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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

2

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

3

Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffraction microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.

Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; Sayre, D.

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction

5

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser HENRY N. CHAPMAN1 of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 Ã? 1013 W cm-2 pulse by one10 . X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expected to permit diffractive imaging at high

Loss, Daniel

6

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien,Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray

7

Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

9

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCouldBiofuelHelp Table ofBiological Imaging

10

Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter (Fremont, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A Curved Image-Plate Detector System for High-Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The developed curved image plate (CIP) is a one-dimensional detector which simultaneously records high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns over a 38.7 2{theta} range. In addition, an on-site reader enables rapid extraction, transfer and storage of X-ray intensity information in {le}30 s, and further qualifies this detector to study kinetic processes in materials science. The CIP detector can detect and store X-ray intensity information linearly proportional to the incident photon flux over a dynamical range of about five orders of magnitude. The linearity and uniformity of the CIP detector response is not compromised in the unsaturated regions of the image plate, regardless of saturation in another region. The speed of XRD data acquisition together with excellent resolution afforded by the CIP detector is unique and opens up wide possibilities in materials research accessible through X-ray diffraction. This article presents details of the basic features, operation and performance of the CIP detector along with some examples of applications, including high-temperature XRD.

Sarin, P.; Haggerty, R; Yoon, W; Knapp, M; Berghaeuser, A; Zschack, P; Karapetrova, E; Yang, N; Kriven, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

13

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility of SF(STEO) ï‚·diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray

14

X-ray Diffraction (XRD) 1.0 What is X-ray Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction (XRD) · 1.0 What is X-ray Diffraction · 2.0 Basics of Crystallography · 3.0 Production of X-rays · 4.0 Applications of XRD · 5.0 Instrumental Sources of Error · 6.0 Conclusions #12 why the cleavage faces of crystals appear to reflect X-ray beams at certain angles of incidence (theta

Moeck, Peter

15

X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Iverson, Adam [National Security Technologies, LLC; Carlson, Carl [National Security Technologies, LLC; Young, Jason [National Security Technologies, LLC; Curtis, Alden [National Security Technologies, LLC; Jensen, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, Kyle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yeager, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fezza, Kamel [Argonne National Laboratory

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

X-Ray Diffraction The X-Ray Diffraction facility is equipped with state-of-the-art  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Diffraction The X-Ray Diffraction facility is equipped with state-of-the-art diffractometers offering both single crystal and powder X-Ray diffraction. Powder X-Ray Diffraction High resolution data For more details on powder X-Ray analysis contact Dr J Hriljac on 0121 414 4458 or email: j

Birmingham, University of

17

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser (CXIDB ID 3)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The diffraction pattern of this entry corresponds to the one shown in **figure 2a** of the corresponding citation.

Chapman, H. N.

18

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has...

19

X-Ray Diffraction on NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently a 192 beam, 1.6 MJ laser. NIF Ramp-Compression Experiments have already made the relevant exo-planet pressure range from 1 to 50 Mbar accessible. We Proposed to Study Carbon Phases by X-Ray Diffraction on NIF. Just a few years ago, ultra-high pressure phase diagrams for materials were very 'simple'. New experiments and theories point out surprising and decidedly complex behavior at the highest pressures considered. High pressures phases of aluminum are also predicted to be complex. Recent metadynamics survey of carbon proposed a dynamic pathway among multiple phases. We need to develop diagnostics and techniques to explore this new regime of highly compressed matter science. X-Ray Diffraction - Understand the phase diagram/EOS/strength/texture of materials to 10's of Mbar. Strategy and physics goals: (1) Powder diffraction; (2) Begin with diamond; (3) Continue with metals etc.; (4) Explore phase diagrams; (5) Develop liquid diffraction; and (6) Reduce background/improve resolution.

Eggert, J H; Wark, J

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University College Station, Texas Phone : 979-845-9125 www.chem.tamu.edu/xray xray@tamu.edu X-rayDiffractionLaboratory DepartmentofChemistry 3255TAMU CollegeStation,TX77843-3255 Mission The purpose of our laboratory is to provide X-ray

Meagher, Mary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

X-ray Diffraction Practicals 1 Graphics Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Practicals 1 Graphics Programs that will read SHELX or CIF files J. Reibenspies, N. Bhuvanesh ver 1.0.0 #12;X-ray Diffraction Practicals 2 Free software. Gretep : Reads SHELX files shelx files or output thermal ellipsoid plots. http://www.umass.edu/microbio/rasmol/ #12;X-ray

Meagher, Mary

22

Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 degrees C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Kirz, Janos; Lima, Enju; Marchesini, Stefano; Miao, Huijie; Neiman, Aaron; Shapiro, David; Steinbrener, Jan; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

24

Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R. [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities...

26

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of EnergyX-ray Computed TomographyImaging

27

In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high of these batteries for commercial use. The two primary obstacles are the solubility of long chain lithium

Cui, Yi

28

X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

Howells, Malcolm R. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatial resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.

Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C.; Weierstall, Uwe; Beetz, Tobias; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France) and ICMM-CSIC Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hard x-ray imaging from explorer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

Grindlay, J.E.; Murray, S.S.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12.0.2.2 Citation: J.J. Turner et al., "X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures," Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 033904 (2011). Web: http:prl.aps.orgpdfPRLv107i3e033904...

34

Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanofabrication of Diffractive X-ray Optics for Synchrotrons and XFELs Wednesday, March 11, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Christian David, Paul...

35

X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Copper Nanopowder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper nanopowder preparation and its X-Ray diffraction studies are reported in this paper. Electrolytic cathode deposition method is simple and cheapest process for its preparation. Copper nanopowder has been prepared from aqueous copper sulphate solution. Wide range of experimental conditions has been adopted in this process and its X-Ray diffraction characterizations have been studied. The results confirming copper nanopowder with size below 30 nm. Uniformed size Copper nanopowder preparation, in normal room temperature is importance of this study.

T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

In-situ mechanical testing during X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deforming metals during recording X-ray diffraction patterns is a useful tool to get a deeper understanding of the coupling between microstructure and mechanical behaviour. With the advances in flux, detector speed and focussing techniques at synchrotron facilities, in-situ mechanical testing is now possible during powder diffraction and Laue diffraction. The basic principle is explained together with illustrative examples.

Van Swygenhoven, Helena, E-mail: helena.vanswygenhoven@psi.ch; Van Petegem, Steven

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

Erin Miller

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Lensless imaging of nanoporous glass with soft X-rays  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Coherent soft X-ray diffraction has been used to image nanoporous glass structure in two dimensions using different methods. The merit of the reconstructions was judged using a new method of Fourier phase correlation with a final, refined image. The porous structure was found to have a much larger average size then previously believed.

Turner, Joshua J.; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Jacobsen, Chris

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolu- tion limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11–13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of mole- cular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lec- tin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

Nelson, J.; Huang, X.; Steinbrener, J.; Shapiro, D.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Neiman, A. M.; Turner, J. J.; Jacobsen, C.

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

X-ray imaging and diffraction from surface phonons on GaAs W. Sauer,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the driver frequency of the synchrotron was multiplied 102 times by a phase-locked loop PLL , ampli- fied are excited on the GaAs 001 surface by using interdigital transducers, designed for frequencies of up to 900 to measured diffraction profiles at different excitation voltages, the SAW amplitudes were calculated

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPUSERFD form that can be accessed by the X-ray diffraction webpage. RESPONSIBILITY: The X-ray Diffraction and suggestions in a timely manner. MATERIALS: · Computer Database · Web interface #12;X-ray Diffraction

Meagher, Mary

42

Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

45

X-ray Diffraction / MSE 603 Spring 2002 Qun Shen / CHESS qs11@cornell.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction / MSE 603 Spring 2002 Qun Shen / CHESS qs11@cornell.edu 1. X-ray production & basic properties ­ common sources for diffraction experiments ­ synchrotron radiation ­ response to x-rays by an electron ­ refraction index ­ total external reflection & evanescent wave, TXRF 2. X-ray scattering basics

Shen, Qun

46

Single molecule imaging with longer x-ray laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In serial femtosecond crystallography, x-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes because Bragg diffraction exceeds the damage-induced background scattering for longer pulses ($\\sim$ 50--100 fs). This is due to a "self-gating pulse" effect whereby damage terminates Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if that diffraction were produced by a shorter pulse of equal fluence. We show here that a similar gating effect applies to single molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage ("damage noise"). Our results suggest that sub-nanometer single molecule imaging with longer pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The...

Martin, Andrew V; Caleman, Carl; Quiney, Harry M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell Xiaojing Huang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 e of biological electron microscopy [1­3]. Radiation damage precludes repeated imaging of live specimens [4 in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103

Mohseni, Hooman

49

Borman effect in resonant diffraction of X-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamic theory of resonant diffraction (occurring when the energy of incident radiation is close to the energy of the absorption edge of an element in the composition of a given substance) of synchronous X-rays is developed in the two-wave approximation in the coplanar Laue geometry for large grazing angles in perfect crystals. A sharp decrease in the absorption coefficient in the substance with simultaneously satisfied diffraction conditions (Borman effect) is demonstrated, and the theoretical and first experimental results are compared. The calculations reveal the possibility of applying this approach in analyzing the quadrupole-quadrupole contribution to the absorption coefficient.

Oreshko, A. P., E-mail: ap.oreshko@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPLABSEC that will prevent unwanted access to X-ray diffraction laboratory by unauthorized users. POLICY: All entrance to the X-ray Diffraction Laboratory is controlled by magnetic ID cards issued by Texas A & M University

Meagher, Mary

51

Novel X-Ray Imaging Opportunities for the RPI Linear Accelerator's Tunable, Quasi-monochromatic X-ray Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel X-Ray Imaging Opportunities for the RPI Linear Accelerator's Tunable, Quasi-monochromatic X-ray of an intense, tunable, polarized, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source has been ongoing at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute since 2001 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. This X-ray source, known as Parametric X-rays (PXR

Danon, Yaron

52

Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power Inc Jump to:Venture,149.PopeNewX-Ray Diffraction (XRD)

53

Quantitative x-ray imager (abstract)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on development of a quantitative x-ray imager (QXI) for the national Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Included in this development is a study of photocathode response as a function of photon energy, 2--17.5 keV, which is related to diagnostic development on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The QXI is defined as being a quantative imager due to the repeated characterization. This instrument is systematically checked out, electronically as well as its photocathode x-ray response, both on a direct current and pulsed x-ray sources, before and after its use on a shot campaign. The QXI is a gated x-ray imager1 used for a variety of experiments conducted in the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Radiation Physics Program. The camera was assembled in Los Alamos and has been under development since 1997 and has now become the workhorse framing camera by the program. The electronics were built by Grant Applied Physics of San Fransisco, CA.2 The QXI has been used at the LANL Trident, LLNL Nova, and University of Rochester Laboratory OMEGA laser facilities. The camera consists of a grated microchannel plate (MCP), a phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate coupled to film for data readout, along with high speed electronic pulsers to drive the x-ray detector. The QXI has both a two-strip and a four-strip detection head and has the ability to individually bias the gain of each of the strips. The timing of the QXI was done at the Trident short pulse laboratory, using 211 nm light. Single strip jitter was looked at as well and determined to be <25 ps. Flatfielding of the photocathode across the MCP was done with the Trident main laser with 150 J on a gold disk with a 1 ns. Spatial resolution was determined to be <5 {mu}m by using the same laser conditions as before and a backlit 1000 lp/in. grid. The QXI has been used on cylindrical implosion work at the Nova Laser Facility, and on direct-drive cylinder mix and indirect-drive high convergence implosion experiments at OMEGA. Its two-strip module has provided the capability to look at point backlighters, as part of technique development for experiments on the NIF. Its next use will be in March 2000 with its off axis viewer nose at Omega, providing a perpendicular view of Rayleigh--Taylor spike dissipation.

Evans, Scott C.; Archuleta, Tom N.; Oertel, John A.; Walsh, Peter J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of +/- 80 degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done by computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.

Beetz, T.; Howells, M.R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kao, C.-C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Mentes, T.O.; Miao, H.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPDATSMA data collection on the Bruker SMART1000 Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

57

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPABSSTR for absolute structure determination on the Bruker GADDS Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

58

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPPOWGAD data collection on the Bruker GADDS Powder X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must be collected AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Powder X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can identify the materials

Meagher, Mary

59

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPDATSM1 to facilitate data collection on the Bruker APEXii Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

60

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPDATGAD to facilitate data collection on the Bruker GADDS Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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61

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPPOWD8 Standard Operating Procedure Title: X-ray Powder Diffraction: D8 Advanced Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 12/29/2008 Page: 1 of 3 SOP: SOPPOWD8 Last date revised: December 23 2009 Date approved: December 29 2009 X-ray

Meagher, Mary

62

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPDATAP1 data collection on the Bruker APEXii Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

63

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPDATAP2 to facilitate data collection on the Bruker APEXii Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

64

Water Window Ptychographic Imaging with Characterized Coherent X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a ptychographical coherent diffractive imaging experiment in the water window with focused soft X-rays at $500~\\mathrm{eV}$. An X-ray beam with high degree of coherence was selected for ptychography at the P04 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. We measured the beam coherence with the newly developed non-redundant array method. A pinhole $2.6~\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ in size selected the coherent part of the beam and was used for ptychographic measurements of a lithographically manufactured test sample and fossil diatom. The achieved resolution was $53~\\mathrm{nm}$ for the test sample and only limited by the size of the detector. The diatom was imaged at a resolution better than $90~\\mathrm{nm}$.

Rose, Max; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Senkbeil, Tobias; von Gundlach, Andreas; Gorniak, Thomas; Shabalin, Anatoly; Viefhaus, Jens; Rosenhahn, Axel; Vartanyants, Ivan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Applications of holography to x-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we consider various applications of holographic techniques to the problem of soft x-ray imaging. We give special attention to imaging biological material using x-rays in the wavelength range 24 to 45A. We describe some experiments on formation and reconstruction of x-ray holograms and propose some ways in which holographic techniques might contribute to the difficult problem of fabricating optical elements for use in the soft x-ray region.

Howells, M.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Rarback, H.; Rosser, R.; Yun, W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Applications of holography to X-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the authors consider various applications of holographic techniques to the problem of soft x-ray imaging. Special attention is given to imaging biological material using x-rays in the wavelength range 24-45A. The authors describe some experiments on formation and reconstruction of x-ray holograms and propose some ways in which holographic techniques might contribute to the difficult problem of fabricating optical elements for use in the soft x-ray region.

Howells, M.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Rarback, H.; Rosser, R.; Yun, W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H NLensless X-Ray Imaging in

68

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H NLensless X-Ray Imaging

69

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H NLensless X-Ray ImagingLensless

70

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIALLenslessX-Ray Imaging in

71

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIALLenslessX-Ray Imaging

72

Phase-sensitive X-ray imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

Baker, Kevin Louis

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

Huang, Xian-Rong, E-mail: xiahuang@aps.anl.gov; Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Peng, Ru-Wen, E-mail: rwpeng@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Siddons, D. P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

74

Preparation and X-Ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a/sub 0/ = 0.3769(8) nm and c/sub 0/ = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considere to be CmH/sub 3//sup -//sub 8/ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a/sub 0/ = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH /SUB 2-x/ (B.M. Bansal and D. Damien. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett. 6 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanidelike behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.

Gibson, J.K.; Maire, R.G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPALIGNA Standard Operating Procedure Title: X-ray Instrument Alignment ­ APEXII Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 6 the alignment of the APEXII single crystal X-ray diffractometer. POLICY: The instrument must be aligned

Meagher, Mary

76

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPSAXSLA Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 12/26/2008Standard Operating Procedure Title: Small Angle X-ray Scattering approved: December 26 2009 Small Angle X-ray Scattering, Rotating Anode PURPOSE: This Standard Operating

Meagher, Mary

77

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPALIGNS Standard Operating Procedure Title: X-ray Instrument Alignment ­ SMART1000 Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 6 the alignment of the SMART1000 single crystal X-ray diffractometer. POLICY: The instrument must be aligned

Meagher, Mary

78

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF NANOSCALE MATERIALS BY UISNG COHERENT X-RAYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray crystallography is currently the primary methodology used to determine the 3D structure of materials and macromolecules. However, many nanostructures, disordered materials, biomaterials, hybrid materials and biological specimens are noncrystalline and, hence, their structures are not accessible by X-ray crystallography. Probing these structures therefore requires the employment of different approaches. A very promising technique currently under rapid development is X-ray diffraction microscopy (or lensless imaging), in which the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline specimen is measured and then directly phased to obtain a high-resolution image. Through the DOE support over the past three years, we have applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to quantitative imaging of GaN quantum dot particles, and revealed the internal GaN-Ga2O3 core shell structure in three dimensions. By exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross-section near electronic resonances, we carried out the first experimental demonstration of resonant X-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent X-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M5 edge. We have also applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to nondestructive imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials - intramuscular fish bone - at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization and proposed a dynamic mechanism to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. In addition, we have also discovered a novel 3D imaging modality, denoted ankylography, which allows for complete 3D structure determination without the necessity of sample titling or scanning. We showed that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a sufficiently fine scale on the Ewald sphere, the 3D structure of the object is determined by the 2D spherical pattern. We confirmed the theoretical analysis by performing 3D numerical reconstructions of a sodium silicate glass structure at 2 Ã? resolution from a 2D spherical diffraction pattern alone. As X-ray free electron lasers are under rapid development worldwide, ankylography may open up a new horizon to obtain the 3D structure of a non-crystalline specimen from a single pulse and allow time-resolved 3D structure determination of disordered materials.

Jianwei Miao

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

80

Real-time X-ray Diffraction Measurements of Shocked Polycrystalline Tin and Aluminum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, fast, single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) diagnostic for determining phase transitions in shocked polycrystalline materials has been developed. The diagnostic consists of a 37-stage Marx bank high-voltage pulse generator coupled to a needle-and-washer electron beam diode via coaxial cable, producing line and bremsstrahlung x-ray emission in a 35-ns pulse. The characteristic K? lines from the selected anodes of silver and molybdenum are used to produce the diffraction patterns, with thin foil filters employed to remove the characteristic K? line emission. The x-ray beam passes through a pinhole collimator and is incident on the sample with an approximately 3-mm by 6-mm spot and 1° full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) angular divergence in a Bragg-reflecting geometry. For the experiments described in this report, the angle between the incident beam and the sample surface was 8.5°. A Debye-Scherrer diffraction image was produced on a phosphor located 76 mm from the polycrystalline sample surface. The phosphor image was coupled to a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera through a coherent fiberoptic bundle. Dynamic single-pulse XRD experiments were conducted with thin foil samples of tin, shock loaded with a 1-mm vitreous carbon back window. Detasheet high explosive with a 2-mm-thick aluminum buffer was used to shock the sample. Analysis of the dynamic shock-loaded tin XRD images revealed a phase transformation of the tin beta phase into an amorphous or liquid state. Identical experiments with shock-loaded aluminum indicated compression of the face-centered-cubic (fcc) aluminum lattice with no phase transformation.

Dane V. Morgan, Don Macy, Gerald Stevens

2008-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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83

Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

85

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

86

Tracking the catalyzed growth process of nanowires by in situ x-ray diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity.4­7 Silicon nanowires have also found application in solar cells, both as ab- sorber OF NANOSTRUCTURES Gold-catalyzed silicon nanowires were grown in an x-ray furnace so that in situ x-ray diffraction-type furnace attached to a Pana- lytical X'Pert PRO diffractometer. The temperature of the furnace

Wang, Zhong L.

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - angle x-ray diffraction Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Materials Science 60 Page 12 CHESS News Magazine 2005 FacilityHighlight Impact of a Future Energy Recovery Linac Summary: -rolled Aluminum SR X-ray diffraction. Map grain...

88

An atomic layer deposition chamber for in situ x-ray diffraction and scattering analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal structure of thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) will determine important performance properties such as conductivity, breakdown voltage, and catalytic activity. We report the design of an atomic layer deposition chamber for in situ x-ray analysis that can be used to monitor changes to the crystal structural during ALD. The application of the chamber is demonstrated for Pt ALD on amorphous SiO{sub 2} and SrTiO{sub 3} (001) using synchrotron-based high resolution x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and grazing incidence small angle scattering.

Geyer, Scott M.; Methaapanon, Rungthiwa; Kim, Woo-Hee; Bent, Stacey F., E-mail: sbent@stanford.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Johnson, Richard W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Van Campen, Douglas G.; Metha, Apurva [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwiatkowski, Kris K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapustinsky, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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92

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging: FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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93

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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94

Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

Gibson, David M. (Voorheesville, NY); Gibson, Walter M. (Voorheesville, NY); Huang, Huapeng (Latham, NY)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Femtosecond X-ray Diffraction From Two-Dimensional Protein Crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we present femtosecond x-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals using an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). To date it has not been possible to acquire x-ray diffraction from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permits a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy methodology at the Linac Coherent Light Source, we observed Bragg diffraction to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples that were maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B.; Hunter, Mark; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Chu, Kaiqin; Graf, Alexander; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Padeste, Celestino; Pardini, Tommaso; Pedrini, Bill; Segelke, Brent; Seibert, M. M.; Spence , John C.; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Lane, Steve M.; Li, Xiao-Dan; Schertler, Gebhard; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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98

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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99

X-ray Diffraction from Membrane Protein Nanocrystals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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100

Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

Schot, Gijs, vander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Theory of angular dispersive imaging hard x-ray spectrographs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spectrograph is an optical instrument that disperses photons of different energies into distinct directions and space locations, and images photon spectra on a position-sensitive detector. Spectrographs consist of collimating, angular dispersive, and focusing optical elements. Bragg reflecting crystals arranged in an asymmetric scattering geometry are used as the dispersing elements. A ray-transfer matrix technique is applied to propagate x-rays through the optical elements. Several optical designs of hard x-ray spectrographs are proposed and their performance is analyzed. Spectrographs with an energy resolution of 0.1 meV and a spectral window of imaging up to a few tens of meVs are shown to be feasible for inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy applications. In another example, a spectrograph with a 1-meV spectral resolution and 85-meV spectral window of imaging is considered for Cu K-edge resonant IXS (RIXS).

Shvyd'ko, Yuri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

X-ray diffraction and EXAFS analysis of materials for lithium-based rechargeable batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium iron phosphate LiFePO{sub 4} (triphylite) and lithium titanate Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} are used as components of a number of active materials in modern rechargeable batteries. Samples of these materials are studied by X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Hypotheses about the phase composition of the analyzed samples are formulated.

Sharkov, M. D., E-mail: mischar@mail.ioffe.ru; Boiko, M. E.; Bobyl, A. V.; Ershenko, E. M.; Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Y. V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

Pawloski, G.A.

1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Quality experimental and calculated powder x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, we have submitted quality powder XRD patterns to the International Centre for Diffraction Data for inclusion as reference standards in their Powder Diffraction File. The procedure followed is described; examples used are {beta}-UH{sub 3}, {alpha}- BaT{sub 2}, alpha-lithium disilicate ({alpha}-Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and 2,2`,4,4`,6,6`hexanitroazobenzene-III (HNAB-III).

Sullenger, D.B.; Cantrell, J.S.; Beiter, T.A.; Tomlin, D.W.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

Sun, Cheng-Jun, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zhang, Bangmin [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); Venkatesan, T. [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore) [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium online xxxx Keywords: Amorphous calcium carbonate; EPSR modelling; Neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron

Benning, Liane G.

107

X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond time D. VON DER LINDE and K. SOKOLOWSKI-TINTEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution D. VON DER LINDE and K. SOKOLOWSKI-essen.de (Received 4 March 2002) Abstract. Intense ultrashort laser pulses enable the generation of subpico- second X-ray pulses in the multi-kilovolt range of photon energies. These X- ray pulses have opened the door

von der Linde, D.

