckhoff, B.; Fliegauf, R.; Holfelder, I.; Hoenicke, P.; Mueller, M.; Pollakowski, B.; Reinhardt, F.; Weser, J. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel ultra-high vacuum instrument for X-ray reflectometry and spectrometry-related techniques for nanoanalytics by means of synchrotron radiation has been constructed and commissioned. This versatile instrument was developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany's national metrology institute, and includes a 9-axis manipulator that allows for an independent alignment of the samples with respect to all degrees of freedom. In addition, a rotational and translational movement of several photodiodes as well as a translational movement of an aperture system in and out of the beam is provided. Thus, the new instrument enables various analytical techniques based on energy dispersive X-ray detectors such as reference-free X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), total-reflection XRF, grazing-incidence XRF in addition to optional X-ray reflectometry measurements or polarization-dependent X-ray absorption fine structure analyses. With this instrument samples having a size of up to 100 mm Multiplication-Sign 100 mm can be analyzed with respect to their mass deposition, elemental or spatial composition, or the species in order to probe surface contamination, layer composition and thickness, the depth profile of matrix elements or implants, the species of nanolayers, nanoparticles or buried interfaces as well as the molecular orientation of bonds. Selected applications of this advanced ultra-high vacuum instrument demonstrate both its flexibility and capability.

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of the supernova remnant RCW 86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Vink; Jelle Kaastra; Johan Bleeker

    1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of ASCA X-ray data of SNR RCW 86. There appears to be a remarkable spectral variation over the remnant, indicating temperatures varying from 0.8 keV to > 3 keV. We have fitted these spectra with non-equilibrium ionization models and found that all regions are best fitted by emission from a hot plasma underabundant in metals (<0.25 solar), but in some cases fluorescent emission indicates overabundances of Ar and Fe. The ionization stage of the metals appears to be far from equilibrium, at some spots as low as log(n_e t) 15.3 (SI units). We discuss the physical reality of the abundances and suggest an electron distribution with a supra-thermal tail to alleviate the strong depletion factors observed. We argue that RCW 86 is the result of a cavity explosion.

  10. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela); Angeli-Greaves, M. [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Apartado 90373 Caracas 1083A (Venezuela)

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments.

  11. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  12. X-RAY POINT-SOURCE POPULATIONS CONSTITUTING THE GALACTIC RIDGE X-RAY EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morihana, Kumiko [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)] [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Ebisawa, Ken [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)] [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Yoshida, Tessei, E-mail: morihana@crab.riken.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparently diffuse X-ray emission has been known to exist along the central quarter of the Galactic Plane since the beginning of X-ray astronomy; this is referred to as the Galactic Ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). Recent deep X-ray observations have shown that numerous X-ray point sources account for a large fraction of the GRXE in the hard band (2-8 keV). However, the nature of these sources is poorly understood. Using the deepest X-ray observations made in the Chandra bulge field, we present the result of a coherent photometric and spectroscopic analysis of individual X-ray point sources for the purpose of constraining their nature and deriving their fractional contributions to the hard-band continuum and Fe K line emission of the GRXE. Based on the X-ray color-color diagram, we divided the point sources into three groups: A (hard), B (soft and broad spectrum), and C (soft and peaked spectrum). The group A sources are further decomposed spectrally into thermal and non-thermal sources with different fractions in different flux ranges. From their X-ray properties, we speculate that the group A non-thermal sources are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf (WD) binaries such as magnetic and non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs), pre-CVs, and symbiotic stars, whereas the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flares and quiescence, respectively. In the log N-log S curve of the 2-8 keV band, the group A non-thermal sources are dominant above Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is gradually taken over by Galactic sources in the fainter flux ranges. The Fe K{alpha} emission is mostly from the group A thermal (WD binaries) and the group B (X-ray active stars) sources.

  13. Fundamental Parameters of Low Mass X-ray Binaries II: X-Ray Persistent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Casares; Phil Charles

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of fundamental parameters in X-ray luminous (persistent) X-ray binaries has been classically hampered by the large optical luminosity of the accretion disc. New methods, based on irradiation of the donor star and burst oscillations, provide the opportunity to derive dynamical information and mass constraints in many persistent systems for the first time. These techniques are here reviewed and the latest results presented.

  14. Soft x-ray capabilities for investigating the strongly correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray, aiming to understand their sciences for applying a new material. In particular, soft x-ray capabilities have been used to obtain microscopic-level understanding of the...

  15. Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dawn of x-ray nonlinear optics Wednesday, July 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: David Reis, PULSE Program Description X-ray free electron lasers...

  16. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  17. A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A World's Top-10 X-ray Crystal Structure October 7, 2014 Bookmark and Share Philip Coppens An x-ray crystal structure solved by Philip Coppens has been chosen as one of the world's...

  18. Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the soft x-ray range and down to 15 nm in the multi keV range. For use at x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources, diffractive optics must be capable of withstanding extreme...

  19. atomic fluorescence spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Chapman 2010-12-08 9 Quantification of trace metals in deciduous tooth enamel using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  20. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisskopf, Martin C; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing almost all areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission named the X-ray Surveyor. This study starts with a baseline payloa...

  1. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  2. X-ray mammography with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E. (CNR and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati, Rome (Italy)); Gambaccini, M.; Marziani, M.; Rimondi, O. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy)); Indovina, P.L. (Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell'Universita and Sezione INFN di Napoli, Naples (Italy)); Pocek, M.; Simonetti, G. (Istituto di Radiologia, Ospedale Sant'Eugenio, Universita di Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)); Benassi, M.; Tirelli, C. (Istituto Nazionale del Cancro, Regina Elena, Rome (Italy)); Passariello, R. (Cattedra di Radiologia, Universita dell'Aquila, L'Aquila (Italy))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time in the literature, radiographs of breast phantoms were obtained using several monochromatic synchrotron radiation x-ray beams of selected energy in the range from 14 to 26 keV. In addition, after optimization of the photon energy as a function of the phantom thickness, several mammographs were obtained on surgically removed human breast specimens containing cancer nodules. Comparison between radiographs using a conventional x-ray unit and those obtained of the same specimens utilizing synchrotron monochromatic beams clearly shows that higher contrast and better resolution can be achieved with synchrotron radiation. These results demonstrate the possibility of obtaining radiographs of excised human breast tissue containing a greater amount of radiological information using synchrotron radiation.

  3. X-rays from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of X-ray observations of supernova remnants is presented including the explosion fragment A of the Vela SNR, Tycho, N132D, RX J0852-4622, the Crab Nebula and the 'bulls eye', and SN 1987A, high-lighting the progress made with Chandra and XMM-Newton and touching upon the questions which arise from these observations and which might inspire future research.

  4. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    .................................................................................6 3.1 XRF System ........................................................................................................................................7 4.1 Overview of the XRF System................................................................................ 7 4.2 Preparation for XRF Analysis-- XRF Laboratory

  5. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, New York:State ParksWyrulec1991) |

  6. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tugay, A V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  7. Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    .A. & Svergun D.I. (1987). Structure Analysis by Small-Angle X-Ray and Neutron Scattering. NY: Plenum PressSmall Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) Laboratory Learning Experiences o - Use of small angle X-ray scattering instrumentation o - Programs that you will use SAXS (BRUKER AXS) PRIMUS (Konarev, Volkov, Koch

  8. Femtosecond laser-electron x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartemann, Frederic V.; Baldis, Hector A.; Barty, Chris P.; Gibson, David J.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2004-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source. A high-brightness relativistic electron injector produces an electron beam pulse train. A system accelerates the electron beam pulse train. The femtosecond laser-electron X-ray source includes a high intra-cavity power, mode-locked laser and an x-ray optics system.

  9. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Henke, B.L.; Gullikson, E.M.; Davis, J.C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  10. Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

  11. Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J.

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

  12. X-ray server : an outline resource for simulations of x-ray diffraction and scattering.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, S.; Biosciences Division

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray Server is a public project operational at the APS since 1997 with the goals to explore novel network technologies for providing wide scientific community with access to personal research results, establishing scientific collaborations, and refining scientific software. The Server provides Web-based access to a number of programs developed by the author in the field of X-ray diffraction and scattering. The software code operates directly on the Server available for use without downloading. Currently seven programs are accessible that have been used more than 85,000 times. This report discusses the Server philosophy, provides an overview of the physical models and algorithms beneath the codes and demonstrates some applications of the programs. It is shown with examples and statistics how the Server goals are achieved. The plans for further X-ray Server development are outlined.

  13. HgMn Stars as apparent X-ray emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Mathys, G

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ROSAT all-sky survey 11 HgMn stars were detected as soft X-ray emitters (Berghoefer, Schmitt & Cassinelli 1996). Prior to ROSAT, X-ray observations with the Einstein Observatory had suggested that stars in the spectral range B5-A7 are devoid of X-ray emission. Since there is no X-ray emitting mechanism available for these stars (also not for HgMn stars), the usual argument in the case of an X-ray detected star of this spectral type is the existence of an unseen low-mass companion which is responsible for the X-ray emission. The purpose of the present work is to use all available data for our sample of X-ray detected HgMn stars and conclude on the nature of possible companions.

  14. The CHANDRA HETGS X-ray Grating Spectrum of Eta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; J. H. Swank; R. Petre; K. Ishibashi; K. Davidson; L. Townsley; R. Smith; S. White; R. Viotti; A. Damineli

    2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Eta Car may be the most massive and luminous star in the Galaxy and is suspected to be a massive, colliding wind binary system. The CHANDRA X-ray observatory has obtained a calibrated, high-resolution X-ray spectrum of the star uncontaminated by the nearby extended soft X-ray emisssion. Our 89 ksec CHANDRA observation with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) shows that the hot gas near the star is non-isothermal. The temperature distribution may represent the emission on either side of the colliding wind bow shock, effectively ``resolving'' the shock. If so, the pre-shock wind velocities are ~ 700 and ~ 1800 km/s in our analysis, and these velocities may be interpreted as the terminal velocities of the winds from Eta Car and from the hidden companion star. The forbidden-to-intercombination (f/i) line ratios for the He-like ions of S, Si and Fe are large, indicating that the line forming region lies far from the stellar photosphere. The iron fluorescent line at 1.93 Angstrom, first detected by ASCA, is clearly resolved from the thermal iron line in the CHANDRA grating spectrum. The Fe fluorescent line is weaker in our CHANDRA observation than in any of the ASCA spectra. The CHANDRA observation also provides an uninterrupted high-time resolution lightcurve of the stellar X-ray emission from Eta Car and suggests that there was no significant, coherent variability during the CHANDRA observation. The Eta Car CHANDRA grating spectrum is unlike recently published X-ray grating spectra of single massive stars in significant ways and is generally consistent with colliding wind emission in a massive binary.

  15. X-ray emission properties of galaxies in Abell 3128

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell J. Smith

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use archival Chandra X-ray Observatory data to investigate X-ray emission from early-type galaxies in the rich z=0.06 cluster Abell 3128. By combining the X-ray count-rates from an input list of optically-selected galaxies, we obtain a statistical detection of X-ray flux, unbiased by X-ray selection limits. Using 87 galaxies with reliable Chandra data, X-ray emission is detected for galaxies down to M_B ~ -19.0, with only an upper limit determined for galaxies at M_B ~ -18.3. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosities is consistent with recent determinations of the low-mass X-ray binary content of nearby elliptical galaxies. Taken individually, in contrast, we detect significant (3sigma) flux for only six galaxies. Of these, one is a foreground galaxy, while two are optically-faint galaxies with X-ray hardness ratios characteristic of active galactic nuclei. The remaining three detected galaxies are amongst the optically-brightest cluster members, and have softer X-ray spectra. Their X-ray flux is higher than that expected from X-ray binaries, by a factor 2-10; the excess suggests these galaxies have retained their hot gaseous haloes. The source with the highest L_X / L_B ratio is of unusual optical morphology with prominent sharp-edged shells. Notwithstanding these few exceptions, the cluster population overall exhibits X-ray properties consistent with their emission being dominated by X-ray binaries. We conclude that in rich cluster environments, interaction with the ambient intra-cluster medium acts to strip most galaxies of their hot halo gas.

  16. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-ID-B intermediate-energy scanning X-ray microscope at theW. D. , Morrison, G. R. et al. Scanning transmission X-rayX-ray spectromicroscopy with the scanning transmission X-ray

  17. X-ray generation using carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parmee, Richard J.; Collins, Clare M.; Milne, William I.; Cole, Matthew T.

    2015-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of these sys- tems are illustrated in Figure 2(b) also outlines the principle mode of operation. Here, sealed in an inexpensive and eas- ily fabricated evacuated glass or ceramic envelope, the elec- trons are liberated from a metallic filament, often made... - ment of CNT-based FE sources is provided in [152]. Here we provide a condensed review of the progress, as it pertains to X-ray sources, since then. CNTs have some of the highest attainable aspect ratios, high thermal conductivity, low chemical...

  18. The BMW X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Moretti; Luigi Guzzo; Sergio Campana; Stefano Covino; Davide Lazzati; Marcella Longhetti; Emilio Molinari; Maria Rosa Panzera; Gianpiero Tagliaferri; Ian Dell'Antonio

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  19. The BMW X-ray Cluster Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moretti, A; Campana, S; Covino, S; Lazzati, D; Longhetti, M; Molinari, E; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Dell'Antonio, I P; Moretti, Alberto; Guzzo, Luigi; Campana, Sergio; Covino, Stefano; Lazzati, Davide; Longhetti, Marcella; Molinari, Emilio; Panzera, Maria Rosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Antonio, Ian Dell'

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the main features of the BMW survey of serendipitous X-ray clusters, based on the still unexploited ROSAT-HRI archival observations. The sky coverage, surface density and first deep optical CCD images of the candidates indicate that this sample can represent an excellent complement to the existing PSPC deep cluster surveys and will provide us with a fully independent probe of the evolution of the cluster abundance, in addition to significantly increasing the number of clusters known at z>0.6.

  20. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray Imaging in

  1. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray Imaging

  2. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest News ReleasesDepartmentLendingX-Ray

  3. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearningLensless ImagingLensless X-Ray

  4. Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidumAngle X-ray Scattering

  5. SMB, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorption Spectroscopy X-ray

  6. X-ray emission from Saturn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ness, J U; Wolk, S J; Dennerl, K; Burwitz, V

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first unambiguous detection of X-ray emission originating from Saturn with a Chandra observation, duration 65.5 ksec with ACIS-S3. Beyond the pure detection we analyze the spatial distribution of X-rays on the planetary surface, the light curve, and some spectral properties. The detection is based on 162 cts extracted from the ACIS-S3 chip within the optical disk of Saturn. We found no evidence for smaller or larger angular extent. The expected background level is 56 cts, i.e., the count rate is (1.6 +- 0.2) 10^-3 cts/s. The extracted photons are rather concentrated towards the equator of the apparent disk, while both polar caps have a relative photon deficit. The inclination angle of Saturn during the observation was -27 degrees, so that the northern hemisphere was not visible during the complete observation. In addition, it was occulted by the ring system. We found a small but significant photon excess at one edge of the ring system. The light curve shows a small dip twice at identical phases,...

  7. The variability properties of X-ray steep and X-ray flat quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio Fiore; Ari Laor; Martin Elvis; Fabrizio Nicastro; Emanuele Giallongo

    1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the variability of 6 low redshift, radio quiet `PG' quasars on three timescales (days, weeks, and months) using the ROSAT HRI. The quasars were chosen to lie at the two extreme ends of the ROSAT PSPC spectral index distribution and hence of the H$\\beta$ FWHM distribution. The observation strategy has been carefully designed to provide even sampling on these three basic timescales and to provide a uniform sampling among the quasars We have found clear evidence that the X-ray steep, narrow H_beta, quasars systematically show larger amplitude variations than the X-ray flat broad H_beta quasars on timescales from 2 days to 20 days. On longer timescales we do not find significant differences between steep and flat quasars, although the statistics are poorer. We suggest that the above correlation between variability properties and spectral steepness can be explained in a scenario in which the X-ray steep, narrow line objects are in a higher L/L_Edd state with respect to the X-ray flat, broad line objects. We evaluated the power spectrum of PG1440+356 (the brigthest quasar in our sample) between 2E-7 and 1E-3 Hz, where it goes into the noise. The power spectrum is roughly consistent with a 1/f law between 1E-3 and 2E-6 Hz. Below this frequency it flattens significantly.

  8. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  9. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  10. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  11. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Edward M. (Pleasanton, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational X-ray laser (30) is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition X-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The X-ray laser (30) is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam (32) illuminates a free-standing thin foil (34) that may be associated with a substrate (36) for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the X-ray laser gain medium. The X-ray laser (30) may be driven by more than one optical laser beam (32, 44). The X-ray laser (30) has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  12. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

    1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

  13. Density gradient free electron collisionally excited x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.

    1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational x-ray laser is provided that amplifies 3p-3s transition x-ray radiation along an approximately linear path. The x-ray laser is driven by a high power optical laser. The driving line focused optical laser beam illuminates a free-standing thin foil that may be associated with a substrate for improved structural integrity. This illumination produces a generally cylindrically shaped plasma having an essentially uniform electron density and temperature, that exists over a long period of time, and provides the x-ray laser gain medium. The x-ray laser may be driven by more than one optical laser beam. The x-ray laser has been successfully demonstrated to function in a series of experimental tests.

  14. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  15. Legacy of the X-Ray Laser Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J.

    1993-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-Ray Laser Program has evolved from a design effort focusing on developing a Strategic Defense Initiative weapon that protects against Soviet ICBMs to a scientific project that is producing new technologies for industrial and medical research. While the great technical successes and failures of the X-ray laser itself cannot be discussed, this article presents the many significant achievements made as part of the X-ray laser effort that are now being used for other applications at LLNL.

  16. Sum rules for polarization-dependent x-ray absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankudinov, A.; Rehr, J.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of sum rules is obtained for polarization-dependent x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray circular magnetic dichroism (CMD), analogous to those for CMD derived by Thole [ital et] [ital al]. These sum rules relate x-ray-absorption coefficients to the ground-state expectation values of various operators. Problems with applying these sum rules are discussed.

  17. Atomic holography with electrons and x-rays: Theoretical and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Len, P M [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gabor first proposed holography in 1948 as a means to experimentally record the amplitude and phase of scattered wavefronts, relative to a direct unscattered wave, and to use such a {open_quotes}hologram{close_quotes} to directly image atomic structure. But imaging at atomic resolution has not yet been possible in the way he proposed. Much more recently, Szoeke in 1986 noted that photoexcited atoms can emit photoelectron of fluorescent x-ray wavefronts that are scattered by neighboring atoms, thus yielding the direct and scattered wavefronts as detected in the far field that can then be interpreted as holographic in nature. By now, several algorithms for directly reconstructing three-dimensional atomic images from electron holograms have been proposed (e.g. by Barton) and successfully tested against experiment and theory. Very recently, Tegze and Faigel, and Grog et al. have recorded experimental x-ray fluorescence holograms, and these are found to yield atomic images that are more free of the kinds of aberrations caused by the non-ideal emission or scattering of electrons. The basic principles of these holographic atomic imaging methods are reviewed, including illustrative applications of the reconstruction algorithms to both theoretical and experimental electron and x-ray holograms. The author also discusses the prospects and limitations of these newly emerging atomic structural probes.

  18. A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Richard Allen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ionized state or the physical processes occurring 15 in a high temperature plasma. There are many advantages to the use of the vacuum spark as an x-ray source; the simplicity of the machine is one. The x-ray output is within the range usable for x-ray... spark apparatus ha- been studied here to determine its applicability to x-ray lithography. A capacitor which stored approximately 3 KJ supplied most of the energy for the plasma. A Nd-YAG laser was used to supply electrons and metallic atoms...

  19. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Colston, Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source.

  20. X-ray compass for determining device orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, L.B.; Matthews, D.L.; Fitch, J.P.; Everett, M.J.; Colston, B.W.; Stone, G.F.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for determining the orientation of a device with respect to an x-ray source are disclosed. In one embodiment, the present invention is coupled to a medical device in order to determine the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. In such an embodiment, the present invention is comprised of a scintillator portion which is adapted to emit photons upon the absorption of x-rays emitted from the x-ray source. An x-ray blocking portion is coupled to the scintillator portion. The x-ray blocking portion is disposed so as to vary the quantity of x-rays which penetrate the scintillator portion based upon the particular rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. A photon transport mechanism is also coupled to the scintillator portion. The photon transport mechanism is adapted to pass the photons emitted from the scintillator portion to an electronics portion. By analyzing the quantity of the photons, the electronics portion determines the rotational orientation of the medical device with respect to the x-ray source. 25 figs.

  1. Unexpected Angular Dependence of X-Ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    axes must be taken into account for accurate interpretation of XMLD data. Magnetism and X Rays The ancient Greeks and also the Chinese knew about strange and rare...

  2. Generation of Coherent X-Ray Radiation Through Modulation Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiang, Ji

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ultra-short coherent X-ray radiation by controlling the fraction of the beam that can be properly unchirped using a few-cycle laser

  3. The Daguerreotype and the X-ray: A Deep Look

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - likely will play a crucial role in future scientific breakthroughs. Last week, hers was the first daguerreotype to undergo powerful x-ray analysis in a collaboration...

  4. X-ray Absorption Measurements on Nickel Cathode of Sodium-beta Alumina batteries: Fe-Ni-CI Chemical Associations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowden, Mark E.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Fulton, John L.; Lemmon, John P.; Lu, Xiaochuan; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Heald, Steve M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Mortensen, Devon R.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Hess, Nancy J.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sections of Na-Al-NiCl2 cathodes from sodium-beta alumina ZEBRA batteries have been characterized with X-ray fluorescence mapping, and XANES measurements to probe the microstructure, elemental correlation, and chemical speciation after voltage cycling. Cycling was performed under identical load conditions at either 240 or 280 °C operating temperature and subsequently quenched in either the charged or discharged state. X-ray fluorescence mapping and XANES measurements were made adjacent to the current collector and ?"-Al2O3 solid electrolyte interfaces to detect possible gradients in chemical properties across the cathode. An FeS additive, introduced during battery synthesis, was found to be present as either Fe metal or an Fe(II) chloride in all cathode samples. X-ray fluorescence mapping reveals an operating temperature and charge-state dependent spatial correlation between Fe, Ni, and Cl concentration. XANES measurements indicate that both Ni and Fe are chemically reactive and shift between metallic and chloride phases in the charged and discharged states, respectively. However the percentage of chemically active Ni and Fe is significantly less in the cell operated at lower temperature. Additionally, the cathode appeared chemically homogeneous at the scale of our X-ray measurements.

  5. Solution spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonio, M.R.; Soderholm, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.; Song, I. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ fluorescence XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements of bulk solution species during constant-potential electrolysis is described. The cell performance was demonstrated by the collection of europium L{sub 3}-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) throughout the course of electrolysis of an aqueous solution of EuCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The europium L{sub 3}-edge resonances reported here for the Eu{sup III} and Eu{sup II} ions demonstrate that their 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 5d electronic transition probabilities are not the same.

  6. X-ray Emission from Megamaser Galaxy IC 2560

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg Madejski; Chris Done; Piotr Zycki; Lincoln Greenhill

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of the H2O megamaser galaxy IC 2560 with the Chandra Observatory reveals a complex spectrum composed of soft X-ray emission due to multi-temperature thermal plasma, and a hard continuum with strong emission lines. The continuum is most likely a Compton reflection (reprocessing) of primary emission that is completely absorbed at least up to 7 keV. The lines can be identified with fluorescence from Si, S and Fe in the lowest ionization stages. The equivalent widths of the Si and S lines are broadly compatible with those anticipated for reprocessing by optically thick cold plasma of Solar abundances, while the large equivalent width of the Fe line requires some overabundance of iron. A contribution to the line from a transmitted component cannot be ruled out, but the limits on the strength of the Compton shoulder make it less likely. From the bolometric luminosity of the nuclear region, we infer that the source radiates at 1 - 10% of its Eddington luminosity, for an adopted central mass of 3 million Solar masses. The overall spectrum is consistent with the hypotheses that the central engines powering the detected megamsers in accretion disks are obscured from direct view by the associated accretion disk material itself, and that there is a correlation between the occurrence of megamaser emission and Compton-thick absorption columns. For the 11 known galaxies with both column density measurements and maser emission believed to arise from accretion disks, eight AGN are Compton thick.

  7. X-ray laser system, x-ray laser and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A. (Oakland, CA); Rosen, Mordecai D. (Berkeley, CA); Strauss, Moshe (Omer, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an x-ray laser system comprising a laser containing generating means for emitting short wave length radiation, and means external to said laser for energizing said generating means, wherein when the laser is in an operative mode emitting radiation, the radiation has a transverse coherence length to width ratio of from about 0.05 to 1. Also disclosed is a method of adjusting the parameters of the laser to achieve the desired coherence length to laser width ratio.

  8. THE XMM-NEWTON X-RAY SPECTRA OF THE MOST X-RAY LUMINOUS RADIO-QUIET ROSAT BRIGHT SURVEY-QSOs: A REFERENCE SAMPLE FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QSO SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumpe, M.; Markowitz, A. [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Lamer, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Corral, A., E-mail: mkrumpe@ucsd.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Brera 28, 20121 Milan (Italy)

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the broadband X-ray properties of four of the most X-ray luminous (L{sub X} {>=} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.5-2 keV band) radio-quiet QSOs found in the ROSAT Bright Survey. This uniform sample class, which explores the extreme end of the QSO luminosity function, exhibits surprisingly homogenous X-ray spectral properties: a soft excess with an extremely smooth shape containing no obvious discrete features, a hard power law above 2 keV, and a weak narrow/barely resolved Fe K{alpha} fluorescence line for the three high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The soft excess can be well fitted with only a soft power law. No signatures of warm or cold intrinsic absorbers are found. The Fe K{alpha} centroids and the line widths indicate emission from neutral Fe (E = 6.4 keV) originating from cold material from distances of only a few light days or further out. The well-constrained equivalent widths (EW) of the neutral Fe lines are higher than expected from the X-ray Baldwin effect which has been only poorly constrained at very high luminosities. Taking into account our individual EW measurements, we show that the X-ray Baldwin effect flattens above L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} (2-10 keV band) where an almost constant (EW) of {approx}100 eV is found. We confirm the assumption of having very similar X-ray active galactic nucleus properties when interpreting stacked X-ray spectra. Our stacked spectrum serves as a superb reference for the interpretation of low S/N spectra of radio-quiet QSOs with similar luminosities at higher redshifts routinely detected by XMM-Newton and Chandra surveys.

  9. Constraints on jet X-ray emission in low/hard state X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the combination of the similarities between the X-ray properties of low luminosity accreting black holes and accreting neutron stars, combined with the differences in their radio properties argues that the X-rays from these systems are unlikely to be formed in the relativistic jets. Specifically, the spectra of extreme island state neutron stars and low/hard state black holes are known to be indistinguishable, while the power spectra from these systems are known to show only minor differences beyond what would be expected from scaling the characteristic variability frequencies by the mass of the compact object. The spectral and temporal similarities thus imply a common emission mechanism that has only minor deviations from having all key parameters scaling linearly with the mass of the compact object, while we show that this is inconsistent with the observations that the radio powers of neutron stars are typically about 30 times lower than those of black holes at the same X-ray luminosity. We also show that an abrupt luminosity change would be expected when a system makes a spectral state transition from a radiatively inefficient jet dominated accretion flow to a thin disk dominated flow, but that such a change is not seen.

  10. Isotropic star in low-mass X-ray binaries and X-ray pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehedi Kalam; Sk. Monowar Hossein; Sajahan Molla

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for compact stars in the low mass X-ray binaries(LMXBs) and X-ray pulsars using a metric given by John J. Matese and Patrick G. Whitman \\citep{Matese and Whitman1980}. Here the field equations are reduced to a system of two algebraic equations considering the isotropic pressure. Compact star candidates 4U 1820-30(radius=10km) in LMXBs, and Her X-1(radius=7.7km), SAX J 1808.4-3658(SS1)(radius=7.07km) and SAX J 1808.4-3658(SS2)(radius=6.35km) in X-ray pulsars satisfy all the energy conditions, TOV-equation and stability condition. From our model, we have derived mass($M$), central density($\\rho_{0}$), suface density($\\rho_{b}$), central pressure($p_{0}$), surface pressure($p_{b}$) and surface red-shift($Z_{s}$) of the above mentioned stars, which are very much consistant with the observed/reported datas\\citep{N. K. Glendenning1997,Gondek2000}. We have also observe the adiabatic index($\\gamma$>4/3) of the above steller objects.

  11. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .3.6.2. Synchrotron Diffraction.........................................................................9 II. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN X-RAY DIFFRACTION.....................................12 2.1. X-ray Source... radiations ...................................................................16 Table 2.2 Structure factors and reflection conditions ...................................................20 Table 4.1 Chemical composition of SS316...

  12. Ultrafast x-rays: radiographing magnetism Project overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    , head of the ultrafast magnetism group. Stanford PULSE is a worldwide renowned centre for ultrafast1 Ultrafast x-rays: radiographing magnetism Project overview The main purpose of the proposed, it is now possible to achieve x-ray pulses that are a few femtoseconds long and that are focused within

  13. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nygren, David R. (Berkeley, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  14. Residual stress measurement using X-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderoglu, Osman

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -rays..............................................................................................16 2.4. Bragg's Law ..........................................................................................................18 2.5. Diffractometer Geometry... Figure 2.2 Schematic showing the basic components of a modern x-ray tube. Beryllium window is highly transparent to x-rays...............................15 Figure 2.3 Coherent scattering from an electron to a point P...

  15. Shad-o-Snap X-Ray Camera Hardware Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -o-Snap x-ray camera is a complete, stand-alone x-ray imaging device featuring "smart" microprocessor-controlled camera electronics and a convenient USB interface. The plug- and-play interface allows easy control by the silicon photodiodes. The Shad-o-Snap camera also includes electronics to digitize the video signal

  16. Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, K.H.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Fourteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 12 - 25, 2012 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  18. Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boothroyd, Andrew

    Neutron and X-ray Scattering Study of Magnetic Manganites Graeme Eoin Johnstone A Thesis submitted are performed using a variety of neutron scattering and x-ray scattering techniques. The electronic ground for analysing the results of the polarised neutron scattering experiment. There are a large number of people who

  19. Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Tenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering September 24 - October 11, 2008 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  20. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15th National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 - 24, 2013 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major Ridge National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang

  1. Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 11 ­ June 25, 2011 at Argonne of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  2. Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Sixteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Suzanne G.E. te Velthuis, Esen Ercan Alp

  3. Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Twelfth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 12 ­ June 26, 2010 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  4. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering May 30 ­ June 13, 2009 at Argonne National of the National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering is to educate graduate students on the utilization of major National Laboratory's Neutron Scattering Science Division. Scientific Directors: Jonathan C. Lang, Suzanne

  5. Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    , Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

  6. Chandra X-ray Analysis of Galaxy Cluster A168

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanbin Yang; Zhiying Huo; Xu Zhou; Suijian Xue; Shude Mao; Jun Ma; Jiansheng Chen

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra X-ray observations of galaxy cluster A168 (z=0.045). Two X-ray peaks with a projected distance of 676 kpc are found to be located close to two dominant galaxies, respectively. Both peaks are significantly offset from the peak of the number density distribution of galaxies. This suggests that A168 consists of two subclusters, a northern subcluster (A168N) and a southern subcluster (A168S). Further X-ray imaging analysis reveals that (1) the X-ray isophotes surrounding the two X-ray peaks are heavily distorted, (2) an elongated and ontinuous filament connects the two X-ray peaks. These suggest that strong interactions have occurred between the two subclusters. Spectral analysis shows that A168 has a mean temperature of 2.53 +/- 0.09 keV and a mean metallicity of 0.31 +/- 0.04 Z_{solar}. The metallicity is roughly a constant across the cluster but the temperature shows some systematic variations. Most X-ray, optical and radio properties of A168 are consistent with it being an off-axis merger several Gyrs after a core passage, although detailed numerical simulations are required to see whether the observed properties, in particular the significant offset between the optical and X-ray centers, can be reproduced in such a scenario.

  7. Millisecond oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muno, Michael Patrick, 1975-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I analyze 68 oscillation trains detected in a search of 159 thermonuclear bursts from eight neutron star X-ray binaries observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. I use all data that were public as of September 2001. ...

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.; Lima, E.; Huang, X.; Krupin, O.; Seu, K.; Parks, D.; Kevan, S.; Kisslinger, K.; McNulty, I.; Gambino, R.; Mangin, S.; Roy, S. and Fischer, P.

    2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first proof-of-principle experiment of iterative phase retrieval from magnetic x-ray diffraction. By using the resonant x-ray excitation process and coherent x-ray scattering, we show that linearly polarized soft x rays can be used to image both the amplitude and the phase of magnetic domain structures. We recovered the magnetic structure of an amorphous terbium-cobalt thin film with a spatial resolution of about 75 nm at the Co L{sub 3} edge at 778 eV. In comparison with soft x-ray microscopy images recorded with Fresnel zone plate optics at better than 25 nm spatial resolution, we find qualitative agreement in the observed magnetic structure.

  9. X-Ray Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippo Frontera

    2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery by the BeppoSAX satellite of X-ray afterglow emission from the gamma-ray burst which occurred on 28 February 1997 produced a revolution in our knowledge of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon. Along with the discovery of X-ray afterglows, the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts were discovered and the distance issue was settled, at least for long $\\gamma$-ray bursts. The 30 year mystery of the gamma-ray burst phenomenon is now on the way to solution. Here I rewiew the observational status of the X-ray afterglow emission, its mean properties (detection rate, continuum spectra, line features, and light curves), and the X-ray constraints on theoretical models of gamma-ray bursters and their progenitors. I also discuss the early onset afterglow emission, the remaining questions, and the role of future X-ray afterglow observations.

  10. Scattering of x rays from low-Z materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, J.L.; Kissel, L.D.; Catron, H.C.; Hansen, R.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X rays incident on thin beryllium, boron, carbon, and other low-Z materials undergo both elastic and inelastic scattering as well as diffraction from the crystalline or crystalline-like structure of the material. Unpolarized monoenergetic x rays in the 1.5 to 8.0-keV energy range were used to determine the absolute scattering efficiency of thin beryllium, carbon, and boron foils. These measurements are compared to calculated scattering efficiencies predicted by single-atom theories. In addition, the relative scattering efficiency versus x-ray energy was measured for other low-Z foils using unpolarized bremsstrahlung x rays. In all the low-Z foils examined, we observed Bragg-like x-ray diffraction due to the ordered structure of the materials.

  11. Deep x-ray lithography for micromechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, T.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guckel, H. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensions of the German LIGA process have brought about fabrication capability suitable for cost effective production of precision engineered components. The process attributes allow fabrication of mechanical components which are not capable of being made via conventional subtractive machining methods. Two process improvements have been responsible for this extended capability which involve the areas of thick photoresist application and planarization via precision lapping. Application of low-stress x-ray photoresist has been achieved using room temperature solvent bonding of a preformed photoresist sheet. Precision diamond lapping and polishing has provided a flexible process for the planarization of a wide variety of electroplated metals in the presence of photoresist. Exposure results from the 2.5 GeV National Synchrotron Light Source storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown that structural heights of several millimeter and above are possible. The process capabilities are also well suited for microactuator fabrication. Linear and rotational magnetic microactuators have been constructed which use coil winding technology with LIGA fabricated coil forms. Actuator output forces of 1 milliNewton have been obtained with power dissipation on the order of milliWatts. A rotational microdynamometer system which is capable of measuring torque-speed data is also discussed.

  12. X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen/s)Velocity (km/s) #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;absorption emission emission occulted emission emission UV telescope side side front back #12;The

  13. Novel Approaches to Soft X-ray Spectroscopy: Scanning TransmissionX-ray Microscopy and Ambient Pressure X-Ray PhotoelectronSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Gilles, Mary K.; Mun, Simon B.; Tyliszczak, Tolek

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop focused on novel spectroscopies at Beamlines 11.0.2, 5.3.2 and 9.3.2 at the ALS. The workshop brought together users from a wide range of fields to highlight recent experimental and technical developments both in scanning transmission X-ray spectroscopy (STXM) and ambient pressure photoelectron spectroscopy (APPES). The morning session featured talks on experiments involving new developments at the STXM, while the afternoon session was devoted to those using APXPS. In the morning session, Tolek Tyliszczak discussed the improved detector developments at the STXM, such as an avalanche photodiode detector and fluorescence and electron detection, as well as the continued development of in situ cells for heating, gas flow, and electrochemical cells. Of these, only the avalanche photodiode in combination with a novel multichannel photon-counting system is in routine use in time-resolved studies. Bartel Van Waeyenberge (Ghent University) presented results of magnetic imaging with a time resolution of 70-100 ps combined with a lateral resolution of 20-40 nm performed with the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). As a complement to the time-domain ''pump-and-probe'' measurements, they developed a frequency-domain ''sine-excitation'' technique in order to study specific eigenmodes of these ferromagnetic patterns with high spatial resolution. This new approach was used to study the gyrotropic vortex motions in micron-sized ferromagnetic patterns. Adam Hitchcock (McMaster University) presented the development, in collaboration with Daniel Guay (INRS, Varennes) and Sherry Zhang, of the apparatus and techniques for applying STXM to in-situ studies of electrochemistry, in particular electrochromism in polyaniline. In addition, substantial progress was reported on a joint project to develop substrates and methods for chemically selective lithography of multilayer polymer systems. Selective patterns, such as that displayed in the figure, can now be written efficiently with the bend magnet STXM on Beamline 5.3.2. Yves Acremann (SSRL) discussed time and spatially resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) experiments on spin transfer devices at the STXM (Beamline 11.0.2). These elegant experiments explore time resolved measurements of the magnetization dynamics within a 100 x 150 nm sample influenced by a spin-polarized current. This experiment shows that the magnetization in these magnetic nanostructures are not uniform, as they are influenced by the Oersted field of the charge current needed to generate the spin current. The implementation of a novel multichannel photon counting system in combination with an avalanche photon detector decreased the data-acquisition time by a factor of 10, owing to its ability to resolve the structure of multi bunch mode. Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University and SSRL) described ''Applications of STXM to Microbial Bioweathering and Biomineralization''. In the interaction of bacteria with ferrihydrite nanoparticles, microenvironments that were very different than the bulk material were observed, showing that bulk thermodynamics may not be useful for predicting micro phases. Gordon also presented work showing that iron nanoparticles are attracted to the negatively charged bacteria and form a coating that reduces iron oxide minerals. The afternoon session started with presentations by Simon Mun and Hendrik Bluhm, who discussed the current status and the future plans for the two APPES end-stations at the ALS, which are located at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2, respectively. In both end-stations, samples can be measured in gaseous environments at pressures of up to several Torr, which makes possible the investigation of numerous phenomena, in particular in the fields of atmospheric and environmental science as well as heterogeneous catalysis. Specific examples of the application of APPES were shown in the following presentations. John Hemminger (University of California, Irvine) reported on APPES investigations at Beamlines 9.3.2 and 11.0.2 of the interaction of alkali halide surfaces with water. The m

  14. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  15. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, C.K.; Boyer, K.; Solem, J.C.; Haddad, W.S.

    1990-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced. 7 figs.

  16. Apparatus for generating x-ray holograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Charles K. (Chicago, IL); Boyer, Keith (Los Alamos, NM); Solem, Johndale C. (Los Alamos, NM); Haddad, Waleed S. (Chicago, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for x-ray microholography of living biological materials. A Fourier transform holographic configuration is described as being most suitable for the 3-dimensional recording of the physical characteristics of biological specimens. The use of a spherical scatterer as a reference and a charge-coupled device two-dimensional detector array placed in the forward direction relative to the incident x-radiation for viewing electromagnetic radiation simultaneously scattered from both the specimen and the reference scatterer permits the ready reconstruction of the details of the specimen from the fringe pattern detected by the charge-coupled device. For example, by using a nickel reference scatter at 4.5 nm, sufficient reference illumination is provided over a wide enough angle to allow similar resolution in both transverse and longitudinal directions. Both laser and synchrotron radiation sources are feasible for generating microholographs. Operation in the water window (2.4 to 4.5 nm) should provide maximum contrast for features of the specimen and spatial resolution on the order of the wavelength of x-radiation should be possible in all three dimensions, which is sufficient for the visualization of many biological features. It is anticipated that the present apparatus will find utility in other areas as well where microscopic physical details of a specimen are important. A computational procedure which enables the holographic data collected by the detector to be used to correct for misalignments introduced by inexact knowledge of the relative positions of the spherical reference scatterer and the sample under investigation has been developed. If the correction is performed prior to reconstruction, full compensation can be achieved and a faithfully reconstructed image produced.

  17. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A., E-mail: a-physics2001@yahoo.com; Tibai, Z. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary)] [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Hebling, J. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary) [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs–7624 (Hungary); Szentagothai Research Centre, University of Pecs, Pecs-7624 (Hungary); Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  18. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  19. Gated x-ray detector for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, John A.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Tom; Barnes, Cris; Casper, Larry; Fatherley, Valerie; Heinrichs, Todd; King, Robert; Landers, Doug; Lopez, Frank; Sanchez, Phillip; Sandoval, George; Schrank, Lou; Walsh, Peter; Bell, Perry; Brown, Matt; Costa, Robert; Holder, Joe; Montelongo, Sam; Pederson, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); VI Control Systems Ltd., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed, and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These gated x-Ray detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significantly different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due, in part, to an innovative impedance matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring, and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution, and no detectable impedance reflections.

  20. X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tavani

    1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider possible interpretations of the recently detected X- ray afterglow from the gamma-ray burst source GRB 970228. Cosmological and Galactic models of gamma-ray bursts predict different flux and spectral evolution of X-ray afterglows. We show that models based on adiabatic expansion of relativistic forward shocks require very efficient particle energization or post-burst re-acceleration during the expansion. Cooling neutron star models predict a very distinctive spectral and flux evolution that can be tested in current X-ray data.