108

Segmentation of x-ray images using Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Segmentation is a process of separating objects of interest from their background or from other objects in an image. Without a suitable segmentation scheme, it is very difficult to detect contraband in X-rays images. In this paper, a Probabilistic Relaxation Labeling (PRL) segmentation scheme is presented and compared with other segmentation methods. PRL segmentation is an interative algorithm that labels each pixel in an image by cooperative use of two information sources: the pixel probability and the degree of certainty of its probability supported by the neighboring pixels. The practical implementation and results of the PRL segmentation on X-ray baggage images are also discussed and compared with other segmentation methods. 13 refs., 12 figs.

Thai, T.Q.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

1982-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

Ice, Gene E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sparks, Jr., Cullie J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin: EnergyEdison,WindDiffraction (XRD) Jump

112

Radial x-ray diffraction of tungsten tetraboride to 86 GPa under nonhydrostatic compression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radial x-ray diffraction of tungsten tetraboride to 86 GPa under nonhydrostatic compression Lun December 2012; published online 16 January 2013) Investigations of the equation of state of tungsten moduli and hardness exceed- ing or closing that of diamond. Tungsten tetraboride (WB4) is a candidate

Lin, Jung-Fu "Afu"

113

Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Methodology for Optimal In Situ Alignment and Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction-Limited Focusing of Soft X-Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mirrors, x-rays, x-ray optics, synchrotron radiation,beamline, Kirkpatrick-Baez, metrology of x-ray opticsand Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction-Limited

Merthe, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

116

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business X-ray Image Bank Open for Business February 22, 2011 Filipe Maia is building a data bank where scientists from around the world can deposit and...

117

X-ray diffraction study of the static strength of tungsten to 69 GPa Duanwei He* and Thomas S. Duffy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction study of the static strength of tungsten to 69 GPa Duanwei He* and Thomas S of tungsten was determined under static high pressures to 69 GPa using x-ray diffraction techniques strength of tungsten increases with compression, reaching a value of 5.3 GPa at the highest pressure

Duffy, Thomas S.

118

Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

Jacobsen, Chris

2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

119

Imaging biofilm architecture within porous media using synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging biofilm architecture within porous media using synchrotron-based X-ray computed. Wildenschild (2011), Imaging biofilm architecture within porous media using synchrotron-based X-ray computed synchrotron-based X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) has been developed. Imaging biofilms in porous media

Wildenschild, Dorthe

120

An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

Howells, M.R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H.N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J.M.; Jacobsen, C.J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D.A.; Spence, J.C.H.; Starodub, D.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation. 6 figs.

Hailey, C.J.; Ziock, K.P.

1992-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

Hailey, Charles J. (San Francisco, CA); Ziock, Klaus-Peter (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

X-ray dark-field imaging modeling * F. Pfeiffer,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray dark-field imaging modeling W. Cong,1, * F. Pfeiffer,2 M. Bech,2 and G. Wang1 1 Biomedical-field images are formed from x-ray small-angle scattering signals. The small-angle scattering signals to describe the relationship between x-ray small-angle scattering coefficients of an object and dark

Wang, Ge

124

X-Ray Diffraction Study of Elemental Erbium to 65 GPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated phase transitions in elemental erbium in a diamond anvil cell up to 65 GPa using x-ray powder diffraction methods. We present preliminary evidence of a series of phase transitions that appear to follow the expected hcp {yields} Sm-type {yields} dhcp {yields} distorted fcc sequence. In particular, we believe that we have evidence for the predicted dhcp {yields} distorted fcc transition between 43 GPa and 65 GPa.

Pravica, M.G.; Lipinska-Kalita, K.; Quine, Z.; Romano, E.; Nicol, M.F. (UNLV)

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ?10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup ?1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (?40??s) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

Haugh, M. J., E-mail: haughmj@nv.doe.gov; Jacoby, K. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

Duffy, Thomas S.

128

Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. We show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffraction patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.

Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

130

High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Goodman, Claude A. (Kensington, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Terrill, Nick J. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rogers, Sarah E. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins.

Bennett, Kochise, E-mail: kcbennet@uci.edu; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

134

Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; ,

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

135

Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for x-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the x-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

Green, L.A.; Heck, J.L. Jr.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

Investigation of the hard x-ray background in backlit pinhole imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard x-rays from laser-produced hot electrons (>10 keV) in backlit pinhole imagers can give rise to a background signal that decreases signal dynamic range in radiographs. Consequently, significant uncertainties are introduced to the measured optical depth of imaged plasmas. Past experiments have demonstrated that hard x-rays are produced when hot electrons interact with the high-Z pinhole substrate used to collimate the softer He-? x-ray source. Results are presented from recent experiments performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to further study the production of hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate and how these x-rays contribute to the background signal in radiographs. Radiographic image plates measured hard x-rays from pinhole imagers with Mo, Sn, and Ta pinhole substrates. The variation in background signal between pinhole substrates provides evidence that much of this background comes from x-rays produced in the pinhole substrate itself. A Monte Carlo electron transport code was used to model x-ray production from hot electrons interacting in the pinhole substrate, as well as to model measurements of x-rays from the irradiated side of the targets, recorded by a bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrometer. Inconsistencies in inferred hot electron distributions between the different pinhole substrate materials demonstrate that additional sources of hot electrons beyond those modeled may produce hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate.

Fein, J. R., E-mail: jrfein@umich.edu; Holloway, J. P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Peebles, J. L. [Center for Energy Research, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Rev 1.0.3 1/20/2009 Approved by Department of Chemistry and EHSD Texas A & M University (1997)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Rev 1.0.3 1/20/2009 Approved by Department of Chemistry and EHSD Texas A & M University (1997) Name : ______________________________ UIN _____________________ X-ray Safety Release form for the X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Department of Chemistry, Texas A & M University Answer

Meagher, Mary

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced x-ray imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new... reconstruction technique (SART) algorithm for image reconstruction from projection data generated by an x-ray... discuss relevant issues and conclude the paper. II....

139

X-ray shearing interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

High-pressure X-ray diffraction and X-ray emission studies on iron-bearing silicate perovskite under high pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-bearing silicate perovskite is believed to be the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle. Recent studies have shown that Fe{sup 2+} exists predominantly in the intermediate-spin state with a total spin number of 1 in silicate perovskite in the lower part of the lower mantle. Here we have measured the spin states of iron and the pressure-volume relation in silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}] at pressure conditions relevant to the lowermost mantle using in situ X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction in a diamond cell. Our results showed that the intermediate-spin Fe{sup 2+} is stable in the silicate perovskite up to {approx} 125 GPa but starts to transition to the low-spin state at approximately 135 GPa. Concurrent X-ray diffraction measurements showed a decrease of approximately 1% in the unit cell volume in the silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}], which is attributed to the intermediate-spin to the low-spin transition. The transition pressure coincides with the pressure conditions of the lowermost mantle, raising the possibility of the existence of the silicate perovskite phase with the low-spin Fe{sup 2+} across the transition from the post-perovskite to the perovskite phases in the bottom of the D{double_prime} layer.

Lin, Jung-Fu; Speciale, Sergio; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Dera, Przemek; Lavina, Babara; Watson, Heather C. (NIU); (UC); (Texas); (GFZ)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

In-orbit performance of the XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes: images and spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of the three X-ray telescopes on-board of XMM-Newton is evaluated addressing imaging characteristics and effective collecting area. The agreement with ground calibration data is excellent. The analysis of images and spectra of cosmic X-ray sources, emphazising supernova and supernova remnants, prooves that the telescopes are even better than originally required.

B. Aschenbach

2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

X-Ray Microscopy at BESSY: From Nano-Tomography to Fs-Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BESSY X-ray microscopy group has developed a new full-field x-ray microscope with glass capillary condenser. It permits tomography and spectromicroscopy of cryogenic as well as heated samples. Correlative light and x-ray microscopy is supported by an incorporated high resolution light microscope. Spectromicroscopy with polarized x-rays from a helical undulator can be performed with E/{delta}E = 104. With the planned BESSY High Gain Harmonic Generation Free Electron Laser (HGHG-FEL) x-ray imaging with ultra-short pulses and an integral photon flux of about 1011 photons/pulse in an energy bandwidth of 0.1% will be possible. Single shot imaging with a full field Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM) employing a beam shaper as a condenser will be feasible with 20 fs pulses.

Schneider, G.; Heim, S.; Rehbein, S.; Eichert, D. [BESSY GmbH, Albert Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Guttmann, P. [IRP, c/o BESSY m.b.H., Albert Einstein Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Niemann, B. [IRP, University of Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

143

X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

X-Ray Microscopy and Imaging: Science and Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-RayX-Ray

145

A Diffractive-Optic Telescope for X-Ray Astronomy D. Dewey, T.H. Markert, and M.L. Schattenburg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Diffractive-Optic Telescope for X-Ray Astronomy D. Dewey, T.H. Markert, and M.L. Schattenburg for a light-weight X-ray astronomical telescope that uses a diffractive optical element is described (200-1000 cm2 ) through the use of a blazed diffractive optic. State-of-the-art grating technology

Dewey, Daniel

146

Reactive sputter magnetron reactor for preparation of thin films and simultaneous in situ structural study by X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the designed reactor is (i) to obtain polycrystalline and/or amorphous thin films by controlled deposition induced by a reactive sputtering magnetron and (ii) to perform a parallel in situ structural study of the deposited thin films by X-ray diffraction, in real time, during the whole growth process. The designed reactor allows for the control and precise variation of the relevant processing parameters, namely, magnetron target-to-sample distance, dc magnetron voltage, and nature of the gas mixture, gas pressure and temperature of the substrate. On the other hand, the chamber can be used in different X-ray diffraction scanning modes, namely, {theta}-2{theta} scanning, fixed {alpha}-2{theta} scanning, and also low angle techniques such as grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray reflectivity. The chamber was mounted on a standard four-circle diffractometer located in a synchrotron beam line and first used for a preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of AlN thin films during their growth on the surface of a (100) silicon wafer.

Buergi, J.; Molleja, J. Garcia; Feugeas, J. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario (CONICET-UNR), Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, S2000EZP Rosario (Argentina); Neuenschwander, R. [Laboratorio Nacional Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Caixa Postal 6192, CEP13083-970 Campinas (Brazil); Kellermann, G. [Departamento de Fisica (Universidade Federal do Parana), Caixa Postal 19044, CEP81531-990 Curitiba (Brazil); Craievich, A. F. [Instituto de Fisica (Universidade de Sao Paulo), Rua do Matao Travessa R 187, CEP05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

CALIBRATION OF X-RAY IMAGING DEVICES FOR ACCURATE INTENSITY MEASUREMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M J; Charest, M R; Ross, P W; Lee, J J; Schneider, M B; Palmer, N E; Teruya, A T

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

149

Calibration of X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems using NIST traceable sources. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is the key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included the quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, the camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M. J., Charest, M., Ross, P., Lee, J. Schneider, M., Palmer, N., Teruya,

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

X-ray diffraction studies and equation of state of methane at 202 GPa Liling Sun a,*, Wei Yi a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction studies and equation of state of methane at 202 GPa Liling Sun a,*, Wei Yi that at room temperature compressed CH4 remains an insulator with cubic structure to 202 GPa. Ã? 2009 Elsevier B of planetary interiors and the origin of their magnetic field distribution. CH4 has a very rich phase diagram

Shen, Guoyin

151

X-ray diffraction study of thermal stress relaxation in ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in a high compressive stress state. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements inside a furnace revealed a relaxation of the as-grown stresses at temperatures which vary with the atmosphere in the furnace and change in many application domains such as ultraviolet detectors, light-emitting diodes, solar cells. As a II

152

Tamper to delay motion and decrease ionization of a sample during short pulse x-ray imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for x-ray imaging of a small sample comprising positioning a tamper so that it is operatively connected to the sample, directing short intense x-ray pulses onto the tamper and the sample, and detecting an image from the sample. The tamper delays the explosive motion of the sample during irradiation by the short intense x-ray pulses, thereby extending the time to obtain an x-ray image of the original structure of the sample.

London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Szoke; Abraham (Fremont, CA), Hau-Riege; Stefan P. (Fremont, CA), Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

154

In-line x-ray phase-contrast tomography and diffraction-contrast tomography study of the ferrite-cementite microstructure in steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-line x-ray phase-contrast tomography and diffraction-contrast tomography study of the ferrite;In-line X-ray phase-contrast tomography and diffraction-contrast tomography study of the ferrite embedded in a ferrite matrix of medium-carbon steel. The measurements were carried out at the material

van Vliet, Lucas J.

155

A Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dual-energy X-ray images for better object classification and threat detection. The fusion stepA Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage-based noise reduction technique which is very efficient in removing background noise from fused X-ray images

Abidi, Mongi A.

156

DXRD (Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction) studies of oil shale mineral reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of second generation, above-ground oil shale processes, retorted shale is likely to be combusted at temperatures between 1000{degree}K and 1200{degree}K. At these temperatures the mineral matrix of the shale will undergo a variety of chemical reactions including carbonate decomposition, sulfation and recombination reactions to form silicates. This complex set of reactions can be very important to the optimum design of a retorted shale combustor. For example the net heat of combustion is very dependent on these reactions since the carbonate mineral decomposition reactions are highly endothermic and some of the silication reactions only mildly endothermic. In addition, the combusted shale (ash) will have to be disposed and revegetated and the environmental consequences of this process will be highly dependent on the mineral composition of the ash. The degree to which the mineral reactions influence these considerations will depend on the time-temperature history to which the shale is exposed. Thus it is important to have a knowledge of the kinetics of these reactions. Previous attempts to study these kinetics have been made at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and in our own laboratory. However, these studies all employed TGA techniques and, since there is usually more than one reaction occurring simultaneously, there is no way to distinguish between competing reactions. What is described here is the application of a new technique - Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction (DXRD), which has been successfully applied to studies of oil shale mineral reactions under typical retorted shale combustion conditions.

Helling, K.A.; Thomson, W.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Thermal equation-of-state of TiC: a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure (P)-volume (V)-temperature (T) measurements were carried out for titanium carbide at pressures and temperatures up to 8.1 GPa and 1273 K using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Thermoelastic parameters were derived for TiC based on a modified high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a thermal-pressure approach. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K'{sub 0}, fixed at 4.0, we obtain: the ambient bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 268(6) GPa, temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub p} = -0.026(9) GPa K{sup -1}, volumetric thermal expansivity a{sub T}(K{sup -1}) = a + bT with a = 1.62(12) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} and b = 1.07(17) x 10{sup -8} K{sup -2}, pressure derivative of thermal expansion ({partial_derivative}a/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} = (-3.62 {+-} 1.14) x 10{sup -7} GPa{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant volume ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub v} = -0.015 (8) GPa K{sup -1}. These results provide fundamental thermo physical properties for TiC and are important to theoretical and computational modeling of transition metal carbides.

Yu, Xiaohui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lin, Zhijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jianzhong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Liping [STATE UNIV OF NEW YORK; Ding, Zejun [CHINA; Jin, Changqing [CHINA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor.

Kinney, John H. (Danville, CA); Bonse, Ulrich K. (Dortmund, DE); Johnson, Quintin C. (Livermore, CA); Nichols, Monte C. (Livermore, CA); Saroyan, Ralph A. (Livermore, CA); Massey, Warren N. (Livermore, CA); Nusshardt, Rudolph (Waltrop, DE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: (a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, (b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the (c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, (d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and (e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor. 25 figures.

Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.K.; Johnson, Q.C.; Nichols, M.C.; Saroyan, R.A.; Massey, W.N.; Nusshardt, R.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

160

Imaging of lateral spin valves with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated Co/Cu lateral spin valves by means of high-resolution transmission soft x-ray microscopy with magnetic contrast that utilizes x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). No magnetic XMCD contrast was observed at the Cu L{sub 3} absorption edge, which should directly image the spin accumulation in Cu. Although electrical transport measurements in a non-local geometry clearly detected the spin accumulation in Cu, which remained unchanged during illumination with circular polarized x-rays at the Co and Cu L{sub 3} absorption edges.

Mosendz, O.; Mihajlovic, G.; Pearson, J. E.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Bader, S. D.; Hoffmann, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Imaging of lateral spin valves with soft x-ray microscopy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated Co/Cu lateral spin valves by means of high-resolution transmission soft x-ray microscopy with magnetic contrast that utilizes x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). No magnetic XMCD contrast was observed at the Cu L{sub 3} absorption edge, which should directly image the spin accumulation in Cu, although electrical transport measurements in a nonlocal geometry clearly detected the spin accumulation in Cu, which remained unchanged during illumination with circular polarized x rays at the Co and Cu L{sub 3} absorption edges.

Mosendz, O.; Mihajlovic, G.; Pearson, J. E.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Bader, S. D.; Hoffmann, A.; LBNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of EnergyX-ray ComputedOver

163

X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 ?m validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten L?1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 ?m. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

Lu, J., E-mail: jlu@pppl.gov [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Physics Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J. [Inrad Optics, 181 Legrand Avenue, Northvale, New Jersey 07647 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination--Crystal views from inside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination--Crystal views from inside P. Korecki a Keywords: X-ray absorption Real-space imaging X-ray holography Electron channeling Electron backscatter of the fine structure in X-ray absorption anisotropy, which results from incident beam diffraction

Korecki, Pawe³

165

Applying x-ray digital imaging to the verification of cadmium in fuel-storage components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor utilizes large underwater fuel-storage arrays to stage irradiated fuel before it is shipped from the facility. Cadmium is required as a thermal neutron absorber in these fuel-storage arrays to produce an acceptable margin of nuclear subcriticality during both normal and off-normal operating conditions. Due to incomplete documentation from the time of their fabrication, the presence of cadmium within two stainless-steel parts of fuel-storage arrays must be experimentally verified before they are reused in new fuel-storage arrays. A cadmium-verification program has been developed in association with the Waste Examination and Assay Facility located at the Oak Ridge national Laboratory to nondestructively examine these older shroud assemblies. The program includes the following elements (1) x-ray analog imaging, (2) x-ray digital imaging, (3) prompt-gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements, and (4) neutron-transmission measurements. X-ray digital imaging utilizes an analog-to-digital convertor to record attenuated x-ray intensities observed on a fluorescent detector by a video camera. These x-ray intensities are utilized in expressions for cadmium thickness based upon x-ray attenuation theory.

Dabbs, R.D.; Cook, D.H.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

Thermal Equation of State of TiC: A Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure-volume-temperature measurements were carried out for titanium carbide (TiC) at pressures and temperatures up to 8.1 GPa and 1273 K using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Thermoelastic parameters were derived for TiC based on a modified high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a thermal pressure approach. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K{prime}{sub 0}, fixed at 4.0, we obtain: the ambient bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 268(6) GPa, which is comparable to previously reported value; temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} = -0.026(9) GPa K{sup -1}, volumetric thermal expansivity {alpha}{sub T}(K{sup -1}) = a+b T with a = 1.62(12) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} and b = 1.07(17) x 10{sup -8}K{sup -2}, pressure derivative of thermal expansion ({partial_derivative}{sub {alpha}}/{partial_derivative}{sub P}){sub T} = (-3.62 {+-} 1.14) x 10{sup -7} GPa{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant volume ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub V} = -0.015(8) GPa K{sup -1}. These results provide fundamental thermophysical properties for TiC for the first time and are important to theoretical and computational modeling of transition metal carbides.

Yu, X.; Lin, Z; Zhang, J; Wang, L; Ding, Z; Jin, C; Zhao, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Thermal equation of state of TiC: A synchrotron x-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure-volume-temperature measurements were carried out for titanium carbide (TiC) at pressures and temperatures up to 8.1 GPa and 1273 K using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Thermoelastic parameters were derived for TiC based on a modified high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a thermal pressure approach. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K{sub 0}{sup '}, fixed at 4.0, we obtain: the ambient bulk modulus K{sub 0}=268(6) GPa, which is comparable to previously reported value; temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P}=-0.026(9) GPa K{sup -1}, volumetric thermal expansivity {alpha}{sub T}(K{sup -1})=a+bT with a=1.62(12)x10{sup -5} K{sup -1} and b=1.07(17)x10{sup -8} K{sup -2}, pressure derivative of thermal expansion ({partial_derivative}{alpha}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T}=(-3.62{+-}1.14)x10{sup -7} GPa{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant volume ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub V}=-0.015(8) GPa K{sup -1}. These results provide fundamental thermophysical properties for TiC for the first time and are important to theoretical and computational modeling of transition metal carbides.

Yu Xiaohui [LANSCE Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lin Zhijun; Zhang Jianzhong; Zhao Yusheng [LANSCE Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang Liping [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Ding Zejun [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Jin Changqing [National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

X-Ray Tomographic Imaging of Crystal Structure at the Atomic Level P. Korecki,1,* M. Tolkiehn,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Tomographic Imaging of Crystal Structure at the Atomic Level P. Korecki,1,* M. Tolkiehn,2 D of the crystal structure from real-space projections obtained by illuminating the sample with white x rays. This approach was applied to the pattern of the directional fine structure in absorption of white x rays

Korecki, Pawe³

171

anomalous x-ray diffraction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

172

High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

Hantke, Max, F.

173

Rietveld X-ray diffraction analysis of nanostructured rutile films of titania prepared by pulsed laser deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rietveld powder X-ray diffraction analysis of the rutile films of titanium oxide prepared by pulsed laser deposition was carried out. The crystallite size increased with increase of substrate temperature, while the strain showed a reverse trend. The films synthesized at temperature {>=}573 K showed that the crystal structure was almost close to that of bulk rutile structure. The influence of the substrate temperature on the lattice parameters and oxygen coordinates were also studied in the present work.

Murugesan, S. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Kuppusami, P., E-mail: pk@igcar.gov.in [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)] [Physical Metallurgy Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns (CXIDB ID 20)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This deposition includes the diffraction images generated by the paired polystyrene spheres in random orientations. These images were used to determine and phase the single particle diffraction volume from their autocorrelation functions.

Starodub, D.

175

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Investigation of the spontaneous lateral modulation in short-period superlattices by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of spontaneous lateral composition modulation in short-period InAs/AlAs superlattices has been investigated by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. We have developed a theoretical description of x-ray scattering from laterally modulated structures that makes it possible to determine the lateral composition modulation directly without assuming any structure model. From experimental intensity distributions in reciprocal space we have determined the amplitudes of the modulation and its degree of periodicity and their dependence on the number of superlattice periods. From the data it follows that the modulation process cannot be explained by bunching of monolayer steps and most likely, it is caused by stress-driven morphological instabilities of the growing surface.

Moss, Simon C. (University of Houston, Houston, TX); Holy, Vaclav (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic); Reno, John Louis; Krause, B. (ESRF, Grenoble, France); Norman, Andrew G. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Mikulik, P. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Caha, O. (Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic); Mascarenhas, Angelo (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal ...

Mayr, P.

179

Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction Theory Jianshu Cao* and Kent R. Wilson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

notablely using ultrafast optical pump-probe pulses. Unfortunately, except for a few favorable cases of a sample is initiated by an ultrafast optical laser pulse and then probed by an ultrafast X-ray pulse initiated by the optical pump pulse in real time and real space.9-11 From a simple viewpoint, ultrafast X

Cao, Jianshu

180

Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-? x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu; Gamboa, E. J. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Streit, J. [Schafer Corporation, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method.e., the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms of the spectral image) to obtain smoothed (regularized

Piana, Michele

182

Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z.sub.1 above upper collimator plane, distance z.sub.2 above the lower collimator plane, and distance z.sub.3 above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v.sub.1, v.sub.2, v.sub.3 proportional to z.sub.1, z.sub.2 and z.sub.3, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site.