  1. Linear accelerator x-ray sources with high duty cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condron, Cathie; Brown, Craig; Gozani, Tsahi; Langeveld, Willem G. J. [Rapiscan Laboratories, Inc., 520 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA 94085 (United States); Hernandez, Michael [XScell corp., 2134 Old Middlefield Way, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray cargo inspection systems typically use a several-MV pulsed linear accelerator (linac) to produce a bremsstrahlung spectrum of x rays by bombarding a target with electrons. The x rays traverse the cargo and are detected by a detector array. Spectroscopy of the detected x rays is very desirable: if one can determine the spectrum of the transmitted x rays, one can determine the Z of the material they traversed. Even in relatively low-dose modes of operation, thousands of x rays arrive at each detector element during each pulse, unless the x rays are heavily absorbed or scattered by the cargo. For portal or fixed-site systems, dose rates, and therefore x-ray count rates, are even higher. Because of the high x-ray count rate, spectroscopy is impractical in conventional cargo inspection systems, except in certain special cases. For a mobile system, typical pulse durations are a few microseconds, and the number of pulses is on the order of 100 per second, leading to a duty factor of about 0.04%. Clearly, a linear accelerator x-ray source with much higher duty factor would be useful, since then the same number of x rays could be spread out over time, reducing the x-ray count rate. In this paper, we explore the possibility of designing a linear accelerator system, using more or less Conventional Off the Shelf (COTS) components, capable of duty cycles of 1% or greater. A survey was conducted of available linac RF source options and, given the possibilities, calculations were performed for suitable beam centerline designs. Keeping in mind that the size and cost of the accelerator system should be practical for use in a mobile cargo inspection system, only a few options are shown to be reasonably feasible, both requiring the use of klystrons instead of the magnetrons used in conventional systems. An S-Band design appears clearly possible, and there is also a promising X-Band design.

  2. Characterization of X-ray generator beam profiles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean J; Harding, Lee T.; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Theisen, Lisa Anne; Parmeter, John Ethan; Thompson, Kyle Richard

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T to compute the radiography properties of various materials, the flux profiles of X-ray sources must be characterized. This report describes the characterization of X-ray beam profiles from a Kimtron industrial 450 kVp radiography system with a Comet MXC-45 HP/11 bipolar oil-cooled X-ray tube. The empirical method described here uses a detector response function to derive photon flux profiles based on data collected with a small cadmium telluride detector. The flux profiles are then reduced to a simple parametric form that enables computation of beam profiles for arbitrary accelerator energies.

  3. X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more toConsensusX-RayX-RayX-ray

  4. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  5. X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumental drifts, and systematic errors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray optics metrology limited by random noise, instrumentalUSA Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Nationaland reflecting x-ray optics suitable for micro- and nano-

  6. atf compton x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D; Fritzsche, S 2014-01-01 14 Photospheres, Comptonization and X-ray Lines in Gamma Ray Bursts Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: Steep X-ray spectral slopes, X-ray excesses and...

  7. adc x-ray binary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems. Sudip Bhattacharyya 2010-02-24 17 X-ray Transients from X-ray Binaries to Gamma Ray Bursts CERN Preprints Summary: We discuss three classes of x-ray transients to...

  8. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nonradiologists in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometrymorphometry studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

  9. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cells with Soft X-Rays Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Wednesday, 26 May 2010 00:00 A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction...

  10. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

  11. X-ray Emission from Megamaser Galaxy IC 2560

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madejski, Greg; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Done, Chris; /Durham U.; Zycki, Piotr; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Greenhill, Lincoln; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of the H{sub 2}O megamaser galaxy IC 2560 with the Chandra Observatory reveals a complex spectrum composed of soft X-ray emission due to multi-temperature thermal plasma, and a hard continuum with strong emission lines. The continuum is most likely a Compton reflection (reprocessing) of primary emission that is completely absorbed at least up to 7 keV. The lines can be identified with fluorescence from Si, S and Fe in the lowest ionization stages. The equivalent widths of the Si and S lines are broadly compatible with those anticipated for reprocessing by optically thick cold plasma of Solar abundances, while the large equivalent width of the Fe line requires some overabundance of iron. A contribution to the line from a transmitted component cannot be ruled out, but the limits on the strength of the Compton shoulder make it less likely. From the bolometric luminosity of the nuclear region, we infer that the source radiates at 1-10% of its Eddington luminosity, for an adopted central mass of 3 x 10{sup 6} M{sub {circle_dot}}. The overall spectrum is consistent with the hypotheses that the central engines powering the detected megamsers in accretion disks are obscured from direct view by the associated accretion disk material itself, and that there is a correlation between the occurrence of megamaser emission and Compton-thick absorption columns. For the 11 known galaxies with both column density measurements and maser emission believed to arise from accretion disks, eight AGN are Compton thick.

  12. Experimental study for the feasibility of using hard x-rays for micro-XRF analysis of multilayered metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polese, C., E-mail: claudia.polese@lnf.infn.it; Dabagov, S. B.; Esposito, A.; Hampai, D.; Gorghinian, A.; Liedl, A. [LNF - INFN, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Ferretti, M. [ITABC - CNR, Via Salaria km 29.300, 00016 Montelibretti (Italy)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of polycapillary optical systems to improve a spatial resolution for the ?-XRF analysis by focusing a primary x-ray beam and/or by collecting fluorescence emission is well known. The challenge is to optimize them in combination with x-ray source for exciting K-lines above 20 keV that could allow characterization of many materials composed by heavy elements. To pursue this goal, preliminary studies on possible polycapillary lens employment in thickness determination for multilayer metal materials will be presented in this work. In this paper, the results of first attempts of integrating PyMCA with Monte Carlo simulation code (XMI-MSIM) that takes into account the secondary fluorescence effects on quantitative analysis of homogeneous matrices, in particular, metal alloys, are presented.

  13. How Can X-ray Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Aide Solar Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are from optimized on structural, energetic and dynamic parameters. Intense X-ray pulses from synchrotrons and X-ray free electrons lasers coupled with ultrafast lasers...

  14. X-rays only when you want them: Report on Pseudo-single-bunch...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Speaker: David Robin, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Program Description Laser pump - x-ray probe experiments require control over the x-ray pulse pattern and timing. Such...

  15. Scanning X-ray Microscopy Investigations into the Electron Beam Exposure Mechanism of Hydrogen Silsesquioxane Resists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olynick, Deirdre L.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Salmassi, Farhad; Liddle, J. Alexander

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning X-ray Microscopy Investigations into the Electronchemistry is investigated by Scanning Transmission X-raythe area exposed. 15 Recently, scanning transmission x-ray

  16. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular...

  17. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  18. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL...

  19. Streaked x-ray microscopy of laser-fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, R.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Rosen, M.D.; Auerbach, J.M.; Phillion, D.W.; Whitlock, R.R.; Obenshain, S.P.; McLean, E.A.; Ripin, B.H.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast soft x-ray streak camera has been coupled to a Wolter axisymmetric x-ray microscope. This system was used to observe the dynamics of laser fusion targets both in self emission and backlit by laser produced x-ray sources. Spatial resolution was 7 ..mu..m and temporal resolution was 20 ps. Data is presented showing the ablative acceleration of foils to velocities near 10/sup 7/ cm/sec and the collision of an accelerated foil with a second foil, observed using 3 keV streaked x-ray backlighting. Good agreement was found between hydrocode simulations, simple models of the ablative acceleration and the observed velocities of the carbon foils.

  20. Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering - Combining Structural with Spectroscop...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as well as important L-edges of the 3d transition metals important in magnetic and oxide systems. Measurements of soft x-ray absorption spectra are inherently surface sensitive,...

  1. Staff at sector 30, inelastic x-ray scattering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 30 Staff Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button...

  2. Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering Wednesday, April 8, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Yoshiharu Sakurai (Japan Synchrotron...

  3. The Identification Problem for the attenuated X-ray transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray transform has been solved in [27], see also [15]. The main result in .... For any compact set K ? T2, we define Hs(K) to be the closed subspace of Hs(T2) of

  4. Systems and methods for detecting x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for detecting x-rays are disclosed herein. One or more x-ray-sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of heavy element nano-sized particles and a plastic material, such as polystyrene. As will be explained in greater detail herein, the heavy element nano-sized particles (e.g., PbWO4) can be compounded into the plastic material with at least one dopant that permits the plastic material to scintillate. X-rays interact with the heavy element nano-sized particles to produce electrons that can deposit energy in the x-ray sensitive scintillator, which in turn can produce light.

  5. Epoxy replication for Wolter x-ray microscope fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priedhorsky, W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An epoxy replica of a test piece designed to simulate a Wolter x-ray microscope geometry showed no loss of x-ray reflectivity or resolution, compared to the original. The test piece was a diamond-turned cone with 1.5/sup 0/ half angle. A flat was fly-cut on one side, then super- and conventionally polished. The replica was separated at the 1.5/sup 0/-draft angle, simulating a shallow angle Wolter microscope geometry. A test with 8.34 A x rays at 0.9/sup 0/ grazing angle showed a reflectivity of 67% for the replica flat surface, and 70% for the original. No spread of the reflected beam was observed with a 20-arc second wide test beam. This test verifies the epoxy replication technique for production of Wolter x-ray microscopes.

  6. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aigeldinger, Georg (Livermore, CA); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA); Griffiths, Stewart K. (Livermore, CA); Talin, Albert Alec (Livermore, CA); Losey, Matthew W. (Livermore, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter (Dublin, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  7. Performance enhancement approaches for a dual energy x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evans, J.P.O. , “Stereoscopic dual energy imaging for targetCrawford, C.R. , “Dual Energy Volumetric X-ray Tomographicimages in 4–10 MeV Dual- energy customs system for material

  8. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 033904 (2011). Web: http:prl.aps.orgpdfPRLv107i3e033904...

  9. Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism studies using resonant, coherent, x-ray scattering Monday, September 10, 2012 - 10:00am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Keoki Seu Seminar: With the advent of free electron...

  10. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be used instead of HC FEL. In the following illustra-UM is now tuned for resonant FEL interaction with the 32-nmAttosecond X-Ray Pulses from the FEL Alexander A. Zholents,

  11. X-ray micromodulated luminescence tomography in dual-cone ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 16, 2014 ... ing the intensity of x-ray energy at the vertex point of a double- cone beam. ... such focusing element, but it is of low efficiency and restricted.

  12. X-ray mask and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention describes a method for fabricating an x-ray mask tool which is a contact lithographic mask which can provide an x-ray exposure dose which is adjustable from point-to-point. The tool is useful in the preparation of LIGA plating molds made from PMMA, or similar materials. In particular the tool is useful for providing an ability to apply a graded, or "stepped" x-ray exposure dose across a photosensitive substrate. By controlling the x-ray radiation dose from point-to-point, it is possible to control the development process for removing exposed portions of the substrate; adjusting it such that each of these portions develops at a more or less uniformly rate regardless of feature size or feature density distribution.

  13. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  14. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury.

  15. Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J; Paul, A C

    2004-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of the injector would lead to an accurate value of the emittance. If the emittance was approximately half of the measured value, the beam envelope is slightly space charge dominated, but envelope measurements would set reasonable bounds on the emittance value. For an emittance much less than 100 cm-mr, the envelope measurements would be insensitive to emittance. The outcome of this envelope experiment determines if a redesigned diode is needed or if more sophisticated emittance measurements should be pursued.

  16. X-ray tube with magnetic electron steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Kim W. (Albuquerque, NM); Turman, Bobby N. (Albuquerque, NM); Kaye, Ronald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray tube uses a magnetic field to steer electrons. The magnetic field urges electrons toward the anode, increasing the proportion of electrons emitted from the cathode that reach desired portions of the anode and consequently contribute to X-ray production. The magnetic field also urges electrons reflected from the anode back to the anode, further increasing the efficiency of the tube.

  17. Quantum coherence phenomena in x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisimov, Petr Mikhailovich

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN X-RAY OPTICS A Dissertation by PETR MIKHAILOVICH ANISIMOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December... 2008 Major Subject: Physics QUANTUM COHERENCE PHENOMENA IN X-RAY OPTICS A Dissertation by PETR MIKHAILOVICH ANISIMOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  18. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roger Falcone

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    July 15, 2008 Berkeley Lab lecture: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  19. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  20. Quiet Sun X-rays as Signature for New Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zioutas; K. Dennerl; L. DiLella; D. H. H. Hoffmann; J. Jacoby; Th. Papaevangelou

    2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied published data from the Yohkoh solar X-ray mission, with the purpose of searching for signals from radiative decays of new, as yet undiscovered massive neutral particles. This search is based on the prediction that solar axions of the Kaluza-Klein type should result in the emission of X-rays from the Sun direction beyond the limb with a characteristic radial distribution. These X-rays should be observed more easily during periods of quiet Sun. An additional signature is the observed emission of hard X-rays by SMM, NEAR and RHESSI. The recent observation made by RHESSI of a continuous emission from the non-flaring Sun of X-rays in the 3 to ~15 keV range fits the generic axion scenario. This work also suggests new analyses of existing data, in order to exclude instrumental effects; it provides the rationale for targeted observations with present and upcoming (solar) X-ray telescopes, which can provide the final answer on the nature of the signals considered here. Such measurements become more promising during the forthcoming solar cycle minimum with an increased number of quiet Sun periods.

  1. X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumpe, M; Corral, A; Schwope, A D; Carrera, F J; Barcons, X; Page, M; Mateos, S; Tedds, J A; Watson, M G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN coun...

  2. Spectral Formation in X-Ray Pulsar Accretion Columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Becker; Michael T. Wolff

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first self-consistent model for the dynamics and the radiative transfer occurring in bright X-ray pulsar accretion columns, with a special focus on the role of the shock in energizing the emerging X-rays. The pressure inside the accretion column of a luminous X-ray pulsar is dominated by the photons, and consequently the equations describing the coupled radiative-dynamical structure must be solved simultaneously. Spectral formation in these sources is therefore a complex, nonlinear phenomenon. We obtain the analytical solution for the Green's function describing the upscattering of monochromatic radiation injected into the column from the thermal mound located near the base of the flow. The Green's function is convolved with a Planck distribution to model the X-ray spectrum resulting from the reprocessing of blackbody photons produced in the thermal mound. These photons diffuse through the infalling gas and eventually escape out the walls of the column, forming the observed X-ray spectrum. We show that the resulting column-integrated, phase-averaged spectrum has a power-law shape at high energies and a blackbody shape at low energies, in agreement with the observational data for many X-ray pulsars.

  3. 54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed

  4. X-ray absorption in distant type II QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Krumpe; G. Lamer; A. Corral; A. D. Schwope; F. J. Carrera; X. Barcons; M. Page; S. Mateos; J. A. Tedds; M. G. Watson

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the X-ray spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton-selected type II QSO sample with z>0.5 and 0.5-10 keV flux of 0.3-33 x 10^{-14} erg/s/cm^2. The distribution of absorbing column densities in type II QSOs is investigated and the dependence of absorption on X-ray luminosity and redshift is studied. We inspected 51 spectroscopically classified type II QSO candidates from the XMM-Newton Marano field survey, the XMM-Newton-2dF wide angle survey (XWAS), and the AXIS survey to set-up a well-defined sample with secure optical type II identifications. Fourteen type II QSOs were classified and an X-ray spectral analysis performed. Since most of our sources have only ~40 X-ray counts (PN-detector), we carefully studied the fit results of the simulated X-ray spectra as a function of fit statistic and binning method. We determined that fitting the spectra with the Cash-statistic and a binning of minimum one count per bin recovers the input values of the simulated X-ray spectra best. Above 100 PN counts, the free fits of the spectrum's slope and absorbing hydrogen column density are reliable. We find only moderate absorption (N_H=(2-10) x 10^22 cm^-2) and no obvious trends with redshift and intrinsic X-ray luminosity. In a few cases a Compton-thick absorber cannot be excluded. Two type II objects with no X-ray absorption were discovered. We find no evidence for an intrinsic separation between type II AGN and high X-ray luminosity type II QSO in terms of absorption. The stacked X-ray spectrum of our 14 type II QSOs shows no iron K-alpha line. In contrast, the stack of the 8 type II AGN reveals a very prominent iron K-alpha line at an energy of ~ 6.6 keV and an EW ~ 2 keV.

  5. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating the shortest wavelength laboratory x-ray laser, below 4.5 nm and operating in the water window, by using the high-energy capability of the Titan laser.

  6. The XMM-Newton X-ray Spectra of the Most X-ray Luminous Radio-quiet ROSAT Bright Survey-QSOs: A Reference Sample for the Interpretation of High-redshift QSO Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumpe, Mirko; Markowitz, Alex; Corral, Amalia; 10.1088/0004-637X/725/1/1

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the broadband X-ray properties of four of the most X-ray luminous (L_X >= 10^{45} erg/s in the 0.5-2 keV band) radio-quiet QSOs found in the ROSAT Bright Survey. This uniform sample class, which explores the extreme end of the QSO luminosity function, exhibits surprisingly homogenous X-ray spectral properties: a soft excess with an extremely smooth shape containing no obvious discrete features, a hard power law above 2 keV, and a weak narrow/barely resolved Fe K-alpha fluorescence line for the three high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The soft excess can be well fitted with only a soft power law. No signatures of warm or cold intrinsic absorbers are found. The Fe K-alpha centroids and the line widths indicate emission from neutral Fe (E=6.4 keV) originating from cold material from distances of only a few light days or further out. The well-constrained equivalent widths (EW) of the neutral Fe lines are higher than expected from the X-ray Baldwin effect which has been only poorly constrained at...

  7. Gain dynamics in a soft X-ray laser ampli er perturbed by a strong injected X-ray eld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yong [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Wang, Shoujun [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Oliva, E [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Lu, L [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Yin, Liang [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Nejdl, J [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Luther, Brad [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Proux, C [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique] [Laboratoire d’Optique Applique´e, ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique; Le, T. T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Dunn, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ros, D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas] [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Gaz et des Plasmas; Zeitoun, Philippe [École Polytechnique] [École Polytechnique; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seeding soft X-ray plasma ampli ers with high harmonics has been demonstrated to generate high-brightness soft X-ray laser pulses with full spatial and temporal coherence. The interaction between the injected coherent eld and the swept-gain medium has been modelled. However, no exper- iment has been conducted to probe the gain dynamics when perturbed by a strong external seed eld. Here, we report the rst X-ray pump X-ray probe measurement of the nonlinear response of a plasma ampli er perturbed by a strong soft X-ray ultra-short pulse. We injected a sequence of two time-delayed high-harmonic pulses (l518.9 nm) into a collisionally excited nickel-like molybdenum plasma to measure with femto-second resolution the gain depletion induced by the saturated ampli cation of the high-harmonic pump and its subsequent recovery. The measured fast gain recovery in 1.5 1.75 ps con rms the possibility to generate ultra-intense, fully phase-coherent soft X-ray lasers by chirped pulse ampli cation in plasma ampli ers.

  8. Water destruction by X-rays in young stellar objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Stauber; J. K. Jorgensen; E. F. van Dishoeck; S. D. Doty; A. O. Benz

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the H2O chemistry in star-forming environments under the influence of a central X-ray source and a central far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation field. The gas-phase water chemistry is modeled as a function of time, hydrogen density and X-ray flux. To cover a wide range of physical environments, densities between n_H = 10^4-10^9 cm^-3 and temperatures between T = 10-1000 K are studied. Three different regimes are found: For T water abundance is of order 10^-7-10^-6 and can be somewhat enhanced or reduced due to X-rays, depending on time and density. For 100 K 10^-3 ergs s-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^4 yrs) and for F_X > 10^-4 ergs s^-1 cm^-2 (t = 10^5 yrs). At higher temperatures (T > 250 K) and hydrogen densities, water can persist with x(H2O) ~ 10^-4 even for high X-ray fluxes. The X-ray and FUV models are applied to envelopes around low-mass Class 0 and I young stellar objects (YSOs). Water is destroyed in both Class 0 and I envelopes on relatively short timescales (t ~ 5000 yrs) for realistic X-ray fluxes, although the effect is less prominent in Class 0 envelopes due to the higher X-ray absorbing densities there. FUV photons from the central source are not effective in destroying water. The average water abundance in Class I sources for L_X > 10^27 ergs s^-1 is predicted to be x(H2O) < 10^-6.

  9. Chandra Multiwavelength Project X-ray Point Source Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsun Kim; Dong-Woo Kim; Belinda J. Wilkes; Paul J. Green; Eunhyeuk Kim; Craig S. Anderson; Wayne A. Barkhouse; Nancy R. Evans; Zeljko Ivezic; Margarita Karovska; Vinay L. Kashyap; Myung Gyoon Lee; Peter Maksym; Amy E. Mossman; John D. Silverman; Harvey D. Tananbaum

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Chandra Multiwavelength Project (ChaMP) X-ray point source catalog with ~6,800 X-ray sources detected in 149 Chandra observations covering \\~10 deg^2. The full ChaMP catalog sample is seven times larger than the initial published ChaMP catalog. The exposure time of the fields in our sample ranges from 0.9 to 124 ksec, corresponding to a deepest X-ray flux limit of f_{0.5-8.0} = 9 x 10^{-16} erg/cm2/sec. The ChaMP X-ray data have been uniformly reduced and analyzed with ChaMP-specific pipelines, and then carefully validated by visual inspection. The ChaMP catalog includes X-ray photometric data in 8 different energy bands as well as X-ray spectral hardness ratios and colors. To best utilize the ChaMP catalog, we also present the source reliability, detection probability and positional uncertainty. To quantitatively assess those parameters, we performed extensive simulations. In particular, we present a set of empirical equations: the flux limit as a function of effective exposure time, and the positional uncertainty as a function of source counts and off axis angle. The false source detection rate is ~1% of all detected ChaMP sources, while the detection probability is better than ~95% for sources with counts >30 and off axis angle <5 arcmin. The typical positional offset between ChaMP X-ray source and their SDSS optical counterparts is 0.7+-0.4 arcsec, derived from ~900 matched sources.

  10. X-Ray Reflection Nebulae with Large Equivalent Widths of Neutral Iron Ka Line in the Sgr C Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Nakajima; Takeshi Go Tsuru; Masayoshi Nobukawa; Hironori Matsumoto; Katsuji Koyama; Hiroshi Murakami; Atsushi Senda; Shigeo Yamauchi

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the first results of the Suzaku observation in the Sgr C region. We detected four diffuse clumps with strong line emission at 6.4keV, Ka from neutral or low-ionized Fe. One of them, M359.38-0.00, is newly discovered with Suzaku. The X-ray spectra of the two bright clumps, M359.43-0.07 and M359.47-0.15, after subtracting the Galactic center diffuse X-ray emission (GCDX), exhibit strong Ka line from FeI with large equivalent widths (EWs) of 2.0-2.2keV and clear Kb of FeI. The GCDX in the Sgr C region is composed of the 6.4keV- and 6.7keV-associated components. These are phenomenologically decomposed by taking relations between EWs of the 6.4keV and 6.7keV lines. Then the former EWs against the associated continuum in the bright clump regions are estimated to be 2.4(+2.3_-0.7)keV. Since the two different approaches give similar large EWs of 2keV, we strongly suggest that the 6.4keV clumps in the Sgr C region are due to X-ray reflection/fluorescence (the X-ray reflection nebulae).

  11. Spectral Study of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission with Suzaku

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Ebisawa; Shigeo Yamauchi; Yasuo Tanaka; Katsuji Koyama; Yuichiro Ezoe; Aya Bamba; Motohide Kokubun; Yoshiaki Hyodo; Masahiro Tsujimoto; Hiromitsu Takahashi

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed a typical Galactic plane field at (l,b) = (28.46d, -0.20d) with Suzaku for 100 ksec to carry out a precise spectral study of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE). The field is known to be devoid of X-ray point sources brighter than ~2 x 10^{-13} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} (2--10 keV), and already deeply observed with Chandra. Thanks to the low and stable background and high spectral resolution of Suzaku, we were able to resolve, for the first time, three narrow iron K-emission lines from low-ionized (6.41 keV), helium-like (6.67 keV), and hydrogenic ions (7.00 keV) in the GRXE spectrum. These line features constrain the GRXE emission mechanisms: The cosmic-ray ion charge exchange model or the non-equilibrium ionization plasma model are unlikely, since they require either broad emission lines or lines at intermediate ionization states. Collisional ionization equilibrium plasma is the likely origin for the 6.67 keV and 7.00 keV lines, while origin of the 6.41 keV line, which is due to fluorescence from cold material, is not elucidated. Low non-X-ray background and little stray-light contamination of Suzaku allowed us to precisely measure the absolute X-ray surface brightness in the direction of the Galactic plane. Excluding the point sources brighter than ~2 x 10^{-13} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} (2--10 keV), the total surface brightness on the Galactic plane is ~6.1 x 10^{-11} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} deg^{-2} (2--10 keV), including the contribution of the cosmic X-ray background that is estimated to be ~1.3x 10^{-11} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} deg^{-2}.

  12. Tools for a Theoretical X-ray Beamline J. J. Rehr*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Tools for a Theoretical X-ray Beamline J. J. Rehr* Department of Physics University of Washington, France 22 October 2010 #12;X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline #12;Tools for a Theoretical X-ray Beamline · GOAL Theoretical X-ray Beamline: 2. Tools for EXAFS and XANES, EELS, XMCD, ... 3. DFT/MD-TOOLS 4. Next generation

  13. Fourier analysis of X-ray micro-diffraction profiles to characterize laser shock peened metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    .L., 1950. The effect of cold-work distortion on X-ray pat- terns. Journal of Applied Physics 21, 595LSP need to be further studied from the measured X-ray micro-diffraction profile. Broadening of X-rayFourier analysis of X-ray micro-diffraction profiles to characterize laser shock peened metals

  14. Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Quantification of rapid environmental redox processes with quick-scanning x-ray absorption. Here we apply quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy (Q-XAS), at sub-second time that can be measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. arsenic extended x-ray absorption fine structure

  15. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siddons, David Peter (Shoreham, NY); Johnson, Erik D. (Ridge, NY); Guckel, Henry (Madison, WI); Klein, Jonathan L. (Madison, WI)

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures.

  16. Method and apparatus for micromachining using hard X-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siddons, D.P.; Johnson, E.D.; Guckel, H.; Klein, J.L.

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray source such as a synchrotron which provides a significant spectral content of hard X-rays is used to expose relatively thick photoresist such that the portions of the photoresist at an exit surface receive at least a threshold dose sufficient to render the photoresist susceptible to a developer, while the entrance surface of the photoresist receives an exposure which does not exceed a power limit at which destructive disruption of the photoresist would occur. The X-ray beam is spectrally shaped to substantially eliminate lower energy photons while allowing a substantial flux of higher energy photons to pass through to the photoresist target. Filters and the substrate of the X-ray mask may be used to spectrally shape the X-ray beam. Machining of photoresists such as polymethylmethacrylate to micron tolerances may be obtained to depths of several centimeters, and multiple targets may be exposed simultaneously. The photoresist target may be rotated and/or translated in the beam to form solids of rotation and other complex three-dimensional structures. 21 figs.

  17. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  18. Viewing spin structures with soft x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Peter

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment marks the basic unit for magnetic properties of matter. Magnetism, in particular ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism is described by a collective order of these spins, where the interaction between individual spins reflects a competition between exchange, anisotropy and dipolar energy terms. As a result the energetically favored ground state of a ferromagnetic system is a rather complex spin configuration, the magnetic domain structure. Magnetism is one of the eldest scientific phenomena, yet it is one of the most powerful and versatile utilized physical effects in modern technologies, such as in magnetic storage and sensor devices. To achieve highest storage density, the relevant length scales, such as the bit size in disk drives is now approaching the nanoscale and as such further developments have to deal with nanoscience phenomena. Advanced characterization tools are required to fully understand the underlying physical principles. Magnetic microscopes using polarized soft X-rays offer a close-up view into magnetism with unique features, these include elemental sensitivity due to X-ray magnetic dichroism effects as contrast mechanism, high spatial resolution provided by state-of-the-art X-ray optics and fast time resolution limited by the inherent time structure of current X-ray sources, which will be overcome with the introduction of ultrafast and high brilliant X-ray sources.

  19. A Soft X-Ray Lag Detected in Centaurus A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed time lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2--4 keV, 4--10 keV, and 10--20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a time scale of days by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method in a flare episode. A peak in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of $\\sim 5$ days in 2--4 keV versus 4--10 keV and in 4--10 keV versus 10--20 keV, and $\\sim 10$ days in 2--4 keV versus 10--20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons in these three energy bands. Alternatively, if the X-ray variation was produced in a corona surrounding or along the inner part of the accretion disk, we can explain ...

  20. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, C.; /UCLA /SLAC; ,

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  1. ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul, 34956 (Turkey)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

  2. Quantized hard-x-ray phase vortices nucleated by aberrated nanolenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlov, Konstantin M. [School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales 2351 (Australia); School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Paganin, David M. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Vine, David J. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Schmalz, Jelena A. [School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales 2351 (Australia); Suzuki, Yoshio; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Yagi, Naoto [SPring-8/JASRI (Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute), Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kharchenko, Alexander; Blaj, Gabriel [PANalytical B.V., P.O. Box 13, 7600 AA Almelo (Netherlands); Jakubek, Jan [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, 166 36 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Altissimo, Matteo [Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication, 151 Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Materials Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Clayton South, Victoria 3169 (Australia); Clark, Jesse N. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantized x-ray phase vortices, namely, screw-type topological defects in the wave fronts of a coherent monochromatic scalar x-ray wave field, may be spontaneously nucleated by x-ray lenses. Phase retrieval is used to reconstruct the phase and amplitude of the complex disturbance created by aberrated gold nanolenses illuminated with hard x rays. A nanoscale quantized x-ray vortex-antivortex dipole is observed, manifest both as a pair of opposite-helicity branch points in the Riemann sheets of the multivalued x-ray phase map of the complex x-ray field and in the vorticity of the associated Poynting vector field.

  3. Hard X-rays from Emission Line Galaxies and the X-ray Background: A Test for Advection Dominated Accretion with Radio Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insu Yi; Stephen P. Boughn

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of the cosmic X-ray background (XRB) have suggested the possible existence of a population of relatively faint sources with hard X-ray spectra; however, the emission mechanism remains unclear. If the hard X-ray emission is from the radiatively inefficient, advection dominated accretion flows (ADAFs) around massive black holes in galactic nuclei, X-ray luminosity and radio luminosity satisfy the approximate relation $L_R\\sim 7\\times 10^{35}(\

  4. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrapp, Michael J. [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany); Physik Department E21, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Goldammer, Matthias [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Otto-Hahn-Ring 6, 81739 Munich (Germany); Schulz, Michael [Physik Department E21, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Bangalore (India); Böni, Peter [Physik Department E21, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  5. Eta Car and Its Surroundings: the X-ray Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. F. Corcoran; K. Hamaguchi

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray emission from the supermassive star Eta Carinae (\\ec) originates from hot shocked gas produced by current stellar mass loss as well as ejecta from prior eruptive events. Absorption of this emission by cool material allows the determination of the spatial and temporal distribution of this material. Emission from the shocked gas can provide important information about abundances through the study of thermal X-ray line emission. We discuss how studies of the X-ray emission from Eta Car at a variety of temporal, spatial and spectral scales and resolutions have helped refine our knowledge of both the continuous and discrete mass loss from the system, and its interactions with more extended material around the star.

  6. Counterparts to the Nuclear Bulge X-ray source population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Gosling; Reba M. Bandyopadhyay; Katherine M. Blundell; Phil Lucas

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an initial matching of the source positions of the Chandra Nuclear Bulge X-ray sources to the new UKIDSS-GPS near-infrared survey of the Nuclear Bulge. This task is made difficult by the extremely crowded nature of the region, despite this, we find candidate counterparts to ~50% of the X-ray sources. We show that detection in the J-band for a candidate counterpart to an X-ray source preferentially selects those candidate counterparts in the foreground whereas candidate counterparts with only detections in the H and K-bands are more likely to be Nuclear Bulge sources. We discuss the planned follow-up for these candidate counterparts.

  7. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Thibault, P. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Beetz, T. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Elser, V. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Howells, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Jacobsen, C. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Functional Nanomaterials; Kirz, J. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Lima, E. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Miao, H. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Neiman, A. M. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sayre, D. [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  8. Non-thermal X-ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Vink

    2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of narrow, X-ray synchrotron radiating filaments surrounding young supernova remnants indicate that magnetic fields strengths are relatively high, B ~ 0.1 mG, or even higher, and that diffusion is close to the Bohm limit. I illustrate this using Cas A as an example. Also older remnants such as RCW 86 appear to emit X-ray synchrotron radiation, but the emission is more diffuse, and not always confined to a region close to the shock front. I argue that for RCW 86 the magnetic field is likely to be low (B ~ 17 microGauss), and at the location where the shell emits X-ray synchrotron radiation the shock velocity is much higher than the average shock velocity of ~600 km/s.

  9. X-ray radiography with highly charged ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marrs, Roscoe E. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extremely small (1-250 micron FWHM) beam of slow highly charged ions deexciting on an x-ray production target generates x-ray monochromatic radiation that is passed through a specimen and detected for imaging. The resolution of the x-ray radiograms is improved and such detection is achieved with relatively low dosages of radiation passing through the specimen. An apparatus containing an electron beam ion trap (and modifications thereof) equipped with a focusing column serves as a source of ions that generate radiation projected onto an image detector. Electronic and other detectors are able to detect an increased amount of radiation per pixel than achieved by previous methods and apparati.

  10. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bird, C.R.; Rockett, P.D.

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source is disclosed having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events. 5 figs.

  11. Movable anode x-ray source with enhanced anode cooling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bird, Charles R. (Ypsilanti, MI); Rockett, Paul D. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An x-ray source having a cathode and a disc-shaped anode with a peripheral surface at constant radius from the anode axis opposed to the cathode. The anode has stub axle sections rotatably carried in heat conducting bearing plates which are mounted by thermoelectric coolers to bellows which normally bias the bearing plates to a retracted position spaced from opposing anode side faces. The bellows cooperate with the x-ray source mounting structure for forming closed passages for heat transport fluid. Flow of such fluid under pressure expands the bellows and brings the bearing plates into heat conducting contact with the anode side faces. A worm gear is mounted on a shaft and engages serrations in the anode periphery for rotating the anode when flow of coolant is terminated between x-ray emission events.

  12. Portable X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, V.

    1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-Ray, K-Edge Heavy Metal Detection System was designed and built by Ames Laboratory and the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. The system uses a C-frame inspection head with an X-ray tube mounted on one side of the frame and an imaging unit and a high purity germanium detector on the other side. the inspection head is portable and can be easily positioned around ventilation ducts and pipes up to 36 inches in diameter. Wide angle and narrow beam X-ray shots are used to identify the type of holdup material and the amount of the contaminant. Precise assay data can be obtained within minutes of the interrogation. A profile of the containerized holdup material and a permanent record of the measurement are immediately available.

  13. The nature of the Vela X-ray "jet"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Gvaramadze

    1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the Vela X-ray "jet", recently discovered by Markwardt & \\"Ogelman (1995), is examined. It is suggested that the "jet" arises along the interface of domelike deformations of the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable shell of the Vela supernova remnant; thereby the "jet" is interpreted as a part of the general shell of the remnant. The origin of deformations as well as the general structure of the remnant are discussed in the framework of a model based on a cavity explosion of a supernova star. It is suggested that the shell deformations viewed at various angles appear as filamentary structures visible throughout the Vela supernova remnant at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. A possible origin of the nebula of hard X-ray emission detected by Willmore et al. (1992) around the Vela pulsar is proposed.

  14. Fundamental physics at an X-ray free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ringwald

    2001-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray free electron lasers (FELs) have been proposed to be constructed both at SLAC in the form of the so-called Linac Coherent Light Source as well as at DESY, where the so-called XFEL laboratory is part of the design of the electron-positron linear collider TESLA. In addition to the immediate applications in condensed matter physics, chemistry, material science, and structural biology, X-ray FELs may be employed also to study some physics issues of fundamental nature. In this context, one may mention the boiling of the vacuum (Schwinger pair creation in an external field), horizon physics (Unruh effect), and axion production. We review these X-ray FEL opportunities of fundamental physics and discuss the necessary technological improvements in order to achieve these goals.

  15. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  16. Quiescent X-ray emission from an evolved brown dwarf ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Stelzer

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    I report on the X-ray detection of Gl569Bab. During a 25ksec Chandra observation the binary brown dwarf is for the first time spatially separated in X-rays from the flare star primary Gl569A. Companionship to Gl569A constrains the age of the brown dwarf pair to ~300-800 Myr. The observation presented here is only the second X-ray detection of an evolved brown dwarf. About half of the observing time is dominated by a large flare on Gl569Bab, the remainder is characterized by weak and non-variable emission just above the detection limit. This emission -- if not related to the afterglow of the flare -- represents the first detection of a quiescent corona on a brown dwarf, representing an important piece in the puzzle of dynamos in the sub-stellar regime.

  17. X-ray microscope assemblies. Final report and metrology report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehnpfennig, T.F.

    1981-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Final Report and Metrology Report prepared under Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Subcontract 9936205, X-ray Microscope Assemblies. The purpose of this program was to design, fabricate, and perform detailed metrology on an axisymmetric grazing-incidence x-ray microscope (XRMS) to be used as a diagnostic instrument in the Lawrence Livermore Laser Fusion Program. The optical configuration chosen for this device consists of two internally polished surfaces of revolution: an hyperboloid facing the object; and a confocal, co-axial elliposid facing the image. This arrangement is known as the Wolter Type-I configuration. The grazing angle of reflection for both surfaces is approximately 1/sup 0/. The general optical performance goals under this program were to achieve a spatial resolution in the object plane in the soft x-ray region of approximately 1 micron, and to achieve an effective solid collecting angle which is an appreciable fraction of the geometric solid collecting angle.

  18. Biological Imaging by Soft X-ray Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro,D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; et al.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

  19. Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 45 (2014) ISSN 0911-7806 Report on 10th Chinese X-Ray Spectrometry Conference (CXRSC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Kawai

    and Information Technology), Dr. Yidong Zhao (Institute of High Energy Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences-Ray Spectrometry Conference (CXRSC) Ying LIU #12;#12;45 345 Report on 10th Chinese X-Ray Spectrometry Conference (CXRSC) Adv. X-Ray. Chem. Anal., Japan 45, pp.345-348 (2014) Report on 10th Chinese X-Ray Spectrometry

  20. Probing stellar winds and accretion physics in high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources with LOFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlandini, M; Zampieri, L; Bozzo, E; Baykal, A; Blay, P; Chernyakova, M; Corbet, R; D'Aì, A; Enoto, T; Ferrigno, C; Finger, M; Klochkov, D; Kreykenbohm, I; Inam, S C; Jenke, P; Masetti, N; Manousakis, A; Mihara, T; Paul, B; Postnov, K; Reig, P; Romano, P; Santangelo, A; Shakura, N; Staubert, R; Torrejón, J M; Walter, R; Wilms, J; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

  1. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Theta Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yael Naze; Gregor Rauw

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Context : The peculiar hot star Theta Car in the open cluster IC2602 is a blue straggler as well as a single-line binary of short period (2.2d). Aims : Its high-energy properties are not well known, though X-rays can provide useful constraints on the energetic processes at work in binaries as well as in peculiar, single objects. Methods : We present the analysis of a 50ks exposure taken with the XMM-Newton observatory. It provides medium as well as high-resolution spectroscopy. Results : Our high-resolution spectroscopy analysis reveals a very soft spectrum with multiple temperature components (1--6MK) and an X-ray flux slightly below the `canonical' value (log[L_X(0.1-10.)/L_{BOL}] ~ -7). The X-ray lines appear surprisingly narrow and unshifted, reminiscent of those of beta Cru and tau Sco. Their relative intensities confirm the anomalous abundances detected in the optical domain (C strongly depleted, N strongly enriched, O slightly depleted). In addition, the X-ray data favor a slight depletion in neon and iron, but they are less conclusive for the magnesium abundance (solar-like?). While no significant changes occur during the XMM-Newton observation, variability in the X-ray domain is detected on the long-term range. The formation radius of the X-ray emission is loosely constrained to <5 R_sol, which allows for a range of models (wind-shock, corona, magnetic confinement,...) though not all of them can be reconciled with the softness of the spectrum and the narrowness of the lines.

  2. X-RAY BINARY EVOLUTION ACROSS COSMIC TIME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragos, T.; Zezas, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lehmer, B.; Tzanavaris, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Homewood Campus, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tremmel, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Basu-Zych, A.; Hornschemeier, A.; Jenkins, L.; Ptak, A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Centre, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Belczynski, K. [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland)] [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); Kalogera, V., E-mail: tfragos@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High-redshift galaxies permit the study of the formation and evolution of X-ray binary (XRB) populations on cosmological timescales, probing a wide range of metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs). In this paper, we present results from a large-scale population synthesis study that models the XRB populations from the first galaxies of the universe until today. We use as input to our modeling the Millennium II cosmological simulation and the updated semi-analytic galaxy catalog by Guo et al. to self-consistently account for the star formation history and metallicity evolution of the universe. Our modeling, which is constrained by the observed X-ray properties of local galaxies, gives predictions about the global scaling of emission from XRB populations with properties such as SFR and stellar mass, and the evolution of these relations with redshift. Our simulations show that the X-ray luminosity density (X-ray luminosity per unit volume) from XRBs in our universe today is dominated by low-mass XRBs, and it is only at z {approx}> 2.5 that high-mass XRBs become dominant. We also find that there is a delay of {approx}1.1 Gyr between the peak of X-ray emissivity from low-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 2.1) and the peak of SFR density (at z {approx} 3.1). The peak of the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs (at z {approx} 3.9) happens {approx}0.8 Gyr before the peak of the SFR density, which is due to the metallicity evolution of the universe.