Parker, Sherwood (Berkeley, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z{sub 1} above upper collimator plane, distance z{sub 2} above the lower collimator plane, and distance z{sub 3} above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v{sub 1}, v{sub 2}, v{sub 3} proportional to z{sub 1}, z{sub 2} and z{sub 3}, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site. 5 figs.

Parker, S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

184

Performance of CID camera X-ray imagers at NIF in a harsh neutron environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are solid-state 2D imaging sensors similar to CCDs, but their distinct architecture makes CIDs more resistant to ionizing radiation.1–3 CID cameras have been used extensively for X-ray imaging at the OMEGA Laser Facility4,5 with neutron fluences at the sensor approaching 109 n/cm2 (DT, 14 MeV). A CID Camera X-ray Imager (CCXI) system has been designed and implemented at NIF that can be used as a rad-hard electronic-readout alternative for time-integrated X-ray imaging. This paper describes the design and implementation of the system, calibration of the sensor for X-rays in the 3 – 14 keV energy range, and preliminary data acquired on NIF shots over a range of neutron yields. The upper limit of neutron fluence at which CCXI can acquire useable images is ~ 108 n/cm2 and there are noise problems that need further improvement, but the sensor has proven to be very robust in surviving high yield shots (~ 1014 DT neutrons) with minimal damage.

Palmer, N. E. [LLNL; Schneider, M. B. [LLNL; Bell, P. M. [LLNL; Piston, K. W. [LLNL; Moody, J. D. [LLNL; James, D. L. [LLNL; Ness, R. A. [LLNL; Haugh, M. J. [NSTec; Lee, J. J. [NSTec; Romano, E. D. [NSTec

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Installation of soft X-ray array diagnostics and its application to tomography reconstruction using synthetic KSTAR X-ray images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four-array system of soft X-ray diagnostics was installed on KSTAR tokamak. Each array has 32 viewing chords of two photo-diode array detectors with spatial resolution of 2 cm. To estimate signals from the soft X-ray radiation power, typical n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and argon impurity line radiation profiles in KSTAR are chosen. The photo-diodes were absolutely calibrated as a function of the incident photon energy in 2–40 keV range with a portable X-ray tube. Two-dimensional T{sub e} image properties by multi-energy method were simulated and visualized with six combinations of beryllium filter sets within the dynamic range of signal ratio.

Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Juhyeok; Hong, Joohwan; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Impurity and Edge Research Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati 00044 (Italy); Kim, Junghee [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Major of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Science Department, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Multiferroic CuCrO{sub 2} under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO{sub 2} has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34?GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ?23?GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, ?{sub c}?=?1.26?×?10{sup ?3}(1) GPa{sup ?1} and a-axis compressibility, ?{sub a}?=?8.90?×?10{sup ?3}(6) GPa{sup ?1}. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B{sub 0}?=?156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B{sub 0}{sup ?} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ?24?GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

Garg, Alka B., E-mail: alkagarg@barc.gov.in; Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

187

A convenient alignment approach for x-ray imaging experiments based on laser positioning devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a two-laser alignment approach for facilitating the precise alignment of various imaging and measuring components with respect to the x-ray beam. The first laser constantly pointed to the output window of the source, in a direction parallel to the path along which the components are placed. The second laser beam, originating from the opposite direction, was calibrated to coincide with the first laser beam. Thus, a visible indicator of the direction of the incident x-ray beam was established, and the various components could then be aligned conveniently and accurately with its help.

Zhang Da; Donovan, Molly; Wu Xizeng; Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States); Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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189

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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190

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-Ray Imaging

191

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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192

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-RayX-ray Image Bank

193

X-ray imaging with monochromatic and small focal spot size sources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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194

X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction via Wavelet Frame Based Regularization and Radon Domain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reconstruct high quality CT images from limited and noisy projection data. One of the common CT systems Bin Dong Jia Li Zuowei Shen December 22, 2011 Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been,8]. Numerical simulations and comparisons will be presented at the end. Keywords: Computed tomography, wavelet

Zakharov, Vladimir

195

X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

196

In-situ stoichiometry determination using x-ray fluorescence generated by reflection-high-energy-electron-diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge in the stoichiometric growth of complex oxide compounds is the control of the relative compositions of the constituent materials. A potential avenue for compositional analysis during growth is the use of x-ray fluorescence generated during reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements. Using this technique, relative compositions of Y and Mn in molecular beam epitaxy grown YMnO{sub 3} samples were studied. Comparing the results with Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy suggests that the technique has the potential for real-time analysis of elemental fluxes and stoichiometry control during sample growth.

Keenan, Cameron; Chandril, Sandeep; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Myers, T. H. [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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198

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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199

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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200

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCouldBiofuelHelp Table ofBiological

202

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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203

X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct investigation of mechanisms of vascular dysfunctions.

Umetani, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukushima, K. [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Hospital, Fujishirodai, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Medical Physics, Volume 11, No. 3 1984 , Pages 303310 A photodiode array x-ray imaging system for digital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medical Physics, Volume 11, No. 3 1984 , Pages 303­310 A photodiode array x-ray imaging system, self-scanning, photodiode array Reticon RL 1024S optically coupled to an x-ray image intensifier tube, SPATIAL RESOLUTION, PHOTODIODES, BLOOD VESSELS, BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY #12;

Cunningham, Ian

205

EXIST A High Sensitivity Hard X-ray Imaging Sky Survey Mission for ISS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A deep all-sky imaging hard x-ray survey and wide-field monitor is needed to extend soft (ROSAT) and medium (ABRIXAS2) x-ray surveys into the 10-100 keV band (and beyond) at comparable sensitivity (~0.05 mCrab). This would enable discovery and study of >3000 obscured AGN, which probably dominate the hard x-ray background; detailed study of spectra and variability of accreting black holes and a census of BHs in the Galaxy; Gamma-ray bursts and associated massive star formation (PopIII) at very high redshift and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters throughout the Local Group; and a full galactic survey for obscured supernova remnants. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed array of 8 x 1m^2 coded aperture telescopes fixed on the International Space Station (ISS) with 160deg x 40deg field of view which images the full sky each 90 min orbit. EXIST has been included in the most recent NASA Strategic Plan as a candidate mission for the next decade. An overview of the science goals and mission concep...

Grindlay, J; Chakraborty, D; Elvis, M; Fabian, A C; Fiore, F; Gehrels, N; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F; Hartmann, D; Prince, T A; Ramsey, B; Rothschild, R; Skinner, G K; Woosley, S

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reconstruction of a yeast cell from X-ray diffraction data  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Details are provided of the algorithm used for the reconstruction of yeast cell images in the recent demonstration of diffraction microscopy by Shapiro, Thibault, Beetz, Elser, Howells, Jacobsen, Kirz, Lima, Miao, Nieman & Sayre [Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA (2005), 102, 15343-15346]. Two refinements of the iterative constraint-based scheme are developed to address the current experimental realities of this imaging technique, which include missing central data and noise. A constrained power operator is defined whose eigenmodes allow the identification of a small number of degrees of freedom in the reconstruction that are negligibly constrained as a result of the missing data. To achieve reproducibility in the algorithm's output, a special intervention is required for these modes. Weak incompatibility of the constraints caused by noise in both direct and Fourier space leads to residual phase fluctuations. This problem is addressed by supplementing the algorithm with an averaging method. The effect of averaging may be interpreted in terms of an effective modulation transfer function, as used in optics, to quantify the resolution. The reconstruction details are prefaced with simulations of wave propagation through a model yeast cell. These show that the yeast cell is a strong-phase-contrast object for the conditions in the experiment.

Thibault, Pierre; Elser, Veit; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David; Sayre, David

2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

The use of X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and magnetic measurements for analysing microstructural features of a duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction, light optical microscopy, and magnetization saturation measurements were employed to analyse the microstructural features of a UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel modified by high-temperature treatments. The samples were heated to 1300 deg. C and cooled by different ways to produce five different microstructures. Solution treatments at 1000 deg. C were also employed to produce another five conditions. Three methods were employed to determine the austenite/ferrite proportions. X-ray diffraction gave higher austenite values than the other methods, due to the influence of texture, but can be successfully used to determine the microstrain level in each phase. Magnetic saturation measurement is a very simple and precise method for quantification of austenite and ferrite volume fractions in samples that were fast-cooled and slow-cooled. Light microscopy can give a fast and precise measurement of the phase proportions and reveals important features related to the morphology of the phases, but in the samples where the austenite content is low, quantification becomes difficult and imprecise.

Ribeiro Miranda, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60455-760 Fortaleza/CE (Brazil)]. E-mail: marcus@fisica.ufc.br; Sasaki, J.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Campus do Pici, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60455-760 Fortaleza/CE (Brazil); Tavares, S.S.M. [PGMEC/TEM, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Passo da Patria, 156, CEP 24210-240, Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); de Abreu, H.F.G. [Depto. Engenharia Meca-hat nica, Universidade Federal do Ceara (Brazil); Neto, J.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

A 31?T split-pair pulsed magnet for single crystal x-ray diffraction at low temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a pulsed magnet system with panoramic access for synchrotron x-ray diffraction in magnetic fields up to 31?T and at low temperature down to 1.5?K. The apparatus consists of a split-pair magnet, a liquid nitrogen bath to cool the pulsed coil, and a helium cryostat allowing sample temperatures from 1.5 up to 250?K. Using a 1.15?MJ mobile generator, magnetic field pulses of 60?ms length were generated in the magnet, with a rise time of 16.5?ms and a repetition rate of 2 pulses/h at 31?T. The setup was validated for single crystal diffraction on the ESRF beamline ID06.

Duc, F.; Frings, P.; Nardone, M.; Billette, J.; Zitouni, A.; Delescluse, P.; Béard, J.; Nicolin, J. P.; Rikken, G. L. J. A. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses, CNRS-INSA-UJF-UPS, 143, avenue de Rangueil, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Fabrèges, X. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses, CNRS-INSA-UJF-UPS, 143, avenue de Rangueil, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Laboratoire Léon Brillouin, UMR12 CEA-CNRS Bât 563 CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Roth, T. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Boîte Postale 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); European XFEL GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Ring 19, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Detlefs, C.; Lesourd, M.; Zhang, L. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Boîte Postale 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Oxygen diffusivity in silicon derived from dynamical X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thickness dependent Pendelloesung oscillations are highly sensitive to strain fields from defects in a host crystal. Based on this, we present a novel technique to measure the precipitation kinetics of oxygen in silicon already at its early stage of clustering at high temperatures. At 900 Degree-Sign C, precipitates with a radius smaller than 4 nm and with a density of 1 {+-} 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} 1/cm{sup 3} were observed. The technique was calibrated by complementary scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray measurements in the range of normal diffusivity yielding a diffusion constant of 1.7 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}cm{sup 2}/s, which is close to the literature value of 2.074 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}cm{sup 2}/s. The measurements have been made with the characteristic K{sub {alpha}1}-line of a high voltage tungsten X-ray tube at 59.31 keV, which provides the opportunity to illuminate through complex sample environments like high temperature scattering furnaces.

Will, J.; Groeschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Steinrueck, H.-G.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kot, D.; Schubert, M. A.; Kissinger, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

210

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL); McKay, Timothy A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Proceedings of the workshop on X-ray computed microtomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of vugraphs from the nine presentations at the conference. Titles of the presentations are: CMT: Applications and Techniques; Computer Microtomography Using X-rays from Third Generation Synchrotron X-ray; Approaches to Soft-X-ray Nanotomography; Diffraction Enhanced Tomography; X-ray Computed Microtomography Applications at the NSLS; XCMT Applications in Forestry and Forest Products; 3DMA: Investigating Three Dimensional Pore Geometry from High Resolution Images; X-ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Volcanic Rock; and 3-D Visualization of Tomographic Volumes.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A concept to collect neutron and x-ray images on the same line of sight at NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron and x-ray images are collected at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the size and shape of inertial confinement fusion implosions. The x-ray images provide a measure of the size and shape of the hot region of the deuterium-tritium fuel while the neutron images provide a measure of the size and shape of the burning plasma. Although these two types of images are collected simultaneously, they are not collected along the same line of sight (LOS). One 14 MeV neutron image is collected on the NIF equator, and two x-ray images are collected along the polar axis and nearly perpendicular to the neutron imaging line of sight on the equator. Both measurements use pinhole apertures to form the images, but existing x-ray imaging provides time-resolved measurements while the neutron images are time-integrated. Detailed comparisons of the x-ray and neutron images can provide information on the fuel assembly, but these studies have been limited because the implosions are not azimuthally symmetric and the images are collected along different LOS. We have developed a conceptual design of a time-integrated x-ray imaging system that could be added to the existing neutron imaging LOS. This new system would allow these detailed studies, providing important information on the fuel assembly of future implosions. Here we present this conceptual design and the expected performance characteristics.

Merrill, F. E., E-mail: fmerrill@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten K?{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Stoichiometry optimization of homoepitaxial oxide thin films using x-ray diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a “MBE growth window” in which the film stoichiometry iswindow, the best fits of the diffraction patterns were obtained with film

Stemmer, Susanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parameters of the ITER core plasmas will be measured using the Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (CIXS), a high-resolution crystal spectrometer focusing on the L-shell spectra of highly ionized tungsten atoms. In order to correctly infer the plasma properties accurate atomic data are required. Here, some aspects of the underlying physics are discussed using experimental data and theoretical predictions from modeling.

Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Biedermann, C; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Graf, A; Gu, M F; Hill, K W; Barnsley, R

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

In-situ stress analysis with X-Ray diffraction for yield locus characterization of sheet metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A main problem in the field of sheet metal characterization is the inhomogeneous plastic deformation in the gauge regions of specimens which causes the analytically calculated stresses to differ from the sought state of stress acting in the middle of the gauge region. To overcome this problem, application of X-Ray diffraction is analyzed. For that purpose a mobile X-ray diffractometer and an optical strain measurement system are mounted on a universal tensile testing machine. This enables the recording of the whole strain and stress history of a material point. The method is applied to uniaxial tension tests, plane strain tension tests and shear tests to characterize the interstitial free steel alloy DC06. The applicability of the concepts of stress factors is verified by uniaxial tension tests. The experimentally obtained values are compared with the theoretical values calculated with crystal elasticity models utilizing the orientation distribution functions (ODF). The relaxation problem is addressed which shows itself as drops in the stress values with the strain kept at a constant level. This drop is analyzed with elasto-viscoplastic material models to correct the measured stresses. Results show that the XRD is applicable to measure the stresses in sheet metals with preferred orientation. The obtained yield locus is expressed with the Yld2000–2D material model and an industry oriented workpiece is analyzed numerically. The comparison of the strain distribution on the workpiece verifies the identified material parameters.

Güner, A.; Tekkaya, A. E. [Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction, TU Dortmund University, Baroper Str. 301, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Zillmann, B.; Lampke, T. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemnitz University of Technology, Erfenschlager Strasse 73 D-09125 Chemnitz (Germany)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

218

Tuning of colossal dielectric constant in gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes using in-situ x-ray diffraction techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ x-ray diffraction technique has been used to study the growth process of gold incorporated polypyrrole nanotubes that exhibit colossal dielectric constant due to existence of quasi-one-dimensional charge density wave state. These composite nanotubes were formed within nanopores of a polycarbonate membrane by flowing pyrrole monomer from one side and mixture of ferric chloride and chloroauric acid from other side in a sample cell that allows collection of x-ray data during the reaction. The size of the gold nanoparticle embedded in the walls of the nanotubes was found to be dependent on chloroauric acid concentration for nanowires having diameter more than 100 nm. For lower diameter nanotubes the nanoparticle size become independent of chloroauric acid concentration and depends on the diameter of nanotubes only. The result of this study also shows that for 50 nm gold-polypyrrole composite nanotubes obtained with 5.3 mM chloroauric acid gives colossal dielectric constant of about 10{sup 7}. This value remain almost constant over a frequency range from 1Hz to 10{sup 6} Hz even at 80 K temperature.

Sarma, Abhisakh; Sanyal, Milan K., E-mail: milank.sanyal@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

220

Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 ?m, respectively.

Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Beam hardening effects in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In this work, the authors investigate how beam hardening affects the image formation in x-ray phase-contrast imaging and consecutively develop a correction algorithm based on the results of the analysis. Methods: The authors' approach utilizes a recently developed x-ray imaging technique using a grating interferometer capable of visualizing the differential phase shift of a wave front traversing an object. An analytical description of beam hardening is given, highlighting differences between attenuation and phase-contrast imaging. The authors present exemplary beam hardening artifacts for a number of well-defined samples in measurements at a compact laboratory setup using a polychromatic source. Results: Despite the differences in image formation, the authors show that beam hardening leads to a similar reduction of image quality in phase-contrast imaging as in conventional attenuation-contrast imaging. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that for homogeneous objects, beam hardening artifacts can be corrected by a linearization technique, applicable to all kinds of phase-contrast methods using polychromatic sources. Conclusions: The evaluated correction algorithm is shown to yield good results for a number of simple test objects and can thus be advocated in medical imaging and nondestructive testing.

Chabior, Michael; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Bunk, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Schroer, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz [Siemens AG Corporate Technology, 80200 Muenchen (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Siemens AG Corporate Technology, 80200 Muenchen (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Synthesis and single crystal x-ray diffraction study of a Schiff base derived from 4-acylpyrazolone and 2-aminophenol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title compound, (Z)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4[1((2hydroxyphenyl)amino)propylidene] -3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H)-one was synthesized by refluxing compound 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-3-methyl-4-propionyl-5-pyrazolone, with 2-aminophenol in ethanol. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pca2{sub 1} having unit cell parameters: a = 26.2993(8), b = 7.0724(2) and c = 18.7170(5)Å. The structure contains two crystallographically independent molecules, A, and, B, in the asymmetric unit cell. The crystal structure was solved by direct method using single crystal X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature and refined by full-matrix least-squares procedures to a final R- value of 0.049 for 5207 observed reflections.

Sharma, Naresh; Kant, Rajni, E-mail: vivek-gupta2k2@hotmail.com; Gupta, Vivek K., E-mail: vivek-gupta2k2@hotmail.com [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu Tawi - 180006 (India); Jadeja, R. N. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Thermoelastic study of nanolayered structures using time-resolved X-ray diffraction at high repetition rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the thermoelastic response of a nanolayered sample composed of a metallic SrRuO{sub 3} electrode sandwiched between a ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} film with negative thermal expansion and a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. SrRuO{sub 3} is rapidly heated by fs-laser pulses with 208?kHz repetition rate. Diffraction of X-ray pulses derived from a synchrotron measures the transient out-of-plane lattice constant c of all three materials simultaneously from 120?ps to 5??s with a relative accuracy up to ?c/c?=?10{sup ?6}. The in-plane propagation of sound is essential for understanding the delayed out-of-plane compression of Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}.

Navirian, H. A.; Schick, D., E-mail: daniel.schick@uni-potsdam.de; Leitenberger, W.; Bargheer, M. [Institut für Physik und Astronomie, Universität Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Röntgen Campus, BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of laser-induced acoustic wave propagation in bilayer metallic thin crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phonon propagation across the interface of a Cu/Ag(111) bilayer and transient lattice disorder, induced by a femtosecond 267?nm pulse, in Ag(111) crystal have been measured by means of time resolved X-ray diffraction. A “blast” force due to thermal stress induced by suddenly heated electrons is formed within two picoseconds after excitation and its “blast wave” propagation through the interface and Ag (111) crystal was monitored by the shift and broadening of the rocking curve, I vs. ?, as a function of time after excitation. Lattice disorder, contraction and expansion as well as thermal strain formation and wave propagation have also been measured. The experimental data and mechanism proposed are supported by theoretical simulations.

Er, Ali Oguz [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States); Tang, Jau, E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Research Center for Applied Sciences Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jie [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Rentzepis, Peter M., E-mail: jautang@gate.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: prentzepis@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Diffusion-driven precipitate growth and ripening of oxygen precipitates in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray Pendellösung fringes from three silicon single crystals measured at 900?°C are analyzed with respect to density and size of oxygen precipitates within a diffusion-driven growth model and compared with TEM investigations. It appears that boron doped (p+) material shows a higher precipitate density and a higher strain than moderately (p-) boron crystals. In-situ diffraction reveals a diffusion-driven precipitate growth followed by a second growth regime in both materials. An interpretation of the second growth regime in terms of Ostwald ripening yields surface energy values (around 70?erg/cm{sup 2}) similar to published data. Further, an increased nucleation rate by a factor of ?13 is found in the p+ sample as compared to a p- sample at a nucleation temperature of 450?°C.

Will, J., E-mail: will@krist.uni-erlangen.de; Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Spiecker, E. [Center for Nanoanalysis and Electron Microscopy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

228

Feasibility Study of Gas Electron Multiplier Detector as an X-Ray Image Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For its ease manufacturing, flexible geometry, and cheap manufacturing cost, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector can be used as an x-ray image sensor. For this purpose, we acquired relative detection efficiencies and suggested a method to increase the detection efficiency in order to study the possibility of GEM detector as an x-ray image sensor. The GEM detector system is composed of GEM foils, the instrument system, the gas system, and the negative power supply. The instrument system consists of the A225 charge sensitive preamp, A206 discriminator, and MCA8000D multichannel analyzer. For the gas system, Argon gas was mixed with CO2 to the ratio of 8:2, and for the negative 2,000 volts, the 3106D power supply was used. The CsI-coated GEM foil was used to increase the detection efficiency. Fe-55 was used as an x-ray source and the relative efficiency was acquired by using the ratio of GEM detector to the CdTe detector. The total count method and the energy spectrum method were used to calculate the rel...

Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Soonhyouk

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

SENSITIVITY OF STACKED IMAGING DETECTORS TO HARD X-RAY POLARIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

Muleri, Fabio; Campana, Riccardo, E-mail: fabio.muleri@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (CXIDB ID 15)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The file contains 125 images corresponding to different tilts of the sample around the y axis at 1 degree intervals. Each image is the result of 4 exposures merged together. For more details see the citation.

Chapman, Henry N.

231

Cs-Exchange in Birnessite: Raction Mechanisms Inferred from Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have explored the exchange of Cs for interlayer Na in birnessite using several techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and time-resolved synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). Our goal was to test which of two possible exchange mechanisms is operative during the reaction: (1) diffusion of cations in and out of the interlayer or (2) dissolution of Na-birnessite and reprecipitation of Cs-birnessite. The appearance of distinct XRD peaks for Na- and Cs-rich phases in partially exchanged samples offered support for a simple diffusion model, but it was inconsistent with the compositional and crystallographic homogeneity of (Na,Cs)-birnessite platelets from core to rim as ascertained by TEM. Time-resolved XRD revealed systematic changes in the structure of the emergent Cs-rich birnessite phase during exchange, in conflict with a dissolution and reprecipitation model. Instead, we propose that exchange occurred by sequential delamination of Mn oxide octahedral sheets. Exfoliation of a given interlayer region allowed for wholesale replacement of Na by Cs and was rapidly followed by reassembly. This model accounts for the rapidity of metal exchange in birnessite, the co-existence of distinct Na- and Cs-birnessite phases during the process of exchange, and the uniformly mixed Na- and Cs-compositions ascertained from point analyses by selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy of partially exchanged grains.

Lopano, C.; Heaney, P; Post, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An x-ray diffraction study of some mesoionic 2,3-diphenyltetrazoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An X-my diffraction study is reported for four molecules of mesoionic 2,3-diphenyltetrazoles. The results confirm a dipolar [open quotes]mesoionic[close quotes] structure, aromatic character of the tetrazole ring and no conjugation between the phenyl and tetrazole rings. The geometry of the exocyclic group is discussed in detail. The molecular parameters of the compounds investigated are correlated with [sup 13]C and [sup 15]N nmr data. The results obtained are compared with similar structures which have already been studied.

Luboradzki, R. (Institute of Physical Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland)); Kozminski, W.; Stefaniak, L. (Institute of Organic Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Amyloid Treatment and Research Program key research findings: Definition of the electron microscopic structure and x-ray diffraction pattern of amyloid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which for the first time defined the biochemical nature and source of the amyloid fibril in this form microscopic structure and x-ray diffraction pattern of amyloid fibrils in 1967, providing key insight of amyloidosis. Characterization of the protein deposits in dialysis-associated amyloidosis as 2- microglobulin

Finzi, Adrien

234

Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub ?} line at ?1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ?7 cm in ?100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ?1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 ?m. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

Stoeckl, C., E-mail: csto@lle.rochester.edu; Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Growth and nucleation regimes in boron doped silicon by dynamical x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxygen precipitation of highly (17.5 m? cm) and moderately (4.5 ? cm) boron (B) doped silicon (Si) crystals at 780?°C is investigated by following in-situ the evolution of diffraction Pendellösung oscillations. All samples show an initial diffusion-driven growth process which may change over into Ostwald ripening. For the highly doped sample and involving a nucleation step at 450?°C for 30?h, the precipitate density ? is enhanced by a factor of 8 as compared to the moderately doped sample. The influence of a high B concentration on ? is dramatically higher for the samples directly heated to 780?°C, where an enhancement factor of 80 is found. Considering Ostwald ripening as a second growth regime reveals consistent ripening rates and surface energies ? with those found at 900?°C in a previous publication.

Will, J., E-mail: johannes.will@fau.de; Gröschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Weißer, M.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

237

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-Ray Imaging

238

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imaging of the

239

2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

Nishimura, K., E-mail: nishim11@nuclear.es.kit.ac.jp; Sanpei, A., E-mail: sanpei@kit.ac.jp; Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm[sup 2]. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics. 9 figures.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Seppala, L.G.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

242

all-sky x-ray image: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be...

243

Structure of a zeolite ZSM-5-Bithiophene complex as determined by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of a zeolite ZSM-5 complex with ca. 4 molecules/unit cell of bithiophene was determined by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. In adopts monoclinic symmetry in space group P2{sub 1}/n ({alpha} unique) between room temperature and 25 K, with refined lattice parameters at 25 K of a = 20.0614(4), b = 19.8251(4), c = 13.3623(4) {Angstrom}, and a = 90.848(2){degrees}. Structural modeling and Rietveld refinements showed that there are two crystallographically unique bithiophene molecules, each with an occupancy factor of ca. 0.5. One bithiophene is localized at the center of the straight channels with one of the rings residing at the intersection with the sinusoidal channels. The other molecule lies in the sinusoidal channels and projects partially into the straight channels. The relationship between polythiophene chain length and the formation of conducting polythiophene molecular wires in the ZSM-5 framework is discussed. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Eylem, C.; Hriljac, J.A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Ramamurthy, V.; Corbin, D.R. [Du Pont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)] [Du Pont Co., Wilmington, DE (United States); Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the human mismatch repair protein MutS[beta  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MutS{beta} is a eukaryotic mismatch repair protein that preferentially targets extrahelical unpaired nucleotides and shares partial functional redundancy with MutS{alpha} (MSH2-MSH6). Although mismatch recognition by MutS{alpha} has been shown to involve a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif, little is known about the lesion-binding mechanism of MutS{beta}. Combined MSH3/MSH6 deficiency triggers a strong predisposition to cancer in mice and defects in msh2 and msh6 account for roughly half of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer mutations. These three MutS homologs are also believed to play a role in trinucleotide repeat instability, which is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. The baculovirus overexpression and purification of recombinant human MutS{beta} and three truncation mutants are presented here. Binding assays with heteroduplex DNA were carried out for biochemical characterization. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein bound to a heteroduplex DNA substrate are also reported.

Tseng, Quincy; Orans, Jillian; Hast, Michael A.; Iyer, Ravi R.; Changela, Anita; Modrich, Paul L.; Beese, Lorena S. (Duke)

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

X-ray Diffraction and Molecular Dynamics Study of Medium-range Order in Ambient and Hot Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed x-ray diffraction measurements with high energy-resolution and accuracy to study water structure at three different temperatures (7, 25 and 66 C) under normal pressure. Using a spherically curved Ge crystal an energy resolution better than 15 eV has been achieved which eliminates influence from Compton scattering. The high quality of the data allows a precise oxygen-oxygen pair correlation function (PCF) to be directly derived from the Fourier transform of the experimental data resolving shell structure out to ~12 {\\AA}, i.e. 5 hydration shells. Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the TIP4P/2005 force-field reproduce excellently the experimental shell-structure in the range 4-12 {\\AA} although less agreement is seen for the first peak in the PCF. The Local Structure Index [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 7671 (1996)] identifies a tetrahedral minority giving the intermediate-range oscillations in the PCF and a disordered majority providing a more featureless background in this range. The current study supports the proposal that the structure of liquid water, even at high temperatures, can be described in terms of a two-state fluctuation model involving local structures related to the high-density and low-density forms of liquid water postulated in the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis.

Congcong Huang; K. T. Wikfeldt; D. Nordlund; U. Bergmann; T. McQueen; J. Sellberg; L. G. M. Pettersson; A. Nilsson

2011-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

246

Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient.

Bogdan Neculaes, V., E-mail: neculaes@research.ge.com; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)] [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

3-dimensional imaging system using crystal diffraction lenses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for imaging a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. Diffracting crystals are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to a detector which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for a method for imaging x-ray and gamma radiation by supplying a plurality of sources of radiation; focusing the radiation onto a detector; analyzing the focused radiation to collect data as to the type and location of the radiation; and producing an image using the data. 18 figs.

Smither, R.K.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

248

3-dimensional imaging system using crystal diffraction lenses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for imaging a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. Diffracting crystals are used for focussing the radiation and directing the radiation to a detector which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for a method for imaging x-ray and gamma radiation by supplying a plurality of sources of radiation; focussing the radiation onto a detector; analyzing the focused radiation to collect data as to the type and location of the radiation; and producing an image using the data.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which automatically selects these parameters.

Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

Zuo, Jian-min (University of Illinois) [University of Illinois

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Simultaneous measurements of several state variables in shocked carbon by imaging x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We apply the novel experimental technique of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering to measure the spatial profiles of the temperature, ionization state, relative material density, and the shock speed in a high-energy density system. A blast wave driven in a low-density foam is probed with 90? scattering of 7.8?keV helium-like nickel x-rays, which are spectrally dispersed and resolved in one spatial dimension by a doubly curved crystal. The inferred properties of the shock are shown to be self-consistent with 1D analytical estimates. These high-resolution measurements enable a direct comparison of the observed temperature with the results from hydrodynamic simulations. We find good agreement with the simulations for the temperature at the shock front but discrepancies in the modeling of the spatial temperature profile and shock speed. These results indicate the challenges in modeling the shock dynamics of structured materials like foams, commonly used in many high-energy density and laboratory astrophysics experiments.

Gamboa, E. J., E-mail: eliseo@umich.edu; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Trantham, M. R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Falk, K.; Montgomery, D. S.; Benage, J. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Imaging design of the wide field x-ray monitor onboard the HETE satellite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE), to be launched in 1995, will study Gamma-Ray Bursts in an unprecendented wide wavelength range from Gamma- and X-ray to UV wavelengths. The X-ray range (2 to 25 keV) will be covered by 2 perpendicularly oriented 1-dimensional coded aperture cameras. These instruments cover a wide field of view of 2 sr and thus have a relatively large potential to locate GRBs to a fraction of a degree, which is an order of magnitude better than BATSE. The imaging design of these coded aperture cameras relates to the design of the coded apertures and the decoding algorithm. The aperture pattern is to a large extent determined by the high background in this wide field application and the low number of pattern elements ({approximately}100) in each direction. The result is a random pattern with an open fraction of 33%. The onboard decoding algorithm is dedicated to the localization of a single point source.

Zand, J.J.M. In`T; Fenimore, E.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kawai, N.; Yoshida, A.; Matsuoka, M. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Saitama (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Miyazaki Univ. (Japan)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

In-situ X-ray diffraction study of phase transformations in the Am-O system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of minor actinides recycling, americium can be transmuted by adding it in UO{sub 2} or (U, Pu)O{sub 2} fuels. Americium oxides exhibiting a higher oxygen potential than U or Pu oxides, its addition alters the fuel properties. To comprehend its influence, a thorough knowledge of the Am-O phase equilibria diagram and of thermal expansion behavior is of main interest. Due to americium scarcity and high radiotoxicity, few experimental reports on this topic are available. Here we present in-situ high-temperature XRD results on the reduction from AmO{sub 2} to Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We show that fluorite (Fm-3m) AmO{sub 2} is reduced to cubic (Ia-3) C Prime -type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3+{delta}}, and then into hexagonal (P6{sub 3}/mmc) A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which remains stable up to 1840 K. We also demonstrate the transitional existence of the monoclinic (C2/m) B-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At last, we describe, for the first time, the thermal expansion behavior of the hexagonal Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} between room temperature and 1840 K. - Graphical abstract: Americium dioxide was in situ studied by high-temperature X-ray diffraction. First, fluorite AmO{sub 2} is reduced to cubic C Prime -type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3+{delta}} and then transforms into hexagonal A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which remains stable up to 1840 K. Then, we demonstrate the transitional existence of monoclinic B-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At last, we describe, for the first time, the thermal expansion of A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} between room temperature and 1840 K. This work may contribute to a better understanding of Am oxide behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We realize an in-situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction study on an AmO{sub 2} sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorite AmO{sub 2} transforms to cubic Am{sub 2}O{sub 3+{delta}} and then to hexagonal Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Little-known monoclinic Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} is observed during the cubic-to-hexagonal transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameter thermal expansion of hexagonal Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} is given up to 1840 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We give additional data on AmO{sub 2} lattice parameter expansion under self-irradiation.

Lebreton, Florent, E-mail: florent.lebreton@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France) [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); GEMH, ENSCI, 87065 Limoges (France); Belin, Renaud C., E-mail: renaud.belin@cea.fr [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LMPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)] [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Blanchart, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.blanchart@unilim.fr [GEMH, ENSCI, 87065 Limoges (France)] [GEMH, ENSCI, 87065 Limoges (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction of Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of pressure on the crystal structure of thallium selenate (Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}) (Pmcn, Z=4), containing the Tl{sup +} cations with electron lone pairs, has been studied with single-crystal X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell up to 3.64 GPa at room temperature. No phase transition has been observed. The compressibility data are fitted by a Murnaghan equation of state with the zero-pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0}=29(1) GPa and the unit-cell volume at ambient pressure V{sub 0}=529.6(8) A{sup 3} (B'=4.00). Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} is the least compressible in the c direction, while the pressure-induced changes of the a and b lattice parameters are quite similar. These observations can be explained by different pressure effects on the nine- and 11-fold coordination polyhedra around the two non-equivalent Tl atoms. The SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-} tetrahedra are not rigid units and become more distorted. Their contribution to the compressibility is small. The effect of pressure on the isotypical oxide materials A{sub 2}TO{sub 4} with the {beta}-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} structure is discussed. It appears that the presence of electron lone pairs on the Tl{sup +} cation does not seem to influence the compressibility of Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: Pressure dependence of normalized lattice parameters and unit-cell volumes in Tl{sub 2}SeO{sub 4} (Pmcn, Z=4). The solid line is the Murnaghan equation of state.

Grzechnik, Andrzej [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Pais Vasco, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: andrzej.grzechnik@ehu.es; Breczewski, Tomasz; Friese, Karen [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Pais Vasco, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Phases of underpotentially deposited Hg on Au(111): An in situ surface X-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on an in situ surface X-ray diffraction study of the underpotential deposition (UPD) of mercury on Au(111). We have observed three UPD phases present at potentials prior to bulk mercury deposition. These phases consist of two well-ordered intermediate states and what appears to be either a fully discharged two-dimensional liquid Hg layer or a monolayer of an amorphous Hg-Au alloy. Both ordered intermediate phases have hexagonal structures with lattice vectors that are rotated 30{degree} from those of the Au(111) substrate. The first phase (phase I), present at a potential of +0.68 V, was only observed on fresh flame-annealed Au(111) electrodes and appears to be an open incommensurate structure with a lattice constant of 3.86 {+-} 0.03 A. This phase appears to be metastable since it changes to a second ordered phase (phase II) after a certain time. The second phase has a more compact lattice with a = 3.34 {+-} 0.01 A and appears to be a commensurate 2x2 structure with 2/3 of the Hg atoms at threefold hollow sites and 1/3 on atop sites. Similar to the first one, this phase is also metastable and can be transformed to a final, fully discharged, state of a two-dimensional liquid Hg layer or an amorphous Hg-Au alloy. The entire Hg UPD process, from Hg{sup 2+} to the fully discharged metallic Hg layer, agrees well with a multistep mechanism based on previous electrochemical kinetic studies on polycrystalline Au electrodes. 31 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Li, J.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1997-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4?GPa and temperatures up to 1073?K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (?P{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ?} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}?=?174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (?K{sub T}/?T){sub P}=?0.060(8) GPa K{sup ?1} and at constant volume (?K{sub T}/?T){sub V}=?0.046(8)?GPa K{sup ?1}, the volumetric thermal expansivity ?{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10{sup ?5}+0.3(2)×10{sup ?8}T (K{sup ?1}), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (??/?P){sub T}=(?2.0±0.4)×10{sup ?6} K{sup ?1?}GPa{sup ?1}. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature ?{sub 0}?=?276.6?K gives ?{sub 0}?=?1.27(8) and K{sub T0}?=?171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q?=?3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ?5?GPa as has been reported previously.

Zou, Yongtao, E-mail: yongtao.zou@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Qi, Xintong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting [Department of Geosciences, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Li, Xuefei [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Physics and Chemistry of the Ministry of Education, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Welch, David [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

257

Blue-enhanced thin-film photodiode for dual-screen x-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on a-Si:H-based low-leakage blue-enhanced photodiodes for dual-screen x-ray imaging detectors. Doped nanocrystalline silicon was incorporated in both the n- and p-type regions to reduce absorption losses for light incoming from the top and bottom screens. The photodiode exhibits a dark current density of 900 pA/cm{sup 2} and an external quantum efficiency up to 90% at a reverse bias of 5 V. In the case of illumination through the tailored p-layer, the quantum efficiency of 60% at a 400 nm wavelength is almost double that for the conventional a-Si:H n-i-p photodiode.

Vygranenko, Y.; Vieira, M. [Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Computer Engineering, ISEL, Lisbon 1949-014 (Portugal); Sazonov, A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo N2L 3G1 (Canada); Heiler, G.; Tredwell, T. [Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, New York 14652-3487 (United States); Nathan, A. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of effective temperature in a vibrated granular medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of the effective temperature $T_{eff}$ in a vibrated granular medium. By tracking the directed motion and the fluctuation dynamics of the tracers inside, we obtained $T_{eff}$ of the system using Einstein relation. We found that as the system unjams with increasing vibration intensities $\\Gamma$, the structural relaxation time $\\tau$ increases substantially which can be fitted by an Arrhenius law using $T_{eff}$. And the characteristic energy scale of structural relaxation yielded by the Arrhenius fitting is $E = 0.21 \\pm 0.02$ $pd^3$, where $p$ is the pressure and $d$ is the background particle diameter, which is consistent with those from hard sphere simulations in which the structural relaxation happens via the opening up of free volume against pressure.

Yixin Cao; Xiaodan Zhang; Binquan Kou; Xiangting Li; Xianghui Xiao; Kamel Fezzaa; Yujie Wang

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analysed by high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex core radius was observed, from #24; ~38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Kasai, S.; Yamada, K.; Ono, T.; Thiaville, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Simultaneous High-Resolution 2-Dimensional Spatial and 1-Dimensional Picosecond Streaked X-ray Pinhole Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Kentech x-ray streak camera was run at the LLNL Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to record simultaneous space- and time-resolved measurements of picosecond laser-produced plasmas. Four different x-ray energy channels were monitored using broad-band filters to record the time history of Cu targets heated at irradiances of 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Through the Cu filter channel, a time-resolution below 3ps was obtained. Additionally, an array of 10 {micro}m diameter pinholes was placed in front of the camera to produce multiple time-resolved x-ray images on the photocathode and time-integrated images on the phosphor with 10 and 15 times magnification, respectively, with spatial resolution of <13 {micro}m.

Steel, A B; Nagel, S R; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Maximum Entropy Method and Charge Flipping, a Powerful Combination to Visualize the True Nature of Structural Disorder from in situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a systematic approach, the ability of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to reconstruct the most probable electron density of highly disordered crystal structures from X-ray powder diffraction data was evaluated. As a case study, the ambient temperature crystal structures of disordered {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] and {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[CO{sub 3}] and ordered {delta}-K{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] were investigated in detail with the aim of revealing the 'true' nature of the apparent disorder. Different combinations of F (based on phased structure factors) and G constraints (based on structure-factor amplitudes) from different sources were applied in MEM calculations. In particular, a new combination of the MEM with the recently developed charge-flipping algorithm with histogram matching for powder diffraction data (pCF) was successfully introduced to avoid the inevitable bias of the phases of the structure-factor amplitudes by the Rietveld model. Completely ab initio electron-density distributions have been obtained with the MEM applied to a combination of structure-factor amplitudes from Le Bail fits with phases derived from pCF. All features of the crystal structures, in particular the disorder of the oxalate and carbonate anions, and the displacements of the cations, are clearly obtained. This approach bears the potential of a fast method of electron-density determination, even for highly disordered materials. All the MEM maps obtained in this work were compared with the MEM map derived from the best Rietveld refined model. In general, the phased observed structure factors obtained from Rietveld refinement (applying F and G constraints) were found to give the closest description of the experimental data and thus lead to the most accurate image of the actual disorder.

Samy, A.; Dinnebier, R; van Smaalen, S; Jansen, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of epitaxial mixed ternary bixbyite Pr{sub x}Y{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} (x = 0-2) films on Si (111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ternary single crystalline bixbyite Pr{sub x}Y{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} films over the full stoichiometry range (x = 0-2) have been epitaxially grown on Si (111) with tailored electronic and crystallographic structure. In this work, we present a detailed study of their local atomic environment by extended X-ray absorption fine structure at both Y K and Pr L{sub III} edges, in combination with complementary high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements. The local structure exhibits systematic variations as a function of the film composition. The cation coordination in the second and third coordination shells changes with composition and is equal to the average concentration, implying that the Pr{sub x}Y{sub 2-x}O{sub 3} films are indeed fully mixed and have a local bixbyite structure with random atomic-scale ordering. A clear deviation from the virtual crystal approximation for the cation-oxygen bond lengths is detected. This demonstrates that the observed Vegard's law for the lattice variation as a function of composition is based microscopically on a more complex scheme related to local structural distortions which accommodate the different cation-oxygen bond lengths.

Niu, G.; Zoellner, M. H.; Zaumseil, P. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); Pouliopoulos, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale C. BertiPichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); D'Acapito, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Operative Group in Grenoble, c/o European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Schroeder, T. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany); BTU Cottbus, Konrad-Zuse-Str. 1, 03046 Cottbus (Germany); Boscherini, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale C. BertiPichat 6/2, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Officina dei Materiali, Operative Group in Grenoble, c/o European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Relationship of brain imaging with radionuclides and with x-ray computed tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of high sensitivity and specificity for altered local cerebral structure, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the preferred initial diagnostic imaging study under most circumstances when cerebral disease is suspected. CT has no competitor for detecting fresh intracerebral hemorrhage. Radionuclide imaging (RN) scan is preferred when relative perfusion is to be assessed, in patients allergic to contrast media, and when an adequate CT study is not technically possible. (RN) plays an important complementary role to CT, especially for patients suspected of subacute or chronic subdura hematoma, cerebral infarction, arteriovenous malformations, meningitis, encephalitis, normal pressure hydrocephalus, or when CT findings are inconclusive. When CT is not available, RN serves as a good screening study for suspected cerebral tumor, infection, recent infarction, arteriovenous malformation, and chronic subdural hematoma. Future improvement in radionuclide imaging by means of emission composition potential. The compound plating approacl threshold for all the investigated transistors and fast neutron spectra lies within the raal. The value of the potential slightly changes with the coordinate change in this region, i.e. the charge on a collecting electrode is not practically guided up to a certain moment of time during the movement of nonequilibrium carriers.

Kuhl, D.E.

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

Calculation of the parameters of the X-ray diffraction station with adaptive segmented optics on the side beam from the wiggler of the Sibir'-2 storage ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mounting of an X-ray diffraction station on the side beam of a 19-pole superconducting wiggler makes it possible not only to use the central synchrotron radiation beam with a wavelength of 0.5 Angstrom-Sign , but also to solve problems requiring softer X rays at a synchrotron radiation (SR) intensity exceeding that for the beams from the bending magnet. A numerical simulation of the formation of photon beams from a source and their transmission through the elements of the station (and through the station as a whole) allows one to calculate the parameters of the station, compare it with the existing analogs, determine its potential and actual efficiency of its elements, and estimate the adjustment quality. A numerical simulation of the SR source on the side beam from the wiggler and the focusing channel (segmented condenser mirror, monochromator with sagittal focusing by the segmented second crystal, and segmented focusing mirror) has been performed. The sizes of the focus and the divergence of rays in it are determined with allowance for the finite sizes of segments. The intensity of radiation with a wavelength {lambda} = 1.0 Angstrom-Sign in the focus is determined taking into account the loss in the SR extraction channel and in the focusing channel. The values of the critical wavelength for the side beam from the wiggler and the wavelength resolution are calculated. The intensities in the X-ray diffraction pattern and its angular resolution are found.

Molodenskii, D. S.; Kheiker, D. M., E-mail: kheiker@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Korchuganov, V. N. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Konoplev, E. E. [NPO Luch (Russian Federation); Dorovatovskii, P. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Developments in limited data image reconstruction techniques for ultrahigh-resolution x-ray tomographic imaging of microchips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of soft x-ray (about 1.8 KeV) nanotomography techniques for the evaluation and failure mode analysis of microchips was investigated. Realistic numerical simulations of the imaging process were performed and a specialized approach to image reconstruction from limited projection data was devised. Prior knowledge of the structure and its component materials was used to eliminate artifacts in the reconstructed images so that defects and deviations from the original design could be visualized. Simulated data sets were generated with a total of 21 projections over three different angular ranges: -50 to +50, - 80 to +80 and -90 to +90 degrees. In addition, a low level of illumination was assumed. It was shown that sub-micron defects within one cell of a microchip (< 10 pm3) could be imaged in 3-D using such an approach.

Haddad, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.

1997-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager: FOXSI Sam Kruckera,b, Steven Christec, Lindsay Glesenera,d, Shin-nosuke Ishikawaa, Stephen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan ABSTRACT The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI, solar physics, solar flares, silicon strip detectors, grazing-incidence optics, high-energy x-ray optics

California at Berkeley, University of

268

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI. INTRODUCTION The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI,1 is a space-based solar x

California at Berkeley, University of

269

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore than 20X-RayX-RayX-Ray

270

Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to low levels of ionizing radiation: BEIR VII Phase 2. TheBlake G, Genant HK (1999) Radiation exposure in bone mineralGuglielmi Thomas M. Link Radiation exposure in X-ray-based

Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a cell. This use of soft x-ray tomography is now generating considerable interest in the pharmaceutical industry as a potential method for reducing the cost and time it takes to...

272

Imaging X-ray spectroscopy with micro-X and Chandra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High spectral resolution observations of X-ray phenomena have the potential to uncover new physics. Currently, only point sources can be probed with high resolution spectra, using gratings. Extended objects like supernova ...