  3. X Ray Precursors in SGRs: Precessing Gamma Jet Tails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion

    2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak isolated X-ray precursor events before the main Gamma Ray Burst, GRB, and also rare Soft Gamma Repeaters, SGR, events are in complete disagreement with any Fireball, or Magnetar, one-shoot explosive scenarios. Fireball model in last two years has been deeply modified into a fountain beamed Jet exploding and interacting on external shells to explain GRB fine time structure. On the contrary earlier we proposed a unified scenario for both GRBs-SGRs where a precessing Gamma Jet (of different intensity) and its geometrical beaming is the source of both GRB and SGRs wide morphology. GRBs are peaked SNs Jet spinning and precessing observed along the thin Jet axis. Their mysterious weak X precursors bursts, corresponding to non-negligible energy powers, up to million Supernova ones for GRB, are gamma Jet tails beamed off-axis, observed at X-Ray tails. They are rare, about (3-6)% of all GRBs, but not unique at all. Comparable brief X-ray precursor flashes occurred in rarest and most detailed SGRs events as the 27 and the 29 August 1998 event from SGR 1900+14. The same source has been in very power-full activity on recent 18 April 2001 once again preceded by X-Ray precursors. These events are inconsistent with any Fireball or Magnetar-Mini-Fireball models. We interpret them naturally as earlier marginal blazing of outlying X conical precessing Jet, an off-axis tails surrounding a narrower gamma precessing Jet. Only when the light-house Jet is in on-axis blazing mode toward the Earth we observe the harder power-full SGR event. We predict such a rich X-Ray precursor signals (more numerous then gamma ones) during Soft Gamma Repeater peak activities; they should be abundant and within detection threshold by a permanent monitoring SGRs by Beppo-Sax WFC or Chandra X ray satellites while at peak activity.

  4. Bragg x-ray survey spectrometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varshney, S. K.; Jakhar, S. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Barnsley, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); O'Mullane, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several potential impurity ions in the ITER plasmas will lead to loss of confined energy through line and continuum emission. For real time monitoring of impurities, a seven channel Bragg x-ray spectrometer (XRCS survey) is considered. This paper presents design and analysis of the spectrometer, including x-ray tracing by the Shadow-XOP code, sensitivity calculations for reference H-mode plasma and neutronics assessment. The XRCS survey performance analysis shows that the ITER measurement requirements of impurity monitoring in 10 ms integration time at the minimum levels for low-Z to high-Z impurity ions can largely be met.

  5. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 2–18 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  6. X-Ray Binary Systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kahabka; W. Pietsch

    1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of a systematic search for spectrally hard and soft X-ray binary systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). This search has been applied to ROSAT PSPC data (0.1-2.4 keV) collected during 9 pointed observations towards this galaxy covering a time span of 2 years from October 91 till October 93. Selection criteria have been defined in order to confine the sample of candidates. Finally 7 spectrally hard and 4 spectrally soft sources were selected from the list as candidates for binaries in the SMC. The sample is luminosity limited (>3.10**35 erg/s). SMC X-1 has been observed during a full binary orbit starting with a low-state covering an X-ray eclipse and emerging into a bright long-duration flare with two short-duration flares separated by 10 hours. The Be type transient SMC X-2 has been redetected with ROSAT. Variability has been found in the sources RX J0051.8-7231 and RX J0052.1-731 already discovered with Einstein. RX J0101.0-7206 has been discovered at the north-eastern boundary of the giant SMC HII region N66 during an X-ray outburst and half a year later during a quiescent phase. A variable source, RX J0049.1-7250, located north-east of the SMC supernova remnant N19 and which may either be an X-ray binary or an AGN turns out to be strongly absorbed. It may be located behind the SMC. If it is an X-ray binary then it radiates at the Eddington limit in the X-ray bright state. Another variable and hard X-ray source RX J0032.9-7348 has been discovered at the south-eastern border of the body of the SMC. A high mass X-ray binary nature is favored for this source. We searched for CAL87 like systems in the SMC catalog and found none. A new candidate supersoft source RX J0103.8-7254 has been detected. We cannot exclude that it is a foreground object.

  7. The dominant X-ray wind in massive star binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens

    2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate which shocked wind is responsible for the majority of the X-ray emission in colliding wind binaries, an issue where there is some confusion in the literature, and which we show is more complicated than has been assumed. We find that where both winds rapidly cool (typically close binaries), the ratio of the wind speeds is often more important than the momentum ratio, because it controls the energy flux ratio, and the faster wind is generally the dominant emitter. When both winds are largely adiabatic (typically long-period binaries), the slower and denser wind will cool faster and the stronger wind generally dominates the X-ray luminosity.

  8. The First Angstrom X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galayda, John; /SLAC

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linac Coherent Light Source produced its first x-ray laser beam on 10 April 2009. Today it is routinely producing x-ray pulses with energy >2 mJ across the operating range from 820-8,200 eV. The facility has begun operating for atomic/molecular/optical science experiments. Performance of the facility in its first user run (1 October - 21 December) and current machine development activities will be presented. Early results from the preparations for the start of the second user run is also reported.

  9. Viscosity in X-ray clusters: Braginskii over 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gruzinov

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that it is currently impossible to simulate X-ray clusters using correct equations, because even the MHD description is not applicable. But since fluid simulations actually reproduce observations quite well, one may try to improve the fluid codes by including molecular transport of heat and momentum. We calculate the effective molecular viscosity for the simplest model of magnetic field and obtain 1/5 of the Braginskii value, similar to 1/3 of Spitzer for the heat conduction. This is large enough to noticeably damp the X-ray cluster turbulence.

  10. Confusion of Diffuse Objects in the X-ray Sky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mark Voit; August E. Evrard; Greg L. Bryan

    2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the baryons in the present-day universe are thought to reside in intergalactic space at temperatures of 10^5-10^7 K. X-ray emission from these baryons contributes a modest (~10%) fraction of the ~ 1 keV background whose prominence within the large-scale cosmic web depends on the amount of non-gravitational energy injected into intergalactic space by supernovae and AGNs. Here we show that the virialized regions of groups and clusters cover over a third of the sky, creating a source-confusion problem that may hinder X-ray searches for individual intercluster filaments and contaminate observations of distant groups.

  11. Stratigraphic correlation with X-ray powder patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singletary, John B

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pattern of maxima characteristic of all the principal spacings. For instance, if the radiation detector is set so as to observe the secondary diffracted beam at an angle which satisfies Bragg~s Law for some value of d found in the crystal, then a... focusing x-ray spectrometer manufac- tured by the North American Philips Company for commercial use. This instrument, shown in Fig. RB, consists of an x-ray generating unit, a goniometer, and a Geiger counter radiation detector. The patte ns were...

  12. High-resolution radio observations of X-ray binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Miller-Jones

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an overview of important results obtained using high-resolution very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of X-ray binary systems. These results derive from both astrometric observations and resolved imaging of sources, from black holes to neutron star and even white dwarf systems. I outline a number of upcoming developments in instrumentation, both new facilities and ongoing upgrades to existing VLBI instruments, and I conclude by identifying a number of important areas of investigation where VLBI will be crucial in advancing our understanding of X-ray binaries.

  13. Femtosecond Time-Delay X-ray Holography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruary 17,Time-Delay X-ray Holography X-ray

  14. A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folkard, Melvyn; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Schettino, Giuseppe; Atkinson, Kirk; Prise, Kevin, M.; Michael, Barry, D.

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gray Cancer Institute has pioneered the use of X ray focussing techniques to develop systems for micro irradiating individual cells and sub cellular targets in vitro. Cellular micro irradiation is now recognised as a highly versatile technique for understanding how ionising radiation interacts with living cells and tissues. The strength of the technique lies in its ability to deliver precise doses of radiation to selected individual cells (or sub cellular targets). The application of this technique in the field of radiation biology continues to be of great interest for investigating a number of phenomena currently of concern to the radiobiological community. One important phenomenon is the so called ‘bystander effect’ where it is observed that unirradiated cells can also respond to signals transmitted by irradiated neighbours. Clearly, the ability of a microbeam to irradiate just a single cell or selected cells within a population is well suited to studying this effect. Our prototype ‘tabletop’ X-ray microprobe was optimised for focusing 278 eV C-K X rays and has been used successfully for a number of years. However, we have sought to develop a new variable energy soft X-ray microprobe capable of delivering focused CK (0.28 keV), Al-K (1.48 keV) and notably, Ti-K (4.5 keV) X rays. Ti-K X rays are capable of penetrating several cell layers and are therefore much better suited to studies involving tissues and multi cellular layers. In our new design, X-rays are generated by the focussed electron bombardment of a material whose characteristic-K radiation is required. The source is mounted on a 1.5 x 1.0 metre optical table. Electrons are generated by a custom built gun, designed to operate up to 15 kV. The electrons are focused using a permanent neodymium iron boron magnet assembly. Focusing is achieved by adjusting the accelerating voltage and by fine tuning the target position via a vacuum position feedthrough. To analyze the electron beam properties, a custom built microscope is used to image the focussed beam on the target, through a vacuum window. The X-rays are focussed by a zone plate optical assembly mounted to the end of a hollow vertical tube that can be precisely positioned above the X ray source. The cell finding and positioning stage comprises an epi-fluorescence microscope and a feedback controlled 3 axis cell positioning stage, also mounted on the optical table. Independent vertical micro positioning of the microscope objective turret allows the focus of the microscope and the X ray focus to coincide in space (i.e. at the point where the cell should be positioned for exposure). The whole microscope stage assembly can be precisely raised or lowered, to cater for large differences in the focal length of the X ray zone plates. The facility is controlled by PC and the software provides full status and control of the source and makes use of a dual-screen for control and display during the automated cell finding and irradiation procedures.

  15. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. [Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry; Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ({mu}-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  16. Synchrotron radiation induced x-ray micro analysis: A realistic alternative for electron- and ion beam microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens, K.; Adams, F. (Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Chemistry); Rivers, M.L.; Jones, K.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron Radiation induced X-ray micro Fluorescence analysis ([mu]-SRXRF) is compared with more conventional microanalytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Microscopy (SIMS) and Electron Probe X-ray Microanalysis (EPXMA) for two typical microanalytical applications. SRXRF and EPXMA are employed for the analysis of individual particles, showing the complementary character of both techniques. By means of element mapping of trace constituents in a heterogeneous feldspar, the strong and weak points of SRXRF in comparison to EPXMA and SIMS are illustrated. The most striking difference between SRXRF and the other two microanalytical methods is the ability of SRXRF to probe deep into the investigated Material, whereas SIMS and EPXMA only investigate the upper surface of the material. The possibilities of SRXRF at third generation synchrotron rings is also briefly discussed.

  17. Modification of the TASMIP x-ray spectral model for the simulation of microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisniega, A.; Vaquero, J. J., E-mail: juanjose.vaquero@uc3m.es [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Desco, M. [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain) [Departamento de Bioingeniería e Ingeniería Aeroespacial, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Madrid ES28911 (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid ES28007 (Spain); Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Madrid ES28029 (Spain)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The availability of accurate and simple models for the estimation of x-ray spectra is of great importance for system simulation, optimization, or inclusion of photon energy information into data processing. There is a variety of publicly available tools for estimation of x-ray spectra in radiology and mammography. However, most of these models cannot be used directly for modeling microfocus x-ray sources due to differences in inherent filtration, energy range and/or anode material. For this reason the authors propose in this work a new model for the simulation of microfocus spectra based on existing models for mammography and radiology, modified to compensate for the effects of inherent filtration and energy range. Methods: The authors used the radiology and mammography versions of an existing empirical model [tungsten anode spectral model interpolating polynomials (TASMIP)] as the basis of the microfocus model. First, the authors estimated the inherent filtration included in the radiology model by comparing the shape of the spectra with spectra from the mammography model. Afterwards, the authors built a unified spectra dataset by combining both models and, finally, they estimated the parameters of the new version of TASMIP for microfocus sources by calibrating against experimental exposure data from a microfocus x-ray source. The model was validated by comparing estimated and experimental exposure and attenuation data for different attenuating materials and x-ray beam peak energy values, using two different x-ray tubes. Results: Inherent filtration for the radiology spectra from TASMIP was found to be equivalent to 1.68 mm Al, as compared to spectra obtained from the mammography model. To match the experimentally measured exposure data the combined dataset required to apply a negative filtration of about 0.21 mm Al and an anode roughness of 0.003 mm W. The validation of the model against real acquired data showed errors in exposure and attenuation in line with those reported for other models for radiology or mammography. Conclusions: A new version of the TASMIP model for the estimation of x-ray spectra in microfocus x-ray sources has been developed and validated experimentally. Similarly to other versions of TASMIP, the estimation of spectra is very simple, involving only the evaluation of polynomial expressions.

  18. Correlated long-term optical and X-ray variations in NGC 5548

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Uttley; Rick Edelson; Ian McHardy; Bradley M. Peterson; Alex Markowitz

    2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine the long-term optical light curve of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC5548 with the X-ray light curve measured by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer over 6 years, to determine the relationship between the optical and X-ray continua. The X-ray light curve is strongly correlated with the optical light curve on long (~year) time-scales. The amplitude of the long-term optical variability in NGC5548 is larger than that of the X-ray variability (after accounting for the host galaxy contribution), implying that X-ray reprocessing is not the main source of the optical/X-ray correlation. The correlated X-ray and optical variations in NGC5548 may be caused by instabilities in the inner part of the accretion flow, where both the X-ray and optical emission regions may be located.

  19. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu, E-mail: i-jeon@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Ho [Pro-optics Co., Ltd., 475 Ami-ri, Bubal-eup, Icheon 467-866 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gye-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Nambu University, 76 Chumdan Jungang 1-ro, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju 506-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Youb [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  20. Thermal X-ray composites as an effect of projection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Petruk

    2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new possibility to explain the nature of thermal X-ray composites (TXCs), i.e. a class of supernova remnants (SNRs) with a thermal X-ray centrally-filled morphology within a radio shell, as a projection effect of the 2- or 3-dimensional shell-like SNR evolved in a nonuniform medium with scale-height <10 pc is proposed. Both X-ray and radio morphologies, as well as the basic theoretical features of this kind of SNR and the surrounding medium, are considered. Theoretical properties of a shell-like SNR evolved at the edge of a molecular cloud correspond to the observed properties of TXCs if the gradient of the ambient density does not lie in the projection plane and the magnetic field is nearly aligned with the line of sight. So, at least a part of objects from the class may be interpreted within the framework of the considered effect. The proposed model suggests that SNRs with barrel-like radio and centrally-brightened thermal X-ray morphologies should exist. The model allows us to consider TXCs as prospective sources of proton origin gamma-rays.

  1. Multidimensional analysis of X-ray variability of AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Halevin

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we analyzed X-ray light curves of active galactic nucleus NGC 4051 obtained using Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer of Chandra satellite. Taking into account mainly flaring behaviour of AGNs we have used wavelet analysis for searching of short time lived events on light curves.

  2. Quantum coherence phenomena in x-ray optics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisimov, Petr Mikhailovich

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    effects in a three-level coherently driven system. Second, we show that the interference effects may appear in X-ray radiation at the nuclear transitions under the condition of the nuclear level anti-crossing. This effects are similar...

  3. Thermal management of masks for deep x-ray lithography.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khounsary, A.; Chojnowski, D.; Mancini, D.C.; Lai, B.; Dejus, R.

    1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses some options and techniques in the thermal management of masks used in deep x-ray lithography. The x-ray masks are thin plates made of low-atomic-number materials on which a patterned thin film of a high-atomic-number metal has been deposited. When they are exposed to an x-ray beam, part of the radiation is transmitted to replicate the pattern on a downstream photoresist, and the remainder is absorbed in the mask in the form of heat. This heat load can cause deformation of the mask and thus image distortion in the lithography process. The mask geometry considered in the present study is 100 mm x 100 mm in area, and about 0.1 to 2 mm thick. The incident radiation is a bending magnet x-ray beam having a footprint of 60 mm x 4 mm at the mask. The mask is scanned vertically about {+-} 30 mm so that a 60 mm x 60 mm area is exposed. the maximum absorbed heat load in the mask is 80 W, which is significantly greater than a few watts encountered in previous systems. In this paper, cooling techniques, substrate material selection, transient and steady state thermal and structural behavior, and other thermo-mechanical aspects of mask design are discussed. It is shown that, while diamond and graphite remain attractive candidates, at present beryllium is a more suitable material for this purpose and, when properly cooled, can provide the necessary dimensional tolerance.

  4. DEDUCING ELECTRON PROPERTIES FROM HARD X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    of the accelerated electron distribution. Keywords: Sun: flares; Sun: X-rays; Sun: acceleration; Sun: energetic distribution 31 4.5 Low-energy cutoffs in the electron distribution 32 4.6 Temperature distribution of thermal-ray emission process(es) in question with the electron distribution function, which is in turn a function

  5. X-Ray Astronomy to Resonant Theranostics for Cancer Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA E-mail: nahar@astronomy.ohio. The falling particles spiral around the black hole, move faster close to it and release energy in the form jets at the center (Observed by X-ray space observatory Chandra). In the image: red indicates low-energy

  6. Lensless imaging of nanoporous glass with soft X-rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Joshua J.; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Jacobsen, Chris

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent soft X-ray diffraction has been used to image nanoporous glass structure in two dimensions using different methods. The merit of the reconstructions was judged using a new method of Fourier phase correlation with a final, refined image. The porous structure was found to have a much larger average size then previously believed.

  7. X-ray Emission from Thunderstorms and Lightning

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Joseph Dwyer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    How lightning is initiated in the relatively low electric fields inside thunderclouds and how it can then propagate for tens of kilometers through virgin air are two of the great unsolved problems in the atmospheric sciences.  Until very recently it was believed that lightning was entirely a conventional discharge, involving only low-energy (a few eV) electrons.  This picture changed completely a few years ago with the discovery of intense x-ray emission from both natural cloud-to-ground lightning and rocket-triggered lightning.  This energetic emission cannot be produced by a conventional discharge, and so the presence of x-rays strongly implies that runaway breakdown plays a role in lightning processes.  During runaway breakdown, electrons are accelerated through air to nearly the speed of light by strong electric fields.  These runaway electrons then emit bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma-rays during collisions with air.  Indeed, the x-ray and gamma-ray emission produced by runaway breakdown near the tops of thunderstorms is bright enough to be seen from outer space, 600 km away.  As a result, the physics used for decades to describe thunderstorm electrification and lightning discharges is incomplete and needs to be revisited. 

  8. Helium and Iron in X-ray galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefano Ettori

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the role of the sedimentation of helium in galaxy cluster cores on the observed X-ray properties and present a history of the metal accumulation in the ICM, with new calculations with respect to my previous work following the recent evidence of a bi-modal distribution of the delay time in Supernovae Type Ia.

  9. In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Swygenhoven, Helena, E-mail: helena.vanswygenhoven@psi.ch; Van Petegem, Steven

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

  10. Crystal defect studies using x-ray diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, B.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic lattice defects such as point (single atom) defects, dislocation loops, and solute precipitates are characterized by local electronic density changes at the defect sites and by distortions of the lattice structure surrounding the defects. The effect of these interruptions of the crystal lattice on the scattering of x-rays is considered in this paper, and examples are presented of the use of the diffuse scattering to study the defects. X-ray studies of self-interstitials in electron irradiated aluminum and copper are discussed in terms of the identification of the interstitial configuration. Methods for detecting the onset of point defect aggregation into dislocation loops are considered and new techniques for the determination of separate size distributions for vacancy loops and interstitial loops are presented. Direct comparisons of dislocation loop measurements by x-rays with existing electron microscopy studies of dislocation loops indicate agreement for larger size loops, but x-ray measurements report higher concentrations in the smaller loop range. Methods for distinguishing between loops and three-dimensional precipitates are discussed and possibilities for detailed studies considered. A comparison of dislocation loop size distributions obtained from integral diffuse scattering measurements with those from TEM show a discrepancy in the smaller sizes similar to that described above.

  11. Soft x-ray laser microscope. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL`s 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  12. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, J.

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions. 4 figs.

  13. Soft x-ray diagnostics for pulsed power machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idzorek, G.C.; Coulter, W.L.; Walsh, P.J.; Montoya, R.R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of soft x-ray diagnostics are being fielded on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus and Procyon pulsed power systems and also being fielded on joint US/Russian magnetized target fusion experiments known as MAGO (Magnitoye Obzhatiye). The authors have designed a low-cost modular photoemissive detector designated the XRD-96 that uses commercial 1100 series aluminum for the photocathode. In addition to photocathode detectors a number of designs using solid state silicon photodiodes have been designed and fielded. They also present a soft x-ray time-integrated pinhole camera system that uses standard type TMAX-400 photographic film that obviates the need for expensive and no longer produced zero-overcoat soft x-ray emulsion film. In a typical experiment the desired spectral energy cuts, signal intensity levels, and desired field of view will determine diagnostic geometry and x-ray filters selected. The authors have developed several computer codes to assist in the diagnostic design process and data deconvolution. Examples of the diagnostic design process and data analysis for a typical pulsed power experiment are presented.

  14. X-rays at Solid-Liquid Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dosch, Helmut (Max Planck Institute for Metals Research) [Max Planck Institute for Metals Research

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-liquid interfaces play an important role in many areas of current and future technologies, and in our biosphere. They play a key role in the development of nanofluidics and nanotribology, which sensitively depend on our knowledge of the microscopic structures and phenomena at the solid-liquid interface. The detailed understanding of how a fluid meets a wall is also a theoretical challenge. In particular, the phenomena at repulsive walls are of interest, since they affect many different phenomena, such as water-repellent surfaces or the role of the hydrophobic interaction in protein folding. Recent x-ray reflectivity studies of various solid-liquid interfaces have disclosed rather intriguiing phenomena, which will be discussed in this lecture: premelting of ice in contact with silica; liquid Pb in contact with Si; water in contact with hydrophobic surfaces. These experiments, carried out with high-energy x-ray microbeams, reveal detailed insight into the liquid density profile closest to the wall. A detailed insight into atomistic phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces is also a prerequisite in the microscopic control of electrochemical reactions at interfaces. Recent x-ray studies show the enormous future potential of such non-destructive analytical tools for the in situ observation of (electro-)chemical surface reactions. This lecture will review recent x-ray experiments on solid-liquid interfaces.

  15. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  16. Compact X-ray Light Source Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Evans, James E.; Terminello, Louis J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Manke, Kristin L.; Plata, Charity

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, produced jointly by EMSL and FCSD, is the result of a workshop held in September 2011 that examined the utility of a compact x-ray light source (CXLS) in addressing many scientific challenges critical to advancing energy science and technology.

  17. Transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy of hydrated halogen atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elles, Christopher G.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Crowell, Robert A.; Arms, Dohn A.; Landahl, Eric C.

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to observe the transient species generated by one-photon detachment of an electron from aqueous bromide. The K-edge spectrum of the short-lived Br(0) atom exhibits a resonant 1s-4p transition...

  18. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  19. Soft X-ray spectral variability of AM Herculis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Beuermann; E. El Kholy; K. Reinsch

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Polars (AM Herculis binaries) are a prominent class of bright soft X-ray sources, many of which were discovered with ROSAT. We present a homogenous analysis of all the pointed ROSAT PSPC observations of polars subdivided into two papers that discuss the prototype polar AM Her in detail and summarize the class properties of all other polars. We derive the high-state soft X-ray flux and short-term spectral variability of AM Her using a new detector response matrix and a confirmed flux calibration of the ROSAT PSPC below 0.28 keV. The best-fit mean single-blackbody temperature and integrated bright-phase energy flux of AM Her in its April 1991 high state are 27.2 +/- 1.0 eV and (2.6 +/- 0.6) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1, respectively. The total blackbody flux of a multi-temperature model that fits both the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components is Fbb = (4.5 +/- 1.5) x 10^-9 erg cm^-2s^-1. The total accretion luminosity at a distance of 80 pc, Lbb = (2.1 +/- 0.7) x 10^33 erg s-1, implies an accretion rate of Mdot = (2.4 +/- 0.8) x 10^-10 Msun yr^-1 for an 0.78 Msun white dwarf. The soft X-ray flux displays significant variability on time scales down to 200 ms. Correlated spectral and count-rate variations are seen in flares on time scales down to 1 s, demonstrating the heating and cooling associated with individual accretion events. Our spectral and temporal analysis provides direct evidence for the blobby accretion model and suggests a connection between the soft X-ray and the fluctuating far-ultraviolet components.

  20. SUPERLUMINOUS X-RAYS FROM A SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levan, A. J.; Wheatley, P. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Read, A. M.; Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Metzger, B. D., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, 704 Pupin Hall, MC 5255, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of {approx}100 brighter than normal supernovae (SNe; typically SLSNe have M{sub V} < -21), has shown an unexpected diversity in core-collapse SN properties. Numerous models have been postulated for the nature of these events, including a strong interaction of the shockwave with a dense circumstellar environment, a re-energizing of the outflow via a central engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability SNe). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra, and Swift, and show that at least one SLSN-I is likely the brightest X-ray SN ever observed, with L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1}, {approx}150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity three orders of magnitude higher than seen in other X-ray SNe powered via circumstellar interactions. Such high X-ray luminosities are sufficient to ionize the ejecta and markedly reduce the optical depth, making it possible to see deep into the ejecta and any source of emission that resides there. Alternatively, an engine could have powered a moderately relativistic jet external to the ejecta, similar to those seen in gamma-ray bursts. If the detection of X-rays does require an engine it implies that these SNe do create compact objects, and that the stars are not completely destroyed in a pair instability event. Future observations will determine which, if any, of these mechanisms are at play in SLSNe.

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy by full-field X-ray microscopy of a thin graphite flake: Imaging and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    .bittencourt@ua.ac.be * Corresponding author Keywords: carbon; graphene; nanostructure; NEXAFS; X-ray microscopy Beilstein J structure of graphite flakes consisting of a few graphene layers. The flake was produced by exfoli- ation of the remarkable transport properties of graphene in 2004 by Geim and Novoselov triggered intense interest in its

  2. X-ray source system at the MSFC x-ray calibration facility J. J. Kolodziejczak, R. A. Austin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wargelin, Bradford J.

    hyperbolic shells, which combine to form AXAF's Wolter-I High-resolution mirror assembly (HRMA), is a phase. A part of this time will be devoted exclusively to x-ray characterization of the HRMA using a set of instruments developed by personnel at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) called the HRMA X

  3. X-ray crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yennawar, Hemant [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Møller, Magda [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gillilan, Richard [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yennawar, Neela, E-mail: nhy1@psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, 8 Althouse Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray crystal structure and a small-angle X-ray scattering solution structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase have been determined. The details of the interactions that enable the tetramer scaffold to be the functional biological unit have been analyzed. The X-ray crystal structure of sheep liver sorbitol dehydrogenase (slSDH) has been determined using the crystal structure of human sorbitol dehydrogenase (hSDH) as a molecular-replacement model. slSDH crystallized in space group I222 with one monomer in the asymmetric unit. A conserved tetramer that superposes well with that seen in hSDH (despite belonging to a different space group) and obeying the 222 crystal symmetry is seen in slSDH. An acetate molecule is bound in the active site, coordinating to the active-site zinc through a water molecule. Glycerol, a substrate of slSDH, also occupies the substrate-binding pocket together with the acetate designed by nature to fit large polyol substrates. The substrate-binding pocket is seen to be in close proximity to the tetramer interface, which explains the need for the structural integrity of the tetramer for enzyme activity. Small-angle X-ray scattering was also used to identify the quaternary structure of the tetramer of slSDH in solution.

  4. Line-resolved M-shell x-ray production cross sections of Pb and Bi induced by highly charged C and F ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Y. P.; Misra, D.; Kadhane, U.; Tribedi, Lokesh C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement on the M-shell x-ray production cross sections are reported for Pb and Bi induced by the highly charged F (only on Pb) and C ions (on both). The energy of the incident ions was varied between 20 and 102 MeV. We have derived the absolute cross sections for M{alpha}{beta} and M{gamma} lines as well as the total M x-ray cross sections. The measured cross sections are compared with available theoretical calculations, namely, the ECPSSR based on the perturbed-stationary state approximation including the effects due to the increased binding energy, Coulomb deflection (C), energy-loss (E), and relativistic (R) wave function. The energy shifts and the intensity ratios of M{alpha}{beta} and M{gamma} lines are shown to depend on the projectile atomic number. The M{gamma} x-ray cross sections are unusually higher compared to the ECPSSR prediction that is primarily attributed to a dramatic enhancement in the M{sub 3}-subshell fluorescence yield owing to multiple vacancies in N subshells. This enhancement has been quantified and it is shown that the enhancement depends on the projectile atomic number. In addition we have derived the x-ray cross section arising due to M-K-shell electron transfer from a study of a charge state dependence of M-shell x-ray yields.

  5. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC] as observed by x-ray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K and 373 K. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray...

  6. Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs Non-Destructive X-ray Measurement of Soot, Ash, Washcoat and Regeneration Damage for DPFs New commercially...

  7. Simple Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates. Simple Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates. Abstract: This note describes an approach for...

  8. The ALS X-Ray Streak Camera: Bringing the Ultrafast and Ultrasmall...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ultrafast is at the frontier of scientific research. Two x-ray approaches can be used for ultrafast examinations. The first entails developing sources that have short x-ray pulses...

  9. Development of procedures for refurbishing x-ray optics at the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction- Limitedof Soft X-Rays,” Abstract to SPIE Optics and Photonics 2012,Metrology for X-Ray and EUV Optics IV (San Diego, August 12-

  10. alpha particle x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of X-rays from the Sun direction beyond the limb with a characteristic radial distribution. These X-rays should be observed more easily during periods of quiet Sun. An...

  11. A New Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use ofRussell...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use of Russell-Saunders Coupling . A New Analysis of X-Ray Adsorption Branching Ratios: Use of Russell-Saunders Coupling . Abstract:...

  12. Ultra-high Resolution Optics for EUV and Soft X-ray Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voronov, Dmitry L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16. Yu. Shvyd’ko, X-Ray Optics, Berlin: Springer-Verlag,Ultra-high Resolution Optics for EUV and Soft X-rayspectral resolution soft x-ray optics. Conventionally in the

  13. Advanced X-ray Optics Metrology for Nanofocusing and Coherence Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    workshop: “Advanced X-Ray Optics Metrology for Nano-focusinglight sources if beamline optics won’t be available toTitled, “Advanced X-Ray Optics Metrology for Nano-focusing

  14. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    precise reflective X-ray optics,” Nucl. Instrum. and Methods70 (2001). [2] P. Z. Takacs, “X- ray optics metrology,” in [Handbook of Optics], 3rd ed. , Vol. V, M. Bass, Ed. ,

  15. Bendable X-ray Optics at the ALS: Design, Tuning, Performance and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BENDABLE X-RAY OPTICS AT THE ALS: DESIGN, TUNING,ALS) of bendable x- ray optics widely used for focusing ofAn example of a bendable optic used at ALS beamline 5.0.2.

  16. Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-Bass (Ed. ), Handbook of Optics, third ed. , vol. V, ch. 46,wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS* Valeriy V.

  17. SciTech Connect: White and Monochromatic X-ray Microbeam Investigation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    White and Monochromatic X-ray Microbeam Investigations of Materials Microstructure and Tri-Axial Stress Citation Details In-Document Search Title: White and Monochromatic X-ray...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aspect ratio x-ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0953-89841825S17 Summary: the power ratio of beam splitting. With centralized remote control, heating and x-ray diffraction... for in situ x-ray diffraction at high...

  19. Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source Advanced Research in Diesel Fuel Sprays Using X-rays from the Advanced Photon Source 2003 DEER...

  20. atmospheric electron-induced x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    opacity to X-rays, and the wind flow parameters, such as mass loss rate and terminal speed. L. M. Oskinova; R. Ignace; J. C. Brown; J. P. Cassinelli 2001-04-25 5 Hard X-ray...

  1. all-sky hard x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be...

  2. all-sky x-ray image: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be...

  3. angle x-ray sky: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We describe a search for X-ray afterglows from gamma-ray bursts using the ROSAT all-sky survey (RASS) data. If the emission in the soft X-ray...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - astronomical hard x-ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: astronomical hard x-ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Reverse Drift Bursts in the 0.8-4.5 GHz Band and their Relation to X-Rays Summary: and causing radio...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - attosecond kev x-ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de Montral Collection: Engineering 3 Generation of Attosecond X-ray and gamma-ray via Compton backscattering Summary: Generation of Attosecond X-ray and gamma-ray via...

  6. Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal for parametric X-ray (PXR) production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal for parametric X-ray (PXR) production B. Sones *, Y. Danon, R 2004 Abstract Parametric X-ray (PXR) production is reported using lithium fluoride (LiF) as a target

  7. X-ray Computed Tomography of the Root System of a Live Potted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray Computed Tomography of the Root System of a Live Potted Plant X-ray Computed Tomography of the Root System of a Live Potted Plant Being able to see the root structure of a...

  8. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast...

  9. Studies of a Linac Driver for a High Repetition Rate X-Ray FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REPETITION RATE X-RAY FEL ? M. Venturini † , J. Corlett, L.support a high repetition rate FEL operating in the soft x-of high-repetition rate FEL machine generat- ing soft x-rays

  10. Technique for the Generation of Attosecond X-Ray Pulses Using an FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penn, G.; Zholents, A.A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments at a X-ray SASE FEL”, Optics Communications,considerations for a SASE X-ray FEL”, Nucl. Instr. Methodsa fully 3D time-dependent FEL simulation code”, Nucl. Instr.

  11. Ion implantation for figure correction of high-resolution x-ray telescope mirrors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chalifoux, Brandon D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabricating mirrors for future high-resolution, large-aperture x-ray telescopes continues to challenge the x-ray astronomy instrumentation community. Building a large-aperture telescope requires thin, lightweight mirrors; ...

  12. Design and development of a 3D X-ray microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of needle-free injection systems demands better and faster imaging systems, capable of imaging the transient and steady state response of an injection into real tissue. X-ray radiography, x-ray ...

  13. accretion-powered millisecond x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAX J1808.4-3658, which also makes this the first X-ray pulsar which exhibits thermonuclear X-ray bursts. Rudy Wijnands; Michiel van der Klis 1998-04-21 2 Timing of the first...

  14. accreting millisecond x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SAX J1808.4-3658, which also makes this the first X-ray pulsar which exhibits thermonuclear X-ray bursts. Rudy Wijnands; Michiel van der Klis 1998-04-21 4 Search for...

  15. In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells In Situ X-Ray Scattering Helps Optimize Printed Solar Cells Print Wednesday, 25 February 2015 00:00 Plastic solar cells...

  16. Simulating Ru L3-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ru L3-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Simulating Ru L3-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with...

  17. Laboratory-Based Cryogenic Soft X-ray Tomography with Correlative Cryo-Light and Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, David B.; Gelb, Jeff; Palshin, Vadim; Evans, James E.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we present a novel laboratory-based cryogenic soft X-ray microscope for whole cell tomography of frozen hydrated samples. We demonstrate the capabilities of this compact cryogenic microscope by visualizing internal sub-cellular structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The microscope is shown to achieve better than 50 nm spatial resolution with a Siemens star test sample. For whole biological cells, the microscope can image specimens up to 5 micrometers thick. Structures as small as 90 nm can be detected in tomographic reconstructions at roughly 70 nm spatial resolution following a low cumulative radiation dose of only 7.2 MGy. Furthermore, the design of the specimen chamber utilizes a standard sample support that permits multimodal correlative imaging of the exact same unstained yeast cell via cryo-fluorescence light microscopy, cryo-soft x-ray microscopy and cryo-transmission electron microscopy. This completely laboratory-based cryogenic soft x-ray microscope will therefore enable greater access to three-dimensional ultrastructure determination of biological whole cells without chemical fixation or physical sectioning.

  18. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

    1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

  19. LCLS - The X-ray Laser Has Turned On

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergmann, Uwe (Linac Coherent Light Source) [Linac Coherent Light Source

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 10, 2009 the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world's first hard x-ray free electron laser, was brought to lasing. Producing an x-ray beam with over a billion times higher peak brightness that then most powerful existing syncrotron sources, it marked the beginning of a new era of science. The LCLS pulses arrive at a rate of 60 - 120 Hz in an energy range from 480 eV to 10 keV, with pulse lengths as short as a few fs to about 300 fs. Since October 2009, users have been performing experiments at the LCLS, and currently three of the six planned instruments are available. Although we stand only at the beginning of LCLS science, there is no doubt about the strong sense of early excitement.

  20. A New Measurement of Kaonic Hydrogen X rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; B. Girolami; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The $\\bar{K}N$ system at threshold is a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD, especially for the explicit chiral symmetry breaking. Therefore, we have measured the $K$-series x rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and have determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction energy-level shift and width of the $1s$ atomic state. As x-ray detectors, we used large-area silicon drift detectors having excellent energy and timing resolution, which were developed especially for the SIDDHARTA experiment. The shift and width were determined to be $\\epsilon_{1s} = -283 \\pm 36 \\pm 6 {(syst)}$ eV and $\\Gamma_{1s} = 541 \\pm 89 {(stat)} \\pm 22 {(syst)}$ eV, respectively. The new values will provide vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  1. Superluminous X-rays from a superluminous supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levan, A J; Metzger, B D; Wheatley, P J; Tanvir, N R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a population of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosities a factor of ~100 brighter than normal SNe (typically SLSNe have M_V engine, or an origin in the catastrophic destruction of the star following a loss of pressure due to pair production in an extremely massive stellar core (so-called pair instability supernovae). Here we consider constraints that can be placed on the explosion mechanism of Hydrogen-poor SLSNe (SLSNe-I) via X-ray observations, with XMM-Newton, Chandra and Swift, and show that at least one SLSNe-I is likely the brightest X-ray supernovae ever observed, with L_X ~ 10^45 ergs/s, ~150 days after its initial discovery. This is a luminosity 3 orders of magnitude higher than seen in ...

  2. Segmentation of x-ray images using Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thai, T.Q.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Segmentation is a process of separating objects of interest from their background or from other objects in an image. Without a suitable segmentation scheme, it is very difficult to detect contraband in X-rays images. In this paper, a Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling (PRL) segmentation scheme is presented and compared with other segmentation methods. PRL segmentation is an interative algorithm that labels each pixel in an image by cooperative use of two information sources: the pixel probability and the degree of certainty of its probability supported by the neighboring pixels. The practical implementation and results of the PRL segmentation on X-ray baggage images are also discussed and compared with other segmentation methods. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui [College of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, 250014 Jinan (China); Theoretical Chemistry, Roslagstullsbacken 15, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gel'mukhanov, Faris [Theoretical Chemistry, Roslagstullsbacken 15, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  4. Phase Effects on Mesoscale Object X-ray Absorption Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, Jr., H E; Aufderheide, M B; Barty, A; Lehman, S K; Kozioziemski, B J; Schneberk, D J

    2004-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory particular emphasis is being placed on the nondestructive characterization (NDC) of 'mesoscale' objects.[Martz and Albrecht 2003] We define mesoscale objects as objects that have mm extent with {micro}m features. Here we confine our discussions to x-ray imaging methods applicable to mesoscale object characterization. The goal is object recovery algorithms including phase to enable emerging high-spatial resolution x-ray imaging methods to ''see'' inside or image mesoscale-size materials and objects. To be successful our imaging characterization effort must be able to recover the object function to one micrometer or better spatial resolution over a few millimeters field-of-view with very high contrast.

  5. Background-reducing X-ray multilayer mirror

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bloch, Jeffrey J. (Los Alamos, NM); Roussel-Dupre', Diane (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Barham W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background-reducing x-ray multilayer mirror. A multiple-layer "wavetrap" deposited over the surface of a layered, synthetic-microstructure soft x-ray mirror optimized for reflectivity at chosen wavelengths is disclosed for reducing the reflectivity of undesired, longer wavelength incident radiation incident thereon. In three separate mirror designs employing an alternating molybdenum and silicon layered, mirrored structure overlaid by two layers of a molybdenum/silicon pair anti-reflection coating, reflectivities of near normal incidence 133, 171, and 186 .ANG. wavelengths have been optimized, while that at 304 .ANG. has been minimized. The optimization process involves the choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs as well as the number thereof, and the distance therebetween for the mirror, and the simultaneous choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs, and their number and distance for the "wavetrap."

  6. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S. [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Tang, Henry [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  7. Thermal X-ray emission of the remnants of ashperical Supernova explosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Petruk

    2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolution of adiabatic remnants of an aspherical supernova explosion in uniform medium are considered. Thermal X-ray emission of such remnants are investigated. It is shown that integral thermal X-ray characteristics (X-ray luminosity and spectrum) of the objects do not allow us to reveal the assymetry in the explosion because these characteristics are close to their Sedov counterparts. Surface distribution of X-ray emission is sensitive to anisotropy of the explosion and nonuniformity of the interstellar medium.

  8. A grazing incidence x-ray streak camera for ultrafast, single-shot measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provided by UV pulses derived from an ultrafast laser. Dueultrafast dynamics using a single synchrotron x-ray pulse.

  9. Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy: Applications in Atmospheric Aerosol Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffet, Ryan C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray microscope at BESSY II. Journal of SynchrotronSaskatoon, Canada), 11 BESSY II (Berlin, Germany), 12 Swiss

  10. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

  11. Attenuation of high-energy x rays by iron shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bespalov, V.I.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo calculations are presented on electron-accelerator x-ray spectra for actual target thicknesses and electron energies of 4-50 MeV. Effective attenuation coefficients have been obtained as well as build-up factors for collimated beams andiron shielding of thickness form 1 to 80 cm. The radiation contrast has been determined as a function of thickness for this energy range.

  12. A laser triggered vacuum spark x-ray lithography source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Richard Allen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was 50 cm. Obviously, this type of configurat, ion is totally impractical for a step and repeat system. Synchrotron radiation is being considered as an x-ray lithography source. Many laboratories are experi- menting with synchrotron sources. Also... for production of submicron geometries and improvements needed is presented. 1v ACKNOWLEDGMENT This thesis was made possible through the assistance of a number of people. Huang Wei Ling helped gather much of the data presented in this thesis. She also...

  13. The Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy Beamline at SSRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z.; Tai, R.; Wand, Y.; Yan, R.; Chen, M.; Wu, Y.; Chen, J.; Xue, S.; Xu, H. [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Appled Physics, CAS 239 Zhang Heng Road, Pudong District, Shanghai (China)

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Commissioning of the soft x-ray spectromicroscopy beanmline at SSRF was formally started on Dec 26, 2008. Beamline performance has reached or surpassed the designing goals according to the measurements by domestic experts, especially for its high energy resolution and high spatial resolution. Since its first operation by users on May 6, 2009, tens of experiments have been conducted, and some preliminary exciting results have been acquired.

  14. Generating X-ray lines from annihilating dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilian Dudas; Lucien Heurtier; Yann Mambrini

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose different scenarios where a keV dark matter annihilates to produce a monochromatic signal. The process is generated through the exchange of a light scalar of mass of order 300 keV - 50 MeV coupling to photon through loops or higher dimensional operators. For natural values of the couplings and scales, the model can generate a gamma-ray line which can fit with the recently identified 3.5 keV X-ray line.