Rutherford, John (John Morton)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Concept to diagnose mix with imaging x-ray Thomson scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbulent mixing of two fluid species is a ubiquitous problem, prevalent in systems such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, supernova remnants, and other astrophysical systems. In complex, high Reynolds number compressible high energy density (HED) flows such as these, hydrodynamic instabilities initiate the turbulent mixing process, which can then feedback and alter the mean hydrodynamic motion through nonlinear processes. In order to predict how these systems evolve under turbulent conditions, models are used. However, these models require detailed quantitative data to validate and constrain their detailed physics models as well as improve them. Providing this much needed data is currently at the forefront of HED research but is proving elusive due to a lack of available diagnostics capable of directly measuring detailed flow variables. Thomson scattering is a promising technique in this regard as it provides fundamental conditions of the flow ({rho}, T, Zbar) due to its direct interaction with the small scales of the fluid or plasma and was recently considered as a possible mix diagnostic. With the development of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering (IXRTS) obtaining spatial profiles of these variables is within reach. We propose a novel use of the IXRTS technique that will provide more detailed quantitative data required for model validation in mix experiments.

Keiter, Paul A.; Gamboa, Eliseo J.; Huntington, Channing M.; Kuranz, Carolyn C. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Reflection nebulae in the Galactic Center: the case for soft X-ray imaging polarimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of irradiation and fluorescence of the 6.4 keV bright giant molecular clouds surrounding Sgr A*, the central supermassive black hole of our Galaxy, remains enigmatic. Testing the theory of a past active period of Sgr A* requires X-ray polarimetry. In this paper, we show how modern imaging polarimeters could revolutionize our understanding of the Galactic Center. Through Monte Carlo modeling, we produce a 4-8 keV polarization map of the Galactic Center, focusing on the polarimetric signature produced by Sgr B1, Sgr B2, G0.11-0.11, Bridge E, Bridge D, Bridge B2, MC2, MC1, Sgr C3, Sgr C2, and Sgr C1. We estimate the resulting polarization, include polarized flux dilution by the diffuse plasma emission detected toward the GC, and simulate the polarization map that modern polarimetric detectors would obtain assuming the performances of a mission prototype. The eleven reflection nebulae investigated in this paper present a variety of polarization signatures, ranging from nearly unpolarized to highly pola...

Marin, F; Soffitta, P; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Study of strain propagation in laser irradiated silicon crystal by time-resolved diffraction of K-{alpha} x-ray probe of different photon energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study on the time resolved x-ray diffraction from laser shocked silicon crystal, carried out using a 10 TW Ti:sapphire laser system, is presented. The characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-ray line radiation generated by 45 fs laser produced plasmas of two different target materials (iron and copper) is used as the probe, whereas the stretched pulse of sub-nanosecond duration (pump), derived from the same laser, is used to compress the sample. The use of x-ray probe of different photon energies yields information about the strain over a greater crystal depth. The dynamics of the strain propagation is inferred by monitoring the evolution of rocking curve width of the shocked sample at different time delays between the pump and the probe pulse. The shock velocity deduced from these measurements is {approx}10{sup 6} cm/s, consistent with the sound velocity in bulk silicon. The maximum elastic compression observed is 0.4%, indicating a pressure of 0.8 GPa.

Arora, V.; Bagchi, S.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D. [Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Gupta, M.; Gupta, A.; Chaddah, P. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Indore 452 001 (India)

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

High-Pressure Synchtron Radiation X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate C(CH[subscript 2]ONO[subscript 2 ])[subscript 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate, C(CH{sub 2}ONO{sub 2}){sub 4}, (PETN), has been performed in a diamond-anvil cell at ambient temperature using synchrotron radiation. Pressure-induced alterations in the profiles of the diffraction lines, including their positions, widths and intensities were followed up to 30 GPa in a compressino cycle. The spectral changes in the diffraction patterns at low pressures indicated continuous densification of the tetragonal structure (space group P{bar 4}2{sub 1}c). The diffraction patterns confirmed that PETN compressed from ambient pressure to 7.4 GPa by 17%. At 8.2 GPa and above, several new diffraction lines appeared in the patterns. These lines suggest that the lattice undergoes an incomplete stress-induced structural transformation from the tetragonal to an orthorhombic structure (most probably space group P2{sub 1}22{sub 1}). The mixture of both structures appeared to persist to 30 GPa. The progressive broadening of the diffraction lines as the pressure increased beyond 10 GPa is attributed to the combined diffraction lines of a mixture of two coexisting PETN phases and inhomogeneous pressure distribution within the sample.

Lipinska-Kalita, K.E.; Pravica, M.; Nicol, M. (UNLV)

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

277

Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these experiments to be superior to the TIE-based method for the robustness in performing the phase retrieval.

Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States); Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Relationship between dislocations and residual stresses in cold-drawn pearlitic steel analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed the dislocation distribution of cold-drawn pearlitic-steel wire by using the line-profile analysis based on the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD). Although this line-profile analysis requires a high resolution in reciprocal space, the resolution for EDXD is generally poor due to the energy resolution of the detector. Our analysis demonstrated that the resolution in the reciprocal space can be maximized at small scattering angles. Using the line-profile analysis based on the EDXD, the microstructural parameters such as the crystallite size and the dislocation density of the ferrite phase in the pearlitic steel were successfully analyzed. In addition, the distribution of the residual stress of the ferrite phase of a pearlitic steel wire was also analyzed using the EDXD measurement. - Highlights: • Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction is applied to the line-profile analysis. • Distribution of dislocations in ferrite in the pearlitic steel wire is analyzed. • Relationship between dislocations and residual stress is discussed.

Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kumagai, Masayoshi; Imafuku, Muneyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Tashiro, Hitoshi [Gyoda 361-0011 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo 679-5198 (Japan); Shobu, Takahiasa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo 679-5184 (Japan)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

In situ apparatus for the study of clathrate hydrates relevant to solar system bodies using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clathrate hydrates are believed to play a significant role in various solar system environments, e.g. comets, and the surfaces and interiors of icy satellites, however the structural factors governing their formation and dissociation are poorly understood. We demonstrate the use of a high pressure gas cell, combined with variable temperature cooling and time-resolved data collection, to the in situ study of clathrate hydrates under conditions relevant to solar system environments. Clathrates formed and processed within the cell are monitored in situ using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction allows the formation of clathrate hydrates to be observed as CO2 gas is applied to ice formed within the cell. Complete conversion is obtained by annealing at temperatures just below the ice melting point. A subsequent rise in the quantity of clathrate is observed as the cell is thermally cycled. Four regions between 100-5000cm-1 are present in the Raman spectra that carry feature...

Day, Sarah J; Evans, Aneurin; Parker, Julia E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of Energy WorldwideX-RayX-Ray

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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282

X-ray imaging, spacecraft nuclear fission and cosmic ray contraband  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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283

Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

Schot, Gijs, vander

284

High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L{sub 3} absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Schroer, C. G. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, J. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany) [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Germany; Hofmann, G.; Grunwaldt, J.-D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Damsgaard, C. D. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling the imaging performance of prototype organic x-ray imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unified Monte Carlo and cascaded systems model for the simulation of active-matrix flat-panel imagers is presented. With few input parameters, the model simulated the imaging performance of previously measured flat-panel imagers with reasonable accuracy. The model is used to predict the properties of conceptual flat-panel imagers based on organic semiconductors on plastic substrates. The model suggests that significant improvements in resolution and detective quantum efficiency could be achieved by operating such a detector in a back-side illuminated configuration, or by employing two imaging arrays arranged face-to-face. The effect of semiconductor properties on the conceptual imagers is investigated. According to the model, a photodiode quantum efficiency of 25% and dark current of less than 100 pA mm{sup -2} would be satisfactory for a prototype imager, while a competitive imager would require a photodiode quantum efficiency of 40-50% with a dark current of less than 10 pA mm{sup -2} to be quantum limited over the radiographic exposure range.

Blakesley, J. C.; Speller, R. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

287

Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

Lyu, B., E-mail: blu@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); WCI for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, M. Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Coadsorption of sulfate/bisulfate anions with Hg cations during Hg underpotential deposition on Au(111): An in situ x-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first stage of mercury underpotential deposition on Au(111) electrodes in 0.10 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} containing 1.0 mM Hg{sup 2+} has been studied by synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques including grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and specular crystal truncation rod measurements. An ordered coadsorbed structure of sulfate/bisulfate anions and Hg cations was found at potentials between the first and second Hg UPD peaks (+0.80 V > E > +0.88 V vs Ag/AgCl(3 M KCl)). The coadsorption structure was found to consist of a compressed Hg honeycomb lattice with the honeycomb centers occupied by sulfate or bisulfate anions. The compression of the lattice is likely due to the formation of mercurous (Hg{sub 2}{sup 2+}) ions which have a much shorter Hg-Hg distance than that in frozen bulk Hg crystals. The net charge transferred under the first Hg UPD peak suggests that the chemical state of the species in the coadsorbed structure is likely Hg{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Our results indicate that both the chemical state of the mercury cations and the nature of the anions are important in the resulting electrodeposited structures. 38 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Li, J.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1997-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The application of soft x-ray imaging techniques to auroral research. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of building and operating a grazing incidence X-ray telescope for auroral zone studies from the Polar Plasma Laboratory (PPL) is discussed. A detailed structural analysis of the preferred design, an array of seven nested Wolter mirrors, is presented. An engineering evaluation of the requirements for the instrumental configuration, power, weight and telemetry is included. The problems of radiation hardening and thermal control are discussed. The resulting strawman instrument is presented.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The process of data formation for the Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) in Solar Orbiter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Spectrometer/Telescope for Imaging X-rays (STIX) is a hard X-ray imaging spectroscopy device to be mounted in the Solar Orbiter cluster with the aim of providing images and spectra of solar flaring regions at different photon energies in the range from a few keV to around 150 keV. The imaging modality of this telescope is based on the Moire pattern concept and utilizes 30 sub-collimators, each one containing a pair of co-axial grids. This paper applies Fourier analysis to provide the first rigorous description of the data formation process in STIX. Specifically, we show that, under first harmonic approximation, the integrated counts measured by STIX sub-collimators can be interpreted as specific spatial Fourier components of the incoming photon flux, named visibilities. Fourier analysis also allows the quantitative assessment of the reliability of such interpretation. The description of STIX data in terms of visibilities has a notable impact on the image reconstruction process, since it fosters the applic...

Giordano, Sara; Piana, Michele; Massone, Anna Maria

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Development of a Microchannel Plate-Based Gated X-ray Imager for Imaging and Spectroscopy Experiments on Z  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster describes a microchannelplate (MCP)–based, gated x-ray imager developed by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), and Sandia National Laboratories(SNL) over the past several years. The camera consists of a 40 mm × 40 mm MCP, coated with eight 4 mm wide microstrips. The camera is gated by sending subnanosecond high-voltage pulses across the striplines. We have performed an extensive characterization of the camera, the results of which we present here. The camera has an optical gate profile width (time resolution) as narrow as 150 ps and detector uniformity of better than 30% along the length of a strip, far superior than what was achieved in previous designs. The spatial resolution is on the order of 40 microns for imaging applications and a dynamic range of between ~100 and ~1000. We also present results from a Monte Carlo simulation code developed by NSTec over the last several years. Agreement between the simulation results and the experimental measurements is very good.

Wu, M., Kruschwitz, C. A., Tibbitts, A., Rochau, G.

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

294

X-ray ?-Laue diffraction analysis of Cu through-silicon vias: A two-dimensional and three-dimensional study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here, white X-ray ?-beam Laue diffraction is developed and applied to investigate elastic strain distributions in three-dimensional (3D) materials, more specifically, for the study of strain in Cu 10??m diameter–80??m deep through-silicon vias (TSVs). Two different approaches have been applied: (i) two-dimensional ?-Laue scanning and (ii) ?-beam Laue tomography. 2D ?-Laue scans provided the maps of the deviatoric strain tensor integrated along the via length over an array of TSVs in a 100??m thick sample prepared by Focused Ion Beam. The ?-beam Laue tomography analysis enabled to obtain the 3D grain and elemental distribution of both Cu and Si. The position, size (about 3??m), shape, and orientation of Cu grains were obtained. Radial profiles of the equivalent deviatoric strain around the TSVs have been derived through both approaches. The results from both methods are compared and discussed.

Sanchez, Dario Ferreira; Weleguela, Monica Larissa Djomeni; Audoit, Guillaume; Grenier, Adeline; Gergaud, Patrice; Bleuet, Pierre [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA/LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Laloum, David [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA/LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, F-38920 Crolles (France); Ulrich, Olivier; Micha, Jean-Sébastien; Robach, Odile [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA/INAC and CNRS, SPrAM, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Lorut, Frédéric [ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, F-38920 Crolles (France)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

295

X-ray diffraction study of (TlInSe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TlGaTe{sub 2}){sub x} crystal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystallographic and dynamic characteristics of TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals have been studied by X-ray diffraction in the temperature range of 85-320 K. The temperature dependences of the unit-cell parameters a of TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals, as well as their coefficients of thermal expansion along the [100] direction, are determined. The concentration dependences of the unit-cell parameters a and c for (TlInSe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TlGaTe{sub 2}){sub x} crystals are measured. Anomalies are found in the temperature dependences of the unit-cell parameters a and, correspondingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion, indicating the existence of phase transitions in TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals.

Sheleg, A. U., E-mail: sheleg@ifttp.bas-net.by; Zub, E. M.; Yachkovskii, A. Ya. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, State Scientific and Production Association, Scientific and Practical Materials Research Center (Belarus); Mustafaeva, S. N.; Kerimova, E. M. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Identification of an incommensurate FeAl{sub 2} overlayer on FeAl(110) using x-ray diffraction and reflectivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FeAl, like NiAl, crystallizes in the CsCl structure. Consequently the (110) planes contain equal amounts of Fe and Al distributed as interlocking rectangles. Unlike the NiAI(110) surface, which retains the (1{times}l) in-plane symmetry of the bulk, FeAl(l10) reconstructs to form an ordered, incommensurate overlayer. The reconstructed layer introduces x-ray diffraction rods at half-order positions along the [1{bar 1}0] direction, and displaced {plus_minus}0.2905 from integer positions along the [001] direction. Peak widths reveal excellent long range order. Specular reflectivity measurements above and below the Fe K{alpha} edge can be reproduced using a model containing a single reconstructed overlayer with an Fe:Al ratio of 1:2, consistent with FeA{sub I}2.

Baddorf, A.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chandavarkar, S.S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

Le Gros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Larabell, Carolyn A. (Berkeley, CA)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

LJournal of Alloys and Compounds 291 (1999) 94101 The simultaneous powder X-ray and neutron diffraction refinement of two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting of metals in the The intermetallic ternary transition metal nitrides and presence of carbon]. These phases are of interest decomposition of transition metal tris­ethylenediamine to the solid state chemist diffraction refinement of two h-carbide type nitrides, Fe Mo N and Co Mo N, prepared by3 3 3 3 ammonolysis

zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

299

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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300

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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301

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore than 20X-Ray

302

Analysis of the KROTOS KFC test by coupling X-Ray image analysis and MC3D calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a hypothetical severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the hot molten materials (corium) issuing from the degraded reactor core may generate a steam explosion if they come in contact with water and may damage the structures and threaten the reactor integrity. The SERENA program is an international OECD project that aims at helping the understanding of this phenomenon also called Fuel Coolant Interaction (FCI) by providing data. CEA takes part in this program by performing tests in its KROTOS facility where steam explosions using prototypic corium can be triggered. Data about the different phases in the premixing are extracted from the KROTOS X-Ray radioscopy images by using KIWI software (KROTOS Image analysis of Water-corium Interaction) currently developed by CEA. The MC3D code, developed by IRSN, is a thermal-hydraulic multiphase code mainly dedicated to FCI studies. It is composed of two applications: premixing and explosion. An overall FCI calculation with MC3D requires a premixing calculation followed by an explosion calculation. The present paper proposes an alternative approach in which all the features of the premixing are extracted from the X-Ray pictures using the KIWI software and transferred to an MC3D dataset for a direct simulation of the explosion. The main hypothesis are discussed as well as the first explosion results obtained with MC3D for the KROTOS KFC test. These results are rather encouraging and are analyzed on the basis of comparisons with the experimental data. (authors)

Brayer, C.; Charton, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Fouquart, P.; Bullado, Y.; Compagnon, F.; Correggio, P.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Piluso, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA Cadarache, DEN, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Les-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Superficial dosimetry imaging based on ?erenkov emission for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: ?erenkov radiation emission occurs in all tissue, when charged particles (either primary or secondary) travel at velocity above the threshold for the ?erenkov effect (about 220 KeV in tissue for electrons). This study presents the first examination of optical ?erenkov emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose for MV x-ray beams.Methods: In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of flat and curved surfaces were studied to analyze the energy spectra of charged particles produced in different regions near the surfaces when irradiated by MV x-ray beams. ?erenkov emission intensity and radiation dose were directly simulated in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms. The sampling region of superficial dosimetry based on ?erenkov radiation was simulated in layered skin models. Angular distributions of optical emission from the surfaces were investigated. Tissue mimicking phantoms with flat and curved surfaces were imaged with a time domain gating system. The beam field sizes (50 × 50–200 × 200 mm{sup 2}), incident angles (0°–70°) and imaging regions were all varied.Results: The entrance or exit region of the tissue has nearly homogeneous energy spectra across the beam, such that their ?erenkov emission is proportional to dose. Directly simulated local intensity of ?erenkov and radiation dose in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms further validate that this signal is proportional to radiation dose with absolute average discrepancy within 2%, and the largest within 5% typically at the beam edges. The effective sampling depth could be tuned from near 0 up to 6 mm by spectral filtering. The angular profiles near the theoretical Lambertian emission distribution for a perfect diffusive medium, suggesting that angular correction of ?erenkov images may not be required even for curved surface. The acquisition speed and signal to noise ratio of the time domain gating system were investigated for different acquisition procedures, and the results show there is good potential for real-time superficial dose monitoring. Dose imaging under normal ambient room lighting was validated, using gated detection and a breast phantom.Conclusions: This study indicates that ?erenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable way to superficial dosimetry imaging in real time for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beams.

Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Glaser, Adam K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J.; Fox, Colleen J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 and Department of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 and Department of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Structural phase transition and magnetism in hexagonal SrMnO{sub 3} by magnetization measurements and by electron, x-ray, and neutron diffraction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural and magnetic properties of the hexagonal four-layer form of SrMnO{sub 3} have been investigated by combining magnetization measurements, electron diffraction, and high-resolution synchrotron x-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Below 350 K, there is subtle structural phase transition from hexagonal symmetry (space group P6{sub 3}/mmc) to orthorhombic symmetry (space group C222{sub 1}) where the hexagonal metric is preserved. The second-order phase transition involves a slight tilting of the corner-sharing Mn{sub 2}O{sub 9} units composed of two face-sharing MnO{sub 6} octahedra and the associated displacement of Sr{sup 2+} cations. The phase transition is described in terms of symmetry-adapted displacement modes of the high symmetry phase. Upon further cooling, long range magnetic order with propagation vector k=(0,0,0) sets in below 300 K. The antiferromagnetic structure, analyzed using representation theory, shows a considerably reduced magnetic moment indicating the crucial role played by direct exchange between Mn centers of the Mn{sub 2}O{sub 9} units.

Daoud-Aladine, A.; Chapon, L. C.; Knight, K. S. [ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Martin, C. [Laboratoire CRISMAT-UMR, 6508 ENSI CAEN, 6, Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Hervieu, M. [Laboratoire CRISMAT-UMR, 6508 ENSI CAEN, 6, Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Brunelli, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Radaelli, P. G. [ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory-CCLRC, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St 200 million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UAH/M.Sun et al; Optical: NASA, ESA, & the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Caption: This composite image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue

306

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA http://chandra.harvard.edu Four Supernova Remnants: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory's Chandra X-ray Observatory, four newly processed images of supernova remnants dramatically illustrate

307

Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels Using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation and growth of sigma ( ) phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hour isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In-situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogrov (JMAK) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMAK exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0; however, toward the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMAK exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMAK equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high-temperature value to room temperature.

Elmer, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Palmer, T. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Specht, Eliot D [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Spatial resolution of synchrotron x-ray microtomography in high energy range: Effect of x-ray energy and sample-to-detector distance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial resolution of three-dimensional images obtained by synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique is evaluated using cyclic bar patterns machined on a steel wire. Influences of X-ray energy and the sample-to-detector distance on spatial resolution were investigated. High X-ray energies of 33-78 keV are applied due to the high X-ray absorption of transition metals. Best spatial resolution of about 1.2 {mu}m pitch was observed at the sample-to-detector distance range of 20-110 mm and at the energy range of 68-78 keV. Several factors such as X-ray scattering and diffraction phenomena affecting the degradation of spatial resolution are also discussed.

Seo, D.; Tomizato, F.; Toda, H.; Kobayashi, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Evaluation of X-ray Diffraction of Bit Cuttings as a Proxy for Core Data in Determining Bulk Mineralogy and Clay Species, Bakken Formation, Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The principal question addressed in this study concerns the applicability of x-ray diffractometry to determine bulk rock mineralogy and clay species in the absence of… (more)

Barnes, Stuart Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Saturation and Dynamic Range of Microchannel Plate-Based X-Ray Imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes recent advances in Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP)–based x-ray detectors, a continuation of ongoing work in this area. A Monte Carlo simulation model has been developed over the past several years by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The model simulates the secondary electron emission process in an MCP pore and includes the effects of gain saturation. In this work we focus on MCP gain saturation and dynamic range. We have performed modeling and experimental characterizations of L/D = 46, 10-micron diameter, MCP-based detectors. The detectors are typically operated by applying a subnanosecond voltage pulse, which gates the detector on. Agreement between the simulations and experiment is very good for a variety of voltage pulse waveforms ranging in width from 150 to 300 ps. The results indicate that such an MCP begins to show nonlinear gain around 5 × 10^4 electrons per pore and hard saturation around 105 electrons per pore. The simulations show a difference in MCP sensitivity vs voltage for high flux of photons producing large numbers of photoelectrons on a subpicosecond timescale. Simulations and experiments both indicate an MCP dynamic range of 1 to 10,000, and the dynamic range depends on how the voltage is applied.

,

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic aluminum clad uranium–10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U–10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U–10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U–10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly -250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and -140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the aluminum cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the aluminum cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U–10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size.

D. W. Brown; M. A. Okuniewski; J. D. Almer; L. Balogh; B. Clausen; J. S. Okasinski; B. H. Rabin

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Thermal equation of state of solid naphthalene to 13 GPa and 773 K: In situ X-ray diffraction study and first principles calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a wide range of P-T conditions, such fundamental characteristics as compressibility and thermoelastic properties remain unknown for most classes of organic compounds. Here we attempt to clarify this issue by the example of naphthalene as a model representative of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The elastic behavior of solid naphthalene was studied by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction up to 13 GPa and 773 K and first principles computations to 20 GPa and 773 K. Fitting of the P-V experimental data to Vinet equation of state yielded T 0 = 8.4(3) GPa and T' = 7.2 (3) at V0 = 361 Å(3), whereas the thermal expansion coefficient was found to be extremely low at P > 3 GPa (about 10(-5) K(-1)), in agreement with theoretical estimation. Such a diminishing of thermal effects with the pressure increase clearly demonstrates a specific feature of the high-pressure behavior of molecular crystals like PAHs, associated with a low energy of intermolecular interactions.