  15. Calibrations of a multichannel soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, R.L.; Hockaday, R.G.; Grosso, J.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time resolved, 14 channel spectrometer with an absolutely calibrated response, was developed to cove an x-ray photon energy spectrum from 70 to 650 eV. The spectrometer utilized a combination of thin film prefilters, layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) diffractors, metal coated plastic scintillators, and photomultiplier detector tubes. Calibration of the spectrometer was done piecemeal for each component with standard techniques and the component calibrations were convolved to get a complete spectrometer response function. The two calibration procedures were compared.

  16. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarized X-Rays

  17. Flat-response x-ray-diode-detector development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tirsell, G.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we discuss the design of an improved sub-nanosecond flat response x-ray diode detector needed for ICF diagnostics. This device consists of a high Z cathode and a complex filter tailored to flatten the response so that the total x-ray energy below 1.5 keV can be measured using a single detector. Three major problems have become evident as a result of our work with the original LLNL design including deviation from flatness due to a peak in the response below 200 eV, saturation at relatively low x-ray fluences, and long term gold cathode instability. We are investigating grazing incidence reflection to reduce the response below 200 eV, new high Z cathode materials for long term stability, and a new complex filter for improved flatness. Better saturation performance will require a modified XRD detector under development with reduced anode to cathode spacing and increased anode bias voltage.

  18. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  19. Soft X-ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Paulo J A; Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soft X-ray emissions of solar flares come mainly from the bright coronal loops at the highest temperatures normally achieved in the flare process. Their ubiquity has led to their use as a standard measure of flare occurrence and energy, although the bulk of the total flare energy goes elsewhere. Recently Dolla et al. (2012) noted quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP) in the soft X-ray signature of the X-class flare SOL2011-02-15, as observed by the standard photometric data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) spacecraft. We analyze the suitability of the GOES data for this kind of analysis and find them to be generally valuable after Sept. 2010 (GOES-15). We then extend Dolla et al. results to a list of X-class flares from Cycle 24, and show that most of them display QPP in the impulsive phase. During the impulsive phase the footpoints of the newly-forming flare loops may also contribute to the observed soft X-ray variations. The QPP show up cleanly in both channels of the GOES dat...

  20. THz Pump and X-Ray Probe Development at LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Alan S; /SLAC, LCLS; Durr, Hermann; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Lindenberg, Aaron; Stanford U., Materials Sci.Dept.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE; Reis, David; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Dept. Appl. Phys.; Frisch, Josef; Loos, Henrik; Petree, Mark; /SLAC, LCLS; Daranciang, Dan; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Fuchs, Matthias; /SLAC, PULSE; Ghimire, Shambhu; /SLAC, PULSE; Goodfellow, John; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on measurements of broadband, intense, coherent transition radiation at terahertz frequencies, generated as the highly compressed electron bunches in Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) pass through a thin metal foil. The foil is inserted at 45{sup o} to the electron beam, 31 m downstream of the undulator. The THz emission passes downward through a diamond window to an optical table below the beamline. A fully compressed 350-pC bunch produces up to 0.5 mJ in a nearly half-cycle pulse of 50 fs FWHM with a spectrum peaking at 10 THz. We estimate a peak field at the focus of over 2.5 GV/m. A 20-fs Ti:sapphire laser oscillator has recently been installed for electro-optic measurements. We are developing plans to add an x-ray probe to this THz pump, by diffracting FEL x rays onto the table with a thin silicon crystal. The x rays would arrive with an adjustable time delay after the THz. This will provide a rapid start to user studies of materials excited by intense single-cycle pulses and will serve as a step toward a THz transport line for LCLS-II.

  1. X-ray Lenses Fabricated by LIGA Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazmov, Vladimir; Last, Arndt; Saile, Volker [Institut fuer Microstrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe University, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Reznikova, Elena; Mohr, Jurgen [Institut fuer Microstrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Simon, Rolf [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DiMichiel, Marco [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, 38043, Grenoble (France)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray refractive optical lens systems have been successfully elaborated, designed, fabricated at the Institute for Microstructure Technology at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany) using LIGA technology in recent years. The lenses are structured in a SU-8 polymer. The capability of the LIGA technique to create an arbitrary profile of the focusing microstructures allow the fabrication of lenses with different curvature radius of parabolic geometry, minimized absorption and a large depth of focus. Also a set of planar lens systems on one substrate can be realized with 17 lenses providing identical focal distances for different X-ray energies from 2 to over 100 keV. Nickel lenses fabricated by electroforming using polymer templates can be applied for energies larger than 80 keV. The parabolic crossed lenses are used for 2D nano focusing of monochromatic beams. The quasi-parabolic crossed lenses with a submicron focus and a focus depth of the centimetre range can be used as an achromatic system. Mosaic truncated parabolic lenses with a focusing aperture up to 1 mm are made to increase the X-ray intensity in the focused spot.

  2. Soft X-ray emission in flaring coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, R F; Brun, A S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flares are associated with intense soft X-ray emission generated by the hot flaring plasma in coronal magnetic loops. Kink unstable twisted flux-ropes provide a source of magnetic energy which can be released impulsively and account for the heating of the plasma in flares. We investigate the temporal, spectral and spatial evolution of the properties of the thermal X-ray emission produced in such kink-unstable magnetic flux-ropes using a series of MHD simulations. We deduce emission diagnostics and their temporal evolution and discuss the results of the simulations with respect to observations. The numerical setup used consists of a highly twisted loop embedded in a region of uniform and untwisted background coronal magnetic field. We let the kink instability develop, compute the evolution of the plasma properties in the loop (density, temperature) and deduce the X-ray emission properties of the plasma during the whole flaring episode. During the initial phase of the instability plasma heating is mostly ...

  3. Ultrafast extended x-ray absorption fine structure ,,EXAFS...--theoretical considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Jianshu

    13­20 to generate ultrafast x-ray pulses, however, the prospect of ultrafast EXAFS seems encouragingUltrafast extended x-ray absorption fine structure ,,EXAFS...--theoretical considerations Frank L by the recent experimental demonstration of ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we present a framework

  4. X-ray timing of the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Jacob M., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 7 yr timing study of the 2.5 ms X-ray pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658, an X-ray transient with a recurrence time of =2 yr, using data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer covering 4 transient outbursts (1998-2005). ...

  5. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10-24, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10-24, 2013 Argonne National Laboratory National Laboratory 3:15 ­ 3:30 Break #12;National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10 Dinner Week 1 wrap-up Picnic #12;National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering August 10-24, 2012 Oak

  6. National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering June 14-28, 2014 Argonne National Laboratory:00 Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Week 1 wrap-up Picnic #12;National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Restaurant 9:45 - 10:45 Lecture Interaction of X-rays and Neutrons with Matter Roger Pynn University

  7. Soft X-Ray and Vacuum Ultraviolet Based Spectroscopy of the Actinides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J G

    2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The subjects of discussion included: VUV photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Synchrotron-radiation-based photoelectron spectroscopy, Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, Soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, Inverse photoelectron spectroscopy, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, Low energy IPES, Resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy.

  8. Characterization of Microstructure of Severely Deformed Titanium by X-ray Diffraction Profile Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    Characterization of Microstructure of Severely Deformed Titanium by X-ray Diffraction Profile deformation, X-ray peak profile analysis. Abstract. Nanocrystalline titanium was produced by equal channel of the measured X-ray diffraction peak profiles. The peak profile analysis provided the median and the variance

  9. X-Ray Emission from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth: A Short Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anil Bhardwaj

    2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth - the three planets having dense atmosphere and a well developed magnetosphere - are known to emit X-rays. Recently, Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed X-rays from these planets, and XMM-Newton has observed them from Jupiter and Saturn. These observations have provided improved morphological, temporal, and spectral characteristics of X-rays from these planets. Both auroral and non-auroral (low-latitude) 'disk' X-ray emissions have been observed on Earth and Jupiter. X-rays have been detected from Saturn's disk, but no convincing evidence for X-ray aurora on Saturn has been observed. The non-auroral disk X-ray emissions from Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth, are mostly produced due to scattering of solar X-rays. X-ray aurora on Earth is mainly generated via bremsstrahlung from precipitating electrons and on Jupiter via charge exchange of highlyionized energetic heavy ions precipitating into the polar atmosphere. Recent unpublished work suggests that at higher (>2 keV) energies electron bremsstrahlung also plays a role in Jupiter's X-ray aurora. This paper summarizes the recent results of X-ray observations on Jupiter, Saturn, and Earth mainly in the soft energy (~0.1-2.0 keV) band and provides a comparative overview.

  10. GENTLE IONISATION AND VIOLENT BREAK-UP OF MOLECULES USING SOFT X-RAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bapat, Bhas

    GENTLE IONISATION AND VIOLENT BREAK-UP OF MOLECULES USING SOFT X-RAYS Bhas Bapat PRL, Ahmedabad RRCAT Indore, June 2012 BHAS BAPAT (PRL, AHMEDABAD) BREAK-UP OF MOLECULES USING SOFT X-RAYS RRCAT INDORE INVESTIGATED RECENT RESULTS BHAS BAPAT (PRL, AHMEDABAD) BREAK-UP OF MOLECULES USING SOFT X-RAYS RRCAT INDORE

  11. Using X-ray computed tomography in pore structure characterization for a Berea sandstone: Resolution effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    Using X-ray computed tomography in pore structure characterization for a Berea sandstone Keywords: XCT Pore structure characterization Resolution effect MIP s u m m a r y X-ray computed tomography electron microscopy (Ioannidis et al., 1996), X-ray computed tomography (XCT) with either conventional

  12. Spectral Modeling of X-rays from Hot Star Winds Emma E. Wollman, Swarthmore College `09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    and absorption. Consequently, the more luminous a star is, the stronger the wind it can support. This wind-driving1 Spectral Modeling of X-rays from Hot Star Winds Emma E. Wollman, Swarthmore College `09 Prof x-ray spectra from Chandra's archive. Models of x-ray production in hot star winds predict broad

  13. At-wavelength and optical metrology of bendable x-ray optics for nanofocusing at the ALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metrology of bendable x-ray optics for nanofocusing at theof super-high-quality x-ray optics with sub-microradianalignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize sub-100-nrad

  14. Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL: Design, Metrology, and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, V. V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bendable Focusing X-Ray Optics for the ALS and the LCLS/FEL:USA 4 Center for X-Ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Nationaldevelopment of bendable x-ray optics used for focusing of

  15. SU-E-J-247: A Simulation of X-Ray Emission with Gold Nanoparticle Irradiated by Energetic Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newpower, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the proton induced X-ray emissions in gold-water mixture materials. Methods: In this study a Monte Carlo simulation was created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 4.9.6). The geometry in this setup includes a 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm target, a scoring sphere (radius = 10 cm) and a 65 MeV planar proton source (2 cm × 2 cm). Four concentrations of a gold-water solution were irradiated with 5×10{sup 5} incident protons at a distance of 0.5 cm perpendicular to the surface of the target. The solutions of gold-water mixture had 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.5% of gold by mass, respectively. The number of photon emitting for the target was counted in the scoring sphere for the energy range of 0-86.0 keV in 0.1 keV bins. For this study the reference physics list PhysListEmStandard was used together with the x-ray fluorescence, Auger electron and PIXE (particle induced xray emission) options enabled. The range cuts for photons and electrons were set at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively. Results: In the energy spectra of emitting X-ray fluorescence, peaks from gold K shell characteristic x-rays (68.8 and 66.9 keV) were observed. The number of counts under the peaks of Ka1 and Ka2 was found to increase with the increasing of the gold concentrations in the mixture materials. The X-ray yields (for both Ka1 and Ka2) when fitted with least-square method as a function of gold concentration demonstrate a linear dependency with R{sup 2} > 0.96. The Ka1yield per incident proton was found to be 0.0016 for 10% gold-water mixture solutions. Conclusion: This preliminary study with PIXE technique with gold nanoparticle has demonstrated potentials for its utilization in the development of range and dose verification methodology that is currently of great interest in the field of proton radiation therapy.

  16. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography and Macroscopicdissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was usedobtained from x-ray computed tomography analysis combined

  17. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyu, B., E-mail: blu@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); WCI for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, M. Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  18. Are Optically-Selected Quasars Universally X-Ray Luminous? X-Ray/UV Relations in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert R. Gibson; W. N. Brandt; Donald P. Schneider

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze archived Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of 536 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5) quasars (QSOs) at 1.7 <= z <= 2.7 in order to characterize the relative UV and X-ray spectral properties of QSOs that do not have broad UV absorption lines (BALs). We constrain the fraction of X-ray weak, non-BAL QSOs and find that such objects are rare; for example, sources underluminous by a factor of 10 comprise $\\la$2% of optically-selected SDSS QSOs. X-ray luminosities vary with respect to UV emission by a factor of $\\la$2 over several years for most sources. UV continuum reddening and the presence of narrow-line absorbing systems are not strongly associated with X-ray weakness in our sample. X-ray brightness is significantly correlated with UV emission line properties, so that relatively X-ray weak, non-BAL QSOs generally have weaker, blueshifted CIV$\\lambda$1549 emission and broader CIII]$\\lambda$1909 lines. The CIV emission line strength depends on both UV and X-ray luminosity, suggesting that the physical mechanism driving the global Baldwin effect is also associated with X-ray emission.

  19. Laboratory-size three-dimensional x-ray microscope with Wolter type I mirror optics and an electron-impact water window x-ray source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohsuka, Shinji, E-mail: ohsuka@crl.hpk.co.jp [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, 1955-1 Kurematsu-cho, Nishi-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 431-1202 (Japan); Ohba, Akira; Onoda, Shinobu; Nakamoto, Katsuhiro [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Nakano, Tomoyasu [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-8601 (Japan); Ray-Focus Co. Ltd., 6009 Shinpara, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu-City, 434-0003 (Japan); Miyoshi, Motosuke; Soda, Keita; Hamakubo, Takao [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed a laboratory-size three-dimensional water window x-ray microscope that combines wide-field transmission x-ray microscopy with tomographic reconstruction techniques, and observed bio-medical samples to evaluate its applicability to life science research fields. It consists of a condenser and an objective grazing incidence Wolter type I mirror, an electron-impact type oxygen K? x-ray source, and a back-illuminated CCD for x-ray imaging. A spatial resolution limit of around 1.0 line pairs per micrometer was obtained for two-dimensional transmission images, and 1-?m scale three-dimensional fine structures were resolved.

  20. Feasibility considerations of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser pumped by an x-ray free electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of a soft-x-ray distributed feedback laser (DFL) pumped by an x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL). The DFL under consideration is a Mg/SiC bi-layered Bragg reflector pumped by a single X-FEL bunch at 57.4 eV, stimulating the Mg L2,3 emission at 49 eV corresponding to the 3s-3d â??2p1/2,3/2 transition. Based on a model developed by Yariv and Yeh and an extended coupled-wave theory, we show that it would be possible to obtain a threshold gain compatible with the pumping provided by available X-FEL facilities.

  1. Note: Experiments in hard x-ray chemistry: In situ production of molecular hydrogen and x-ray induced combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pravica, Michael; Bai Ligang; Liu Yu; Galley, Martin; Robinson, John [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center (HiPSEC) and Department of Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4002 (United States); Park, Changyong [HPCAT, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60437 (United States); Hatchett, David [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4003 (United States)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully loaded H{sub 2} into a diamond anvil cell at high pressure using the synchrotron x-ray induced decomposition of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. In a second set of studies, radiation-assisted release of O{sub 2} from KCLO{sub 3}, H{sub 2} release from NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}, and reaction of these gases in a mixture of the reactants to form liquid water using x-rays at ambient conditions was observed. Similar observations were made using a KCLO{sub 3} and NaBH{sub 4} mixture. Depending on reaction conditions, an explosive or far slower reaction producing water was observed.

  2. A Chandra X-ray Study of NGC 1068: II. The Luminous X-ray Source Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Smith; Andrew S. Wilson

    2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the compact X-ray source population in the Seyfert~2 galaxy NGC 1068, imaged with Chandra. We find a total of 84 compact sources, of which 66 are projected onto the galactic disk of NGC 1068. Spectra of the brightest sources have been modeled with both multi-color disk blackbody and power-law models. The power-law model provides the better description of the spectrum for most of these sources. Five sources have 0.4-8 keV intrinsic luminosities greater than 10^{39} erg/s, assuming that their emission is isotropic and that they are associated with NGC 1068. We refer to these sources as Intermediate Luminosity X-ray Objects (IXOs). If these five sources are X-ray binaries accreting with luminosities that are both sub-Eddington and isotropic, then the implied source masses are >7 solar masses, and so they are inferred to be black holes. The brightest source has a much harder spectrum (Gamma = 0.9\\pm0.1) than that found in Galactic black hole candidates and other IXOs. It also shows large-amplitude variability on both short-term and long-term timescales. The ratio of the number of sources with luminosities greater than 2.1 x 10^{38} erg/s in the 0.4-8 keV band to the rate of massive star formation is the same, to within a factor of two, for NGC 1068, the Antennae, NGC 5194 (the main galaxy in M51), and the Circinus galaxy. This suggests that the rate of production of X-ray binaries per massive star is approximately the same for galaxies with currently active star formation, including ``starbursts''.

  3. X-ray observations of NGC 1365: time-resolved eclipse of the X-ray source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Risaliti

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extraordinary variation of the X-ray spectrum of the obscured AGN in NGC 1365, which was observed by Chandra to change from Compton-thin to Compton-thick and back to Compton-thin in four days. This fast variation imply a a size of ~10^14 cm for the emitting region, and an extremely compact size (~10^16 cm) of the clumpy circumnuclear absorber.

  4. The Long Term Stability of Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Constraining the Binary X-ray Mass Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer; William Zhang; Jean H. Swank; Iosif Lapidus

    1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the long term stability of the millisecond oscillations observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from the low mass X-ray binaries (LMXB) 4U 1728-34 and 4U 1636-53. We show that bursts from 4U 1728-34 spanning more than 1.5 years have observed asymptotic oscillation periods which are within 0.2 microsec. of each other, well within the magnitude which could be produced by the orbital motion of the neutron star in a typical LMXB. This stability implies a timescale to change the oscillation period of > 23,000 years, suggesting a highly stable process such as stellar rotation as the oscillation mechanism. We show that period offsets in three distinct bursts from 4U 1636-53 can be plausibly interpreted as due to orbital motion of the neutron star in this 3.8 hour binary system. We discuss the constraints on the mass function which can in principle be derived using this technique.

  5. On the Frequency Evolution of X-ray Brightness Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Evidence for Coherent Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer; Craig B. Markwardt

    1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the time dependence of the frequency of X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear bursts from several neutron star low mass X-ray binaries. We find that the oscillation frequencies in the cooling tails of X-ray bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34 are well described by an exponential "chirp" model. With this model we demonstrate that the pulse trains in the cooling tails of many bursts are highly phase coherent, having oscillation quality factors as high as Q ~ 4000. We use this model of the frequency evolution to search sensitively for significant power at the harmonics and first sub-harmonic of the 330 and 363 Hz signals in bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34, respectively, but find not evidence for significant power at any harmonic or the sub-harmonic. We argue that the high coherence favors stellar rotation as the source of the oscillations. We briefly discuss the frequency evolution in terms of rotational motion of an angular momentum conserving thermonuclear shell. we discuss how the limits on harmonic content can be used to infer properties of the neutron star.

  6. Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

  7. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Augustoni, Arnold L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gerardo, James B. (Albuquerque, NM); Raymond, Thomas D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser.

  8. Apparatus and method to enhance X-ray production in laser produced plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Augustoni, A.L.; Gerardo, J.B.; Raymond, T.D.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for generating x-rays for use in, for instance, x-ray photolithography is disclosed. The method of generating x-rays includes the steps of providing a target and irradiating the target with a laser system which produces a train of sub-pulses to generate an x-ray producing plasma. The sub-pulses are of both high intensity and short duration. The apparatus for generating x-rays from a plasma includes a vacuum chamber, a target supported within the chamber and a laser system, including a short storage time laser. 8 figs.

  9. Cryogenic, high-resolution x-ray detector with high count rate capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA); Mears, Carl A. (Windsor, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA); Hiller, Larry J. (Livermore, CA); Barfknecht, Andrew T. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2003-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenic, high-resolution X-ray detector with high count rate capability has been invented. The new X-ray detector is based on superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs), and operates without thermal stabilization at or below 500 mK. The X-ray detector exhibits good resolution (.about.5-20 eV FWHM) for soft X-rays in the keV region, and is capable of counting at count rates of more than 20,000 counts per second (cps). Simple, FET-based charge amplifiers, current amplifiers, or conventional spectroscopy shaping amplifiers can provide the electronic readout of this X-ray detector.

  10. Investigation of the hard x-ray background in backlit pinhole imagers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fein, J. R., E-mail: jrfein@umich.edu; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Peebles, J. L. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard x-rays from laser-produced hot electrons (>10 keV) in backlit pinhole imagers can give rise to a background signal that decreases signal dynamic range in radiographs. Consequently, significant uncertainties are introduced to the measured optical depth of imaged plasmas. Past experiments have demonstrated that hard x-rays are produced when hot electrons interact with the high-Z pinhole substrate used to collimate the softer He-? x-ray source. Results are presented from recent experiments performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to further study the production of hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate and how these x-rays contribute to the background signal in radiographs. Radiographic image plates measured hard x-rays from pinhole imagers with Mo, Sn, and Ta pinhole substrates. The variation in background signal between pinhole substrates provides evidence that much of this background comes from x-rays produced in the pinhole substrate itself. A Monte Carlo electron transport code was used to model x-ray production from hot electrons interacting in the pinhole substrate, as well as to model measurements of x-rays from the irradiated side of the targets, recorded by a bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrometer. Inconsistencies in inferred hot electron distributions between the different pinhole substrate materials demonstrate that additional sources of hot electrons beyond those modeled may produce hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate.