Likhacheva, Anna Y., E-mail: alih@igm.nsc.ru [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Rashchenko, Sergey V.; Chanyshev, Artem D.; Litasov, Konstantin D. [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation) [Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Department of Geology and Geophysics, Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Inerbaev, Talgat M. [Department of Physics and Technical Science, Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan)] [Department of Physics and Technical Science, Gumilyov Eurasian National University, Astana (Kazakhstan); Kilin, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

Upgraded high time-resolved x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy system for J-TEXT ohmic plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the upgraded x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) system on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) tokamak and the latest experimental results obtained in last campaign. With 500 Hz frame rate of the new Pilatus detector and 5 cm × 10 cm spherically bent crystal, the XICS system can provide core electron temperature (T{sub e}), core ion temperature (T{sub i}), and plasma toroidal rotation (V{sub ?}) with a maximum temporal resolution of 2 ms for J-TEXT pure ohmic plasmas. These parameters with high temporal resolution are very useful in tokamak plasma research, especially for rapidly changed physical processes. The experimental results from the upgraded XICS system are presented.

Jin, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Li, Q. L.; Yan, W.; Luo, Y. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

X-ray and neutron powder diffraction studies of Ba(Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ba(R,R'){sub 2}CuO{sub 5} (R,R'=lanthanides and Y) plays an important role as a flux-pinning agent in enhancing the superconducting properties of the Ba{sub 2}(R,R')Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} (R,R'=lanthanides and Y) coated conductors. Using X-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, we found that the Ba(Nd{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5} solid solution adopts two structure types. In the Nd-rich region (1.8{<=}x{<=}2.0), the materials are of brown color (commonly referred to as the 'brown phase'), and the structure is tetragonal with space group I4/mbm (no. 127). In the Y-rich region (0.0{<=}x{<=}1.4), the materials are green (commonly referred to as the 'green phase') and the structure is orthorhombic with space group Pnma (no. 62). A two-phase region (1.4

Liu, G. [Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Huang, Q. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, Naperville, IL 60563 (United States); Kaduk, J.A. [INEOS Technologies, Naperville, IL 60563 (United States); Yang, Z. [Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China); Lucas, C. [Chemistry and Biochemistry Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wong-Ng, W. [Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)], E-mail: Winnie.wong-ng@nist.gov

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

318

2D grating simulation for X-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging with a Talbot interferometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Talbot interferometry is a recently developed and an extremely powerful X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique. Besides giving access to ultra-high sensitivity differential phase contrast images, it also provides the dark field image, which is a map of the scattering power of the sample. In this paper we investigate the potentialities of an improved version of the interferometer, in which two dimensional gratings are used instead of standard line grids. This approach allows to overcome the difficulties that might be encountered in the images produced by a one dimensional interferometer. Among these limitations there are the phase wrapping and quantitative phase retrieval problems and the directionality of the differential phase and dark-field signals. The feasibility of the 2D Talbot interferometer has been studied with a numerical simulation on the performances of its optical components under different circumstances. The gratings can be obtained either by an ad hoc fabrication of the 2D structures or by a superposition of two perpendicular linear grids. Through this simulation it has been possible to find the best parameters for a practical implementation of the 2D Talbot interferometer.

Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon [Paul Scherrer Insitute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Imaging Wellbore Cement Degradation by Carbon Dioxide under Geologic Sequestration Conditions Using X?ray Computed Microtomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: X-ray microtomography (XMT), a nondestructive three-dimensional imaging technique, was applied to demonstrate its capability to visualize the mineralogical alteration and microstructure changes in hydrated Portland cement exposed to carbon dioxide under geologic sequestration conditions. Steel coupons and basalt fragments were added to the cement paste in order to simulate cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. XMT image analysis showed the changes of material density and porosity in the degradation front (density: 1.98 g/cm3, porosity: 40%) and the carbonated zone (density: 2.27 g/cm3, porosity: 23%) after reaction with CO2- saturated water for 5 months compared to unaltered cement (density: 2.15 g/cm3, porosity: 30%). Three-dimensional XMT imaging was capable of displaying spatially heterogeneous alteration in cement pores, calcium carbonate precipitation in cement cracks, and preferential cement alteration along the cement-steel and cement-rock interfaces. This result also indicates that the interface between cement and host rock or steel casing is likely more vulnerable to a CO2 attack than the cement matrix in a wellbore environment. It is shown here that XMT imaging can potentially provide a new insight into the physical and chemical degradation of wellbore cement by CO2 leakage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Jansik, Danielle P.; Um, Wooyong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coded aperture imaging system optimized for hard x-ray and gamma ray astronomy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coded aperture imaging system has been designed for the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS). The system is optimized for imaging 511-keV positron-annihilation photons. For a galactic center 511-keV source strength of 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, the source location accuracy is expected to be +-0.2/sup 0/.

Gehrels, N.; Cline, T.L.; Huters, A.F.; Leventhal, M.; MacCallum, C.J.; Reber, J.D.; Stang, P.D.; Teegarden, B.J.; Tueller, J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide x-ray imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

less... materials. Researchers have used the method to make high-performance image sensors, transistors, and solar Source: Rogers, John A. - Department of Materials Science...

322

High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was ob...

Watanabe, Shin; Aono, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Generation of continuous and pulsed diagnostic imaging x-ray radiation using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission cathode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray radiation can be generated using a carbon nanotube CNT -based field-emission cathode. The device can readilyGeneration of continuous and pulsed diagnostic imaging x-ray radiation using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission cathode G. Z. Yue Department of Physics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North

324

Capabilities and limitations of Phase Contrast Imaging techniques with X-rays and neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) was studied with the goal of understanding its relevance and its requirements. Current literature does not provide insight on the effect of a relaxation in coherence requirements on the PCI ...

Damato, Antonio Leonardo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning micro-Raman spectroscopy of structural irregularities and strains deep inside the multilayered InGaN/GaN heterostructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy are used to study the spatial distribution of strains in the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN layers and structural quality of these layers in a multilayered light-emitting diode structure produced by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition onto (0001)-oriented sapphire substrates. It is shown that elastic strains almost completely relax at the heterointerface between the thick GaN buffer layer and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN buffer superlattice. It is established that the GaN layers in the superlattice are in a stretched state, whereas the alloy layers are in a compressed state. In magnitude, the stretching strains in the GaN layers are lower than the compressive strains in the InGaN layers. It is shown that, as compared to the buffer layers, the layers of the superlattice contain a smaller number of dislocations and the distribution of dislocations is more randomly disordered. In micro-Raman studies on scanning through the thickness of the multilayered structure, direct evidence is obtained for the asymmetric gradient distributions of strains and crystal imperfections of the epitaxial nitride layers along the direction of growth. It is shown that the emission intensity of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum well is considerably (more than 30 times) higher than the emission intensity of the GaN barrier layers, suggesting the high efficiency of trapping of charge carriers by the quantum well.

Strelchuk, V. V., E-mail: Strelch@isp.kiev.ua; Kladko, V. P.; Avramenko, E. A.; Kolomys, O. F.; Safryuk, N. V.; Konakova, R. V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine); Yavich, B. S., E-mail: byavich@soptel.ru [ZAO Svetlana-Optoelectronics (Russian Federation); Valakh, M. Ya.; Machulin, V. F.; Belyaev, A. E. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Structural characterization of the CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixed system by synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural determination of the CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixed system is a non-trivial problem because of the close resemblance between the ionic sizes of Ce{sup 4+} and Gd{sup 3+} and between the crystal structures of CeO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (Ce{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2-x/2} powder samples with x ranging between 0 and 1 have been synthesized by coprecipitation of mixed oxalates and subsequent thermal decomposition in air at 1200 Degree-Sign C followed by slow cooling. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were collected and refined by the Rietveld method. Lattice parameters do not follow Vegard's law and no peak splitting has been observed for any composition, meaning that no biphasic regions exist over the whole compositional range. The same hybrid structural model - a proper mixture of the structures of the two pure oxides - was used for the refinements, allowing to account for the data observed. - graphical abstract: Substituting Ce{sup 4+} by Gd{sup 3+}, a gradual transition from the F structure (typical of CeO{sub 2}) to the C structure (typical of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) takes place. The lattice parameters do not follow Vegard's law. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A structural study of Ce-Gd mixed oxides has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In (Ce{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2-x/2} a solid solution forms for 0{<=}x{<=}0.3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For x>0.3 a gradual transition from the C to the F structure is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameters do not follow Vegard's law.

Artini, Cristina, E-mail: c.artini@ge.ieni.cnr.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Costa, Giorgio A., E-mail: costa@chimica.unige.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); CNR-SPIN Genova, Corso Perrone 24, 16152 Genova (Italy); Pani, Marcella, E-mail: marcella@chimica.unige.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lausi, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.lausi@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., ss 14, km 163, 5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Plaisier, Jasper, E-mail: jasper.plaisier@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., ss 14, km 163, 5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hidden Superlattice in Tl2(SC6H4S) and Tl2(SeC6H4Se) Solved from Powder X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal structures of the isostructural title compounds poly[({mu}-benzene-1,4-dithiolato)dithallium], Tl{sub 2}(SC{sub 6}H{sub 4}S), and poly[({mu}-benzene-1,4-diselenolato)dithallium], Tl{sub 2}(SeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}Se), were solved by simulated annealing from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Rietveld refinements of an initial structure with one formula unit per triclinic cell gave satisfactory agreement with the data, but led to a structure with impossibly close non-bonded contacts. A disordered model was proposed to alleviate this problem, but an alternative supercell structure leads to slightly improved agreement with the data. The isostructural superlattice structures were confirmed for both compounds through additional data collection, with substantially better counting statistics, which revealed the presence of very weak superlattice peaks not previously seen. Overall, each structure contains Tl-S or Tl-Se two-dimensional networks, connected by phenylene bridges. The sulfur (or selenium) coordination sphere around each thallium is a highly distorted square pyramid or a 'see-saw' shape, depending upon how many Tl-S or Tl-Se interactions are considered to be bonds. In addition, the two compounds contain pairs of Tl{sup I} ions that interact through a closed-shell 'thallophilic' interaction: in the sulfur compound there are two inequivalent pairs of Tl atoms with Tl-Tl distances of 3.49 and 3.58 {angstrom}, while in the selenium compound those Tl-Tl interactions are at 3.54 and 3.63 {angstrom}.

K Stone; D Turner; M Singh; T Vaid; P Stephens

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

Chen, Hui, E-mail: chen33@llnl.gov, E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bitter, M., E-mail: chen33@llnl.gov, E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Kerr, S. [Department of Applied Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasicsScience atIanIgorIlyaBuildingImagingImaging

330

X-ray Imaging of Shock Waves Generated by High-Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-speed sprays are an es- sential technology for many applications, in- cluding fuel injection systems, thermal if not impossible with optical imaging. Under injection conditions similar to those found in operating engines of fuel injection, an under- standing of the structure and dynamics of the fuel sprays is critical

Gruner, Sol M.

331

Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Rosser, Roy (Princeton, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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333

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIALLensless Imaging

334

High-energy radiation visualizer (HERV): A new system for imaging in x-ray and gamma-ray emission regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a description and results of the operation for {gamma}-ray and X-ray objects for the compact visualization system high-energy radiation visualizer (HERV). The imaging in this system is based on use of a conical collimator, scintillator plate, and image intensifier as a detector and CCD matrix as a readout device. The use of HERV as a two-dimensional X-ray image visualizer for the Compton scatter inspection system was considered and first results are discussed. The possibility of using different hexagonal-coded apertures imaging for HERV is discussed and results of Monte Carlo simulation and experiments with optical analog of coded aperture are presented.

Sudarkin, A.N.; Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Volkovich, A.G.; Turin, A.S.; Danilovich, A.S.; Rybakov, D.D.; Urutskoev, L.I. [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chromatic X-Ray imaging with a fine pitch CdTe sensor coupled to a large area photon counting pixel ASIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An innovative X-ray imaging sensor with intrinsic digital characteristics is presented. It is based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology. The detector is able to count individually the incident X-ray photons and to separate them according to their energy (two 'color' images per exposure). The energy selection occurs in real time and at radiographic imaging speed (GHz global counting rate). Photon counting, color mode and a very high spatial resolution (more than 10 l.p./mm at MTF50) allow to obtain an optimal ratio between image quality and absorbed dose. The individual block of the imaging system is a two-side buttable semiconductor radiation detector made of a thin pixellated CdTe crystal (the sensor) coupled to a large area VLSI CMOS pixel ASIC. 1, 2, 4, 8 tile units have been built. The 8 tiles unit has 25cm x 2.5cm sensitive area. Results and images obtained from in depth testing of several configurations of the system are presented. The X-Ray imaging system is the technological platform of PIXIRAD Im...

Bellazzini, R; Brez, A; Minuti, M; Pinchera, M; Mozzo, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures by X-ray Spectro-Holography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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337

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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338

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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339

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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340

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Imaging Quantum States with X-ray Compton Scattering | Stanford Synchrotron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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342

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |Endecaheme c-Type|Iltt: FermiSliSANANov, 1.Imaging

343

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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344

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |Endecaheme c-Type|Iltt:Imaging Antifungal Drug

345

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. |Endecaheme c-Type|Iltt:Imaging Antifungal

346

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIALLensless ImagingLensless

347

High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was obtained at 59.54 keV. Moreover, the possibility of improved spectral performance by utilizing the energy information of both side strips was demonstrated. We designed and fabricated a new analog ASIC, VA32TA6, for the readout of semiconductor detectors, which is also suitable for DSDs. A new feature of the ASIC is its internal ADC function. We confirmed this function and good noise performance that reaches an equivalent noise charge of 110 e- under the condition of 3-4 pF input capacitance.

Shin Watanabe; Shin-nosuke Ishikawa; Hiroyuki Aono; Shin'ichiro Takeda; Hirokazu Odaka; Motohide Kokubun; Tadayuki Takahashi; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Hiroyasu Tajima; Mitsunobu Onishi; Yoshikatsu Kuroda

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

348

Comparison of the bubble size distribution in silicate foams using 2-dimensional images and 3-dimensional x-ray microtomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three silicate glasses were hydrated at high pressure and then heated at atmospheric pressure to exsolve the water into bubbles and create foams. The bubble size distribution in these foams was measured by x-ray microtomography on the GSECARS BM-13 beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The bubble area distributions were measured in two dimensions using the image slices produced from the microtomography and the software ImageJ. The bubble volume distributions were measured from the three-dimensional tomographic images with the BLOB3D software. We found that careful analysis of the microtomography data in both two and three dimensions was necessary to avoid the physically unrealistic, experimental artifact of identifying and counting many small bubbles whose surfaces were not defined by a septum of glass. When this artifact was avoided the foams demonstrated power-law distributions of bubble sizes in both two and three dimensions. Conversion of the power-law exponents for bubble areas measured in two dimensions to exponents for bubble volumes usually agreed with the measured three dimensional volume exponents. Furthermore, the power-law distributions for bubble volumes typically agree with multiple theories of bubble growth, all of which yield an exponent of 1 for the cumulative bubble volume distribution. The measured bubble volume distributions with exponents near 0.3 can be explained by diffusive growth as proposed by other authors, but distributions with exponents near 1.4 remain to be explained and are the subject of continuing research on the effects of water concentration and melt viscosity on foaming behavior.

Robert, G.; Baker, D.R.; Rivers, M.L.; Allard, E.; Larocque, J. (McGill); (UC)

2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S; Barnsley, R

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

350

Three-dimensional imaging of copper pillars using x-ray tomography within a scanning electron microscope: A simulation study based on synchrotron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While microelectronic devices are frequently characterized with surface-sensitive techniques having nanometer resolution, interconnections used in 3D integration require 3D imaging with high penetration depth and deep sub-micrometer spatial resolution. X-ray tomography is well adapted to this situation. In this context, the purpose of this study is to assess a versatile and turn-key tomographic system allowing for 3D x-ray nanotomography of copper pillars. The tomography tool uses the thin electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to provoke x-ray emission from specific metallic targets. Then, radiographs are recorded while the sample rotates in a conventional cone beam tomography scheme that ends up with 3D reconstructions of the pillar. Starting from copper pillars data, collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we build a 3D numerical model of a copper pillar, paying particular attention to intermetallics. This model is then used to simulate physical radiographs of the pillar using the geometry of the SEM-hosted x-ray tomography system. Eventually, data are reconstructed and it is shown that the system makes it possible the quantification of 3D intermetallics volume in copper pillars. The paper also includes a prospective discussion about resolution issues.

Martin, N.; Bertheau, J.; Charbonnier, J.; Hugonnard, P.; Lorut, F. [ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38920 Crolles (France); Bleuet, P.; Tabary, J. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laloum, D. [ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38920 Crolles (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-199 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-199 (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

X-ray Observations of Mrk 231  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

T. J. Turner

1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Introduction X-Ray Properties of Elements Electron Binding Energies X-Ray Levels of Few Electron Ions Now Available Order X-Ray Data Booklet http://xdb.lbl.gov/ (1 of 3) [2

Meagher, Mary

356

Ultrasonic imaging with limited-diffraction beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limited-diffraction beams are a class of waves that may be localized in space and time. Theoretically, these beams are propagation invariant and can propagate to an infinite distance without spreading. In practice, when these beams are produced with wave sources of a finite aperture and energy, they have a very large depth of field, meaning that they can keep a small beam width over a large distance. Because of this property, limited-diffraction beams may have applications in various areas such as medical imaging and tissue characterization. In this paper, fundamentals of limited-diffraction beams are reviewed and the studies of these beams are put into a unified theoretical framework. Theory of limited-diffraction beams is further developed. New limited-diffraction solutions to Klein-Gordon Equation and Schrodinger Equation, as well as limited-diffraction solutions to these equations in confined spaces are obtained. The relationship between the transformation that converts any solutions to an (-1)-dimensional wave equation to limited-diffraction solutions of an -dimensional equation and the Lorentz transformation is clarified and extended. The transformation is also applied to the Klein-Gordon Equation. In addition, applications of limited-diffraction beams are summarized.

Jian-yu Lu

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Monte Carlo study for optimal conditions in single-shot imaging with femtosecond x-ray laser pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intense x-ray pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enable the unveiling of atomic structure in material and biological specimens via ultrafast single-shot exposures. As the radiation is intense enough to destroy the sample, a new sample must be provided for each x-ray pulse. These single-particle delivery schemes require careful optimization, though systematic study to find such optimal conditions is still lacking. We have investigated two major single-particle delivery methods: particle injection as flying objects and membrane-mount as fixed targets. The optimal experimental parameters were searched for via Monte Carlo simulations to discover that the maximum single-particle hit rate achievable is close to 40%.

Park, Jaehyun; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Song, Changyong [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Joti, Yasumasa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

358

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray MicroCT Training Presentation T. Fettah Kosar, PhD Center for Nanoscale Systems Harvard) Model: HMXST225 (max. 225 kV) #12;Overview 3 Introduction to X-ray imaging and Computed Tomography (CT) · What are X-rays and how do we generate and image them? · How do we magnify X-ray images and keep them

359

E-Print Network 3.0 - alxga1-xas high-energy x-ray Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

All rights reserved. X-ray Diffraction Activity... Background Information The X-ray powder Diffractometer uses different ... Source: Cohen, Itai - Department of Physics, Cornell...

360

X-ray diffraction on the X-cut of a Ca{sub 3}TaGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} single crystal modulated by a surface acoustic wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The result of X-ray diffraction study on a single crystal of the calcium-gallogermanate family Ca{sub 3}TaGa{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 14} (CTGS) modulated by a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented. The power flow angle for SAW propagating along the X{sub 2} axis of the X-cut in CTGS was measured. The rocking curves for the CTGS crystal were recorded at different amplitudes of an input high frequency electric signal on interdigital transducer used to excite a SAW. Based on the data obtained, intensity dependence of diffraction satellites on the amplitude of electric signal exciting a SAW was built. Numerical simulation of the crystal rocking curves and dependence of diffraction satellite intensities on the SAW amplitude enabled the selection of a set of material constants at which the most complete coincidence of experimental and calculated results is observed.

Irzhak, D., E-mail: irzhak@iptm.ru; Roshchupkin, D., E-mail: rochtch@iptm.ru [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High-Purity Materials Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspect ratio x-ray Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0953-89841825S17 Summary: the power ratio of beam splitting. With centralized remote control, heating and x-ray diffraction... for in situ x-ray diffraction at high...

362

Validity of Fusion Imaging of Hamster Heart obtained by Fluorescent and Phase-Contrast X-Ray CT with Synchrotron Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorescent X-ray CT (FXCT) to depict functional information and phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) to demonstrate morphological information are being developed to analyze the disease model of small animal. To understand the detailed pathological state, integration of both functional and morphological image is very useful. The feasibility of image fusion between FXCT and PCCT were examined by using ex-vivo hearts injected fatty acid metabolic agent (127I-BMIPP) in normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters. Fusion images were reconstructed from each 3D image of FXCT and PCCT. 127I-BMIPP distribution within the heart was clearly demonstrated by FXCT with 0.25 mm spatial resolution. The detailed morphological image was obtained by PCCT at about 0.03 mm spatial resolution. Using image integration technique, metabolic abnormality of fatty acid in cardiomyopathic myocardium was easily recognized corresponding to anatomical structures. Our study suggests that image fusion provides important biomedical information even in FXCT and PCCT imaging.

Wu, J.; Takeda, T.; Lwin, Thet Thet; Huo, Q.; Minami, M. [Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575 (Japan); Sunaguchi, N.; Murakami, T.; Mouri, S.; Nasukawa, S.; Fukami, T.; Yuasa, T.; Akatsuka, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata University, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Hyodo, K. [Institute of Material Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Hontani, H. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8555 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

363

Present Situation of Diffracted X-ray Radiation and Resonance (Coherent) Transition Radiation Induced by High Energy Charged Particles in Frequencies Region Exiding Atomic one  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The review is devoted to the modern investigations of electromagnetic radiation by relativistic charged particles propagating with constant velocity through the periodic media. Two examples of radiation are considered in this review, the first corresponds to the Bragg scattering of charged particles pseudophotons in crystals, the second one to the Fresnel scattering of pseudophotons in periodic medium. Both examples play essential role in construction new compact tunable sources in X-ray region.

Ter-Mikaelian, M L

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Present Situation of Diffracted X-ray Radiation and Resonance (Coherent) Transition Radiation Induced by High Energy Charged Particles in Frequencies Region Exiding Atomic one  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The review is devoted to the modern investigations of electromagnetic radiation by relativistic charged particles propagating with constant velocity through the periodic media. Two examples of radiation are considered in this review, the first corresponds to the Bragg scattering of charged particles pseudophotons in crystals, the second one to the Fresnel scattering of pseudophotons in periodic medium. Both examples play essential role in construction new compact tunable sources in X-ray region.

M. L. Ter-Mikayelyan

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

365

The X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer onboard of IXO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the instruments on the International X-ray Observatory (IXO), under study with NASA, ESA and JAXA, is the X-ray Microcalorimeter Spectrometer (XMS). This instrument, which will provide high spectral resolution images, ...

Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali

366

Large-field high-contrast hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast nano-imaging beamline at Pohang Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed an off-axis-illuminated zone-plate-based hard x-ray Zernike phase-contrast microscope beamline at Pohang Light Source. Owing to condenser optics-free and off-axis illumination, a large field of view was achieved. The pinhole-type Zernike phase plate affords high-contrast images of a cell with minimal artifacts such as the shade-off and halo effects. The setup, including the optics and the alignment, is simple and easy, and allows faster and easier imaging of large bio-samples.

Lim, Jun; Huang, Jung Yun [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeong [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sung Mi; Kim, Hong-Tae [Department of Anatomy, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu 705-034 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

1987-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

X-ray beamsplitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chest x-Rays  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

370

X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the nuclear astrophysics aspects of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. We summarize open astrophysical questions in light of recent observations and their relation to the underlying nuclear physics. Recent progress in the understanding of the nuclear physics, especially of X-ray bursts, is also discussed.