  11. Self-detection of x-ray Fresnel transmittivity using photoelectron-induced gas ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric response of an x-ray mirror enclosed in a gas flow ionization chamber was studied under the conditions of total external reflection for hard x-rays. It is shown that the electric response of the system as a function of the incidence angle is defined by x-ray Fresnel transmittivity and photon-electron attenuation properties of the mirror material. A simple interpretation of quantum yield of the system is presented. The approach provides non-invasive in-situ diagnostics of hard x-ray optics, easy access to complementary x-ray transmittivity data in x-ray reflectivity experiments and can also pave the way to novel schemes for angle and energy resolving x-ray detectors.

  12. Optical observations of Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Kiziloglu; A. Baykal; N. Kiziloglu

    2006-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ROTSE-IIId observations of the Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300 obtained between September 2004 and December 2005 make it possible to study the correlation between optical and X-ray activity. The optical outburst of 0.1 mag was accompanied by an increase in X-ray flux in 2004 observations. Strong correlation between the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that neutron star directly accretes from the outflowing material of Be star. The nearly zero time lag between X-ray and optical light curves suggests a heating of the disk of Be star by X-rays. No optical brightening and X-ray enhancement was seen in 2005 observations. There is no indication of the orbital modulation in the optical light curve.

  13. An X-ray Imaging Study of the Stellar Population in RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; E. D. Feigelson; L. K. Townsley; P. S. Broos; K. V. Getman; J. Wang; G. P. Garmire; D. Baba; T. Nagayama; M. Tamura; E. B. Churchwell

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a high-resolution X-ray imaging study of the stellar population in the Galactic massive star-forming region RCW49 and its central OB association Westerlund 2. We obtained a 40 ks X-ray image of a 17'x17' field using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and deep NIR images using the Infrared Survey Facility in a concentric 8'3x8'3 region. We detected 468 X-ray sources and identified optical, NIR, and Spitzer Space Telescope MIR counterparts for 379 of them. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of the X-ray image, enhanced by optical and infrared imaging data, yielded the following results: (1) The central OB association Westerlund 2 is resolved for the first time in the X-ray band. X-ray emission is detected from all spectroscopically-identified early-type stars in this region. (2) Most (86%) X-ray sources with optical or infrared identifications are cluster members in comparison with a control field in the Galactic Plane. (3) A loose constraint (2--5 kpc) for the distance to RCW49 is derived from the mean X-ray luminosity of T Tauri stars. (4) The cluster X-ray population consists of low-mass pre--main-sequence and early-type stars as obtained from X-ray and NIR photometry. About 30 new OB star candidates are identified. (5) We estimate a cluster radius of 6'--7' based on the X-ray surface number density profiles. (6) A large fraction (90%) of cluster members are identified individually using complimentary X-ray and MIR excess emission. (7) The brightest five X-ray sources, two Wolf-Rayet stars and three O stars, have hard thermal spectra.

  14. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

  15. Brighter Screens for Nondestructive Digital X-ray Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Jr., A. C.; Bell, Z. W.; Carpenter, D. A.

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fine resolution, bright X-ray screens are needed for digital radiography and material characterization at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Current technology is simply not adequate for transferring high-energy X-ray images to visible light for demanding digital applications. Low energy radiography and especially emerging tomographic technologies are severely hampered for Y-12 nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications by dim screens with poor resolution. Also, the development of more advanced materials characterization techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is driven by a design agency desire for tighter specifications and more uniform materials. Brighter screens would allow us to probe materials on a finer scale, leading to a better understanding of material behavior. A number of X-ray screen materials were studied that would be suitable for direct replacement in existing digital imaging systems. Spectroscopic evaluations were first made for a several candidates and indicated that lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) would be a promising candidate for MeV images. A relative comparison of brightness at various energies was then completed which showed that cesium iodide (CsI) could increase brightness by over an order of magnitude. Since image quality is also important for better screens, the resolving capabilities of candidate materials were measured. Resolution measurements were completed at X-ray peak energies up to 420KeV with magnified optical imaging systems, and indicated that LSO and Industrial Quality Incorporated glass (IQI) exhibited higher resolution than the CsI screen. The results give a choice of materials that can be tailored to the particular test under consideration. If high-speed images are necessary and some resolution can be sacrificed, the CsI screen will be a good choice. The screen can be replaced by an IQI or LSO unit if higher resolution is needed later, for instance to focus in on a region of interest. A number of significant findings were obtained from this study. Most important of the findings was that materials are commercially available that are much brighter than screens currently in use. This finding meets the original objective of the project. Two objectives of the study; however, were not met. We hoped to evaluate a 'quantum dot' (nanometer-sized particles of semiconductor material) wavelength conversion screen, but the manufacturer ceased production of the screen shortly before the project was started. The dot screen could be efficient in converting ultraviolet light to visible light which would have proved important for utilizing a Cherenkov screen. Since this was a very new, cutting-edge technology, an alternative supplier was not found during the study. Also, high-energy testing of a Cherenkov light screen was not performed due to difficulties in obtaining appropriate approvals for locating test equipment in the high-energy X-ray vault at Y-12. The test is still important, and is being pursued through follow-on funding sources. Although many film shots will be eliminated by the availability of high quality digital images, the largest potential gains result from the availability of clearer images that show fine detail in the parts under analysis. Digital radiographic data also offers the possibility of easily sharing data with other sites. This could prove invaluable when critical material, placement, assembly, or quality issues are pressing. Also, increased throughput in the NDE facility allows statistically significant numbers of units to be analyzed. Digital technologies may in fact be needed just to meet minimum requirements of future demands. Increased brightness screens allow for such innovations as 3-D tomographic images to be acquired in a reasonable time. Much of the skill required to interpret 'flattened' X-ray images is not needed to maneuver around the reconstructed tomogram. This study showed that several commercially available materials are much brighter than screens currently in use. The study also showed that materials othe

  16. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

  17. TW Hya: SPECTRAL VARIABILITY, X-RAYS, AND ACCRETION DIAGNOSTICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupree, A. K.; Brickhouse, N. S.; Cranmer, S. R.; Luna, G. J. M.; Schneider, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bessell, M. S. [Australian National Observatory, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bonanos, A. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, National Observatory of Athens, 15236 Athens (Greece); Crause, L. A. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Lawson, W. A. [School of Physical, Environmental, and Math Sciences, University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Mallik, S. V. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Schuler, S. C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nearest accreting T Tauri star, TW Hya was intensively and continuously observed over {approx}17 days with spectroscopic and photometric measurements from four continents simultaneous with a long segmented exposure using the Chandra satellite. Contemporaneous optical photometry from WASP-S indicates a 4.74 day period was present during this time. The absence of a similar periodicity in the H{alpha} flux and the total X-ray flux which are dominated by accretion processes and the stellar corona, respectively, points to a different source of photometric variations. The H{alpha} emission line appears intrinsically broad and symmetric, and both the profile and its variability suggest an origin in the post-shock cooling region. An accretion event, signaled by soft X-rays, is traced spectroscopically for the first time through the optical emission line profiles. After the accretion event, downflowing turbulent material observed in the H{alpha} and H{beta} lines is followed by He I ({lambda}5876) broadening near the photosphere. Optical veiling resulting from the heated photosphere increases with a delay of {approx}2 hr after the X-ray accretion event. The response of the stellar coronal emission to an increase in the veiling follows {approx}2.4 hr later, giving direct evidence that the stellar corona is heated in part by accretion. Subsequently, the stellar wind becomes re-established. We suggest a model that incorporates the dynamics of this sequential series of events: an accretion shock, a cooling downflow in a supersonically turbulent region, followed by photospheric and later, coronal heating. This model naturally explains the presence of broad optical and ultraviolet lines, and affects the mass accretion rates determined from emission line profiles.

  18. Do X-ray Binary Spectral State Transition Luminosities Vary?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Maccarone

    2003-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We tabulate the luminosities of the soft-to-hard state transitions of all X-ray binaries for which there exist good X-ray flux measurements at the time of the transition, good distance estimates, and good mass estimates for the compact star. We show that the state transition luminosities are at about 1-4% of the Eddington rate, markedly smaller than those typically quoted in the literature, with a mean value of 2%. Only the black hole candidate GRO J~1655-40 and the neutron star systems Aql X-1 and 4U 1728-34 have measured state transition luminosities inconsistent with this value at the 1$\\sigma$ level. GRO J~1655-40, in particular, shows a state transition luminosity below the mean value for the other sources at the $4\\sigma$ level. This result, combined with the known inner disk inclination angle (the disk is nearly parallel to the line of sight) from GRO J~1655-40's relativistic jets suggest that the hard X-ray emitting region in GRO J~1655-40 can have a velocity of no more than about $\\beta=0.68$, with a most likely value of about $\\beta=0.52$, and a minimum speed of $\\beta=0.45$, assuming that the variations in state transition luminosities are solely due to relativistic beaming effects. The variance in the state transition luminosities suggests an emission region with a velocity of $\\sim0.2c$. The results are discussed in terms of different emission models for the low/hard state. We also discuss the implications for measuring the dimensionless viscosity parameter $\\alpha$. We also find that if its state transitions occur at typical luminosities, then GX 339-4 is likely to be at a distance of at least 7.6 kpc, much further than typically quoted estimates.

  19. PHYSICAL PROCESSES SHAPING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES: THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS FROM THE SWIFT X-RAY TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    PHYSICAL PROCESSES SHAPING GAMMA-RAY BURST X-RAY AFTERGLOW LIGHT CURVES: THEORETICAL IMPLICATIONS August 15; accepted 2005 December 19 ABSTRACT With the successful launch of the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst component is consistent with the tail emission of the prompt gamma-ray bursts and/or the X-ray flares

  20. Accuracy evaluation of a Compton X-ray spectrometer with bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by a 6 MeV electron bunch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Sadaoki, E-mail: kojima-s@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Zhang, Zhe; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Morace, Alessio; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Sakata, Shouhei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Utsugi, Masaru; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Togawa, Hiromi [Toyota Technical Development Corporation, 1-21 Imae, Hanamoto-cho, Toyota, Aichi 470-0334 (Japan); Ozaki, Tetsuo [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshicho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kato, Ryukou [The Institute of Science and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compton-scattering-based X-ray spectrometer is developed to obtain the energy distribution of fast electrons produced by intense laser and matter interactions. Bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by fast electrons in a material are used to measure fast electrons’ energy distribution in matter. In the Compton X-ray spectrometer, X-rays are converted into recoil electrons by Compton scattering in a converter made from fused silica glass, and a magnet-based electron energy analyzer is used to measure the energy distribution of the electrons that recoil in the direction of the incident X-rays. The spectrum of the incident X-rays is reconstructed from the energy distribution of the recoil electrons. The accuracy of this spectrometer is evaluated using a quasi-monoenergetic 6 MeV electron bunch that emanates from a linear accelerator. An electron bunch is injected into a 1.5 mm thick tungsten plate to produce bremsstrahlung X-rays. The spectrum of these bremsstrahlung X-rays is obtained in the range from 1 to 9 MeV. The energy of the electrons in the bunch is estimated using a Monte Carlo simulation of particle-matter interactions. The result shows that the spectrometer's energy accuracy is ±0.5 MeV for 6.0 MeV electrons.

  1. Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 41 (2010) ISSN 0911-7806 Theoretical Analysis of X-Ray Waveguide Using Fresnel Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Kawai

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Ray Waveguide Using Fresnel Diffraction Yusuke MORIKAWA and Jun KAWAI #12;#12;41 145 X Adv. X-Ray. Chem. Anal., Japan 41, pp.145-150 (2010) 606-8501 X Theoretical Analysis of X-Ray Waveguide Using Fresnel Diffraction symmetrical pattern. We regard it as a slit and calculated the Fresnel diffraction. We find

  2. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ray Conley

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  3. Modeling of X-ray beamlines and devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.E.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray beamlines on synchrotron sources are similar in size and complexity to beamlines at state-of-the-art neutron sources. The design principles, tools, and optimization strategies for synchrotron beamlines are also similar to those of neutron beamlines. The authors describe existing design tools for modeling synchrotron radiation beamlines and describe how these tools have evolved over the last two decades. The development of increasingly powerful modeling tools has been driven by the escalating cost and sophistication of state-of-the-art beamlines and by a world-wide race to exploit advanced synchrotron radiation sources.

  4. Kaonic hydrogen X-ray measurement in SIDDHARTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzi; G. Beer; L. Bombelli; A. M. Bragadireanu; M. Cargnelli; G. Corradi; C. Curceanu; A. d'Uffizi; C. Fiorini; T. Frizzi; F. Ghio; C. Guaraldo; R. S. Hayano; M. Iliescu; T. Ishiwatari; M. Iwasaki; P. Kienle; P. Levi Sandri; A. Longoni; V. Lucherini; J. Marton; S. Okada; D. Pietreanu; T. Ponta; A. Rizzo; A. Romero Vidal; A. Scordo; H. Shi; D. L. Sirghi; F. Sirghi; H. Tatsuno; A. Tudorache; V. Tudorache; O. Vazquez Doce; E. Widmann; J. Zmeskal

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaonic hydrogen atoms provide a unique laboratory to probe the kaon-nucleon strong interaction at the energy threshold, allowing an investigation of the interplay between spontaneous and explicit chiral symmetry breaking in low-energy QCD. The SIDDHARTA Collaboration has measured the $K$-series X rays of kaonic hydrogen atoms at the DA$\\Phi$NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, and has determined the most precise values of the strong-interaction induced shift and width of the $1s$ atomic energy level. This result provides vital constraints on the theoretical description of the low-energy $\\bar{K}N$ interaction.

  5. Nuclear surface studies with antiprotonic atom X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wycech, S; Jastrzebski, J J; Klos, B; Trzcinska, A; Von Egidy, T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent and older level shifts and widths in pbar atoms are analyzed. The results are fitted by an antiproton-nucleus optical potential with two basic complex strength parameters. These parameters are related to average S and P wave scattering parameters in the subthreshold energy region. A fair consistency of the X-ray data for all Z values, stopping pbar data and the Nbar-N scattering data has been achieved. The determination of neutron density profiles at the nuclear surface is undertaken, and the determination of the neutron R_{rms} radii is attempted. Uncertainties due to the input data and the procedure are discussed.

  6. IN SITU SURFACE X-RAY SCATTERING STUDIES OF ELECTROSORPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WANG,J.X.; ADZIC,R.R.; OCKO,B.M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of the application of surface x-ray scattering techniques to the electrode/electrolyte interfaces is presented. Recent results on metal, halide, and metal-halide adlayers with three specific systems: Bi on Au(100) and Au(110); Br on Au(100) and Ag(100); and the coadsorption of Tl with Br or I on Au(111), are given as an illustration. Factors affecting ordering of pure metal and halide adlayers and the metal-halide surface compounds are discussed in some detail.

  7. Possibility of corrector plate tuning of x-ray focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talman, Richard

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schemes for focusing a hard x-ray beam to a small spot are described. The theoretical minimum spot size, assuming perfect mirror shape, is shown to be 4 nm FWHM, independent of x-ray wavelength. This is less than the 10 nm previously said to be the minimum achievable diffraction-limited x-ray spot size. While providing the penetrating power only possible with x rays, this approaches the resolution needed to image individual atoms or atomic layers. However, the perfect mirror assumption is physically unrealistic. This paper discusses the compensation of mirror shape errors by a corrector plate and shows that the tolerances for corrector plate shape are far looser than are tolerances for mirror shape. The full eventual success of achieving theoretical minimum resolution will require mirror shape precision considerably better than has been achieved at this time, though far looser than would be required for simpleminded paraboloidal focusing. Two variants of the scheme, subject to the same mathematical treatment, are described. (i) The ''corrector plate'' name is copied from the similarly functioning element of the same name in a Schmidt camera. The focusing is achieved using glancing, yet coherent, reflection from a high-Z paraboloidal mirror. The strategy is to obtain dominant focusing from reflection and to compensate with weak refractive focusing. The reflective focusing is strong and achromatic but insufficiently accurate. The refractive focusing is weak and chromatic but highly accurate. The corrector plate improves resolution the way eyeglasses help a person to see. It can, for example, be ''fitted'' the same trial-and-error way an optometrist establishes a prescription for glasses. Dimensional tolerances for the compensator are far looser than would be needed for a mirror to achieve the same resolution. Unlike compound refractive lenses, attenuation will be small, at least for wavelengths longer than 1 A, because the compensation layer is thin. (ii) For this variant, the corrector plate is a washer-shaped refractive or Fresnel lens, and the mirror is (theoretically) a perfect cone. All focusing is provided by the lens. Even though the cone provides no focusing, it improves the resolution by increasing the numerical aperture of the device. Compared to a paraboloidal shape, it is assumed that the conical shape can be more accurately fabricated. Of the two variants, only the first variant is, in principle, capable of achieving the theoretical minimum resolution. Configurations are suggested, in both case (i) and case (ii), that use currently possible construction precisions to produce resolutions better than have been achieved to date. However, both results will remain well above the theoretical minimum until fabrication techniques have been developed that provide greater precision than is possible at this time.

  8. GaN for x-ray detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duboz, Jean-Yves; Lauegt, Marguerite; Schenk, David [CRHEA, CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Beaumont, Bernard [Lumilog, 2720 chemin de saint Bernard, F-06220 Vallauris (France); Reverchon, Jean-Luc [THALES R and T, route departementale 128, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Wieck, Andreas D.; Zimmerling, Tino [Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of GaN based materials for x-ray detection is investigated. The absorption coefficient in GaN is measured as a function of photon energy between 6 and 40 keV. Metal-semiconductor-metal photodetectors are fabricated and characterized. The response dependence on bias, the temporal dynamics, and the response dependence on detector geometry all together point toward a mixing of photovoltaic and photoconductive effects. Thanks to a large photoconductive gain, the detector has a decent responsivity at the expense of a large response time.

  9. Radial distribution function in x-ray-absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, E.A.; Ma, Y.; Hanske-Petitpierre, O. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Bouldin, C.E. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been argued that, in systems that have disorder too large to be described by a Gaussian, x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy alone cannot define the radial distribution function (RDF) because of the lack of low-{ital k} data. We show that the low-{ital k} data can, under certain conditions, be reconstructed using cumulant expansions, which give the correct functional form. This allows XAFS to determine unbiased single-shell RDF's in cases of moderate disorder, without assuming a particular model for the RDF. Some examples are given to illustrate the technique and its limitations.

  10. Borman effect in resonant diffraction of X-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oreshko, A. P., E-mail: ap.oreshko@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic theory of resonant diffraction (occurring when the energy of incident radiation is close to the energy of the absorption edge of an element in the composition of a given substance) of synchronous X-rays is developed in the two-wave approximation in the coplanar Laue geometry for large grazing angles in perfect crystals. A sharp decrease in the absorption coefficient in the substance with simultaneously satisfied diffraction conditions (Borman effect) is demonstrated, and the theoretical and first experimental results are compared. The calculations reveal the possibility of applying this approach in analyzing the quadrupole-quadrupole contribution to the absorption coefficient.

  11. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarized X-Rays Reveal

  12. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarized X-RaysPolarized

  13. Polarized X-Rays Reveal Molecular Alignment in Printed Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996)representativePolarizedPolarized X-Rays

  14. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a New Light

  15. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a New

  16. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a NewALS

  17. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a NewALSALS

  18. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat isJoin theanniversaryI 1 0 3 P 0 d d X O O lX-Ray

  19. X-ray Properties of Young Stellar Objects in OMC-2 and OMC-3 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; Y. Tsuboi; M. Goto; N. Kobayashi

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report X-ray results of the Chandra observation of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 and 3. A deep exposure of \\sim 100 ksec detects \\sim 400 X-ray sources in the field of view of the ACIS array, providing one of the largest X-ray catalogs in a star forming region. Coherent studies of the source detection, time variability, and energy spectra are performed. We classify the X-ray sources into class I, class II, and class III+MS based on the J, H, and K-band colors of their near infrared counterparts and discuss the X-ray properties (temperature, absorption, and time variability) along these evolutionary phases.

  20. Spatial resolution of synchrotron x-ray microtomography in high energy range: Effect of x-ray energy and sample-to-detector distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, D.; Tomizato, F.; Toda, H.; Kobayashi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial resolution of three-dimensional images obtained by synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique is evaluated using cyclic bar patterns machined on a steel wire. Influences of X-ray energy and the sample-to-detector distance on spatial resolution were investigated. High X-ray energies of 33-78 keV are applied due to the high X-ray absorption of transition metals. Best spatial resolution of about 1.2 {mu}m pitch was observed at the sample-to-detector distance range of 20-110 mm and at the energy range of 68-78 keV. Several factors such as X-ray scattering and diffraction phenomena affecting the degradation of spatial resolution are also discussed.