H. Schatz; K. E. Rehm

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflections optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices is discussed. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

Price, R.H.

1983-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

X-ray microscopy using grazing-incidence reflection optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kirkpatrick-Baez microscopes are described along with their role as the workhorse of the x-ray imaging devices. This role is being extended with the development of a 22X magnification Kirkpatrick-Baez x-ray microscope with multilayer x-ray mirrors. These mirrors can operate at large angles, high x-ray energies, and have a narrow, well defined x-ray energy bandpass. This will make them useful for numerous experiments. However, where a large solid angle is needed, the Woelter microscope will still be necessary and the technology needed to build them will be useful for many other types of x-ray optics.

Price, R.H.

1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

373

Note: Design and construction of a multi-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-Ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and construction of a high resolution modular x-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is described. The approach for meeting a specified set of performance goals tailored toward experimental versatility is highlighted. The instrument is unique in its detector and x-ray source configuration, both of which enable elevated optimization of spatial and temporal resolution. The process for component selection is provided. The selected components are specified, the custom component design discussed, and the integration of both into a fully functional XCT instrument is outlined. The novelty of this design is a new lab-scale detector and imaging optimization through x-ray source and detector modularity.

Mertens, J. C. E.; Williams, J. J.; Chawla, Nikhilesh [Materials Science and Engineering, Security and Defense Systems Initiative, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, ISTB4, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5604 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering, Security and Defense Systems Initiative, Arizona State University, 781 E. Terrace Road, ISTB4, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5604 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

X-ray laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9473-8 REVIEW X-ray absorption spectroscopy Junko Yano Æand application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, bothX-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-

Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type: Review X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Junko Yano andPhotosystem II; XAS, X-ray absorption spectroscopy; EXAFS,X-ray absorption fine structure; EPR, electron paramagnetic

Yano, Junko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Theoretical standards in x-ray spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose to extend our state-of-the-art, ab initio XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) codes, FEFF. Our current work has been highly successful in achieving accurate, user-friendly XAFS standards, exceeding the performance of both tabulated standards and other codes by a considerable margin. We now propose to add the capability to treat more complex materials. This includes multiple-scattering, polarization dependence, an approximate treatment of XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure), and other improvements. We also plan to adapt FEFF to other spectroscopies, e.g. photoelectron diffraction (PD) and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS).

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological specimens with femtosecond pulses of betatron radiation from a compact laser plasma wakefield accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that x-rays from a recently demonstrated table top source of bright, ultrafast, coherent synchrotron radiation [Kneip et al., Nat. Phys. 6, 980 (2010)] can be applied to phase contrast imaging of biological specimens. Our scheme is based on focusing a high power short pulse laser in a tenuous gas jet, setting up a plasma wakefield accelerator that accelerates and wiggles electrons analogously to a conventional synchrotron, but on the centimeter rather than tens of meter scale. We use the scheme to record absorption and phase contrast images of a tetra fish, damselfly and yellow jacket, in particular highlighting the contrast enhancement achievable with the simple propagation technique of phase contrast imaging. Coherence and ultrafast pulse duration will allow for the study of various aspects of biomechanics.

Kneip, S. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); McGuffey, C.; Dollar, F.; Chvykov, V.; Kalintchenko, G.; Krushelnick, K.; Maksimchuk, A.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matsuoka, T.; Schumaker, W.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Yanovsky, V. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109 (United States); Bloom, M. S.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Schreiber, J. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

X-Ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic study of 2-chloro-N-{l_brace}4-[3-(2,5-dimethylphenyl)-3-methylcyclobutyl] -thiazol-2-yl{r_brace}-acetamide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title compound C{sub 18}H{sub 21}ClN{sub 2}SO crystallizes with Z = 4 in space group P2{sub 1}/c. The structure of the title compound was characterized by {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR, IR and single crystal diffraction. There are an intermolecular N-H-O hydrogen bond and a C-H-{pi} interactions in crystal packing. In addition to the molecular geometry and packing obtained from X-ray experiment, the molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the title compound in ground state have been calculated using density functional theory method DFT (B3LYP) with 6-31G (d, p) basis set. Calculated frequencies, bond lengths, angles and dihedral angles are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

Caliskan, Nezihe, E-mail: nezihec@omu.edu.tr; Guentepe, Feyizan [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey); Yueksektepe, Cigdem [Cankiri Karatekin University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Cukurovali, Alaaddin [Firat University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Bueyuekguengoer, Orhan [Ondokuz Mayis University, Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences (Turkey)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Absence of Structural Impact of Noble Nanoparticles on P3HT: PCBM Blends for Plasmon Enhanced Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells Probed by Synchrotron Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The incorporation of noble metal nanoparticles, displaying localized surface plasmon resonance, in the active area of donor-acceptor bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices is an industrially compatible light trapping strategy, able to guarantee better absorption of the incident photons and give an efficiency improvement between 12% and 38%. In the present work, we investigate the effect of Au and Ag nanoparticles blended with P3HT: PCBM on the P3HT crystallization dynamics by synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. We conclude that the presence of (1) 80nm Au, (2) mix of 5nm, 50nm, 80nm Au, (3) 40nm Ag, and (4) 10nm, 40nm, 60nm Ag colloidal nanoparticles, at different concentrations below 0.3 wt% in P3HT: PCBM blends, does not affect the behaviour of the blends themselves.

Samuele Lilliu; Mejd Alsari; Oier Bikondoa; J. Emyr Macdonald; Marcus S. Dahlem

2014-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Direct evidence of a zigzag spin-chain structure in the honeycomb lattice: A neutron and x-ray diffraction investigation of single-crystal Na2IrO3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have combined single crystal neutron and x-ray diffractions to investigate the magnetic and crystal structures of the honeycomb lattice $\\rm Na_2IrO_3$. The system orders magnetically below $18.1(2)$~K with Ir$^{4+}$ ions forming zigzag spin chains within the layered honeycomb network with ordered moment of $\\rm 0.22(1)~\\mu_B$/Ir site. Such a configuration sharply contrasts the N{\\'{e}}el or stripe states proposed in the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. The structure refinement reveals that the Ir atoms form nearly ideal 2D honeycomb lattice while the $\\rm IrO_6$ octahedra experience a trigonal distortion that is critical to the ground state. The results of this study provide much-needed experimental insights into the magnetic and crystal structure crucial to the understanding of the exotic magnetic order and possible topological characteristics in the 5$d$-electron based honeycomb lattice.

Ye, Feng [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Qi, Tongfei [University of Kentucky; Korneta, O. B. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Cao, Gang [University of Kentucky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

X-ray imaging of dispersive charge modes in a doped Mott insulator near the antiferromagnetic/superconductor transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Momentum-resolved inelastic resonant x-ray scattering is used to map the doping evolution of bulk electronic modes in the doped Mott insulator class Nd{sub 2-x}Ce{sub x}CuO{sub 4}. As the doping induced antiferromagnet/superconductor (AFM/SC) transition is approached, we observe an anisotropic redistribution of the spectral weight of collective excitations over a large energy scale along the {Gamma} {yields} ({pi},{pi}) direction, whereas the modes exhibit broadening (-1 eV) with relatively little softening along {Gamma} {yields} ({pi},0) with respect to the parent Mott state (x=0). Our study reveals a closing of the charge gap in the vicinity of the zone center even though the mode softening and spectral redistribution involve an unusually large energy scale over the full Brillouin zone. The collective behavior of modes in the vicinity of the AFM/SC critical transition is demonstrated.

Li, Y.W.; Qian, D.; Wray, L.; Hsieh, D.; Xia, Y.; Kaga, Y.; Sasagawa, T.; Takagi, H.; Markiewicz, R.S.; Bansil, A.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.; Hasan, M.Z. (U of Tokyo); (AIST); (Princeton); (NEU)

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

In situ X-ray diffraction strain-controlled study of Ti–Nb–Zr and Ti–Nb–Ta shape memory alloys: crystal lattice and transformation features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase and structure transformations in biomedical Ti–21.8Nb–6.0Zr (TNZ) and Ti–19.7Nb–5.8Ta (TNT) shape memory alloys (at.%) under and without load in the ? 150 to 100 °S temperature range are studied in situ using an original tensile module for a low-temperature chamber of an X-ray diffractometer. Alpha?- and beta-phase lattice parameters, the crystallographic resource of recovery strain, phase and structure transformation sequences, and microstress appearance and disappearance are examined, compared and discussed. For both alloys, the crystallographic resource of recovery strain decreases with temperature increase to become 4.5% for TNZ and 2.5% for TNT alloy (at RT). Loading at low temperatures leads to additional ??-phase formation and reorientation. Heating under load, as compared to strain-free heating, affects the reverse transformation sequence of both alloys in different ways. For TNZ alloy, strain-free heating results in simultaneous ??? and ???? transformations, whereas during heating under stress, they are sequential: ? + ???? precedes ????. For TNT alloy, strain-free heating results in reverse ???? transformation, whereas during heating under stress, ???? transformation is preceded by ??-phase reorientation. - Highlights: • Comparative in situ XRD analysis of Ti–Nb–Zr(Ta) shape memory alloys is realized. • Lattice parameters of ?- and ??-phases are calculated in the ? 150 to + 100 °C range. • The higher the temperature, the lower the ???? transformation strain. • Loading at low temperatures results in ??-phase formation and reorientation. • Transformation sequences upon heating with and without loading are different.

Dubinskiy, S. [École de technologie supérieure, 1100, Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3 (Canada); National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, 4, Leninskiy prosp., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Prokoshkin, S. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, 4, Leninskiy prosp., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Brailovski, V., E-mail: vladimir.brailovski@etsmtl.ca [École de technologie supérieure, 1100, Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3 (Canada); Inaekyan, K. [École de technologie supérieure, 1100, Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1K3 (Canada); Korotitskiy, A. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, 4, Leninskiy prosp., Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-Bass (Ed. ), Handbook of Optics, third ed. , vol. V, ch. 46,wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS* Valeriy V.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic multipole x-ray Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radial functions, has been generated with single-crystal X-ray... of a limited data set, a relatively large set of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data was collected......

387

Development of procedures for refurbishing x-ray optics at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction- Limitedof Soft X-Rays,” Abstract to SPIE Optics and Photonics 2012,Metrology for X-Ray and EUV Optics IV (San Diego, August 12-

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

X-ray beam finder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

Gilbert, H.W.

1983-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

389

X-ray grid-detector apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid grid-detector apparatus for x-ray systems wherein a microchannel plate structure has an air-interspaced grid portion and a phosphor/optical fluid-filled grid portion. The grids are defined by multiple adjacent channels separated by lead-glass septa. X-rays entering the air-interspaced grid portion at an angle of impingement upon the septa are attenuated, while non-impinging x-rays pass through to the phosphor/fluid filled portion. X-ray energy is converted to luminescent energy in the phosphor/fluid filled portion and the resultant beams of light are directed out of the phosphor/optical fluid filled portion to an imaging device.

Boone, John M. (Folsom, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA)

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

X-ray source for mammography  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

Logan, C.M.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Design Parameters and Objectives of a High-­Resolution X-­ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for the Large Helical Device (LHD)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-resolution X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, whose instrumental concept was thoroughly tested on NSTX and Alcator C-Mod, is presently being designed for LHD. The instrument will record spatially resolved spectra of helium-like Ar16+ and provide ion temperature profiles with spatial and temporal resolutions of 1 cm and > 10 ms which are obtained by a tomographic inversion of the spectral data, using the stellarator equilibrium reconstruction codes, STELLOPT and PIES. Since the spectrometer will be equipped with radiation hardened, high count rate, PILATUS detectors,, it is expected to be operational for all experimental conditions on LHD, which include plasmas of high density and plasmas with auxiliary RF and neutral beam heating. The special design features required by the magnetic field structure at LHD will be described.

Bitter, M; Gates, D; Neilson, H; Reiman, A; Roquemore, A L; Morita, S; Goto, M; Yamada, H; Rice, J

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hydrogen in polar intermetallics: Syntheses and structures of the ternary Ca5Bi3D0.93, Yb5Bi3Hx, and Sm5Bi3H~1 by powder neutron or single crystal X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The syntheses of the title compounds are described in detail. Structural characterizations from refinements of single crystal X-ray diffraction data for Yb{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub x} and Sm{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub 1} and of powder neutron diffraction data for Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}D{sub 0.93(3)} are reported. These confirm that all three crystallize with the heavy atom structure type of {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, and the third gives the first proof that the deuterium lies in the center of nominal calcium tetrahedra, isostructural with the Ca{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}F-type structure. These Ca and Yb phases are particularly stable with respect to dissociation to Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type product plus H{sub 2}. Some contradictions in the literature regarding Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}H{sub x} phases are considered in terms of adventitious hydrogen impurities that are generated during reactions in fused silica containers at elevated temperatures.

Leon-Escamilla, E. Alejandro; Dervenagas, Panagiotis; Stasis, Constantine; Corbett, John D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

Brock, Joel

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Refractive Optics for Hard X-ray Transmission Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For hard x-ray transmission microscopy at photon energies higher than 15 keV we design refractive condenser and imaging elements to be used with synchrotron light sources as well as with x-ray tube sources. The condenser lenses are optimized for low x-ray attenuation--resulting in apertures greater than 1 mm--and homogeneous intensity distribution on the detector plane, whereas the imaging enables high-resolution (<100 nm) full-field imaging. To obtain high image quality at reasonable exposure times, custom-tailored matched pairs of condenser and imaging lenses are being developed. The imaging lenses (compound refractive lenses, CRLs) are made of SU-8 negative resist by deep x-ray lithography. SU-8 shows high radiation stability. The fabrication technique enables high-quality lens structures regarding surface roughness and arrangement precision with arbitrary 2D geometry. To provide point foci, crossed pairs of lenses are used. Condenser lenses have been made utilizing deep x-ray lithographic patterning of thick SU-8 layers, too, whereas in this case, the aperture is limited due to process restrictions. Thus, in terms of large apertures, condenser lenses made of structured and rolled polyimide film are more attractive. Both condenser types, x-ray mosaic lenses and rolled x-ray prism lenses (RXPLs), are considered to be implemented into a microscope setup. The x-ray optical elements mentioned above are characterized with synchrotron radiation and x-ray laboratory sources, respectively.

Simon, M.; Last, A.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Reznikova, E. [Institute for Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology Kaiserstrasse 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ahrens, G.; Voigt, A. [Microresist Technology, Koepenikerstrasse 325, 12555 Berlin (Germany)

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

397

Principles of X-ray Navigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

399

Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamentalmicroscopies Research of magnetism in low dimensions has notnanoscience [3]. Solid state magnetism is also a showcase in

Fischer, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Design and development of a 3D X-ray microscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid development of needle-free injection systems demands better and faster imaging systems, capable of imaging the transient and steady state response of an injection into real tissue. X-ray radiography, x-ray ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Tunable X-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Phase transition upon K{sup +} ion exchange into Na-low silica X: Combined NMR and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanism by which K{sup +} ions exchange into zeolite Na-low silica X (LSX) (Na{sub 96}Al{sub 96}Si{sub 96}O{sub 384}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O) has ben determined by studying structures of the Na-LSX and K-LSX end members in the Na-K LSX solid solution series as well as samples exchanged at the 20%, 42% and 80% K{sup +} levels. A preliminary investigation using {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy revealed a two-phase region in the solid solution near 80% K{sup +} exchange. Rietveld analysis of the powder diffraction data collected from hydrated samples showed that, up to 42% of K{sup +} exchange, K{sup +} ions were located preferentially at site I{prime}, just outside the double 6-ring (D6R) in the sodalite age, and at site II, above the single 6-ring (S6R) in the supercage. Introduction of K{sup +} ions into site I{prime} repositioned Na{sup +} ions into site I, at the center of the D6R. An abrupt change in the cubic lattice parameter from 25.0389(5) to 25.2086(5) {angstrom} marked the formation of a second phase at the 80% K{sup +}-exchange level as K{sup +} ions began to occupy site I. No coexistence of phases was observed for the fully K{sup +}-exchanged sample (a = 25.2486(2) {angstrom}), where sites I and II were fully occupied by K{sup +} ions.

Lee, Y.; Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Carr, S.W. [ANSTO, Menai (Australia)] [ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

X-Ray Conformational Study of the DNA Duplex in Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Conformational Study of the DNA Duplex in Solution V. GRASSIAN* and G. W. BRADY,f Rensselaer Earlier x-ray studies on dissolved linear DNA molecules were interpreted on the assumption engaged in x-ray diffraction studies of circular su- perhelical DNA. Some of our preliminary results have

Benham, Craig J.

405

X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Diamond Anvil Cell Facility at NSLS: 2010 Progress Report Zhiqiang ChenZhiqiang Chen Stony) Powder X-ray Diffraction, Total Scattering Pair-Distributiony , g Function (PDF) under high P and high, yield strength, amorphization, texturing, compressibility Hydrothermal DAC (Bassett) Angle Dispersive X-ray

Duffy, Thomas S.

406

In situ examination of oxygen non-stoichiometry in La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}CoO{sub 3??} thin films at intermediate and low temperatures by x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural evolution of epitaxial La{sub 0.80}Sr{sub 0.20}CoO{sub 3??} thin films under chemical and voltage stimuli was examined in situ using X-ray diffraction. The changes in lattice parameter (chemical expansivity) were used to quantify oxygen reduction reaction processes and vacancy concentration changes in lanthanum strontium cobaltite. At 550?°C, the observed lattice parameter reduction at an applied bias of ?0.6?V was equivalent to that from the reducing condition of a 2% carbon monoxide atmosphere with an oxygen non-stoichiometry ? of 0.24. At lower temperatures (200?°C), the application of bias reduced the sample much more effectively than a carbon monoxide atmosphere and induced an oxygen non-stoichiometry ? of 0.47. Despite these large changes in oxygen concentration, the epitaxial thin film was completely re-oxidized and no signs of crystallinity loss or film amorphization were observed. This work demonstrates that the effects of oxygen evolution and reduction can be examined with applied bias at low temperatures, extending the ability to probe these processes with in-situ analytical techniques.

Biegalski, M. D.; Belianinov, A.; Kalinin, S. V. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Center for Nanophase Materials Science, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Crumlin, E.; Mutoro, E.; Shao-Horn, Y. [Electrochemical Energy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

407

Synthesis and characterization of alkali-metal titanium alkoxide compounds MTi(O-i-Pr) sub 5 (M = Li, Na, K): Single-crystal x-ray diffraction structure of (LiTi(O-i-Pr) sub 5 ) sub 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The series (MTi(O-iPr){sub 5}), M = Li, Na, or K, has been prepared by the reaction of MO-i-Pr with Ti(O-i-Pr){sub 4}. A single-crystal x-ray diffraction study revealed that (LiTi(O-i-Pr){sub 5}) crystallizes from toluene at {minus}30{degree}C in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/n, with unit cell dimensions a = 11.440 (8) {angstrom}, b = 16.396 (13) {angstrom}, c = 11.838 (8) {angstrom}, {beta} = 92.59 (5){degree}, and Z = 4, as a dimer containing two approximately trigonal-bipyramidal titanium centers linked by lithium bridges. In benzene solution, all three compounds are dimeric, as revealed by cryoscopic molecular weight determination, and all three undergo an alkoxide ligand exchange process that is rapid on the {sup 1}H NMR time scale at room temperature. The positions of {nu}(M-O) are assigned based on the low-energy shifts observed upon deuteriation of the isopropoxide ligands. 23 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Hampden-Smith, M.J.; Williams, D.S. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (USA)); Rheingold, A.L. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark (USA))

1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

408

Synthesis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies of new framework substituted type II clathrates, Cs{sub 8}Na{sub 16}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 136-x} (x<7)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New inorganic type II clathrates with Ag atoms substituting for framework Ge atoms, Cs{sub 8}Na{sub 16}Ag{sub x}Ge{sub 136-x} (x=0, 5.9, and 6.7), have been synthesized by reaction of the pure elements at high temperature. Structural refinements have been performed using single crystal X-ray diffraction. The materials crystallize with the cubic type II clathrate crystal structure (space group Fd3-barm) with a=15.49262(9)A, 15.51605(6)A, and 15.51618(9) for x=0, 5.9, and 6.7, respectively, and Z=1. The structure is formed by a covalently bonded Ag-Ge framework, in which the Cs and Na atoms are found inside two types of polyhedral cages. Ag substitutes for Ge in the tetrahedrally bonded framework positions, and was found to preferentially occupy the most asymmetric 96g site. The proven ability to substitute atoms for the germanium framework should offer a route to the synthesis of new compositions of type II clathrates, materials that are of interest for potential thermoelectrics applications.

Beekman, M. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave., PHY 114, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States); Wong-Ng, W. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kaduk, J.A. [INEOS Technologies, Naperville, IL 60566 (United States); Shapiro, A. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Nolas, G.S. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Ave., PHY 114, Tampa, FL 33620 (United States)], E-mail: gnolas@cas.usf.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Structurally-driven metal-insulator transition in Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} (0{<=}x<0.14): A single crystal X-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlation between structure and transport properties are investigated in high-quality single-crystals of Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} with 0X-ray diffraction and by electronic studies. The parent compound was known to exhibit an intriguing first-order structurally driven metal-insulator (MI) transition at 357 K. Upon chromium doping on the ruthenium site, the metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced, and is related to the competition between structural changes that occur upon Cr doping and with decreasing temperature. A strong suppression of structural distortions with increasing Cr substitution was identified. No clear T{sub MI} can be observed when x>13.5% and the system behaves as an insulator. Such a large, sharp metal-insulator transition and tuneable transition temperature may have potential applications in electronic devices. -- Graphical abstract: The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by Cr doping, and is closely related to the distortion of structure. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by doping Cr into Ca{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystal. {yields} Detailed single crystal structural analysis provided important insight into this structurally-driven metal-insulator transition. {yields} Negative Volume Thermal Expansion (NVTE) was observed with increasing temperature.

Qi, T.F., E-mail: tqi2@uky.ed [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Ge, M. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Korneta, O.B. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Parkin, S. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); De Long, L.E.; Cao, G. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

In situ examination of oxygen non-stoichiometry in La0.80Sr0.20CoO3 thin films at intermediate and low temperatures by X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural evolution of epitaxial La0.80Sr0.20CoO3 thin films under chemical and voltage stimuli were examined in situ using X-ray diffraction. The changes in lattice parameter (chemical expansivity) were used to quantify oxygen reduction reaction processes and vacancy concentration changes in LSCO. At 550 C the observed lattice parameter reduction at an applied bias of 0.6 V was equivalent to that from the reducing condition of a two percent carbon monoxide atmosphere with an oxygen non-stoichiometry of 0.24. At lower temperatures (200 C) the application of bias reduced the sample much more effectively than a carbon monoxide atmosphere and induced an oxygen non-stoichiometry of 0.47. Despite these large changes in oxygen concentration, the epitaxial thin film was completely re-oxidized and no signs of crystallinity loss or film amorphization were observed. This work demonstrates that the effects of oxygen evolution and reduction can be examined with applied bias at low temperatures, extending the ability to probe these processes with in-situ analytical techniques.

Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL] [ORNL; Crumlin, Ethan [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Belianinov, Alex [ORNL] [ORNL; Mutoro, Eva [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Shao-Horn, Yang [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)] [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kalinin, Sergei [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging of Spherical and Flat Counterfaces of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Tribological Contacts: A Correlation of Surface Chemistry and Friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recently installed synchrotron radiation near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) full field imaging electron spectrometer was used to spatially resolve the chemical changes of both counterfaces from an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tribological contact. A silicon flat and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sphere were both coated with UNCD, and employed to form two wear tracks on the flat in a linear reciprocating tribometer. The first wear track was produced using a new, unconditioned sphere whose surface was thus conditioned during this first experiment. This led to faster run-in and lower friction when producing a second wear track using the conditioned sphere. The large depth of field of the magnetically guided NEXAFS imaging detector enabled rapid, large area spectromicroscopic imaging of both the spherical and flat surfaces. Laterally resolved NEXAFS data from the tribological contact area revealed that both substrates had an as-grown surface layer that contained a higher fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and oxygen which was mechanically removed. Unlike the flat, the film on the sphere showed evidence of having graphitic character, both before and after sliding. These results show that the graphitic character of the sphere is not solely responsible for low friction and short run-in. Rather, conditioning the sphere, likely by removing asperities and passivating dangling bonds, leads to lower friction with less chemical modification of the substrate in subsequent tests. The new NEXAFS imaging spectroscopy detector enabled a more complete understanding of the tribological phenomena by imaging, for the first time, the surface chemistry of the spherical counterface which had been in continual contact during wear track formation.

A Konicek; C Jaye; M Hamilton; W Sawyer; D Fischer; R Carpick

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

X-ray lithography source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

X-ray lithography source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Brighter Screens for Nondestructive Digital X-ray Radiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fine resolution, bright X-ray screens are needed for digital radiography and material characterization at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). Current technology is simply not adequate for transferring high-energy X-ray images to visible light for demanding digital applications. Low energy radiography and especially emerging tomographic technologies are severely hampered for Y-12 nondestructive evaluation (NDE) applications by dim screens with poor resolution. Also, the development of more advanced materials characterization techniques, such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), is driven by a design agency desire for tighter specifications and more uniform materials. Brighter screens would allow us to probe materials on a finer scale, leading to a better understanding of material behavior. A number of X-ray screen materials were studied that would be suitable for direct replacement in existing digital imaging systems. Spectroscopic evaluations were first made for a several candidates and indicated that lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) would be a promising candidate for MeV images. A relative comparison of brightness at various energies was then completed which showed that cesium iodide (CsI) could increase brightness by over an order of magnitude. Since image quality is also important for better screens, the resolving capabilities of candidate materials were measured. Resolution measurements were completed at X-ray peak energies up to 420KeV with magnified optical imaging systems, and indicated that LSO and Industrial Quality Incorporated glass (IQI) exhibited higher resolution than the CsI screen. The results give a choice of materials that can be tailored to the particular test under consideration. If high-speed images are necessary and some resolution can be sacrificed, the CsI screen will be a good choice. The screen can be replaced by an IQI or LSO unit if higher resolution is needed later, for instance to focus in on a region of interest. A number of significant findings were obtained from this study. Most important of the findings was that materials are commercially available that are much brighter than screens currently in use. This finding meets the original objective of the project. Two objectives of the study; however, were not met. We hoped to evaluate a 'quantum dot' (nanometer-sized particles of semiconductor material) wavelength conversion screen, but the manufacturer ceased production of the screen shortly before the project was started. The dot screen could be efficient in converting ultraviolet light to visible light which would have proved important for utilizing a Cherenkov screen. Since this was a very new, cutting-edge technology, an alternative supplier was not found during the study. Also, high-energy testing of a Cherenkov light screen was not performed due to difficulties in obtaining appropriate approvals for locating test equipment in the high-energy X-ray vault at Y-12. The test is still important, and is being pursued through follow-on funding sources. Although many film shots will be eliminated by the availability of high quality digital images, the largest potential gains result from the availability of clearer images that show fine detail in the parts under analysis. Digital radiographic data also offers the possibility of easily sharing data with other sites. This could prove invaluable when critical material, placement, assembly, or quality issues are pressing. Also, increased throughput in the NDE facility allows statistically significant numbers of units to be analyzed. Digital technologies may in fact be needed just to meet minimum requirements of future demands. Increased brightness screens allow for such innovations as 3-D tomographic images to be acquired in a reasonable time. Much of the skill required to interpret 'flattened' X-ray images is not needed to maneuver around the reconstructed tomogram. This study showed that several commercially available materials are much brighter than screens currently in use. The study also showed that materials othe

Miller, Jr., A. C.; Bell, Z. W.; Carpenter, D. A.

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

X-Ray Diagnostics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore than 20X-Ray Diagnostics

416

Supplemental information I. OPTICAL-LASER AND X-RAY CONFIGURATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supplemental information I. OPTICAL-LASER AND X-RAY CONFIGURATION The experiment used 70 fs x-ray and x-ray pulses was established by the initial decrease in the 111 diffraction peak in a laser pulses at 10 keV from the LCLS in the high-charge (250 pC) mode at 120 Hz. The x-ray beam was focused

Loss, Daniel

417

Energy resolved X-ray grating interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although compatible with polychromatic radiation, the sensitivity in X-ray phase contrast imaging with a grating interferometer is strongly dependent on the X-ray spectrum. We used an energy resolving detector to quantitatively investigate the dependency of the noise from the spectral bandwidth and to consequently optimize the system-by selecting the best energy band matching the experimental conditions-with respect to sensitivity maximization and, eventually, dose. Further, since theoretical calculations of the spectrum are usually limited due to non-ideal conditions, an energy resolving detector accurately quantifies the spectral changes induced by the interferometer including flux reduction and beam hardening.

Thuering, T.; Stampanoni, M. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland) [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (Switzerland); Barber, W. C.; Iwanczyk, J. S. [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States)] [DxRay, Inc., Northridge, California 91324 (United States); Seo, Y.; Alhassen, F. [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)] [UCSF Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States)

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

X-Ray Nanoimaging: Instruments and Methods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL main campusMore thanX-Ray Imaging ofX-Ray

419

X-ray variability in M87  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the evidence for X-ray variability from the core and from knot A in the M87 jet based on data from two observations with the Einstein Observatory High Resolution Imager (HRI) and three observations with the ROSAT HRI. The core intensity showed a 16% increase in 17 months ('79-'80); a 12% increase in the 3 years '92 to '95; and a 17% drop in the last half of 1995. The intensity of knot A appears to have decreased by 16% between 92Jun and 95Dec. Although the core variability is consistent with general expectations for AGN nuclei, the changes in knot A provide constraints on the x-ray emission process and geometry. Thus we predict that the x-ray morphology of knot A will differ significantly from the radio and optical structure.

D. E. Harris; J. A. Biretta; W. Junor

1996-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Detection of improvised explosive devices at long-range using coded aperture imaging of backscattered X-rays with dynamic reconstruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standoff detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is a continuing problem for the U.S. military. Current X-ray detection systems cannot detect explosives at distances above a few meters and with a source-detector ...

Bell, Jayna T. (Jayna Teresa)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MULTI-STRANDED AND MULTI-THERMAL SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: EVIDENCE FROM HINODE X-RAY TELESCOPE AND EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Japanese/USA/UK Hinode spacecraft were used to investigate the spatial and thermal properties of an isolated quiescent coronal loop. We constructed differential emission measure (DEM) curves using Monte Carlo based, iterative forward fitting algorithms. We studied the loop as a whole, in segments, in transverse cuts, and point-by-point, always with some form of background subtraction, and find that the loop DEM is neither isothermal nor extremely broad, with approximately 96% of the EM between 6.2 {<=}log T{<=} 6.7, and an EM-weighted temperature of log T = 6.48 {+-} 0.16. We find evidence for a gradual change in temperature along the loop, with log T increasing only by {approx}0.1 from the footpoints to the peak. The combine XRT-EIS data set does a good job of constraining the temperature distribution for coronal loop plasma. Our studies show that the strong constraints at high and low temperatures provided by the combined data set are crucial for obtaining reasonable solutions. These results confirm that the observations of at least some loops are not consistent with isothermal plasma, and therefore cannot be modeled with a single flux tube and must be multi-stranded.

Schmelz, J. T.; Nasraoui, K. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Saar, S. H.; Kashyap, V. L.; Weber, M. A.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.ed [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

422

SUZAKU X-RAY IMAGING OF THE EXTENDED LOBE IN THE GIANT RADIO GALAXY NGC 6251 ASSOCIATED WITH THE FERMI-LAT SOURCE 2FGL J1629.4+8236  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of a Suzaku X-ray imaging study of NGC 6251, a nearby giant radio galaxy with intermediate FR I/II radio properties. Our pointing direction was centered on the {gamma}-ray emission peak recently discovered with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) around the position of the northwest (NW) radio lobe 15 arcmin offset from the nucleus. After subtracting two 'off-source' pointings adjacent to the radio lobe and removing possible contaminants in the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer field of view, we found significant residual X-ray emission most likely diffuse in nature. The spectrum of the excess X-ray emission is well fitted by a power law with a photon index {Gamma} = 1.90 {+-} 0.15 and a 0.5-8 keV flux of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We interpret this diffuse X-ray emission component as being due to inverse Compton upscattering of the cosmic microwave background photons by ultrarelativistic electrons within the lobe, with only a minor contribution from the beamed emission of the large-scale jet. Utilizing archival radio data for the source, we demonstrate by means of broadband spectral modeling that the {gamma}-ray flux of the Fermi-LAT source 2FGL J1629.4+8236 may well be accounted for by the high-energy tail of the inverse Compton continuum of the lobe. Thus, this claimed association of {gamma}-rays from the NW lobe of NGC 6251, together with the recent Fermi-LAT imaging of the extended lobes of Centaurus A, indicates that particles may be efficiently (re-)accelerated up to ultrarelativistic energies within extended radio lobes of nearby radio galaxies in general.

Takeuchi, Y.; Kataoka, J.; Takahashi, Y.; Maeda, K.; Nakamori, T. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Stawarz, L.; Tanaka, Y.; Takahashi, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5510 (Japan); Cheung, C. C. [National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC 20001 (United States); Celotti, A., E-mail: uto_of_take@suou.waseda.jp [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), 34014 Trieste (Italy)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Measurement and characterization of x-ray spot size  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In planning an x-ray imaging experiment one must have an accurate model of the imaging system to obtain optimum results. The blurring caused by the finite size of the x-ray source is often the least understood element in the system. We have developed experimental and analytical methods permitting accurate measurement and modeling of the x-ray source. The model offers a simple and accurate way to optimize the radiographic geometry for any given experimental requirement (i.e., resolution and dose at detector). Any text on radiography will mention the effects of the finite size of the x-ray source on image quality and how one can minimize this influence by the choice of a small radiographic magnification. The film blur (independent of the source blur) is often treated as a single number and combined with an effective blur dimension for the x-ray source to give a total blur on the film. In this paper, we will develop a treatment of x-ray sources based on the modulation transfer function (MTF). This approach allows us to infer the spatial distribution function of the electron beam that produces the bremsstrahlung x-rays and to predict the performance of an x-ray imaging system if we know the MTF of the detector. This treatment is much more accurate than a single number characterization. 4 refs., 7 figs.

Mueller, K.H.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

Masoudi, Husain M.

425

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Special Application X-ray Diffraction | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Catalytic Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks . Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to...

427

X-ray fluorescence mapping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biololgical cells, over the measurement of impurities in solar cells, to the rare earth content of geological materials. A somewhat 'typical' layout for a X-ray fluorescence...

428

Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

Miao, H; Downing, K; Huang, X; Kirz, J; Marchesini, S; Nelson, J; Shapiro, D; Steinbrener, J; Stewart, A; Jacobsen, C

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

High resolution x-ray microscope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using a microspot x-ray tube with a multilayer optic and a 92-element parabolic compound refractive lens (CRL) made of a plastic containing only hydrogen and carbon. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using an area source with a spherical lens and a spherical lens with multilayer condenser. The authors found the best image quality using the multilayer condenser with a parabolic lens, compared to images with a spherical lens and without the multilayer optics. The resolution was measured using a 155-element parabolic CRL and a multilayer condenser with the microspot tube. The experiment demonstrates about 1.1 {mu}m resolution.

Gary, C. K.; Park, H.; Lombardo, L. W.; Piestrup, M. A.; Cremer, J. T.; Pantell, R. H.; Dudchik, Y. I. [Adelphi Technology, Inc. 981-B Industrial Road, San Carlos, California 94070 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics Problems, Kurchatova 7, Minsk 220064 (Belarus)

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha tagged x-ray Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ion -Cu K-alpha imaging system -X-ray... and for the optimisation of high power laser-driven ion and X-ray sources. ... Source: Strathclyde, University of - Department...

431

Ris-M-2751 X-Ray Energy Dispersive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PHOT) k«V 50 Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark October 1988 #12;Ris*-M-2751 X-ray energy is impinging on the sample (Fig. lb). Its wavelength (photon energy) is in the course of measurements changedm ii. S Risø-M-2751 X-Ray Energy Dispersive Diffraction Lecture Notes Bronislaw Buras BaKo 30 40 E

432

Gated x-ray detector for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed, and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These gated x-Ray detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significantly different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due, in part, to an innovative impedance matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring, and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution, and no detectable impedance reflections.

Oertel, John A.; Aragonez, Robert; Archuleta, Tom; Barnes, Cris; Casper, Larry; Fatherley, Valerie; Heinrichs, Todd; King, Robert; Landers, Doug; Lopez, Frank; Sanchez, Phillip; Sandoval, George; Schrank, Lou; Walsh, Peter; Bell, Perry; Brown, Matt; Costa, Robert; Holder, Joe; Montelongo, Sam; Pederson, Neal [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); VI Control Systems Ltd., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

X-Ray Source Based on the Parametric X-Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prospects of parametric x-rays (PXR) application for the development of a tuneable quasi-monochromatic x-ray source for medical imaging are discussed. Analysis of basic requirements for electron accelerator shows that it must be relatively low-energy and high-current linac. In comparison with known ultra-relativistic cases, at low energies PXR properties will be modified to a great extent by multiple scattering of the electrons. PXR intensity dependence on target thickness and beam energy are calculated taking multiple scattering into account. It is concluded that PXR source based on real medical accelerators is feasible and can provide x-ray flux needful for obtaining high quality medical images.

Alexander Lobko; Olga Lugovskaya

2005-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu, E-mail: i-jeon@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Ho [Pro-optics Co., Ltd., 475 Ami-ri, Bubal-eup, Icheon 467-866 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gye-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Nambu University, 76 Chumdan Jungang 1-ro, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju 506-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Youb [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Note: A novel normalization scheme for laser-based plasma x-ray sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kHz repetition rate laser pump-X-ray probe system for ultrafast X-ray diffraction is set up based on a laser-driven plasma X-ray source. A simple and reliable normalization approach has been developed to minimize the impact of large X-ray pulse intensity fluctuation on data quality. It utilizes one single X-ray area detector to record both sample and reference signals simultaneously. Performance of this novel normalization method is demonstrated in reflectivity oscillation measurement of a superlattice sample at sub-ps resolution.

Zhang, B. B.; Sun, D. R.; Tao, Y., E-mail: taoy@ihep.ac.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Sun, S. S. [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100090 (China)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

The crystal structure of the interrupted framework silicate K{sub 9.6}Ca{sub 1.2}Si{sub 12}O{sub 30} determined from laboratory X-ray diffraction data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal structure of a potassium calcium silicate with composition K{sub 9.6}Ca{sub 1.2}Si{sub 12}O{sub 30} (or K{sub 8}CaSi{sub 10}O{sub 25}) has been solved by direct methods aided by distance least squares optimization from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data. The trigonal compound adopts the non-centrosymmetric space group R3c with the following basic crystallographic data: a=11.13623(5)A, c=21.9890(2)A, V=2361.63(2)A{sup 3}, Z=3, D{sub calc}=2.617gcm{sup -3}. The crystal structure can be classified as an interrupted framework with exclusively Q{sup 3}-units. It can be thought of as being built from layers parallel to (001) containing isolated six-membered tetrahedral rings in UDUDUD conformation. Corner sharing of tetrahedra belonging to adjacent sheets results in a tetrahedral framework. The framework density of the structure is 15.2 T-atoms/1000A{sup 3}. The coordination sequences are identical for both silicon atoms in the asymmetric unit: 3-6-11-20-32-46-60-80-102-122. The vertex symbols for the two tetrahedral centers are 10{sub 2}.10{sub 2}.6{sub 1}. Topologically, the structure can be described as an Archimedean three-dimensional 3-connected net. It can be derived from the diamond or cristobalite net by removing 20% of the knots. Charge compensation in the structure is achieved by the incorporation of mono- and divalent M-cations (M: K, Ca). These extra-framework ions are coordinated by six to nine oxygen ligands. Ca/K distributions for the five symmetrically independent M-sites were obtained from a combination of bond distance considerations, site occupancy refinements and the bulk chemical composition. The structural characterization is completed by a detailed Raman spectroscopic study. Furthermore, possible implications of the structural chemistry of interrupted framework silicates for the field of silicate glass research are addressed.

Kahlenberg, V. [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)]. E-mail: volker.kahlenberg@uibk.ac.at; Kaindl, R. [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Christian-Doppler-Laboratory for Advanced Hard Coatings at the Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Toebbens, D.M. [Institute of Mineralogy and Petrography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

X-ray radiography for container inspection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chandra X-ray Analysis of Galaxy Cluster A168  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Chandra X-ray observations of galaxy cluster A168 (z=0.045). Two X-ray peaks with a projected distance of 676 kpc are found to be located close to two dominant galaxies, respectively. Both peaks are significantly offset from the peak of the number density distribution of galaxies. This suggests that A168 consists of two subclusters, a northern subcluster (A168N) and a southern subcluster (A168S). Further X-ray imaging analysis reveals that (1) the X-ray isophotes surrounding the two X-ray peaks are heavily distorted, (2) an elongated and ontinuous filament connects the two X-ray peaks. These suggest that strong interactions have occurred between the two subclusters. Spectral analysis shows that A168 has a mean temperature of 2.53 +/- 0.09 keV and a mean metallicity of 0.31 +/- 0.04 Z_{solar}. The metallicity is roughly a constant across the cluster but the temperature shows some systematic variations. Most X-ray, optical and radio properties of A168 are consistent with it being an off-axis merger several Gyrs after a core passage, although detailed numerical simulations are required to see whether the observed properties, in particular the significant offset between the optical and X-ray centers, can be reproduced in such a scenario.

Yanbin Yang; Zhiying Huo; Xu Zhou; Suijian Xue; Shude Mao; Jun Ma; Jiansheng Chen

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Massively parallel X-ray holography STEFANO MARCHESINI1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and a bacterial cell with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser, where illumination by a single 15-fs pulse was successfully used in producing the holographic image. As X-ray lasers move to shorter wavelengths we expectMassively parallel X-ray holography STEFANO MARCHESINI1,2 *, SE´BASTIEN BOUTET3,4 , ANNE E

Petta, Jason

440

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft X-ray tomography of phenotypic switching and the cellular response to antifungal peptoids that circumvent fungal drug- resistance mechanisms. In this work we used soft X-ray tomogra- phy to image of an entire, fully functional biological system, i.e., in the milieu of a cell (8, 10). Recently, soft X-ray

Barron, Annelise E.

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441

X-ray Raman scattering study of aligned polyfluorene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering study at the carbon K-edge on aligned poly[9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-fluorene-2,7-diyl] and show that the x-ray Raman scattering technique can be used as a practical alternative to x-ray absorption measurements. We demonstrate that this novel method can be applied to studies on aligned $\\pi$-conjugated polymers complementing diffraction and optical studies. Combining the experimental data and a very recently proposed theoretical scheme we demonstrate a unique property of x-ray Raman scattering by performing the symmetry decomposition on the density of unoccupied electronic states into $s$- and $p$-type symmetry contributions.

S. Galambosi; M. Knaapila; J. A. Soininen; K. Nyg\\aard; S. Huotari; F. Galbrecht; U. Scherf; A. P. Monkman; K. Hämäläinen

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking Tom Aldcroft SAO/CXC #12;X-ray Stacking 2008 analysis for a sample Stacking ­ mean properties of sample Chandra X-ray data (faint point sources) are photon-limited with low background => stacking in X-rays is very effective #12;X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22

Wolfe, Patrick J.

443

Miniature x-ray source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Possibility of corrector plate tuning of x-ray focusing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Schemes for focusing a hard x-ray beam to a small spot are described. The theoretical minimum spot size, assuming perfect mirror shape, is shown to be 4 nm FWHM, independent of x-ray wavelength. This is less than the 10 nm previously said to be the minimum achievable diffraction-limited x-ray spot size. While providing the penetrating power only possible with x rays, this approaches the resolution needed to image individual atoms or atomic layers. However, the perfect mirror assumption is physically unrealistic. This paper discusses the compensation of mirror shape errors by a corrector plate and shows that the tolerances for corrector plate shape are far looser than are tolerances for mirror shape. The full eventual success of achieving theoretical minimum resolution will require mirror shape precision considerably better than has been achieved at this time, though far looser than would be required for simpleminded paraboloidal focusing. Two variants of the scheme, subject to the same mathematical treatment, are described. (i) The ''corrector plate'' name is copied from the similarly functioning element of the same name in a Schmidt camera. The focusing is achieved using glancing, yet coherent, reflection from a high-Z paraboloidal mirror. The strategy is to obtain dominant focusing from reflection and to compensate with weak refractive focusing. The reflective focusing is strong and achromatic but insufficiently accurate. The refractive focusing is weak and chromatic but highly accurate. The corrector plate improves resolution the way eyeglasses help a person to see. It can, for example, be ''fitted'' the same trial-and-error way an optometrist establishes a prescription for glasses. Dimensional tolerances for the compensator are far looser than would be needed for a mirror to achieve the same resolution. Unlike compound refractive lenses, attenuation will be small, at least for wavelengths longer than 1 A, because the compensation layer is thin. (ii) For this variant, the corrector plate is a washer-shaped refractive or Fresnel lens, and the mirror is (theoretically) a perfect cone. All focusing is provided by the lens. Even though the cone provides no focusing, it improves the resolution by increasing the numerical aperture of the device. Compared to a paraboloidal shape, it is assumed that the conical shape can be more accurately fabricated. Of the two variants, only the first variant is, in principle, capable of achieving the theoretical minimum resolution. Configurations are suggested, in both case (i) and case (ii), that use currently possible construction precisions to produce resolutions better than have been achieved to date. However, both results will remain well above the theoretical minimum until fabrication techniques have been developed that provide greater precision than is possible at this time.

Talman, Richard

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

X-Ray Crystallography What do you need? A crystal. But not just any crystal a well ordered crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Crystallography What do you need? A crystal. But not just any crystal­ a well ordered crystal that will diffract x-rays strongly. A crystal handedness. This reduces number to 6- 12. #12;#12;Generally X-ray beam

Cavanagh, John

446

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore be related to the production of X-rays on massive stars. If so, massive stars' X-rays are much different than those found our own Sun and other cooler stars like the Sun that produce X-rays via magnetic activity

Cohen, David

447

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore #12;What is the mechanism by which massive stars produce x-rays? New results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ­ high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy: measuring Doppler broadening in emission lines Testing

Cohen, David

448

Space charge effects in ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding space charge effects is central for the development of high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy techniques for imaging material transformation with atomic scale detail at the fs to ps timescales. We present methods and results for direct ultrafast photoelectron beam characterization employing a shadow projection imaging technique to investigate the generation of ultrafast, non-uniform, intense photoelectron pulses in a dc photo-gun geometry. Combined with N-particle simulations and an analytical Gaussian model, we elucidate three essential space-charge-led features: the pulse lengthening following a power-law scaling, the broadening of the initial energy distribution, and the virtual cathode threshold. The impacts of these space charge effects on the performance of the next generation high-brightness ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging systems are evaluated.

Tao Zhensheng; Zhang He; Duxbury, P. M.; Berz, Martin; Ruan, Chong-Yu [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2320 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitat