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1

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray...

2

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in...

3

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

4

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

5

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

6

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

7

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy Print Wednesday, 30 November 2005 00:00 Electron and x-ray microscopes are a valuable tool for both the life and materials sciences, but they are limited in their ability to image with nanometer-scale resolution in three dimensions nonperiodic objects that are several microns in size. To fill this gap, the technique of coherent x-ray diffraction imaging now under development takes advantage of the penetrating power of x rays while simultaneously removing the limitations imposed by lens-based optical systems. Researchers from Stony Brook University, in collaboration with scientists at the ALS and Cornell University, have taken a large step in this direction by using a lensless x-ray diffraction microscope to image a freeze-dried yeast cell to better than 30-nm resolution. Images were made at several angular orientations of the cell.

8

Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

High-Energy Diffraction-Enhanced X-ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to apply the diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) method for much wider variety of samples, we have developed the high-energy DEI system. The energy of X-ray was increased up to 70 keV to achieve high permeability for heavy elements. The diffraction of Si(440) was used to keep large field of view. Demonstrative observation of an electrical cable was performed using the X-ray emitted from the vertical wiggler. The obtained images visualized not only the core and ground wire made of copper but also the isolator and outer jacket made of polymer clearly. The comparison of images obtained by the DEI and the absorption-contrast imaging showed that the sensitivity of DEI is about 10 times higher than that of the absorption method for light elements, and 3 times for heavy elements.

Yoneyama, Akio; Ueda, Kazuhiro [Advanced Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 2520, Akanuma, Hatoyama, Saitama, 350-0395 (Japan); Takeda, Tohoru [Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 228-8555 (Japan); Yamazaki, Takanori [Research and Development Laboratory, Hitachi Cable, Ltd., 5-1-1, Hidakacho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1414 (Japan); Hyodo, Kazuyuki [Institute of Materials Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser HENRY N. CHAPMAN1 of this principle using the FLASH soft-X-ray free-electron laser. An intense 25 fs, 4 Ã? 1013 W cm-2 pulse by one10 . X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expected to permit diffractive imaging at high

Loss, Daniel

11

Radiation-induced melting in coherent X-ray diffractive imaging at the nanoscale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent X-ray diffraction techniques play an increasingly significant role in imaging nanoscale structures which range from metallic and semiconductor samples to biological objects. The conventional knowledge about radiation damage effects caused by ever higher brilliance X-ray sources has to be critically revised while studying nanostructured materials.

Ponomarenko, O.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

12

Diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number: Challenge of dynamic mesoscale imaging with hard x rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Real materials have structure at both the atomic or crystalline scale as well as at interfaces and defects at the larger scale of grains. There is a need for the study of materials at the “mesoscale,” the scale at which subgranular physical processes and intergranular organization couple to determine microstructure, crucially impacting constitutive response at the engineering macroscale. Diffractive imaging using photons that can penetrate multiple grains of material would be a transformative technique for the study of the performance of materials in dynamic extremes. Thicker samples imply higher energy photons of shorter wavelength, and imaging of multiple grains implies bigger spot sizes. Such imaging requires the use of future planned and proposed hard x-ray free electron lasers (such as the European XFEL) to provide both the spatial coherence transverse to the large spots and the peak brilliance to provide the short illumination times. The result is that the Fresnel number of the system becomes large and is no longer in the Fraunhofer far-field limit. The interrelated issues of diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number are analyzed, including proof that diffractive imaging is possible in this limit and estimates of the signal-to-noise possible. In addition, derivation of the heating rates for brilliant pulses of x rays are presented. The potential and limitations on multiple dynamic images are derived. This paper will present a study of x-ray interactions with materials in this new regime of spatially coherent but relatively large mesoscale spots at very hard energies. It should provide the theory and design background for the experiments and facilities required to control materials in extreme environments, in particular for the next generation of very-hard-x-ray free electron lasers.

John L. Barber; Cris W. Barnes; Richard L. Sandberg; Richard L. Sheffield

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 083002 (2014)]. This experiment is the first step toward coherent diffractive imaging of structures and structural dynamics of isolated molecules at atomic resolution, i. e., picometers and femtoseconds, using x-ray free-electron lasers.

Stern, Stephan; Filsinger, Frank; Rouzée, Arnaud; Rudenko, Artem; Johnsson, Per; Martin, Andrew V; Barty, Anton; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Coffee, Ryan N; Epp, Sascha; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Rudek, Benedikt; Starodub, Dmitri G; Thøgersen, Jan; Weidenspointner, Georg; White, Thomas A; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Rolles, Daniel; Chapman, Henry N; Küpper, Jochen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Curved Image-Plate Detector System for High-Resolution Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The developed curved image plate (CIP) is a one-dimensional detector which simultaneously records high-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns over a 38.7 2{theta} range. In addition, an on-site reader enables rapid extraction, transfer and storage of X-ray intensity information in {le}30 s, and further qualifies this detector to study kinetic processes in materials science. The CIP detector can detect and store X-ray intensity information linearly proportional to the incident photon flux over a dynamical range of about five orders of magnitude. The linearity and uniformity of the CIP detector response is not compromised in the unsaturated regions of the image plate, regardless of saturation in another region. The speed of XRD data acquisition together with excellent resolution afforded by the CIP detector is unique and opens up wide possibilities in materials research accessible through X-ray diffraction. This article presents details of the basic features, operation and performance of the CIP detector along with some examples of applications, including high-temperature XRD.

Sarin, P.; Haggerty, R; Yoon, W; Knapp, M; Berghaeuser, A; Zschack, P; Karapetrova, E; Yang, N; Kriven, W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction lenses with mechanically bent crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. High quality mechanically bent diffracting crystals of 0.1 mm radial width are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to an array of detectors which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for the use of a multi-component high resolution detector array and for narrow source and detector apertures.

Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

17

KOTOBUKI-1 apparatus for cryogenic coherent X-ray diffraction imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed an experimental apparatus named KOTOBUKI-1 for use in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of frozen-hydrated non-crystalline particles at cryogenic temperature. For cryogenic specimen stage with small positional fluctuation for a long exposure time of more than several minutes, we here use a cryogenic pot cooled by the evaporation cooling effect for liquid nitrogen. In addition, a loading device is developed to bring specimens stored in liquid nitrogen to the specimen stage in vacuum. The apparatus allows diffraction data collection for frozen-hydrated specimens at 66 K with a positional fluctuation of less than 0.4 ?m and provides an experimental environment to easily exchange specimens from liquid nitrogen storage to the specimen stage. The apparatus was developed and utilized in diffraction data collection of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of ?m from material and biological sciences, such as metal colloid particles and chloroplast, at BL29XU of SPring-8. Recently, it has been applied for single-shot diffraction data collection of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of sub-?m using X-ray free electron laser at BL3 of SACLA.

Nakasako, Masayoshi; Takayama, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Amane [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan) [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Shirahama, Keiya [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki; Hikima, Takaaki; Yonekura, Koji; Maki-Yonekura, Saori; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Inubushi, Yuichi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Takahashi, Yukio; Suzuki, Akihiro [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan) [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Inui, Yayoi [Department of Applied Biological Science Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Biological Science Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Joti, Yasumasa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hoshi, Takahiko [Kohzu Precision Co., Ltd., 2-6-15 Kurigi, Aso-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8521 (Japan)] [Kohzu Precision Co., Ltd., 2-6-15 Kurigi, Aso-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8521 (Japan)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Diffraction with a coherent X-ray beam: dynamics and imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Techniques for coherent X-ray scattering measurements are detailed. Applications in the study of the dynamics of fluctuations and in lensless high-resolution imaging are described.

Livet, F.

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

X-ray Imaging Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory October 8-9, 2002 Organizers: John Miao & Keith Hodgson A workshop on "X-ray Imaging and Spectro-microscopy: the Present and the Future" was held on October 8-9, 2002. This workshop, organized by John Miao (SSRL) and Keith Hodgson (SSRL) provided a forum to discuss the scientific applications of a variety of imaging and spectro-microscopic techniques, including photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), coherent diffraction imaging, x-ray microscopy, micro-tomography, holographic imaging, and x-ray micro-probe. Twelve invited speakers discussed the important scientific applications of these techniques, and also predicted the future scientific directions with the advance of instrumentation and x-ray sources. The workshop was well attended with over fifty registered attendees.

20

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

22

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing short-exposure nanoscale images of the magnetic structure of materials. The new method combines aspects of coherent x-ray diffraction, which can determine 3-D charge distributions, and resonant magnetic scattering, which is sensitive to magnetic structures. Physicists have used coherent x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of magnetic atoms, but these terms are traditionally ignored since coherent x-ray diffraction has not been used to retrieve magnetic information. Using the full formula allows for the determination of not only the electron density, but also the magnetic spin distribution and its orientation.

23

Nanoscale Imaging with Resonant Coherent X Rays: Extension of Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction to Nonperiodic Structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methodology of multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction, widely used for macromolecular structure determination, is extended to the imaging of nonperiodic nanostructures. We demonstrate the solution of the phase problem by a combination of two resonantly recorded coherent scattering patterns at the carbon K edge (285 eV). Our approach merges iterative phase retrieval and x-ray holography approaches, yielding unique and rapid reconstructions. The element, chemical, and magnetic state specificity of our method further renders it widely applicable to a broad range of nanostructures, providing a spatial resolution that is limited, in principle, by wavelength only.

A. Scherz; D. Zhu; R. Rick; W. F. Schlotter; S. Roy; J. Lüning; J. Stöhr

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a single raw image and is feasible in live animals. Because the sensitivity of the method scales with the density of the gratings, custom microfabricated gratings should be superior to off-the-shelf lead grids.

Bennett, Eric E.; Kopace, Rael; Stein, Ashley F.; Wen Han [National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Imaging Physics Section, Translational Medicine Branch, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1061, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell Xiaojing Huang,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell Xiaojing Huang,1 Johanna Nelson,1 eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezingV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25

Mohseni, Hooman

26

X-ray Diffraction (XRD) 1.0 What is X-ray Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction (XRD) · 1.0 What is X-ray Diffraction · 2.0 Basics of Crystallography · 3.0 Production of X-rays · 4.0 Applications of XRD · 5.0 Instrumental Sources of Error · 6.0 Conclusions #12 why the cleavage faces of crystals appear to reflect X-ray beams at certain angles of incidence (theta

Moeck, Peter

27

X-Ray Diffraction The X-Ray Diffraction facility is equipped with state-of-the-art  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Diffraction The X-Ray Diffraction facility is equipped with state-of-the-art diffractometers offering both single crystal and powder X-Ray diffraction. Powder X-Ray Diffraction High resolution data For more details on powder X-Ray analysis contact Dr J Hriljac on 0121 414 4458 or email: j

Birmingham, University of

28

Cryogenic X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

Enju Lima; Lutz Wiegart; Petra Pernot; Malcolm Howells; Joanna Timmins; Federico Zontone; Anders Madsen

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cryogenic X-ray Diffraction Microscopy for Biological Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is well suited for nondestructive, high-resolution biological imaging, especially for thick samples, with the high penetration power of x rays and without limitations imposed by a lens. We developed nonvacuum, cryogenic (cryo-) XDM with hard x rays at 8 keV and report the first frozen-hydrated imaging by XDM. By preserving samples in amorphous ice, the risk of artifacts associated with dehydration or chemical fixation is avoided, ensuring the imaging condition closest to their natural state. The reconstruction shows internal structures of intact D. radiodurans bacteria in their natural contrast.

E Lima; L Wiegart; P Pernot; M Howells; J Timmins; F Zontone; A Madsen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

31

SMB, X-Ray Spectroscopy & Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home X-Ray Spectroscopy & Imaging X-Ray Spectroscopy & Imaging SSRL has five hard X-ray Spectroscopy beamlines and three Microfocus Imaging beamlines dedicated to Biological and...

32

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

33

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

34

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

35

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs combine the advantages of sychrotron light sources (high brightness and x-ray wavelengths relevant to atomic and molecular phenomena) with the advantages of visible-light lasers (highly coherent beams). All of these characteristics are important for coherent x-ray diffraction imaging-lensless imaging techniques that are proving to be integral to single-shot, high-resolution imaging of both complex materials and biological samples. Existing techniques are typically designed for transmission geometry, however, and use isolated objects, requiring special sample fabrication and restricting the type of samples under investigation. Recently, researchers from the ALS and the University of Oregon have shown at ALS Beamline 12.0.2 that it is possible to form x-ray holograms in reflection geometry by using the light scattered from a sample, opening the door to lensless imaging of a wealth of new material samples.

36

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has...

37

X-Ray Diffraction on NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently a 192 beam, 1.6 MJ laser. NIF Ramp-Compression Experiments have already made the relevant exo-planet pressure range from 1 to 50 Mbar accessible. We Proposed to Study Carbon Phases by X-Ray Diffraction on NIF. Just a few years ago, ultra-high pressure phase diagrams for materials were very 'simple'. New experiments and theories point out surprising and decidedly complex behavior at the highest pressures considered. High pressures phases of aluminum are also predicted to be complex. Recent metadynamics survey of carbon proposed a dynamic pathway among multiple phases. We need to develop diagnostics and techniques to explore this new regime of highly compressed matter science. X-Ray Diffraction - Understand the phase diagram/EOS/strength/texture of materials to 10's of Mbar. Strategy and physics goals: (1) Powder diffraction; (2) Begin with diamond; (3) Continue with metals etc.; (4) Explore phase diagrams; (5) Develop liquid diffraction; and (6) Reduce background/improve resolution.

Eggert, J H; Wark, J

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ultrafast x-ray diffraction of laser-irradiated crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus has been developed for measuring time-dependent x-ray diffraction. X-ray pulses from an Advanced Light Source bend magnet are diffracted by a sagittally-focusing Si(111) crystal and then by a sample crystal, presently InSb(111). Laser pulses with 100 fs duration and a repetition rate of 1 KHz irradiate the sample inducing a phase transition. Two types of detectors are being employed: an x-ray streak camera and an avalanche photodiode. The streak camera is driven by a photoconductive switch and has a 2 ps temporal resolution determined by trigger jitter. The avalanche photodiode has high quantum efficiency and sufficient time resolution to detect single x-ray pulses in ALS two bunch or camshaft operation. A beamline is under construction dedicated for time resolved and micro-diffraction experiments. In the new beamline a toroidal mirror collects 3 mrad horizontally and makes a 1:1 image of the bend magnet source in the x-ray hutch. A laser induced phase transition has been observed in InSb occurring within 70 ps.

Heimann, P.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US). Advanced Light Source; Larsson, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Physics Dept.; Chang, Z. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (US). Center for Ultrafast Optical Science

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

SMB, X-ray Fluorescence Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluorescence Imaging X-ray Fluorescence Imaging X-ray fluorescence imaging utilizes the high brightness of SPEAR3 and focused beam generated by the uses of K-B optics, capillaries...

40

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University College Station, Texas Phone : 979-845-9125 www.chem.tamu.edu/xray xray@tamu.edu X-rayDiffractionLaboratory DepartmentofChemistry 3255TAMU CollegeStation,TX77843-3255 Mission The purpose of our laboratory is to provide X-ray

Meagher, Mary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

X-ray Diffraction Practicals 1 Graphics Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Practicals 1 Graphics Programs that will read SHELX or CIF files J. Reibenspies, N. Bhuvanesh ver 1.0.0 #12;X-ray Diffraction Practicals 2 Free software. Gretep : Reads SHELX files shelx files or output thermal ellipsoid plots. http://www.umass.edu/microbio/rasmol/ #12;X-ray

Meagher, Mary

42

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

43

X-ray diffraction study of zirconia pillared clays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and X-ray radial electronic distribution density (RED) of initial and zirconia-pillared interlayered clays (Zr-PILC) were studied. After pillaring, the basal ... under air to 17.7 ...

D.A. Zyuzin; E.M. Moroz; T.G. Kuznetsova…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities in the field of lensless imaging. XFELs...

45

Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 deg. C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

Huang Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Lima, Enju; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Kirz, Janos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neiman, Aaron M. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-5215 (United States)

2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

46

Definition: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is a laboratory-based technique commonly used for identification of crystalline materials and analysis of unit cell dimensions. One of two primary types of XRD analysis (X-ray powder diffraction and single-crystal XRD) is commonly applied to samples to obtain specific information about the crystalline material under investigation. X-ray powder diffraction is widely used in geology, environmental science, material science, and engineering to rapidly identify unknown crystalline substances (typically in less than 20 minutes). A pure, finely ground, and homogenized sample is required for determination of the bulk composition. Additional uses include detailed

47

X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png X-Ray Diffraction (XRD): X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is a laboratory-based technique commonly used for identification of crystalline materials and analysis of unit cell dimensions. One of two primary types of XRD analysis (X-ray powder diffraction and single-crystal XRD) is commonly applied to samples to

48

Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Collection and Mapping Parent Exploration Technique: Data Collection and Mapping Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD): Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is a field-based technique that can be used for identification of crystalline materials and analysis of unit cell dimensions. Portable XRD analysis is similar to X-ray powder diffraction,

49

Self-terminating diffraction gates femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallograp...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Self-terminating diffraction gates femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography measurements Authors: Barty, A., Caleman, C., Aquila, A., Timneanu, N., Lomb, L., White, T. A., Andreasson,...

50

Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging in Reflection Print Wednesday, 26 October 2011 00:00 The advent of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) light sources has led to an outburst of research activities...

51

The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence instrument CheMin on the Curiosity rover is a shoebox-sized device using transmission geometry and an energy-discriminating CCD detector. The instrument has returned the first X-ray diffraction data for soil and drilled samples from Mars outcrops, revealing a suite of primary basaltic minerals, amorphous components and varied hydrous alteration products including phyllosilicates.

Bish, D.

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

Howells, Malcolm R. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Beyond hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Simultaneous combination with x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful and novel emerging technique for the nondestructive determination of electronic properties and chemical composition of bulk, buried interfaces and surfaces. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons, increasing the information depth up to several tens of nanometers. Complementing HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique (such as x-ray diffraction) opens a new research field with major applications for materials science. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we have developed a novel experimental set-up that combines HAXPES and x-ray diffraction (x-ray reflectivity, surface x-ray diffraction, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and reciprocal space maps). Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a robust 2S + 3D diffractometer hosting a ultrahigh vacuum chamber equipped with a unique photoelectron spectrometer (few eV < electron kinetic energy < 15 keV), x-ray tube (Mg/Ti), 15 keV electron gun, and auxiliary standard surface facilities (molecular beam epitaxy evaporator, ion gun, low energy electron diffraction, sample heating/cooling system, leak valves, load-lock sample transfer, etc.). This end-station offers the unique possibility of performing simultaneous HAXPES + x-ray diffraction studies. In the present work, we describe the experimental set-up together with two experimental examples that emphasize its outstanding capabilities: (i) nondestructive characterization of the Si/Ge and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} interfaces on Ge-based CMOS devices, and (ii) strain study on La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} ultrathin films grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) substrate.

Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Castro, German R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France) and ICMM-CSIC Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Combined energy dispersive EXAFS and x?ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An in situ experiment to measure both x?ray absorption spectroscopy and x?ray diffraction of aurichalcite is described. The experiment uses position sensitive detectors to enable both data sets to be collected while the sample is slowly decomposed in air and then reduced in hydrogen. ?

A. J. Dent; M. P. Wells; R. C. Farrow; C. A. Ramsdale; G. E. Derbyshire; G. N. Greaves; J. W. Couves; J. M. Thomas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hard x-ray imaging from explorer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coded aperture X-ray detectors were applied to obtain large increases in sensitivity as well as angular resolution. A hard X-ray coded aperture detector concept is described which enables very high sensitivity studies persistent hard X-ray sources and gamma ray bursts. Coded aperture imaging is employed so that approx. 2 min source locations can be derived within a 3 deg field of view. Gamma bursts were located initially to within approx. 2 deg and X-ray/hard X-ray spectra and timing, as well as precise locations, derived for possible burst afterglow emission. It is suggested that hard X-ray imaging should be conducted from an Explorer mission where long exposure times are possible.

Grindlay, J.E.; Murray, S.S.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Definition: Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) is a field-based technique that can be used for identification of crystalline materials and analysis of unit cell dimensions. Portable XRD analysis is similar to X-ray powder diffraction, which has traditionally been used in geology, environmental science, material science, and engineering to rapidly identify unknown crystalline substances. Portable XRD analysis allows for simpler sample preparation, faster analytical times than traditional methods (less than 2 minutes), and can be performed at the sampling site in the field. A pure, finely ground

58

X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Copper Nanopowder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Copper nanopowder preparation and its X-Ray diffraction studies are reported in this paper. Electrolytic cathode deposition method is simple and cheapest process for its preparation. Copper nanopowder has been prepared from aqueous copper sulphate solution. Wide range of experimental conditions has been adopted in this process and its X-Ray diffraction characterizations have been studied. The results confirming copper nanopowder with size below 30 nm. Uniformed size Copper nanopowder preparation, in normal room temperature is importance of this study.

T. Theivasanthi; M. Alagar

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPUSERFD form that can be accessed by the X-ray diffraction webpage. RESPONSIBILITY: The X-ray Diffraction and suggestions in a timely manner. MATERIALS: · Computer Database · Web interface #12;X-ray Diffraction

Meagher, Mary

60

Photon Sciences | Beamlines | XPD: X-ray Powder Diffraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XPD: X-ray Powder Diffraction XPD: X-ray Powder Diffraction Poster | Fact Sheet | Preliminary Design Report Scientific Scope XPD is a tunable facility with the ability to collect diffraction data at high x-ray energies (40keV-80keV), offering rapid acquisition (millisecond) and high angular resolution capabilities on the same instrument. XPD addresses future scientific challenges in, for example, hydrogen storage, CO2 sequestration, advanced structural ceramics, catalysis, and materials processing. Such materials of high technological value often are complex, nanostructured and heterogeneous. The scientific grand challenge is to obtain robust and quantitative (micro)structural information, not only in the ground state at ambient conditions, but also in situ or in operando with varying temperature, pressure, magnetic/electric/stress

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

X-ray lithography using holographic images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 .mu.m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holgraphic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required.

Howells, Malcolm S. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

X-ray diffraction data for graphite to 20 GPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction data have been obtained on polycrystalline graphite at pressures up to 20 GPa. A phase transition is observed at ?11 GPa, as evidenced by softening in the interlayer spacing and the observation of new diffraction lines. Below this pressure the variation of the lattice parameters a and c are compared with elastic stiffnesses obtained from ultrasonic measurements. A new value for C13 is proposed. The variation c(P) is compared to the recently proposed universal isotherm equation.

You Xiang Zhao and Ian L. Spain

1989-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cryogenic x-ray diffraction microscopy utilizing high-pressure cryopreservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present cryo x-ray diffraction microscopy of high-pressure-cryofixed bacteria and report high-convergence imaging with multiple image reconstructions. Hydrated D. radiodurans cells were cryofixed at 200 MPa pressure into ?10??m-thick water layers and their unstained, hydrated cellular environments were imaged by phasing diffraction patterns, reaching sub-30-nm resolutions with hard x-rays. Comparisons were made with conventional ambient-pressure-cryofixed samples, with respect to both coherent small-angle x-ray scattering and the image reconstruction. The results show a correlation between the level of background ice signal and phasing convergence, suggesting that phasing difficulties with frozen-hydrated specimens may be caused by high-background ice scattering.

Enju Lima; Yuriy Chushkin; Peter van der Linden; Chae Un Kim; Federico Zontone; Philippe Carpentier; Sol M. Gruner; Petra Pernot

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

X-ray Diffraction / MSE 603 Spring 2002 Qun Shen / CHESS qs11@cornell.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction / MSE 603 Spring 2002 Qun Shen / CHESS qs11@cornell.edu 1. X-ray production & basic properties ­ common sources for diffraction experiments ­ synchrotron radiation ­ response to x-rays by an electron ­ refraction index ­ total external reflection & evanescent wave, TXRF 2. X-ray scattering basics

Shen, Qun

66

Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Single molecule imaging with longer x-ray laser pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In serial femtosecond crystallography, x-ray laser pulses do not need to outrun all radiation damage processes because Bragg diffraction exceeds the damage-induced background scattering for longer pulses ($\\sim$ 50--100 fs). This is due to a "self-gating pulse" effect whereby damage terminates Bragg diffraction prior to the pulse completing its passage through the sample, as if that diffraction were produced by a shorter pulse of equal fluence. We show here that a similar gating effect applies to single molecule diffraction with respect to spatially uncorrelated damage processes like ionization and ion diffusion. The effect is clearly seen in calculations of the diffraction contrast, by calculating the diffraction of average structure separately to the diffraction from statistical fluctuations of the structure due to damage ("damage noise"). Our results suggest that sub-nanometer single molecule imaging with longer pulses, like those produced at currently operating facilities, should not yet be ruled out. The...

Martin, Andrew V; Caleman, Carl; Quiney, Harry M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Borman effect in resonant diffraction of X-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dynamic theory of resonant diffraction (occurring when the energy of incident radiation is close to the energy of the absorption edge of an element in the composition of a given substance) of synchronous X-rays is developed in the two-wave approximation in the coplanar Laue geometry for large grazing angles in perfect crystals. A sharp decrease in the absorption coefficient in the substance with simultaneously satisfied diffraction conditions (Borman effect) is demonstrated, and the theoretical and first experimental results are compared. The calculations reveal the possibility of applying this approach in analyzing the quadrupole-quadrupole contribution to the absorption coefficient.

Oreshko, A. P., E-mail: ap.oreshko@physics.msu.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bragg diffraction achieved from two-dimensional protein crystals using femtosecond X-ray laser snapshots is presented.

Frank, M.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Image Bank Open X-ray Image Bank Open for Business X-ray Image Bank Open for Business February 22, 2011 Filipe Maia is building a data bank where scientists from around the world can deposit and share images generated by coherent x-ray light sources. A post-doctoral researcher with the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), Maia hopes the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank, or CXIDB (http://www.cxidb.org) can help researchers make the most of their valuable data. Scientists use light sources to shoot intense x-ray beams into molecules, such as proteins, in order to understand their shapes and structures. The resulting diffraction patterns are painstakingly reconstructed to deduce an image. "It kind of works like a microscope, but it has no lens," Maia says.

71

Is linear response to x-rays suitable for digital dental x-ray imaging systems? —Theoretical and experimental considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to consider theoretically and experimentally the suitability of linear response to x-rays for digital dental x-ray imaging systems.

Keiichi Nishikawa PhD; Mamoru Wakoh DDS; PhD; Kinya Kuroyanagi DDS; PhD

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Novel X-Ray Imaging Opportunities for the RPI Linear Accelerator's Tunable, Quasi-monochromatic X-ray Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel X-Ray Imaging Opportunities for the RPI Linear Accelerator's Tunable, Quasi-monochromatic X-ray of an intense, tunable, polarized, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source has been ongoing at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute since 2001 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. This X-ray source, known as Parametric X-rays (PXR

Danon, Yaron

73

Geometry and X-ray diffraction characteristics of carbon nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Algorithms for generating atomic coordinates in nanotubes with an arbitrary cell in the layer plane have been developed. The conditions for the seamless matching of a flat layer rolled up in any direction are formulated for cylindrical, conical, and faceted tubes. A method has been developed for generating different types of faceted nanotubes using a group transformation (obtained in this study) that leaves invariant an arbitrary polygon in the nanotube cross section. Equations are proposed for deriving the diameter and chirality of single-wall carbon cylindrical nanotubes from X-ray diffraction spectra.

Pleshakov, V. F., E-mail: victorpleshakov@list.ru [FGUP Scientific Research Institute of Electrical Carbon Products (Russian Federation)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Study of Potassium Azide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystal structure and compressibility of potassium azide was investigated by in-situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature up to 37.7 GPa. In the body-centered tetragonal (bct) phase, an anisotropic compressibility was observed with greater compressibility in the direction perpendicular to the plane containing N{sub 3}{sup -} ions than directions within that plane. The bulk modulus of the bct phase was determined to be 18.6(7) GPa. A pressure-induced phase transition may occur at 15.5 GPa.

C Ji; F Zhang; D Hong; H Zhu; J Wu; M Chyu; V Levitas; Y Ma

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Quantitative x-ray imager (abstract)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on development of a quantitative x-ray imager (QXI) for the national Inertial Confinement Fusion Program. Included in this development is a study of photocathode response as a function of photon energy, 2--17.5 keV, which is related to diagnostic development on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The QXI is defined as being a quantative imager due to the repeated characterization. This instrument is systematically checked out, electronically as well as its photocathode x-ray response, both on a direct current and pulsed x-ray sources, before and after its use on a shot campaign. The QXI is a gated x-ray imager1 used for a variety of experiments conducted in the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Radiation Physics Program. The camera was assembled in Los Alamos and has been under development since 1997 and has now become the workhorse framing camera by the program. The electronics were built by Grant Applied Physics of San Fransisco, CA.2 The QXI has been used at the LANL Trident, LLNL Nova, and University of Rochester Laboratory OMEGA laser facilities. The camera consists of a grated microchannel plate (MCP), a phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate coupled to film for data readout, along with high speed electronic pulsers to drive the x-ray detector. The QXI has both a two-strip and a four-strip detection head and has the ability to individually bias the gain of each of the strips. The timing of the QXI was done at the Trident short pulse laboratory, using 211 nm light. Single strip jitter was looked at as well and determined to be <25 ps. Flatfielding of the photocathode across the MCP was done with the Trident main laser with 150 J on a gold disk with a 1 ns. Spatial resolution was determined to be <5 {mu}m by using the same laser conditions as before and a backlit 1000 lp/in. grid. The QXI has been used on cylindrical implosion work at the Nova Laser Facility, and on direct-drive cylinder mix and indirect-drive high convergence implosion experiments at OMEGA. Its two-strip module has provided the capability to look at point backlighters, as part of technique development for experiments on the NIF. Its next use will be in March 2000 with its off axis viewer nose at Omega, providing a perpendicular view of Rayleigh--Taylor spike dissipation.

Evans, Scott C.; Archuleta, Tom N.; Oertel, John A.; Walsh, Peter J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPPOWGAD data collection on the Bruker GADDS Powder X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must be collected AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Powder X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can identify the materials

Meagher, Mary

77

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPDATGAD to facilitate data collection on the Bruker GADDS Single-crystal X-ray Diffractometer. POLICY: Data must. BACKGROUND AND PRECAUTIONS 1. Single-Crystal X-ray diffraction is a method by which investigators can

Meagher, Mary

78

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPPOWD8 Standard Operating Procedure Title: X-ray Powder Diffraction: D8 Advanced Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 12/29/2008 Page: 1 of 3 SOP: SOPPOWD8 Last date revised: December 23 2009 Date approved: December 29 2009 X-ray

Meagher, Mary

79

Water Window Ptychographic Imaging with Characterized Coherent X-rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a ptychographical coherent diffractive imaging experiment in the water window with focused soft X-rays at $500~\\mathrm{eV}$. An X-ray beam with high degree of coherence was selected for ptychography at the P04 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron radiation source. We measured the beam coherence with the newly developed non-redundant array method. A pinhole $2.6~\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ in size selected the coherent part of the beam and was used for ptychographic measurements of a lithographically manufactured test sample and fossil diatom. The achieved resolution was $53~\\mathrm{nm}$ for the test sample and only limited by the size of the detector. The diatom was imaged at a resolution better than $90~\\mathrm{nm}$.

Rose, Max; Dzhigaev, Dmitry; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Senkbeil, Tobias; von Gundlach, Andreas; Gorniak, Thomas; Shabalin, Anatoly; Viefhaus, Jens; Rosenhahn, Axel; Vartanyants, Ivan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Applications of holography to x-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we consider various applications of holographic techniques to the problem of soft x-ray imaging. We give special attention to imaging biological material using x-rays in the wavelength range 24 to 45A. We describe some experiments on formation and reconstruction of x-ray holograms and propose some ways in which holographic techniques might contribute to the difficult problem of fabricating optical elements for use in the soft x-ray region.

Howells, M.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Rarback, H.; Rosser, R.; Yun, W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Applications of holography to X-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper the authors consider various applications of holographic techniques to the problem of soft x-ray imaging. Special attention is given to imaging biological material using x-rays in the wavelength range 24-45A. The authors describe some experiments on formation and reconstruction of x-ray holograms and propose some ways in which holographic techniques might contribute to the difficult problem of fabricating optical elements for use in the soft x-ray region.

Howells, M.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Rarback, H.; Rosser, R.; Yun, W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reduction imaging with soft x rays for projection lithography A. A. MacDowell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments with a 20X reduction Schwarzschild optic produced features as small as 50 nm. It is considered multilayer coated mirrors to image soft x rays at/or near the diffraction limit on to resist coated wafers with projection x-ray lithography. This paper will describe our experimental work using a Schwarzschild camera

Bokor, Jeffrey

83

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging: 2-BM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BM BM Introduction The 2-BM beamline offers measurement capabilities for x-ray microtomography, x-ray topography and x-ray microdiffraction. X-ray microtomography and x-ray diffraction instruments are installed on separate optical tables for independent operation with fast switch over time. Optically-coupled high-resolution CCD system is used for microtomography and topography with up to 1 micron spatial resolution. X-ray microdiffraction setup consists of KB microfocussing mirrors (~3 micron minimum spot), four-circle Huber diffractometer, high-precision translation sample stage, two orthogonally-mounted video cameras for viewing sample, fluorescence detector (Si-drift diode) and diffraction detector (a scintillation detector or a CCD). Three different levels of monochromaticity are available. Conventional monochromatic x-rays from a double-bounced Si (111) crystal monochromator (DCM, D E/E=1E-4), wide band-pass monochromatic x-rays from a double multilayer monochromator (DMM, D E/E=1~4E-2) and pink beam. The available x-ray range is from 5 keV to 30 keV. The lower limit is due to the x-ray windows and the upper limit is due to the critical angle of the x-ray mirror. Two different coatings (Cr and Pt) for the x-ray mirror allow either 20 keV or 30 keV energy cutoff.

84

High-Frequency X-ray Beam Chopper Based on Diffraction by Surface Acoustic Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main characteristics of a new type of X-ray beam are presented. Diffraction of X-rays by a pulsed surface acoustic wave is used to perform a flexible high-frequency selection of synchrotron radiation pulses.

Tucoulou, R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Bruker Workshop on Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diagnosis and Treatment of Problem Structures: Diagnosis and Treatment of Problem Structures: A Bruker Workshop on Single Crystal X-Ray Diffraction May 30, 2008 Chemistry Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN This meeting focuses on the scientific resources of four ORNL user facilities funded by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Who Should Attend Synopsis Goals Scheduled Agenda Workshop Materials Confirmed Speakers Important Dates Registration - now open Location - Directions and Map Sponsors Organizing and Local Committee Contacts Relevant Literature, References, Websites Local Information Bruker - UT Workshop Who Should Attend? The Workshop is directed to the newcomer as well as the experienced user of a Bruker Apex / Apex-II system and SHELX software. It will concentrate on hard to solve and/or refine problem structures. We envision it to be

86

Preparation and X-Ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a/sub 0/ = 0.3769(8) nm and c/sub 0/ = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considere to be CmH/sub 3//sup -//sub 8/ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a/sub 0/ = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH /SUB 2-x/ (B.M. Bansal and D. Damien. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett. 6 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanidelike behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.

Gibson, J.K.; Maire, R.G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Diffracted X-ray tracking for monitoring intramolecular motion in individual protein molecules using broad band X-ray  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffracted X-ray tracking (DXT) enables the tilting and twisting motions of single protein molecules to be monitored with micro- to milliradian resolution using a highly brilliant X-ray source with a wide energy bandwidth. We have developed a technique to monitor single molecules using gold nanocrystals attached to individual protein molecules using the BL28B2 beamline at SPring-8. In this paper we present the installation of a single toroidal X-ray mirror at BL28B2 to focus X-rays in an energy range of 10–20 keV (?E/E = 82% for an X-ray with a wide energy bandwidth). With this beamline we tracked diffraction spots from gold nanocrystals over a wide angle range than that using quasi-monochromatic X-rays. Application of the wide angle DXT technique to biological systems enabled us to observe the on-site motions of single protein molecules that have been functionalized in vivo. We further extend the capability of DXT by observing the fractional tilting and twisting motions of inner proteins under various conditions. As a proof of this methodology and to determine instrumental performance the intramolecular motions of a human serum albumin complex with 2-anthracenecarboxylic acid was investigated using the BL28B2 beamline. The random tilting and twisting intramolecular motions are shown to be directly linked to the movement of individual protein molecules in the buffer solution.

Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Sasaki, Yuji C. [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan) [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Masato; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Ohta, Noboru [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hoshisashi, Kentaro; Jae-won, Chang; Tokue, Maki; Matsushita, Yufuku [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)] [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 609 Kiban Building 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kahiwashi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Nishijima, Masaki; Inoue, Yoshihisa [Department of Applied Chemistry and Office for University-Industry Collaboration, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Department of Applied Chemistry and Office for University-Industry Collaboration, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan) [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, CREST, Sasaki-Team, 609 Kiban Building, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPALIGNA Standard Operating Procedure Title: X-ray Instrument Alignment ­ APEXII Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 6 the alignment of the APEXII single crystal X-ray diffractometer. POLICY: The instrument must be aligned

Meagher, Mary

89

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Doc. No: SOPALIGNS Standard Operating Procedure Title: X-ray Instrument Alignment ­ SMART1000 Rev No: Issue date: 1.001 6 the alignment of the SMART1000 single crystal X-ray diffractometer. POLICY: The instrument must be aligned

Meagher, Mary

90

Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction.

Emamzadah, S.

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

91

Attenuation corrections for X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The form of the transmission factor for sample geometries encountered in X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies is considered.

Langan, P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Thermal expansion of manganese dioxide using high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal expansion behaviour of manganese dioxide, an important battery material, is reported using high-temperature in situ X-ray diffraction between 298 and 673 K.

Dose, W.M.

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

93

Calibrating X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project presented is to develop methods to accurately calibrate X-ray imaging devices. The approach was to develop X-ray source systems suitable for this endeavor and to develop methods to calibrate solid state detectors to measure source intensity. NSTec X-ray sources used for the absolute calibration of cameras are described, as well as the method of calibrating the source by calibrating the detectors. The work resulted in calibration measurements for several types of X-ray cameras. X-ray camera calibration measured efficiency and efficiency variation over the CCD. Camera types calibrated include: CCD, CID, back thinned (back illuminated), front illuminated.

Haugh, M. J.

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures by X-ray Spectro...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

co-workers. Their implementation of the technique is an extension of lensless Fourier transform holography to the x-ray regime, which detects the far field diffraction pattern of a...

95

New intraoral x-ray fluorographic imaging for dentistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new dental x-ray fluorographic unit has been developed. This unit is composed of small intraoral x-ray tube, a compact x-ray image intensifier, and a high-resolution TV system. The purposes for developing this equipment were to (1) directly observe the tooth during endodontic procedures and (2) reduce x-ray exposure to the patient and the dentist. The radiation exposure can be reduced to about 1/600 the exposure used with conventional dental film. In clinical trials, a satisfactory fluorographic dental image for endodontic treatment was obtained with this new device.

Higashi, T.; Osada, T.; Aoyama, W.; Iguchi, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kanno, M.; Moriya, K.; Yoshimura, M.; Tusuda, M.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The suppression of fluorescence peaks in energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown experimentally that diffraction peaks which are normally obscured by fluorescence peaks in energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction can be revealed by tuning of the X-ray tube excitation voltage in order to suppress the fluorescence peaks.

Hansford, G.M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Energy weighted x-ray dark-field imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dark-field image obtained in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide information about the objects’ microstructures on a scale smaller than the pixel size...

Pelzer, Georg; Zang, Andrea; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Kraus, Manuel; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, Andre; Wandner, Johannes; Weber, Thomas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Wong, Winnie S; Campbell, Michael; Meiser, Jan; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Incoherent x-ray scattering in single molecule imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imaging of the structure of single proteins or other biomolecules with atomic resolution would be enormously beneficial to structural biology. X-ray free-electron lasers generate highly intense and ultrashort x-ray pulses, providing a route towards imaging of single molecules with atomic resolution. The information on molecular structure is encoded in the coherent x-ray scattering signal. In contrast to crystallography there are no Bragg reflections in single molecule imaging, which means the coherent scattering is not enhanced. Consequently, a background signal from incoherent scattering deteriorates the quality of the coherent scattering signal. This background signal cannot be easily eliminated because the spectrum of incoherently scattered photons cannot be resolved by usual scattering detectors. We present an ab initio study of incoherent x-ray scattering from individual carbon atoms, including the electronic radiation damage caused by a highly intense x-ray pulse. We find that the coherent scattering pa...

Slowik, Jan Malte; Dixit, Gopal; Jurek, Zoltan; Santra, Robin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

THREE-DIMENSIONAL IMAGING OF NANOSCALE MATERIALS BY UISNG COHERENT X-RAYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray crystallography is currently the primary methodology used to determine the 3D structure of materials and macromolecules. However, many nanostructures, disordered materials, biomaterials, hybrid materials and biological specimens are noncrystalline and, hence, their structures are not accessible by X-ray crystallography. Probing these structures therefore requires the employment of different approaches. A very promising technique currently under rapid development is X-ray diffraction microscopy (or lensless imaging), in which the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline specimen is measured and then directly phased to obtain a high-resolution image. Through the DOE support over the past three years, we have applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to quantitative imaging of GaN quantum dot particles, and revealed the internal GaN-Ga2O3 core shell structure in three dimensions. By exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross-section near electronic resonances, we carried out the first experimental demonstration of resonant X-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent X-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M5 edge. We have also applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to nondestructive imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials - intramuscular fish bone - at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization and proposed a dynamic mechanism to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. In addition, we have also discovered a novel 3D imaging modality, denoted ankylography, which allows for complete 3D structure determination without the necessity of sample titling or scanning. We showed that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a sufficiently fine scale on the Ewald sphere, the 3D structure of the object is determined by the 2D spherical pattern. We confirmed the theoretical analysis by performing 3D numerical reconstructions of a sodium silicate glass structure at 2 Ã? resolution from a 2D spherical diffraction pattern alone. As X-ray free electron lasers are under rapid development worldwide, ankylography may open up a new horizon to obtain the 3D structure of a non-crystalline specimen from a single pulse and allow time-resolved 3D structure determination of disordered materials.

Jianwei Miao

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Principal Component Analysis of X-ray Diffraction Patterns To Yield Morphological Classification of Brucite Particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Principal Component Analysis of X-ray Diffraction Patterns To Yield Morphological Classification of Brucite Particles ... Finally, a comparison of the scanning electron microscopy images of the samples classified in each group revealed that in most of the cases a distinct morphology predominates within each group, which can be explained on the basis of the brucite growth mechanism. ... The increasing interest in the application of brucite (crystalline Mg(OH)2) as a flame retardant filler in polymer formulations is motivated by advantages of this material over halogenated flame retardants, which include environmental and health compatibility. ...

Charlene R. S. Matos; Maria José Xavier; Ledjane S. Barreto; Nivan B. Costa, Jr.; Iara F. Gimenez

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

103

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

104

Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

105

Tracking the catalyzed growth process of nanowires by in situ x-ray diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capacity.4­7 Silicon nanowires have also found application in solar cells, both as ab- sorber OF NANOSTRUCTURES Gold-catalyzed silicon nanowires were grown in an x-ray furnace so that in situ x-ray diffraction-type furnace attached to a Pana- lytical X'Pert PRO diffractometer. The temperature of the furnace

Wang, Zhong L.

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - angle x-ray diffraction Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Materials Science 60 Page 12 CHESS News Magazine 2005 FacilityHighlight Impact of a Future Energy Recovery Linac Summary: -rolled Aluminum SR X-ray diffraction. Map grain...

107

Nano structure of low crystallinity carbon materials analyzed by using high energy X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we tried to characterize a kind of low crystallinity carbon materials. The structure of polyparaphenylene(PPP)-based carbon was analyzed by means of high energy X-ray diffraction using the apparatu...

Kyoichi Oshida; Tatsuo Nakazawa; Kozo Osawa…

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

1988-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction on Pulse Laser Heated Iron in Diamond Anvil Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present time-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction to probe the {var_epsilon}-{delta} phase transition of iron during pulse-laser heating in a diamond anvil cell. The system utilizes a monochromatic synchrotron x-ray beam, a two-dimensional pixel array x-ray detector and a dual beam, double side laser-heating system. Multiple frames of the diffraction images are obtained in real-time every 22 ms over 500 ms of the entire pulse heating period. The results show the structural evolution of iron phases at 17 GPa, resulting in thermal expansion coefficient 1/V({Delta}V/{Delta}T){sub p} = 7.1 * 10{sup -6}/K for {var_epsilon}-Fe and 2.4 * 10{sup -5}/K for {gamma}-Fe, as well as the evidence for metastability of {gamma}-Fe at low temperatures below the {var_epsilon}-{gamma} phase boundary.

Yoo, C S; Wei, H; Dias, R; Shen, G; Smith, J; Chen, J Y; Evans, W

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Towards hard x-ray imaging at GHz frame rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard x-rays ( Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research and applications using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and x-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one x-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards x-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are: (a) avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

Wang Zhehui; Morris, C. L.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Luo, S.-N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Towards hard X-ray imaging at GHz frame rate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gigahertz (GHz) imaging using hard X-rays ({approx}> 10 keV) can be useful to high-temperature plasma experiments, as well as research using coherent photons from synchrotron radiation and X-ray free electron lasers. GHz framing rate can be achieved by using multiple cameras through multiplexing. The advantages and trade-offs of single-photon detection mode, when no more than one X-ray photon is detected per pixel, are given. Two possible paths towards X-ray imaging at GHz frame rates using a single camera are (a) Avalanche photodiode arrays of high-Z materials and (b) Microchannel plate photomultipliers in conjunction with materials with large indices of refraction.

Wang, Zhehui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwiatkowski, Kris K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kapustinsky, Jon S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Source effects in analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging with conventional sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several recent papers have shown the implementation of analyzer based X-ray phase contrast imaging (ABI) with conventional X-ray sources. The high flux is always a requirement to make the technique useful for bio-medical applications. Here, we present and discuss three important parameters, which need to be taken into account, when searching for the high flux ABI: anisotropic magnification, double image, and source size spread due to intrinsic dispersive diffraction by asymmetrically cut crystals. These parameters, if not well optimized, may cause important features in the acquired images which can mislead the interpretation. A few ways to minimize these effects are implemented and discussed, including some experimental results.

Hoennicke, M. G. [Universidade Federal da Integracao Latino-Americana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Manica, J. [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, 85867-970 Foz do Iguacu, PR (Brazil); Mazzaro, I.; Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19091, 81531-990 Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Huang, X.-R. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Pixel detectors for x-ray imaging spectroscopy in space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pixelated semiconductor detectors for X-ray imaging spectroscopy are foreseen as key components of the payload of various future space missions exploring the x-ray sky. Located on the platform of the new Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite, the eROSITA (extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array) instrument will perform an imaging all-sky survey up to an X-ray energy of 10 keV with unprecedented spectral and angular resolution. The instrument will consist of seven parallel oriented mirror modules each having its own pnCCD camera in the focus. The satellite born X-ray observatory SIMBOL-X will be the first mission to use formation-flying techniques to implement an X-ray telescope with an unprecedented focal length of around 20 m. The detector instrumentation consists of separate high- and low energy detectors, a monolithic 128 ? 128 DEPFET macropixel array and a pixellated CdZTe detector respectively, making energy band between 0.5 to 80 keV accessible. A similar concept is proposed for the next generation X-ray observatory IXO. Finally, the MIXS (Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer) instrument on the European Mercury exploration mission BepiColombo will use DEPFET macropixel arrays together with a small X-ray telescope to perform a spatially resolved planetary XRF analysis of Mercury's crust. Here, the mission concepts and their scientific targets are briefly discussed, and the resulting requirements on the detector devices together with the implementation strategies are shown.

J Treis; R Andritschke; R Hartmann; S Herrmann; P Holl; T Lauf; P Lechner; G Lutz; N Meidinger; M Porro; R H Richter; F Schopper; H Soltau; L Strüder

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging (XMI) Imaging (XMI) About XMI Science and Research Beamlines Highlights Software and Tools Intranet Search APS... Argonne Home > Advanced Photon Source > Contacts FAQs Beamlines News Publications APS Email Portal APS Intranet APS Phonebook APS Quick Links for Users APS Safety and Training Welcome to the X-ray Microscopy and Imaging group (XMI)! X-ray Microscopy and Imaging is part of the X-ray Science Division at the Advanced Photon Source. We develop and support a diverse and multidisciplinary user research program at Sectors 2 and 32 of the APS, with the overall goal to image and study materials structures at spatial and temporal resolutions that are most scientifically relevant to the cutting-edge advances in materials, biological, environmental, and biomedical sciences. To achieve this goal, we actively engage in various research activities including

116

Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent...

Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Wednesday, 26 May 2010 00:00 A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

118

Theory of angular dispersive imaging hard x-ray spectrographs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A spectrograph is an optical instrument that disperses photons of different energies into distinct directions and space locations, and images photon spectra on a position-sensitive detector. Spectrographs consist of collimating, angular dispersive, and focusing optical elements. Bragg reflecting crystals arranged in an asymmetric scattering geometry are used as the dispersing elements. A ray-transfer matrix technique is applied to propagate x-rays through the optical elements. Several optical designs of hard x-ray spectrographs are proposed and their performance is analyzed. Spectrographs with an energy resolution of 0.1 meV and a spectral window of imaging up to a few tens of meVs are shown to be feasible for inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy applications. In another example, a spectrograph with a 1-meV spectral resolution and 85-meV spectral window of imaging is considered for Cu K-edge resonant IXS (RIXS).

Shvyd'ko, Yuri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

Pawloski, G.A.

1984-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

Schot, Gijs, vander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

122

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

123

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

124

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

125

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

126

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

127

High Quality Image of Biomedical Object by X-ray Refraction Based Contrast Computed Tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently we have developed a new Computed Tomography (CT) algorithm for refraction contrast that uses the optics of diffraction-enhanced imaging. We applied this new method to visualize soft tissue which is not visualized by the current absorption based contrast. The meaning of the contrast that appears in refraction-contrast X-ray CT images must be clarified from a biologic or anatomic point of view. It has been reported that the contrast is made with the specific gravity map with a range of approximately 10 {mu}arc sec. However, the relationship between the contrast and biologic or anatomic findings has not been investigated, to our knowledge. We compared refraction-contrast X-ray CT images with microscopic X-ray images, and we evaluated refractive indexes of pathologic lesions on phase-contrast X-ray CT images. We focused our attenuation of breast cancer and lung cancer as samples. X-ray refraction based Computed Tomography was appeared to be a pathological ability to depict the boundary between cancer nest and normal tissue, and inner structure of the disease.

Hashimoto, E. [Department of Photon-Science, School of Advanced Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (GUAS), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Maksimenko, A.; Hirano, K.; Hyodo, K. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Sugiyama, H. [Department of Photon-Science, School of Advanced Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (GUAS), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Shimao, D. [Department of Health Sciences, Ibaraki prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2Ami, Ami, Inashiki, Ibaraki, 300-0394 (Japan); Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T. [RIKEN Harima Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5148 (Japan); Yuasa, T. [Department of Bio-system Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-8510 (Japan); Ichihara, S. [Dept. of Path., Nagoya Med. Center, Nat. Hospital Organization, Naka-ku, Nagoya 460-0001 (Japan); Arai, Y. [Matsumoto Dental University, 1980 Hirooka, Shiojiri, Nagano (Japan); Ando, M. [Department of Photon-Science, School of Advanced Studies, Graduate University for Advanced Studies (GUAS), Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Inst. of Sci. and Tech., Tokyo Univ. of Science, Yamasaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

128

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

129

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast cells, achieving the highest resolution-11 to 13 nanometers (billionths of a meter)-ever obtained with this method for biological specimens. Their success indicates that full 3-D tomography of whole cells at equivalent resolution should soon be possible. The National Center for X-Ray Tomography at ALS Beamline 2.1 images whole, frozen hydrated cells in 3-D (see highlight "Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography"). Large numbers of cells can currently be processed in a short time at resolutions of 40 to 60 nanometers, but the ability to increase resolution to the 10-nanometer range would enhance research capabilities in both biology and materials sciences.

130

Combined X-ray and neutron fibre diffraction studies of biological and synthetic polymers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fibrous state is a natural one for polymer molecules which tend to assume regular helical conformations rather than the globular structures characteristic of many proteins. Fibre diffraction therefore has broad application to the study of a wide range of biological and synthetic polymers. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the general scope of the method and in particular to demonstrate the impact of a combined approach involving both X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. While the flux of modern X-ray synchrotron radiation sources allows high quality datasets to be recorded with good resolution within a very short space of time, neutron studies can provide unique information through the ability to locate hydrogen or deuterium atoms that are often difficult or impossible to locate using X-ray methods. Furthermore, neutron fibre diffraction methods can, through the ability to selectively label specific parts of a structure, be used to highlight novel aspects of polymer structure that can not be studied using X-rays. Two examples are given. The first describes X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of conformational transitions in DNA. The second describes structural studies of the synthetic high-performance polymer poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA), known commercially as Kevlar{reg_sign} or Twaron{reg_sign}.

Parrot, I. M. [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Gardner, K. H. [DuPont Experimental Station; Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam.

Sun, Cheng-Jun, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Zhang, Bangmin [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore); Venkatesan, T. [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore) [NUSNNI-Nanocore, National University of Singapore, 117411 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 117542 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117575 Singapore (Singapore)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

‘Taking X-ray phase contrast imaging into mainstream applications’ and its satellite workshop ‘Real and reciprocal space X-ray imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...presented Femtosecond X-ray lasers for imaging atomic structure...which he described X-ray laser-induced electronic ordering...characterization of targets for laser fusion experiments. Krist. Tech...1205396109 ) 20 Talbot, HF . 1836 Facts relating to...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Oxides: neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cells. Their thermal stability and high proton conductivity are particu- 15000 15500 16000 16500 17000 Time-of-flight, usec Fig. 6 Neutron diffraction pattern of the high temperature protonic conductor Ba3Ca! uNb].82O9-5 with and without D2O......

Izabela M. Sosnowska; Makoto Shiojiri

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium online xxxx Keywords: Amorphous calcium carbonate; EPSR modelling; Neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron

Benning, Liane G.

135

X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond time D. VON DER LINDE and K. SOKOLOWSKI-TINTEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction experiments with femtosecond time resolution D. VON DER LINDE and K. SOKOLOWSKI-essen.de (Received 4 March 2002) Abstract. Intense ultrashort laser pulses enable the generation of subpico- second X-ray pulses in the multi-kilovolt range of photon energies. These X- ray pulses have opened the door

von der Linde, D.

136

Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of pyridoxal kinase from Plasmodium falciparum (PfPdxK)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PdxK from P. falciparum are described.

Kronenberger, T.

2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

Equation of state of adamite up to 11 GPa: a synchrotron X-ray diffraction study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The compression behavior of natural adamite [Zn2AsO4OH] has been investigated up to 11.07 GPa at room temperature utilizing in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell. No phase transitio...

Jingui Xu; Maining Ma; Shuyi Wei; Xianxu Hu…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Capability of X-ray diffraction for the study of microstructure of metastable thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capability of X-ray diffraction for the microstructure investigations of metastable systems is illustrated on supersaturated and partially decomposed thin films of titanium aluminium nitrides with high aluminium content. The anisotropy of the elastic constants and their role in these investigations is discussed.

Rafaja, D.

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Single-crystal x-ray diffraction of brucite to 14 GPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-crystal brucite, Mg(OH)2, was studied to 14 GPa in a quasi-hydrostatic pressure medium using a diamond anvil cell and energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The parameters of a third-order Birch-...

Thomas S. Duffy; Jinfu Shu; Ho-kwang Mao…

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2{yields}hR9{yields}hP4{yields}distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45 GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

Shen Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F. [Department of Physics and High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4002 (United States)

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

143

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-ray Image Bank Open for Business X-ray Image Bank Open for Business February 22, 2011 Filipe Maia is building a data bank where scientists from around the world can deposit and...

144

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Material Science Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Yijin Liu Seminar There was a revolutionary development of X-ray imaging over the past few decades. The most substantial advancements in this field are closely related to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to extract information that is related to different interactions between the X-rays and the specimen at very fine spatial resolution. The energy tunability of the X-rays has made it possible to combine the energy scan with imaging technique. And the brilliance of the X-ray source has made it practical for many sophisticated

145

Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

Jacobsen, Chris

2014-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

146

Accelerated Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Data Analysis on a Heterogeneous High Performance Computing System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis of synchrotron X-ray Diffraction (XRD) data has been used by scientists and engineers to understand and predict properties of materials. However, the large volume of XRD image data and the intensive computations involved in the data analysis makes it hard for researchers to quickly reach any conclusions about the images from an experiment when using conventional XRD data analysis software. Synchrotron time is valuable and delays in XRD data analysis can impact decisions about subsequent experiments or about materials that they are investigating. In order to improve the data analysis performance, ideally to achieve near real time data analysis during an XRD experiment, we designed and implemented software for accelerated XRD data analysis. The software has been developed for a heterogeneous high performance computing (HPC) system, comprised of IBM PowerXCell 8i processors and Intel quad-core Xeon processors. This paper describes the software and reports on the improved performance. The results indicate that it is possible for XRD data to be analyzed at the rate it is being produced.

J Qin; M A Bauer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Investigation of white etching layers on rails by optical microscopy, electron microscopy, X-ray and synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Patches of white etching layers on rail surfaces were investigated using sophisticated techniques like cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) and synchroton X-ray diffraction. Optical microscopy failed to resolve the microstructure, but in the TEM submicron grains with high dislocation densities and occasional twins, which are characteristic features of high carbon martensite, were observed. The martensitic structure was confirmed by evaluation of synchroton X-ray diffraction line profiles. The latter technique also allowed to determine dislocation densities of the order of 1012 cm?2 and residual compressive stresses of about 200 MPa.

W. Österle; H. Rooch; A. Pyzalla; L. Wang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

Hailey, Charles J. (San Francisco, CA); Ziock, Klaus-Peter (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Method and apparatus for producing sharp chromatic x-ray images of x-ray emitting objects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for producing sharp, chromatic, magnified images of X-ray emitting objects, are provided. The apparatus, which constitutes an X-ray microscope or telescope, comprises a connected collection of Bragg reflecting planes, comprised of either a bent crystal or a synthetic multilayer structure, disposed on and adjacent to a locus determined by a spherical surface. The individual Bragg planes are spatially oriented to Bragg reflect radiation from the object location toward the image location. This is accomplished by making the Bragg planes spatially coincident with the surfaces of either a nested series of prolate ellipsoids of revolution, or a nested series of spheres. The spacing between the Bragg reflecting planes can be tailored to control the wavelengths and the amount of the X-radiation that is Bragg reflected to form the X-ray image. 7 figs.

Thoe, R.S.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Internal Stresses in Metal Matrix  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Internal Stresses in Metal Matrix High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Internal Stresses in Metal Matrix Composites Metal matrix composites (MMCs) comprise an intriguing new class of materials coming to prominence in the aerospace, electronics, and automotive industries. Internal stresses play an important role in the behavior and successful application of MMCs and multi-phase alloys. These stresses form during processing and service due to transformation or thermal expansion mismatch, as well as elastic and plastic mismatch during deformation. In order to develop a deeper understanding of the thermo-mechanical behavior of these materials, it is of key interest to examine the development of mean stresses in the phases of the composite as a function of time upon changes of temperature and/or external load.

151

X-ray dark-field imaging modeling * F. Pfeiffer,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray dark-field imaging modeling W. Cong,1, * F. Pfeiffer,2 M. Bech,2 and G. Wang1 1 Biomedical-field images are formed from x-ray small-angle scattering signals. The small-angle scattering signals to describe the relationship between x-ray small-angle scattering coefficients of an object and dark

Wang, Ge

152

Elimination of higher-order diffraction using zigzag transmission grating in soft x-ray region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a realization of the sinusoidal transmission function using a series of zigzag-profiled strips where the transmission takes on the binary values 0 and 1 in a two-dimensional distribution. A zigzag transmission grating of 1000 line/mm has been fabricated and demonstrated on the soft x-ray beam of synchrotron radiation. The axial single-order diffraction indicates that the zigzag transmission grating is adequate for spectroscopic application.

Zang, H. P.; Wang, C. K. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Gao, Y. L.; Zhou, W. M.; Kuang, L. Y.; Wei, L.; Fan, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Cao, L. F.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhang, B. H. [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Jiang, G. [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Zhu, X. L.; Xie, C. Q. [Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhao, Y. D.; Cui, M. Q. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

153

On the microstructure of nanoporous gold: an x-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of the grain structure, internal stresses, and the lattice misorientations of nanoporous gold (npAu) during dealloying of bulk (3D) Ag-Au alloy samples was studied by various in-situ and ex-situ X-ray diffraction techniques including powder and Laue diffraction. The experiments reveal that the dealloying process preserves the original crystallographic structure, but leads to a small spread in orientations within individual grains. Furthermore, most grains develop in-plane tensile stress. The feature size of the developing nanoporous structure increases with increasing dealloying time.

Van Petegem, S; Brandstetter, S; Maa?, R; Schmitt, B; Borca, C; Van Swygenhoven, H; Hodge, A M; El-Dasher, B S; Biener, J

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

154

Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

Duffy, Thomas S.

155

X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds X-ray Imaging Shows Feather Patterns of First Birds June 30, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather. Bottom: x-ray images showing the distribution of copper (red) in the same organisms. | Photo Courtesy of Gregory Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory A collage of images. Top, optical images of: blue jay feather, squid, and fossil fish with feather. Bottom: x-ray images showing the distribution of copper (red) in the same organisms. | Photo Courtesy of Gregory Stewart, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Through x-ray fluorescent imaging techniques developed at the

156

7 Å Resolution in Protein 2-Dimentional-Crystal X-Ray Diffraction at Linac Coherent Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Membrane proteins arranged as two-dimensional (2D) crystals in the lipid en- vironment provide close-to-physiological structural information, which is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of protein function. X-ray diffraction from individual 2D crystals did not represent a suitable investigation tool because of radiation damage. The recent availability of ultrashort pulses from X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-FELs) has now provided a mean to outrun the damage. Here we report on measurements performed at the LCLS X-FEL on bacteriorhodopsin 2D crystals mounted on a solid support and kept at room temperature. By merg- ing data from about a dozen of single crystal diffraction images, we unambiguously identified the diffraction peaks to a resolution of 7 °A, thus improving the observable resolution with respect to that achievable from a single pattern alone. This indicates that a larger dataset will allow for reliable quantification of peak intensities, and in turn a corresponding increase of resolution. The presented results pave the way to further X-FEL studies on 2D crystals, which may include pump-probe experiments at subpicosecond time resolution.

Pedrini, Bill; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Capitani, Guido; Padeste, Celestino; Hunter, Mark; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Barty, Anton; Benner, Henry; Boutet, Sebastien; Feld, Geoffrey K.; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Kirian, Rick; Kupitz, Christopher; Messerschmidt, Marc; Ogren, John I.; Pardini, Tommaso; Segelke, Brent; Williams, Garth J.; Spence , John C.; Abela, Rafael; Coleman, Matthew A.; Evans, James E.; Schertler, Gebhard; Frank, Matthias; Li, Xiao-Dan

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

Portable chamber for the study of UHV prepared electrochemical interfaces by hard x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a new electrochemical cell setup, combined with a portable UHV chamber, for in situ x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. In contrast to more traditional electrochemical sample preparation schemes, atomically clean and well-ordered surfaces are routinely prepared by UHV methods, even in the case of reactive elements or alloys. Samples can be transferred from larger UHV systems into the portable chamber without exposure to ambient air. They can then be studied successively in UHV, in controlled gas atmospheres, and in contact with electrolyte solutions under applied electrochemical potential. The electrochemical setup employs a droplet geometry, which guarantees good electrochemical conditions during in situ x-ray measurements combined with voltammetry. We present first experimental results of Cu deposition on GaAs(001) and on freshly produced nanometric Pd(001) islands on Cu{sub 0.83}Pd{sub 0.17}(001), respectively.

Renner, Frank Uwe; Gruender, Yvonne; Zegenhagen, Joerg [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Structure determination of thin CoFe films by anomalous x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work reports on the investigation of structure-property relationships in thin CoFe films grown on MgO. Because of the very similar scattering factors of Fe and Co, it is not possible to distinguish the random A2 (W-type) structure from the ordered B2 (CsCl-type) structure with commonly used x-ray sources. Synchrotron radiation based anomalous x-ray diffraction overcomes this problem. It is shown that as grown thin films and 300 K post annealed films exhibit the A2 structure with a random distribution of Co and Fe. In contrast, films annealed at 400 K adopt the ordered B2 structure.

Gloskovskii, Andrei; Stryganyuk, Gregory; Ouardi, Siham [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology Centre, VSB-Technical University of Ostrava, 70833 Ostrava (Czech Republic); Bosu, Subrojati; Saito, Kesami; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Time-, Frequency-, and Wavevector-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction from Single Molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broad-band X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and ...

Bennett, Kochise; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E; Mukamel, Shaul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Improvement of YOHKOH Hard X-Ray Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Figure la shows the X-ray penetration rate through a single, 0.5 mm...index Fig. 1. (a) X-ray penetration rate through a single tung- sten...the K-escape. (b) X-ray penetration rates averaged over the HXT M2 and......

Jun Sato; Takeo Kosugi; Kazuo Makishima

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction study of the thermal decomposition of an ettringite-group crystal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?A Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction study of the thermal decomposition of a naturally occurring, ettringite-group crystal is presented. Raman spectra, ... previous studies that reported higher temperatur...

S. K. Deb; M. H. Manghnani; K. Ross; R. A. Livingston…

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

High-Speed X-ray Phase Imaging with Grating Interferometer and White Synchrotron Light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taking advantage of the fact that an X-ray Talbot interferometer functions with X-rays of a broad energy band width, high-speed X-ray phase imaging and tomography have been achieved by using white synchrotron light. An X-ray phase tomogram could be measured with a 0.25 s exposure. Furthermore, a series of X-ray phase tomograms, in other words, a four-dimensional X-ray phase tomogram, could be reconstructed with a tomogram frame rate of 25.5 fps. This achievement advances X-ray phase imaging/tomography from a technique for static imaging to one for dynamic imaging of weakly absorbing objects.

Momose, Atsushi; Yashiro, Wataru; Huang, Shaohua; Kuwabara, Hiroaki; Kawabata, Katsuyuki [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoka, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for x-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the x-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

Green, L.A.; Heck, J.L. Jr.

1985-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

164

Anisotropic dynamic model of forbidden reflections in x-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dynamic model of anisotropic x-ray diffraction is developed using two-wave approximation. A dispersion surface equation is derived for the screw-axis and glide-plane forbidden reflections. Propagation and polarization phenomena of waves are discussed. The deductions show that all these forbidden reflections may be excited except the 00l (l=2n+1) reflections for a 63 screw axis and the 00l (l=6n+3) reflections for 61 and 65 screw axes. The general methods are illustrated by their application to the rutile structure.

Yong Li, Yi Ding, X. R. Huang, X. S. Wu, W. J. Liu, and S. S. Jiang

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Characterization of GaSb/GaAs interfacial misfit arrays using x-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report a nondestructive large-area method to characterize dislocation formation at a highly lattice-mismatched interface. The analysis is based on x-ray diffraction and reciprocal space mapping using a standard lab-based diffractometer. We use this technique to identify and analyze a two-dimensional array of 90° misfit dislocations at a GaSb/GaAs interface. The full width at half maximum of the GaSb 004 reciprocal lattice point is shown to decrease with increasing GaSb epilayer thickness as expected from theoretical models. Based on these measurements the variation in the spatial dislocation frequency is calculated to be 1%.

Charles J. Reyner; Jin Wang; Kalyan Nunna; Andrew Lin; Baolai Liang; Mark S. Goorsky; D. L. Huffaker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced x-ray imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

new... reconstruction technique (SART) algorithm for image reconstruction from projection data generated by an x-ray... discuss relevant issues and conclude the paper. II....

168

X–ray and neutron diffraction studies and MD simulation of atomic configurations in polyamorphic Y2O3-Al2O3 systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...McMillan and David C. Clary X-ray and neutron diffraction studies and MD simulation...new results of structural studies using neutron and high-energy X-ray diffraction...pair-correlation functions obtained from X-ray and neutron scattering data. Unexpectedly large density...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Rev 1.0.3 1/20/2009 Approved by Department of Chemistry and EHSD Texas A & M University (1997)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Rev 1.0.3 1/20/2009 Approved by Department of Chemistry and EHSD Texas A & M University (1997) Name : ______________________________ UIN _____________________ X-ray Safety Release form for the X-ray Diffraction Laboratory Department of Chemistry, Texas A & M University Answer

Meagher, Mary

170

A Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density materials such as metal are dark in both low and high-energy X-ray images, but areas of lighter of materials in luggage. They fuse a low-energy X-ray image and a high-energy X-ray image into a single image buildings. These systems utilize X-rays of two different energies. The high-energy X-ray is generated

Abidi, Mongi A.

171

Quantitative description of microstructure defects in hexagonal boron nitrides using X-ray diffraction analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A routine for simultaneous quantification of turbostratic disorder, amount of puckering and the dislocation and stacking fault density in hexagonal materials was proposed and tested on boron nitride powder samples that were synthesised using different methods. The routine allows the individual microstructure defects to be recognised according to their effect on the anisotropy of the X-ray diffraction line broadening. For quantification of the microstructure defects, the total line broadening is regarded as a linear combination of the contributions from the particular defects. The total line broadening is obtained from the line profile fitting. As testing material, graphitic boron nitride (h-BN) was employed in the form of hot-isostatically pressed h-BN, pyrolytic h-BN or a h-BN, which was chemically vapour deposited at a low temperature. The kind of the dominant microstructure defects determined from the broadening of the X-ray diffraction lines was verified by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their amount was attempted to be verified by alternative methods. - Highlights: • Reliable method for quantification of microstructure defects in BN was suggested. • The method is based on the analysis of anisotropic XRD line broadening. • This XRD line broadening is unique and characteristic of the respective defect. • Thus, the quantification of coexistent microstructure defects is possible. • The method was tested on hexagonal BN, which was produced by different techniques.

Schimpf, C., E-mail: schimpf@iww.tu-freiberg.de; Motylenko, M.; Rafaja, D.

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

X-ray diffraction studies of the structure of nanometer-sized crystalline materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, nanometer-sized crystalline materials have been proposed to represent a new solid-state structure which exhibits neither long-range order (like crystals) nor short-range order (like glasses). It was the purpose of this study to test this idea by x-ray diffraction experiments. Nanometer-sized crystalline materials are polycrystals in which the size of the crystallites is a few (1–10) nanometers. Structurally, these materials consist of the following two components, the volume fraction of which is about 50% each: a crystalline component, formed by all atoms located in the lattice of the crystallites, and an interfacial component comprising the atoms situated in the interfaces. It is this interfacial component which was proposed to exhibit an atomic arrangement without short- or long-range order. In order to test this idea, the interference function of nanometer-sized crystalline iron (6-nm crystal size) was measured by x-ray diffraction. The measured interference function was compared with the interference function computed by assuming the interfacial component to be short-range ordered or to consist of randomly displaced atoms (no short- or long-range order). It was found that the experimental interference function can only be matched by the computed one if the interfacial component is assumed to have no short- or long-range order.

X. Zhu, R. Birringer, U. Herr, and H. Gleiter

1987-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

X-ray shearing interferometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

174

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a flavoenzyme amine dehydrogenase/oxidase from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report describes the crystallization of a recombinant flavoprotein amine dehydrogenase/oxidase with specificity for L-proline from the hyperthermophile P. furiosus DSM 3638 and X-ray diffraction data collection. Crystals belonged to space group P1 and diffracted to a resolution of 3.3 ?.

Monaghan, P.J.

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

New reactor dedicated to in operando studies of model catalysts by means of surface x-ray diffraction and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new experimental setup has been developed to enable in situ studies of catalyst surfaces during chemical reactions by means of surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering. The x-ray reactor chamber was designed for both ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) and reactive gas environments. A laser beam heating of the sample was implemented; the sample temperature reaches 1100 K in UHV and 600 K in the presence of reactive gases. The reactor equipment allows dynamical observations of the surface with various, perfectly mixed gases at controlled partial pressures. It can run in two modes: as a bath reactor in the pressure range of 1-1000 mbars and as a continuous flow cell for pressure lower than 10{sup -3} mbar. The reactor is connected to an UHV preparation chamber also equipped with low energy electron diffraction and Auger spectroscopy. This setup is thus perfectly well suited to extend in situ studies to more complex surfaces, such as epitaxial films or supported nanoparticles. It offers the possibility to follow the chemically induced changes of the morphology, the structure, the composition, and growth processes of the model catalyst surface during exposure to reactive gases. As an example the Pd{sub 8}Ni{sub 92}(110) surface structure was followed by SXRD under a few millibars of hydrogen and during butadiene hydrogenation while the reaction was monitored by quadrupole mass spectrometry. This experiment evidenced the great sensitivity of the diffracted intensity to the subtle interaction between the surface atoms and the gas molecules.

Saint-Lager, M.-C.; Bailly, A.; Dolle, P.; Baudoing-Savois, R.; Taunier, P.; Garaudee, S.; Cuccaro, S.; Douillet, S.; Geaymond, O.; Perroux, G.; Tissot, O.; Micha, J.-S.; Ulrich, O.; Rieutord, F. [Institut Neel, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); CEA/DRFMC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

The resonant X-ray diffraction in Co-Akermanite: Theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural factors for X-ray resonant diffraction near the K-absorption edge of cobalt in Co-akermanite have been calculated with allowance for the known data about its incommensurate 2D modulation. It is shown that the local symmetry of Co atoms in the basic structure does not allow any pure resonant reflections in the dipole-dipole approximation. However, pure resonant reflections of the h00 (h = 2n + 1) type are possible owing to the dipole-quadrupole contribution. The 5D formalism is used for the incommensurately modulated structure. It is shown that the displacement terms in the anisotropic tensor atomic factors could mainly contribute to the first-order satellites, providing pure resonant satellite reflections of the hhlm0 (m = 2n + 1) or h00mm-bar (h = 2n + 1) types.

Bindi, L. [Universitae di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra (Italy); Dmitrienko, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, E. N. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Soedzhima, Yu. [Kyushu University, Department of Physics (Japan)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous x-ray diffraction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Laboratory Superconducting wiggler 7. Low-energy Anomalous X-ray... 1. High-energy x-ray micro-mapping of materials for advanced energy and structural engineering......

179

High-resolution X-ray diffraction analyses of protein crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...illustration of the X-ray optical system used in the current study...illustrates the X-ray optical system that was used for this study...in a novel X-ray optical system (Matyi et al. 1999), produced...well as a two-dimensional collimation of the incident beam. Both...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Diffractive-Optic Telescope for X-Ray Astronomy D. Dewey, T.H. Markert, and M.L. Schattenburg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Diffractive-Optic Telescope for X-Ray Astronomy D. Dewey, T.H. Markert, and M.L. Schattenburg for a light-weight X-ray astronomical telescope that uses a diffractive optical element is described (200-1000 cm2 ) through the use of a blazed diffractive optic. State-of-the-art grating technology

Dewey, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High-Resolution X-ray Imaging of the Colliding Wind Shock in WR147  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze new high-resolution Chandra X-ray images of the Wolf-Rayet binary system WR147. This system contains a WN8 star with an early-type companion located 0.6'' to its north, and is the only known early-type binary with a separation on the sky large enough for the wind-wind collision between the stars to currently be resolved at X-ray energies. The 5 ksec Chandra HRC-I image provides the first direct evidence for spatially extended X-ray emission in an early-type binary system. The X-ray emission peaks close to the position of the radio bow shock and north of the WN8 star. A deeper X-ray image is needed to accurately determine the degree of spatial extension, to exactly align the X-ray and optical/radio frames, and to determine whether part of the detected X-ray emission arises in the individual stellar winds. Simulated X-ray images of the wind-wind collision have a FWHM consistent with the data, and maximum likelihood fits suggest that a deeper observation may also constrain the inclination and wind momentum ratio of this system. However, as the WR wind dominates the colliding wind X-ray emission it appears unlikely that the mass-loss rate and the terminal velocity of the companion wind can be separately determined from X-ray observations. We also note an inconsistency between numerical and analytical estimates of the X-ray luminosity ratio of the stronger and weaker wind components, and conclude that the analytical results are in error.

J. M. Pittard; I. R. Stevens; P. M. Williams; A. M. T. Pollock; S. L. Skinner; M. F. Corcoran; A. F. J. Moffat

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Simultaneous sample and spatial coherence characterisation using diffractive imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental X-ray diffraction data using partially coherent 1.4 keV X-rays that does not require a priori input of the coherence function. The quality of the reconstruction is significantly better than that obtained by assuming that the illumination is fully coherent. Our approach can be readily applied to diffraction imaging problems where a model for the spatial coherence can be assumed.

Clark, Jesse N.; Peele, Andrew G. (La Trobe)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

183

Simultaneous sample and spatial coherence characterisation using diffractive imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental X-ray diffraction data using partially coherent 1.4 keV X-rays that does not require a priori input of the coherence function. The quality of the reconstruction is significantly better than that obtained by assuming that the illumination is fully coherent. Our approach can be readily applied to diffraction imaging problems where a model for the spatial coherence can be assumed.

Clark, Jesse N. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Melbourne (Australia); Peele, Andrew G. [Department of Physics, La Trobe University, Victoria 3086 (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science, Melbourne (Australia); Australian Synchrotron, Clayton 3168 (Australia)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Human genome sequencing with direct x-ray holographic imaging. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct holographic imaging of biological materials is widely applicable to the study of the structure, properties and action of genetic material. This particular application involves the sequencing of the human genome where prospective genomic imaging technology is composed of three subtechnologies, name an x-ray holographic camera, suitable chemistry and enzymology for the preparation of tagged DNA samples, and the illuminator in the form of an x-ray laser. We report appropriate x-ray camera, embodied by the instrument developed by MCR, is available and that suitable chemical and enzymatic procedures exist for the preparation of the necessary tagged DNA strands. Concerning the future development of the x-ray illuminator. We find that a practical small scale x-ray light source is indeed feasible. This outcome requires the use of unconventional physical processes in order to achieve the necessary power-compression in the amplifying medium. The understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly. Importantly, although the x-ray source does not currently exist, the understanding of these new physical mechanisms is developing rapidly and the research has established the basic scaling laws that will determine the properties of the x-ray illuminator. When this x-ray source becomes available, an extremely rapid and cost effective instrument for 3-D imaging of biological materials can be applied to a wide range of biological structural assays, including the base-pair sequencing of the human genome and many questions regarding its higher levels of organization.

Rhodes, C.K.

1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Sound velocities of compressed Fe3C from simultaneous synchrotron X-ray diffraction and nuclear resonant scattering measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recently installed X-ray diffraction facility that is integrated with existing nuclear resonant scattering set-ups at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is introduced. Its applications for measuring the sound velocities of compressed Fe3C are reported.

Gao, L.

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

186

First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method to map spin-resolved electron distribution from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction is described and applied for the first time to a molecular magnet and it is shown that spin up density is 5% more contracted than spin down density.

Deutsch, M.

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

X-ray diffraction studies and equation of state of methane at 202 GPa Liling Sun a,*, Wei Yi a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray diffraction studies and equation of state of methane at 202 GPa Liling Sun a,*, Wei Yi that at room temperature compressed CH4 remains an insulator with cubic structure to 202 GPa. Ã? 2009 Elsevier B of planetary interiors and the origin of their magnetic field distribution. CH4 has a very rich phase diagram

Shen, Guoyin

188

Three-dimensional plastic response in polycrystalline copper via near-field high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evolution of the crystallographic orientation field in a polycrystalline sample of copper is mapped in three dimensions as tensile strain is applied. Using forward-modeling analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction microscopy data, the ability to track intragranular orientation variations is demonstrated.

Li, S.F.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Smoothing of low-intensity noisy X-ray diffraction data by Fourier filtering: application to supported metal catalyst studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Wiener filtering algorithm was used to smooth broad and noisy X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns from highly dispersed catalysts with low metal loading. It enabled extraction of XRD patterns from the active phases of the catalysts interpretable in terms of phase composition.

Mierzwa, B.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

In-situ X-ray diffraction activation study on an Fe/TiO2 pre-catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well known that pre-treatment procedures affect catalyst performance. In situ X-ray diffraction was used in this study to monitor the changes in phase composition and crystallite size during the pre-treatment of Fe/TiO2 catalysts, yielding insight into crystalline and non-crystalline phase changes and metal-support interactions.

Rayner, M.K.

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Thick-mode resonance of a PZT/Si wafer stack investigated by X-ray diffraction in Bragg geometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction in Bragg geometry was used to investigate the effects of longitudinal standing waves on an Si(111) wafer, constructing a PZT/Si(111) stack with a resonant frequency of 2.34 MHz. In addition to the ultrasonic vibration, a thermal effect is evident, which has been mostly ignored or avoided in previous reports.

Souza, P.E.N; de

2003-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

192

Smoothing of X-ray diffraction data and K2 elimination using penalized likelihood and the composite link model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article proposes a framework for smoothing of and K doublet elimination from X-ray diffraction scans in an automated fashion. Smoothing is performed using penalized likelihood estimation, while for doublet elimination the model is extended using the composite link model.

Rooi, J.J; de

2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

X-ray diffraction study of thermal stress relaxation in ZnO films deposited by magnetron sputtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are in a high compressive stress state. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements inside a furnace revealed a relaxation of the as-grown stresses at temperatures which vary with the atmosphere in the furnace and change in many application domains such as ultraviolet detectors, light-emitting diodes, solar cells. As a II

194

Calibration of X-ray Imaging Devices for Accurate Intensity Measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Security Technologies (NSTec) has developed calibration procedures for X-ray imaging systems using NIST traceable sources. The X-ray sources that are used for calibration are both diode type and diode/fluorescer combinations. Calibrating the X-ray detectors is the key to accurate calibration of the X-ray sources. Both energy dispersive detectors and photodiodes measuring total flux were used. We have developed calibration techniques for the detectors using radioactive sources that are traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The German synchrotron at Physikalische Technische Bundestalt (PTB) is used to calibrate silicon photodiodes over the energy range from 50 eV to 60 keV. The measurements on X-ray cameras made using the NSTec X-ray sources have included the quantum efficiency averaged over all pixels, the camera counts per photon per pixel, and response variation across the sensor. The instrumentation required to accomplish the calibrations is described. X-ray energies ranged from 720 eV to 22.7 keV. The X-ray sources produce narrow energy bands, allowing us to determine the properties as a function of X-ray energy. The calibrations were done for several types of imaging devices. There were back illuminated and front illuminated CCD (charge coupled device) sensors, and a CID (charge injection device) type camera. The CCD and CID camera types differ significantly in some of their properties that affect the accuracy of X-ray intensity measurements. All cameras discussed here are silicon based. The measurements of quantum efficiency variation with X-ray energy are compared to models for the sensor structure. Cameras that are not back-thinned are compared to those that are.

Haugh, M. J., Charest, M., Ross, P., Lee, J. Schneider, M., Palmer, N., Teruya,

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High-resolution imaging with soft x-rays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...concave surface of the larger mirror, where a second reflection...the surface of the spherical mirrors is the main limitation, and...achievable and will permit a Schwarzschild x-ray microscope to have...be able to test spherical mirrors to within 6 angstroms by next...

AL Robinson

1982-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Single-Molecule Imaging with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers: Dream or Reality?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL) are revolutionary photon sources, whose ultrashort, brilliant pulses are expected to allow single-molecule diffraction experiments providing structural information on the atomic length scale of nonperiodic objects. This ultimate goal, however, is currently hampered by several challenging questions basically concerning sample damage, Coulomb explosion, and the role of nonlinearity. By employing an original ab initio approach, we address these issues showing that XFEL-based single-molecule imaging will be only possible with a few-hundred long attosecond pulses, due to significant radiation damage and the formation of preferred multisoliton clusters which reshape the overall electronic density of the molecular system at the femtosecond scale.

Fratalocchi, A. [PRIMALIGHT, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Applied Mathematics and Computational Science, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Physics, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy); Ruocco, G. [Department of Physics, Sapienza University of Rome, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)] [IPCF-CNR, c/o Department of Physics, Sapienza University, P.le Aldo Moro 2, 00185, Rome (Italy)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

Tamper to delay motion and decrease ionization of a sample during short pulse x-ray imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for x-ray imaging of a small sample comprising positioning a tamper so that it is operatively connected to the sample, directing short intense x-ray pulses onto the tamper and the sample, and detecting an image from the sample. The tamper delays the explosive motion of the sample during irradiation by the short intense x-ray pulses, thereby extending the time to obtain an x-ray image of the original structure of the sample.

London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Szoke; Abraham (Fremont, CA), Hau-Riege; Stefan P. (Fremont, CA), Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA)

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ultrafast x-ray diffraction for measurements of structural dynamics in shocked metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experiment on structural dynamics at the ultrafast time scale in shocked metal samples is presented. The technique development of an ultrafast x-ray diffractometer to generate 'molecular movies' is described. Preliminary results of static x-ray measurements of thin unshocked Ga samples are presented. Initial experiments use 200-300 mJ of a 100fs Ti:Sapphire laser to excite K-alpha x-ray emission in an aluminum wire. The x-ray emission is relayed using a spherical crystal to the sample target. Plans for experiments using Cu K-alpha emission will also be described.

Workman, J. B. (Jonathan B.); Keiter, P. A. (Paul A.); Kyrala, George A.; Roberts, J. P. (Jeffrey); Taylor, Antoinette J.,; Funk, D. J. (David J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research describes advancements in the spectral analysis and error propagation techniques associated with x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) that have enabled this diagnostic to be used to accurately constrain ...

Bitter, M.

200

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications in Material Science Thursday, September 6, 2012 - 10:45am SLAC, Bldg. 137, Room 226 Yijin Liu Seminar There was a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Tailoring a plasma focus as hard x-ray source for imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation on temporal and spatial properties of hard x-rays (15–88 keV) emitted in a 5.3 kJ plasma focus using Si pin diodes and a pinhole camera is reported. The maximum yield of hard x-rays of 15–88 keV range is estimated about 4.7 J and corresponding efficiency for x-ray generation is 0.09%. The x-rays with energy > 15 ? keV have 15–20 ns pulse duration and ? 1 ? mm source size. This radiation is used for contact x-ray imaging of biological and compound objects and spatial resolution of ? 50 ? ? m is demonstrated.

S. Hussain; M. Shafiq; M. Zakaullah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

X-Ray Diffraction from Calcite for Wave-Lengths 1.5 to 5 Angstroms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical expressions for the coefficient of reflection, percent reflection, and width of the line to be expected from the second crystal of a double spectrometer in the (1, -1) position, based on Darwin's theory of reflection from a perfect crystal, as modified by Prins, are evaluated for calcite for six lines in the region 1.54 to 5A. This region includes, at 3.06A, the critical absorption limit of calcium. With a specially designed double-crystal spectrometer, these properties of the rocking curve from the second crystal for ten wave-lengths, copper K? radiation and nine spectrum lines selected from the uranium M series, are experimentally measured and these results compared with the calculated values. The agreement between the observed and calculated rocking curve widths is excellent throughout the entire region and gives no evidence of mosaic structure in the crystals. The calculated values of percent reflection are consistently above those observed by some 16 percent. Good agreement is obtained for the values of the coefficient of reflection for wave-lengths shorter than 4A including those close to and on either side of the calcium absorption limit. No correction for temperature motion of the atoms has been attempted, but it seems possible that such a correction would give very satisfactory agreement between theory and experiment, showing that calcite surfaces may be obtained for which there is no evidence of mosaic structure from the diffraction of x-rays.

Lyman G. Parratt

1932-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

DXRD (Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction) studies of oil shale mineral reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the advent of second generation, above-ground oil shale processes, retorted shale is likely to be combusted at temperatures between 1000{degree}K and 1200{degree}K. At these temperatures the mineral matrix of the shale will undergo a variety of chemical reactions including carbonate decomposition, sulfation and recombination reactions to form silicates. This complex set of reactions can be very important to the optimum design of a retorted shale combustor. For example the net heat of combustion is very dependent on these reactions since the carbonate mineral decomposition reactions are highly endothermic and some of the silication reactions only mildly endothermic. In addition, the combusted shale (ash) will have to be disposed and revegetated and the environmental consequences of this process will be highly dependent on the mineral composition of the ash. The degree to which the mineral reactions influence these considerations will depend on the time-temperature history to which the shale is exposed. Thus it is important to have a knowledge of the kinetics of these reactions. Previous attempts to study these kinetics have been made at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and in our own laboratory. However, these studies all employed TGA techniques and, since there is usually more than one reaction occurring simultaneously, there is no way to distinguish between competing reactions. What is described here is the application of a new technique - Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction (DXRD), which has been successfully applied to studies of oil shale mineral reactions under typical retorted shale combustion conditions.

Helling, K.A.; Thomson, W.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

X-ray Diffraction of Cubic Gd2)3/Er under High Pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the in situ high pressure X-ray diffraction studies on Er{sup 3+} doped Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} in a diamond anvil cell up to 39.8 GPa at room temperature. Several phase transitions have been identified in our studies. The structural transformation from a starting cubic phase to a hexagonal phase occurred during the sample compression process, at 8.57 GPa. And the hexagonal phase was stable from 12.5 GPa up to the highest pressure in this study but was not quenchable and transformed to a monoclinic phase after pressure release. An anomalous high pressure behavior in the hexagonal type Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase was observed, which might be caused by an electron transition influenced by Er{sup 3+} ions doping. By fitting the compression data to the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, the bulk moduli of the cubic and two hexagonal (at p < 19.9 GPa and p > 27.0 GPa) Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases were determined to be 164 {+-} 3, 185 {+-} 7, and 150 {+-} 10 GPa with B'{sub 0} = 4, respectively.

X Zou; C Gong; B Liu; Q Li; Z Li; B Liu; R Liu; J Liu; Z Chen; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Thermal equation-of-state of TiC: a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure (P)-volume (V)-temperature (T) measurements were carried out for titanium carbide at pressures and temperatures up to 8.1 GPa and 1273 K using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Thermoelastic parameters were derived for TiC based on a modified high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a thermal-pressure approach. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K'{sub 0}, fixed at 4.0, we obtain: the ambient bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 268(6) GPa, temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub p} = -0.026(9) GPa K{sup -1}, volumetric thermal expansivity a{sub T}(K{sup -1}) = a + bT with a = 1.62(12) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} and b = 1.07(17) x 10{sup -8} K{sup -2}, pressure derivative of thermal expansion ({partial_derivative}a/{partial_derivative}P){sub T} = (-3.62 {+-} 1.14) x 10{sup -7} GPa{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant volume ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub v} = -0.015 (8) GPa K{sup -1}. These results provide fundamental thermo physical properties for TiC and are important to theoretical and computational modeling of transition metal carbides.

Yu, Xiaohui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lin, Zhijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jianzhong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Liping [STATE UNIV OF NEW YORK; Ding, Zejun [CHINA; Jin, Changqing [CHINA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Model-based image reconstruction for dual-energy X-ray CT with fast KVP switching  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most recent generation of X-ray CT systems can collect dual energy (DE) sinograms by rapidly switching the X-ray tube voltage between two levels for alternate projection views. This reduces motion artifacts in DE imaging, but yields sinograms that ... Keywords: dualenergy X-ray computed tomography, model-based image reconstruction, penalized likelihood

Wonseok Huh; Jeffrey A. Fessler

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone 3D View Inside the Skeleton with X-ray Microscopy: Imaging Bone at the Nanoscale Scientists studying osteoporosis and other skeletal diseases are interested in the 3D structure of bone and its responses to conditions such as weightlessness, radiation (of particular interest to astronauts) and vitamin D deficiency. The current gold standard, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), provides 3D images of trabeculae, the small interior struts of bone tissue, and electron microscopy can provide nanometer resolution of thin tissue slices. Hard X-ray transmission microscopy has provided the first 3D view of bone structure within individual trabeculae on the nanoscale. figure 1 Figure 1 Micro-CT (left) shows trabecular structure inside of bone. Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM; center and right) can reveal localized details of osteocyte lacunae and their processes.

208

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor.

Kinney, John H. (Danville, CA); Bonse, Ulrich K. (Dortmund, DE); Johnson, Quintin C. (Livermore, CA); Nichols, Monte C. (Livermore, CA); Saroyan, Ralph A. (Livermore, CA); Massey, Warren N. (Livermore, CA); Nusshardt, Rudolph (Waltrop, DE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: (a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, (b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the (c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, (d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and (e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor. 25 figures.

Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.K.; Johnson, Q.C.; Nichols, M.C.; Saroyan, R.A.; Massey, W.N.; Nusshardt, R.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

A. Kanani; B. Shirani; I. Jabbari; J. Mokhtari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Toward the development of a soft x-ray reflection imaging microscope in the Schwarzschild configuration using a soft x-ray laser at 18. 2 nm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the recent results obtained from a soft X-ray reflection imaging microscope in the Schwarzschild configuration. The microscope demonstrated a spatial resolution of 0.7 {mu}m with a magnification of 16 at 18.2 nm. The soft X-ray laser at 18.2 nm was used as an X-ray source. Mo/Si multilayers were coated on the Schwarzschild optics and the normal incidence reflectivity at 18.2 nm per surface was measured to be {approximately} 20 %. 18 refs., 6 figs.

Dicicco, D.; Rosser, R. (Princeton X-Ray Laser, Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)); Kim, D.; Suckewer, S. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

X-ray Phase Imaging Microscopy using a Fresnel Zone Plate and a Transmission Grating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a hard X-ray phase imaging microscopy (a phase-difference microscopy) that consists of an objective and a transmission grating. The simple optical system provides a quantitative phase image, and does not need a wave field mostly coherent on the objective. Our method has a spatial resolution almost same as that of the absorption contrast microscope image obtained by removing the grating. We demonstrate how our approach provides a phase image from experimentally obtained images. Our approach is attractive for easily appending a quantitative phase-sensitive mode to normal X-ray microscopes, and has potentially broad applications in biology and material sciences.

Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi [Department of Advanced Materials Science, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba, 277-8561 (Japan); Takeuchi, Akihisa; Suzuki, Yoshio [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

213

SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Thermal Equation of State of TiC: A Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure-volume-temperature measurements were carried out for titanium carbide (TiC) at pressures and temperatures up to 8.1 GPa and 1273 K using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Thermoelastic parameters were derived for TiC based on a modified high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a thermal pressure approach. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K{prime}{sub 0}, fixed at 4.0, we obtain: the ambient bulk modulus K{sub 0} = 268(6) GPa, which is comparable to previously reported value; temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P} = -0.026(9) GPa K{sup -1}, volumetric thermal expansivity {alpha}{sub T}(K{sup -1}) = a+b T with a = 1.62(12) x 10{sup -5} K{sup -1} and b = 1.07(17) x 10{sup -8}K{sup -2}, pressure derivative of thermal expansion ({partial_derivative}{sub {alpha}}/{partial_derivative}{sub P}){sub T} = (-3.62 {+-} 1.14) x 10{sup -7} GPa{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant volume ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub V} = -0.015(8) GPa K{sup -1}. These results provide fundamental thermophysical properties for TiC for the first time and are important to theoretical and computational modeling of transition metal carbides.

Yu, X.; Lin, Z; Zhang, J; Wang, L; Ding, Z; Jin, C; Zhao, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermal equation of state of TiC: A synchrotron x-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure-volume-temperature measurements were carried out for titanium carbide (TiC) at pressures and temperatures up to 8.1 GPa and 1273 K using energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Thermoelastic parameters were derived for TiC based on a modified high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and a thermal pressure approach. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus, K{sub 0}{sup '}, fixed at 4.0, we obtain: the ambient bulk modulus K{sub 0}=268(6) GPa, which is comparable to previously reported value; temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub P}=-0.026(9) GPa K{sup -1}, volumetric thermal expansivity {alpha}{sub T}(K{sup -1})=a+bT with a=1.62(12)x10{sup -5} K{sup -1} and b=1.07(17)x10{sup -8} K{sup -2}, pressure derivative of thermal expansion ({partial_derivative}{alpha}/{partial_derivative}P){sub T}=(-3.62{+-}1.14)x10{sup -7} GPa{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant volume ({partial_derivative}K{sub T}/{partial_derivative}T){sub V}=-0.015(8) GPa K{sup -1}. These results provide fundamental thermophysical properties for TiC for the first time and are important to theoretical and computational modeling of transition metal carbides.

Yu Xiaohui [LANSCE Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China); Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Lin Zhijun; Zhang Jianzhong; Zhao Yusheng [LANSCE Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang Liping [Mineral Physics Institute, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Ding Zejun [Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Jin Changqing [National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

X-ray Diffraction Laboratory: Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Rotating Anode Page: 1 of 5 Approved: JHR 1/8/2009 SOP: SOPSAXSLA Last date revised: December 26 2009 Date approved: December 26 2009 Small Angle X-ray Scattering, Rotating Anode PURPOSE: This Standard Operating

Meagher, Mary

217

Applying x-ray digital imaging to the verification of cadmium in fuel-storage components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor utilizes large underwater fuel-storage arrays to stage irradiated fuel before it is shipped from the facility. Cadmium is required as a thermal neutron absorber in these fuel-storage arrays to produce an acceptable margin of nuclear subcriticality during both normal and off-normal operating conditions. Due to incomplete documentation from the time of their fabrication, the presence of cadmium within two stainless-steel parts of fuel-storage arrays must be experimentally verified before they are reused in new fuel-storage arrays. A cadmium-verification program has been developed in association with the Waste Examination and Assay Facility located at the Oak Ridge national Laboratory to nondestructively examine these older shroud assemblies. The program includes the following elements (1) x-ray analog imaging, (2) x-ray digital imaging, (3) prompt-gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements, and (4) neutron-transmission measurements. X-ray digital imaging utilizes an analog-to-digital convertor to record attenuated x-ray intensities observed on a fluorescent detector by a video camera. These x-ray intensities are utilized in expressions for cadmium thickness based upon x-ray attenuation theory.

Dabbs, R.D.; Cook, D.H.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

X-Ray Tomographic Imaging of Crystal Structure at the Atomic Level P. Korecki,1,* M. Tolkiehn,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-Ray Tomographic Imaging of Crystal Structure at the Atomic Level P. Korecki,1,* M. Tolkiehn,2 D of the crystal structure from real-space projections obtained by illuminating the sample with white x rays. This approach was applied to the pattern of the directional fine structure in absorption of white x rays

Korecki, Pawe³

219

Online in situ x-ray diffraction setup for structural modification studies during swift heavy ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high energy density of electronic excitations due to the impact of swift heavy ions can induce structural modifications in materials. We present an x-ray diffractometer called ALIX (''Analyse en Ligne sur IRRSUD par diffraction de rayons X''), which has been set up at the low-energy beamline (IRRadiation SUD - IRRSUD) of the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds facility, to allow the study of structural modification kinetics as a function of the ion fluence. The x-ray setup has been modified and optimized to enable irradiation by swift heavy ions simultaneously to x-ray pattern recording. We present the capability of ALIX to perform simultaneous irradiation-diffraction by using energy discrimination between x-rays from diffraction and from ion-target interaction. To illustrate its potential, results of sequential or simultaneous irradiation-diffraction are presented in this article to show radiation effects on the structural properties of ceramics. Phase transition kinetics have been studied during xenon ion irradiation of polycrystalline MgO and SrTiO{sub 3}. We have observed that MgO oxide is radiation-resistant to high electronic excitations, contrary to the high sensitivity of SrTiO{sub 3}, which exhibits transition from the crystalline to the amorphous state during irradiation. By interpreting the amorphization kinetics of SrTiO{sub 3}, defect overlapping models are discussed as well as latent track characteristics. Together with a transmission electron microscopy study, we conclude that a single impact model describes the phase transition mechanism.

Grygiel, C.; Lebius, H.; Bouffard, S.; Quentin, A.; Ramillon, J. M.; Madi, T.; Guillous, S.; Been, T.; Guinement, P.; Lelievre, D.; Monnet, I. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCBN, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Location of Cu2+ in CHA zeolite investigated by X-ray diffraction using the Rietveld/maximum entropy method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rietveld/MEM analysis applied to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data of dehydrated CHA zeolites with catalytically active Cu2+ reveals Cu2+ in both the six- and eight-membered rings in the CHA framework, providing the first complete structural model that accounts for all Cu2+. Density functional theory calculations are used to corroborate the experimental structure and to discuss the Cu2+ coordination in terms of the Al distribution in the framework.

Andersen, C.W.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

Hantke, Max, F.

222

X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination--Crystal views from inside  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray absorption anisotropy for polychromatic illumination--Crystal views from inside P. Korecki a Keywords: X-ray absorption Real-space imaging X-ray holography Electron channeling Electron backscatter of the fine structure in X-ray absorption anisotropy, which results from incident beam diffraction

Korecki, Pawe³

223

Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns (CXIDB ID 20)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This deposition includes the diffraction images generated by the paired polystyrene spheres in random orientations. These images were used to determine and phase the single particle diffraction volume from their autocorrelation functions.

Starodub, D.

224

A criterion for the dynamical to kinematical transition of x-ray diffraction on a bent crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well known that the peak reflectivity of a bent crystal, generally speaking, is smaller than that of a plane crystal, and it goes to zero when the crystal curvature goes to infinity. The reason for this is the transition between dynamical and kinematical diffraction that takes place as the crystal curvature increases. The physical explanation is as follows: the deviation from exact Bragg position along the beam changes so fast that the thickness over which the beam is within a Darwin width becomes too small to reflect the beam. Bent crystals are widely used as focusing elements in X-ray optics, and estimation of whether or not a bent crystal is still perfect enough to provide good reflectivity is of great importance. Currently the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is considering a number of bent crystals as focusing elements for future APS beamlines, including a sagittaly focusing monochromator and bent backscattering analyzer for inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. A criterion is given in answer to the question: To what extent is it possible to bend a crystal without loss of X-ray peak reflectivity? An expression based on the work of Chukhovskii, Gabrielyan and Petrashen, is formulated that applies to anisotropic cubic crystal and that can be used not only for conventional asymmetric Bragg diffraction, but also for inclined crystal diffraction. The following special cases are treated as examples: isotropic crystal, standard symmetrical Bragg diffraction, extremely asymmetric diffraction, and backscattering with Bragg angles near 90{degree}. In addition, an asymptotic behavior for high energies is detailed.

Kushnir, V.I.; Macrander, A.T.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

X-ray imaging, spacecraft nuclear fission and cosmic ray contraband  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D 100 Awards winners R&D 100 Awards winners X-ray imaging, spacecraft nuclear fission and cosmic ray contraband detection score R&D 100 awards R&D Magazine announced the winners and three technologies from Los Alamos National Laboratory and its partners are among the honorees. July 8, 2013 MiniMAX is a battery powered, digital x-ray imaging system that is completely self-contained, lightweight, compact and portable. MiniMAX is a battery powered, digital x-ray imaging system that is completely self-contained, lightweight, compact and portable. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "The innovation and creativity shown in this year's awards is truly inspiring. It gives me great confidence in the Laboratory's intellectual vitality and ongoing role in national security science. Congratulations to

226

Feasibility test of Z{sub eff} imaging using x-ray interferometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental imaging using X-ray interferometry has been developed. Since the atomic number (Z) of a single-element sample (effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) for a plural-element sample) corresponds to the ratio of the real to imaginary part of the complex refractive index, an elemental map is calculable with the ratio of an absorption and phase-contrast image. Several metal foils underwent feasibility observations by crystal X-ray interferometry, providing accurate detection of X-ray intensity and phase-shift. The obtained Z{sub eff} image shows that aluminum, iron, nickel, and copper foil were clearly distinguished, and nickel and copper's Z{sub eff} values coincide with ideal Z number within 1%.

Yoneyama, Akio [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 2520 Akanuma, Hatoyama 350-0395 (Japan)] [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 2520 Akanuma, Hatoyama 350-0395 (Japan); Hyodo, Kazuyuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan)] [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Takeda, Tohoru [Allied Health Sciences and Graduate School of Medical Science, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara 252-0373 (Japan)] [Allied Health Sciences and Graduate School of Medical Science, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara 252-0373 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

227

Enhanced renal image contrast by ethanol fixation in phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To obtain higher image contrast in phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography, the fixation technique has been examined with 100% ethanol and the commonly used 10% formalin. Fine renal structure was depicted by the ethanol fixation, and the image was approximately three times higher in contrast in all renal areas due to the physical properties and strong dehydration by ethanol.

Shirai, R.

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Mirrors for X-ray telescopes: Fresnel diffraction-based computation of Point Spread Functions from metrology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The imaging sharpness of an X-ray telescope is chiefly determined by the optical quality of its focusing optics, which in turn mostly depends on the shape accuracy and the surface finishing of the grazing incidence X-ray mirrors that compose the optical modules. In order to ensure the imaging performance during the mirror manufacturing, a fundamental step is represented by the prediction of the mirror Point Spread Function (PSF) from the metrology of its surface. Traditionally, the PSF computation in X-rays is assumed to be different depending on whether the surface defects are classified as figure errors or roughness [...] The aim of this work is to overcome this limit, providing analytical formulae, valid at any light wavelength, to compute the PSF of an X-ray mirror shell from the measured longitudinal profiles and the roughness Power Spectral Density (PSD), without distinguishing spectral ranges with different treatments. The method we adopted is based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle to compute the diffr...

Raimondi, Lorenzo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

X-ray imaging performance of scintillator-filled silicon pore arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for fine detail visibility in various applications such as dental imaging, mammography, but also neurology and cardiology, is the driver for intensive efforts in the development of new x-ray detectors. The spatial resolution of current scintillator layers is limited by optical diffusion. This limitation can be overcome by a pixelation, which prevents optical photons from crossing the interface between two neighboring pixels. In this work, an array of pores was etched in a silicon wafer with a pixel pitch of 50 {mu}m. A very high aspect ratio was achieved with wall thicknesses of 4-7 {mu}m and pore depths of about 400 {mu}m. Subsequently, the pores were filled with Tl-doped cesium iodide (CsI:Tl) as a scintillator in a special process, which includes powder melting and solidification of the CsI. From the sample geometry and x-ray absorption measurement the pore fill grade was determined to be 75%. The scintillator-filled samples have a circular active area of 16 mm diameter. They are coupled with an optical sensor binned to the same pixel pitch in order to measure the x-ray imaging performance. The x-ray sensitivity, i.e., the light output per absorbed x-ray dose, is found to be only 2.5%-4.5% of a commercial CsI-layer of similar thickness, thus very low. The efficiency of the pores to transport the generated light to the photodiode is estimated to be in the best case 6.5%. The modulation transfer function is 40% at 4 lp/mm and 10%-20% at 8 lp/mm. It is limited most likely by the optical gap between scintillator and sensor and by K-escape quanta. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is determined at different beam qualities and dose settings. The maximum DQE(0) is 0.28, while the x-ray absorption with the given thickness and fill factor is 0.57. High Swank noise is suspected to be the reason, mainly caused by optical scatter inside the CsI-filled pores. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations of the photon transport inside the pore array structure. In addition, some x-ray images of technical and anatomical phantoms are shown. This work shows that scintillator-filled pore arrays can provide x-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, but are not suitable in their current state for most of the applications in medical imaging, where increasing the x-ray doses cannot be tolerated.

Simon, Matthias; Engel, Klaus Juergen; Menser, Bernd; Badel, Xavier; Linnros, Jan [Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstr. 2, 52080 Aachen (Germany); Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 16440 Kista (Sweden)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

230

Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Observation and simulation of hard x ray photoelectron diffraction to determine polarity of polycrystalline zinc oxide films with rotation domains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) patterns of polar zinc oxide (ZnO) surfaces were investigated experimentally using hard x rays and monochromatized Cr K{alpha} radiation and theoretically using a cluster model approach and a dynamical Bloch wave approach. We focused on photoelectrons emitted from the Zn 2p{sub 3/2} and O 1s orbitals in the analysis. The obtained XPD patterns for the (0001) and (0001) surfaces of a ZnO single crystal were distinct for a given emitter and polarity. Polarity determination of c-axis-textured polycrystalline ZnO thin films was also achieved with the concept of XPD, even though the in-plane orientation of the columnar ZnO grains was random.

Williams, Jesse R.; Adachi, Yutaka; Ohashi, Naoki [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); NIMS Saint-Gobain Research Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Pis, Igor [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, NIMS, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8 18000 (Czech Republic); Kobata, Masaaki [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, NIMS, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Winkelmann, Aimo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Matsushita, Tomohiro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kobayashi, Keisuke [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, NIMS, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, Hiroshima University, 2-313 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-0046 (Japan)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Soft x-ray imaging for spheromak-like plasmas (abstract)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pinhole soft x-rayimagingcamera is being developed for use on the Caltech solar prominence simulation experiment and also the Caltech spheromak experiment. The camera is based upon a commercial gated intensifier which produces an image on a phosphor screen. Moderate signal level excellent time resolution and reasonable imaging have been obtained but there has not been any determination of the x-ray energy spectrum. An estimation of the spectrum is now underway using filtered AXUV diodes and it is expected that knowledge of the x-ray energy will enable further optimization of the camera.

P. M. Bellan; J. F. Hansen; S. Zweben; D. Stutman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Phase imaging of magnetic nanostructures using resonant soft x-ray holography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate phase imaging by means of resonant soft x-ray holography. Our holographic phase-contrast method utilizes the strong energy-dependence of the refractive index at a characteristic x-ray absorption resonance. The general concept is shown by using a Co?Pd multilayer sample which exhibits random nanosized magnetic domains. By tuning below the Co L-edge resonance, our quantitative and spectroscopic phase method allows high-contrast imaging of nanoscale electronic and magnetic order while increasing the probing depth and decreasing the radiation dose by an order of magnitude. The complex refractive index is quantitatively obtained through the interference between resonant and nonresonant scattering.

A. Scherz; W. F. Schlotter; K. Chen; R. Rick; J. Stöhr; J. Lüning; I. McNulty; Ch. Günther; F. Radu; W. Eberhardt; O. Hellwig; S. Eisebitt

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

Grain orientation measurement of passivated aluminum interconnectsby x-ray micro diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystallographic orientations of individual grains in apassivated aluminum interconnect line of 0.7-mu m width were investigatedby using an incidentwhite x-ray microbeam at the Advanced Light Source,Berkeley National Laboratory. Intergrain orientation mapping was obtainedwith about 0.05o sensitivity by the micro Laue diffractiontechnique.

Chang, Chang-Hwan; Valek, B.C.; Padmore,H.A.; MacDowell, A.A.; Celestre, R.; Marieb, T.; Bravman, J.C.; Koo, Y.M.; Patel, J.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ris-R-747(EN) Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describes X-ray and neutron scattering experiments per- formed on two examples of modulated structures is divided in three parts. A single crystal elastic neutron scattering experiment between 4.2 and 115 K has shift across the layers. A small-angle neutron scattering experiment has been performed on the mag

238

X-ray dynamical diffraction from single crystals with arbitrary shape and strain field: A universal approach to modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of dynamical diffraction in single crystals engender many unique diffraction phenomena that cannot be interpreted by the kinematical-diffraction theory, yet knowledge of them is vital to resolving a vast variety of scientific problems ranging from crystal optics to strain measurements in crystalline specimens. Although the fundamental dynamical-diffraction theory was established decades ago, modeling it remains a challenge in a general case wherein the crystal has complex boundaries and mixed diffraction geometries (Bragg or Laue). Here, we propose a universal approach for modeling x-ray dynamical diffraction from a single crystal with arbitrary shape and strain field that is based on the integral representation of the Takagi-Taupin equations. Using it, we can construct the solution iteratively via a converging series, independent of the diffraction geometry. Moreover, the integral equations offer additional insights into the diffraction physics that are not readily apparent in its differential counterparts. To demonstrate this approach, we studied the dynamical diffraction from a slab of single crystal with both Bragg and Laue diffraction excited on the entrance boundaries, a problem that is difficult to model by other methods. We also explored the mirage effect caused by the presence of a linear strain field and compared it to the Eikonal theory. Lastly, we derived a dynamical-diffraction equation correlating the structural properties of a particle to its far-field Bragg-diffraction pattern, shedding light on how dynamical diffraction affects these kinematical-diffraction-based inverse techniques for reconstructing the shape and the strain field.

Hanfei Yan and Li Li

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

239

Expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of thermostable -1,3-xylanase from Thermotoga neapolitana strain DSM 4359  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Highly thermostable -1,3-xylanase from T. neapolitana strain DSM 4359 was prepared and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.82 ?.

Okazaki, F.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

X-ray holography at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The x-ray holography program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has two principal goals: (1) the development of x-ray diffraction techniques for DNA sequence analysis and (2) the development of x-ray laser holography for structural analysis of intact biological cells and organelles. DNA sequence analysis will be accomplished by applying x-ray diffraction techniques to determine the ensemble average of the sequence of labels along the individual elements of crystalline DNA. X-ray laser holographic imaging will be accomplished by applying three dimensional x-ray holography to elucidate the structure of few hundred angstrom objects such as 300 {Angstrom} chromatin fibers, nuclear pores and nucleic acid replication complexes in living cells. Existing laboratory x-ray lasers will be utilized to produce flash x-ray holograms of the biological structures.

Trebes, J.; Annese, C.; Birdsall, D.; Brase, J.; Gray, J.; Lane, S.; London, R.; Matthews, D.; Peters, D.; Pinkel, D.; Stone, G.; Rapp, D.; Rosen, M.; Weier, U.; Yorkey, T.

1990-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be moved at high speed by injecting nanosecond pulses of spin-polarized currents into the wires, but the motion is largely stochastic. This result will have an impact on the current development of magnetic storage devices in which data is moved electronically rather than mechanically as in computer disk drives.

242

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be moved at high speed by injecting nanosecond pulses of spin-polarized currents into the wires, but the motion is largely stochastic. This result will have an impact on the current development of magnetic storage devices in which data is moved electronically rather than mechanically as in computer disk drives.

243

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be moved at high speed by injecting nanosecond pulses of spin-polarized currents into the wires, but the motion is largely stochastic. This result will have an impact on the current development of magnetic storage devices in which data is moved electronically rather than mechanically as in computer disk drives.

244

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be moved at high speed by injecting nanosecond pulses of spin-polarized currents into the wires, but the motion is largely stochastic. This result will have an impact on the current development of magnetic storage devices in which data is moved electronically rather than mechanically as in computer disk drives.

245

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be moved at high speed by injecting nanosecond pulses of spin-polarized currents into the wires, but the motion is largely stochastic. This result will have an impact on the current development of magnetic storage devices in which data is moved electronically rather than mechanically as in computer disk drives.

246

Nanoscale chemical imaging using synchrotron x-ray enhanced scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of synchrotron radiation with scanning tunneling microscopy provides a promising new concept for chemical imaging of nanoscale structures. It employs detection of local x-ray absorption, which directly yields chemical, electronic, and magnetic sensitivity. The study of the tip current in the far field (800 nm tip/sample separation) shows that insulator-coated tips have to be considered in order to reduce the background from stray photoelectron. A picture of the different channels contributing to the x-ray enhanced STM process is proposed. If during electron tunneling the sample is illuminated with monochromatic x-rays, characteristic absorption will arise, and core electrons are excited, which might modulate the conventional tunnel current and facilitate chemical imaging at the nanoscale.

Rose, Volker; Freeland, John W. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

Soft x-ray images of the laser entrance hole of ignition hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hohlraums are employed at the national ignition facility to convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes a fusion capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low spectral resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer, which views the region around the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the size of the hohlraum's opening ('clear aperture') and fraction of the measured x-radiation, which comes from this opening, must be known. The size of the clear aperture is measured with the time integrated static x-ray imager (SXI). A soft x-ray imaging channel has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation emitted from inside the clear aperture. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the peak of the x-ray spectrum of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed.

Schneider, M. B.; Meezan, N. B.; Alvarez, S. S.; Alameda, J.; Baker, S.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Celeste, J. R.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Fernandez-Perea, M.; Hau-Riege, S.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method.e., the two-dimensional spatial Fourier transforms of the spectral image) to obtain smoothed (regularized

Piana, Michele

249

Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z{sub 1} above upper collimator plane, distance z{sub 2} above the lower collimator plane, and distance z{sub 3} above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v{sub 1}, v{sub 2}, v{sub 3} proportional to z{sub 1}, z{sub 2} and z{sub 3}, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site. 5 figs.

Parker, S.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Idempotent density matrices for correlated systems from x-ray-diffraction structure factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray structure-factor data can be used to obtain an electron-density matrix corresponding to a wave function that is a single determinant of orbitals. Equations are derived which treat this problem for the case of electronic open shells. The equations are solved for model numerical problems of lithium and berylium atoms. For these cases the structure-factor data are obtained from essentially exact wave functions.

C. Frishberg and L. J. Massa

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Installation of soft X-ray array diagnostics and its application to tomography reconstruction using synthetic KSTAR X-ray images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four-array system of soft X-ray diagnostics was installed on KSTAR tokamak. Each array has 32 viewing chords of two photo-diode array detectors with spatial resolution of 2 cm. To estimate signals from the soft X-ray radiation power, typical n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and argon impurity line radiation profiles in KSTAR are chosen. The photo-diodes were absolutely calibrated as a function of the incident photon energy in 2–40 keV range with a portable X-ray tube. Two-dimensional T{sub e} image properties by multi-energy method were simulated and visualized with six combinations of beryllium filter sets within the dynamic range of signal ratio.

Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Juhyeok; Hong, Joohwan; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho, E-mail: wchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Impurity and Edge Research Center, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati 00044 (Italy); Kim, Junghee [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Major of Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Science Department, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by the method of x-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations of the dynamics of phase transformations accompanying self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by the method of x-ray diffraction analysis on a synchroton-radiation diffractometer offers the possibility of obtaining data on the dynamics of phase transformations, of observing unstable or unknown phases, of discovering liquid phases, of refining the models of the wave structure, and of obtaining data on the kinetics of formation of each of the phases participating in the synthesis process. This paper reviews the actual results in all of these areas to date and anticipates advances likely under each possibility.

Aleksandrov, V.V.; Korchagin, M.A.; Sheromov, M.A.; Tolochko, B.P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2014-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction via Wavelet Frame Based Regularization and Radon Domain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reconstruct high quality CT images from limited and noisy projection data. One of the common CT systems Bin Dong Jia Li Zuowei Shen December 22, 2011 Abstract X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been,8]. Numerical simulations and comparisons will be presented at the end. Keywords: Computed tomography, wavelet

Zakharov, Vladimir

255

Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Paul, S; Ince-Cushmann, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

A convenient alignment approach for x-ray imaging experiments based on laser positioning devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents a two-laser alignment approach for facilitating the precise alignment of various imaging and measuring components with respect to the x-ray beam. The first laser constantly pointed to the output window of the source, in a direction parallel to the path along which the components are placed. The second laser beam, originating from the opposite direction, was calibrated to coincide with the first laser beam. Thus, a visible indicator of the direction of the incident x-ray beam was established, and the various components could then be aligned conveniently and accurately with its help.

Zhang Da; Donovan, Molly; Wu Xizeng; Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States); Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct investigation of mechanisms of vascular dysfunctions.

Umetani, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukushima, K. [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Hospital, Fujishirodai, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Improvement of YOHKOH Hard X-Ray Imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......90 step) 1-2 126 840 210 0.5 mm thick tungsten electric discharge 48 (8 el. x 6 PAs*) 0 , 30 , 60 , 90 , 120 , 150...2 -2 2500 cts cm 10000 cts cm Model Source FWHM 24 arc sec Fig. 8. Numerical simulation of MEM imaging with......

Jun Sato; Takeo Kosugi; Kazuo Makishima

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dark-field hyperspectral X-ray imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...or to studying static systems. Hyperspectral imaging...integrated circuitry. Systems, currently available...energy-dispersive XRD, defined by collimation through the pinhole...energy broadening from collimation is deltaE/E=9...achievable with our detector system and with large amounts...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires Print Wednesday, 26 September 2007 00:00 The quest to increase both computer data-storage density and the speed at which one can read and write the information remains unconsummated. One novel concept is based on the use of a local electric current to push magnetic domain walls along a thin nanowire. A German, Korean, Berkeley Lab team has used the x-ray microscope XM-1 at the ALS to demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in curved permalloy nanowires can be moved at high speed by injecting nanosecond pulses of spin-polarized currents into the wires, but the motion is largely stochastic. This result will have an impact on the current development of magnetic storage devices in which data is moved electronically rather than mechanically as in computer disk drives.

262

Soft x ray/extreme ultraviolet images of the solar atmosphere with normal incidence multilayer optics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first high resolution Soft X-Ray/Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) images of the Sun with normal incidence multilayer optics were obtained by the Standford/MSFC Rocket X-Ray Spectroheliograph on 23 Oct. 1987. Numerous images at selected wavelengths from 8 to 256 A were obtained simultaneously by the diverse array of telescopes flown on-board the experiment. These telescopes included single reflection normal incidence multilayer systems (Herschelian), double reflection multilayer systems (Cassegrain), a grazing incidence mirror system (Wolter-Schwarzschild), and hybrid systems using normal incidence multilayer optics in conjunction with the grazing incidence primary (Wolter-Cassegrain). Filters comprised of approximately 1700{Angstrom} thick aluminum supported on a nickel mesh were used to transmit the soft x ray/EUV radiation while preventing the intense visible light emission of the Sun from fogging the sensitive experimental T-grain photographic emulsions. These systems yielded high resolution soft x ray/EUV images of the solar corona and transition region, which reveal magnetically confined loops of hot solar plasma, coronal plumes, polar coronal holes, supergranulation, and features associated with overlying cool prominences. The development, testing, and operation of the experiments, and the results from the flight are described. The development of a second generation experiment, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, which is scheduled to fly in the summer of 1990, and a recently approved Space Station experiment, the Ultra-High Resolution XUV Spectroheliograph, which is scheduled to fly in 1996 are also described.

Lindblom, J.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

EXIST A High Sensitivity Hard X-ray Imaging Sky Survey Mission for ISS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A deep all-sky imaging hard x-ray survey and wide-field monitor is needed to extend soft (ROSAT) and medium (ABRIXAS2) x-ray surveys into the 10-100 keV band (and beyond) at comparable sensitivity (~0.05 mCrab). This would enable discovery and study of >3000 obscured AGN, which probably dominate the hard x-ray background; detailed study of spectra and variability of accreting black holes and a census of BHs in the Galaxy; Gamma-ray bursts and associated massive star formation (PopIII) at very high redshift and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters throughout the Local Group; and a full galactic survey for obscured supernova remnants. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed array of 8 x 1m^2 coded aperture telescopes fixed on the International Space Station (ISS) with 160deg x 40deg field of view which images the full sky each 90 min orbit. EXIST has been included in the most recent NASA Strategic Plan as a candidate mission for the next decade. An overview of the science goals and mission concep...

Grindlay, J; Chakraborty, D; Elvis, M; Fabian, A C; Fiore, F; Gehrels, N; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F; Hartmann, D; Prince, T A; Ramsey, B; Rothschild, R; Skinner, G K; Woosley, S

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Medical Physics, Volume 11, No. 3 1984 , Pages 303310 A photodiode array x-ray imaging system for digital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Medical Physics, Volume 11, No. 3 1984 , Pages 303­310 A photodiode array x-ray imaging system, self-scanning, photodiode array Reticon RL 1024S optically coupled to an x-ray image intensifier tube, SPATIAL RESOLUTION, PHOTODIODES, BLOOD VESSELS, BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY #12;

Cunningham, Ian

265

X-ray diffraction line profile analysis of deformation microstructure in boron modified Ti-6Al-4V alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction line profile analysis (XRDLPA) techniques have been applied to investigate the deformed microstructure of a recently developed boron modified two-phase titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The alloy was hot compressed at 750 deg. C up to 50% height reduction at two different strain rates (10{sup -3} S{sup -1} and 1 S{sup -1}). Microstructural parameters like average domain size, average microstrain within the domain and dislocation density of the two phases were determined using X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. The results indicate an increase in the microstrain and dislocation density for the {alpha}-phase and decrease for the {beta}-phase in the case of boron modified alloys as compared to the normal material. Microstructural modifications viz. the grain refinement and the presence of hard, brittle TiB particles in the case of boron modified alloy are held responsible for the observed difference in the dislocation density. - Research Highlights: {yields} Microstructural examination of hot compressed Ti64 with and without boron addition by XRDLPA. {yields} Smaller average domain size in alpha-phase compared to the corresponding alpha-phase in all cases. {yields} Higher microstrain and dislocation density for {alpha} phase and lower for {beta} phase in case of Ti64+B. {yields} Decrease in domain size while increase in micro-strain and dislocation density with strain rate. {yields} Strain accumulation around TiB particles responsible for high dislocation density in {alpha} phase.

Sarkar, Apu; Roy, Shibayan; Suwas, Satyam, E-mail: satyamsuwas@materials.iisc.ernet.in

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Oxygen diffusivity in silicon derived from dynamical X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thickness dependent Pendelloesung oscillations are highly sensitive to strain fields from defects in a host crystal. Based on this, we present a novel technique to measure the precipitation kinetics of oxygen in silicon already at its early stage of clustering at high temperatures. At 900 Degree-Sign C, precipitates with a radius smaller than 4 nm and with a density of 1 {+-} 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} 1/cm{sup 3} were observed. The technique was calibrated by complementary scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray measurements in the range of normal diffusivity yielding a diffusion constant of 1.7 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}cm{sup 2}/s, which is close to the literature value of 2.074 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12}cm{sup 2}/s. The measurements have been made with the characteristic K{sub {alpha}1}-line of a high voltage tungsten X-ray tube at 59.31 keV, which provides the opportunity to illuminate through complex sample environments like high temperature scattering furnaces.

Will, J.; Groeschel, A.; Bergmann, C.; Steinrueck, H.-G.; Magerl, A. [Crystallography and Structural Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Kot, D.; Schubert, M. A.; Kissinger, G. [IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, 15236 Frankfurt (Oder) (Germany)

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

267

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL); McKay, Timothy A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stoichiometry optimization of homoepitaxial oxide thin films using x-ray diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a “MBE growth window” in which the film stoichiometry iswindow, the best fits of the diffraction patterns were obtained with film

Stemmer, Susanne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

CMOS Imaging Detectors as X-ray Detectors for Synchrotron Radiation Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CMOS imagers are matrix-addressed photodiode arrays, which have been utilized in devices such as commercially available digital cameras. The pixel size of CMOS imagers is usually larger than that of CCD and smaller than that of TFT, giving them a unique position. Although CMOS x-ray imaging devices have already become commercially available, they have not been used as an x-ray area detector in synchrotron radiation experiments. We tested performance of a CMOS detector from Rad-icon (Shad-o-Box1024) in medical imaging, small-angle scattering, and protein crystallography experiments. It has pixels of 0.048 mm square, read-out time of 0.45 sec, 12-bit ADC, and requires a frame grabber for image acquisition. The detection area is 5-cm square. It uses a Kodak Min-R scintillator screen as a phosphor. The sensitivity to x-rays with an energy less than 15 keV was low because of the thick window materials. Since the readout noise is high, the dynamic range is limited to 2000. The biggest advantages of this detector are cost-effectiveness (about 10,000 US dollars) and compactness (thickness < 3 cm, weight < 2 kg)

Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro; Inoue, Katsuaki [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [SPring-8/RIKEN, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

The BioCAT undulator beamline 18ID: A facility for biological non-crystalline diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the APS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 18ID undulator beamline of the Biophysics Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne, IL, USA, is a high-performance instrument designed for, and dedicated to, the study of partially ordered and disordered biological materials using the techniques of small-angle X-ray scattering, fiber diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The beamline and associated instrumentation are described in detail and examples of the representative experimental results are presented.

Fischetti, R.; Stepanov, S.; Rosenbaum, G.; Barrea, R.; Black, E.; Gore, D.; Heurich, R.; Kondrashkina, E.; Kropf, A.J.; Wang, S.; Zhang, K.; Irving, T.C.; Bunker, G.B. (IIT); (Georgia)

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

272

A concept to collect neutron and x-ray images on the same line of sight at NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron and x-ray images are collected at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the size and shape of inertial confinement fusion implosions. The x-ray images provide a measure of the size and shape of the hot region of the deuterium-tritium fuel while the neutron images provide a measure of the size and shape of the burning plasma. Although these two types of images are collected simultaneously, they are not collected along the same line of sight (LOS). One 14 MeV neutron image is collected on the NIF equator, and two x-ray images are collected along the polar axis and nearly perpendicular to the neutron imaging line of sight on the equator. Both measurements use pinhole apertures to form the images, but existing x-ray imaging provides time-resolved measurements while the neutron images are time-integrated. Detailed comparisons of the x-ray and neutron images can provide information on the fuel assembly, but these studies have been limited because the implosions are not azimuthally symmetric and the images are collected along different LOS. We have developed a conceptual design of a time-integrated x-ray imaging system that could be added to the existing neutron imaging LOS. This new system would allow these detailed studies, providing important information on the fuel assembly of future implosions. Here we present this conceptual design and the expected performance characteristics.

Merrill, F. E., E-mail: fmerrill@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Controllable variation of the intensity of diffracted X-ray beams and double modulation of such beams for transmission and reception of audio information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses research devoted to the study of the intensity change of diffracted and transmitted X-ray beams under the action of a temperature gradient or acoustic oscillations, as well as the techniques for `controllable complete reflection' of transmitted X-radiation in the direction of the diffracted beam.

Navasardyan, M.A.

2001-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Two-dimensional Detector for High Resolution Soft X-ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new two-dimensional (2D) detector for detecting soft X-ray (SX) images was developed. The detector has a scintillator plate to convert a SX image into a visible (VI) one, and a relay optics to magnify and detect the converted VI image. In advance of the fabrication of the detector, quantum efficiencies of scintillators were investigated. As a result, a Ce:LYSO single crystal on which Zr thin film was deposited was used as an image conversion plate. The spatial resolution of fabricated detector is 3.0 {mu}m, and the wavelength range which the detector has sensitivity is 30-6 nm region.

Ejima, Takeo; Ogasawara, Shodo; Hatano, Tadashi; Yanagihara, Mihiro; Yamamoto, Masaki [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

In-situ stress analysis with X-Ray diffraction for yield locus characterization of sheet metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A main problem in the field of sheet metal characterization is the inhomogeneous plastic deformation in the gauge regions of specimens which causes the analytically calculated stresses to differ from the sought state of stress acting in the middle of the gauge region. To overcome this problem, application of X-Ray diffraction is analyzed. For that purpose a mobile X-ray diffractometer and an optical strain measurement system are mounted on a universal tensile testing machine. This enables the recording of the whole strain and stress history of a material point. The method is applied to uniaxial tension tests, plane strain tension tests and shear tests to characterize the interstitial free steel alloy DC06. The applicability of the concepts of stress factors is verified by uniaxial tension tests. The experimentally obtained values are compared with the theoretical values calculated with crystal elasticity models utilizing the orientation distribution functions (ODF). The relaxation problem is addressed which shows itself as drops in the stress values with the strain kept at a constant level. This drop is analyzed with elasto-viscoplastic material models to correct the measured stresses. Results show that the XRD is applicable to measure the stresses in sheet metals with preferred orientation. The obtained yield locus is expressed with the Yld2000–2D material model and an industry oriented workpiece is analyzed numerically. The comparison of the strain distribution on the workpiece verifies the identified material parameters.

Güner, A.; Tekkaya, A. E. [Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction, TU Dortmund University, Baroper Str. 301, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Zillmann, B.; Lampke, T. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemnitz University of Technology, Erfenschlager Strasse 73 D-09125 Chemnitz (Germany)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

276

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of GCIP/HHM transcriptional regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Native and selenomethionine-derivatized crystals of full-length human GCIP/HHM protein were obtained. The crystals belonged to space group P3221 and the best native crystal diffracted to 3.5 ? resolution.

Seto, A.

2008-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Agglomeration and sintering in annealed FePt nanoparticle assemblies studied by small angle neutron scattering and x-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we give a detailed account of complementary small angle neutron scattering and x-ray diffraction studies of polymer mediated, self-assembled FePt nanoparticle arrays as a function of annealing temperature. The combination of these two techniques provides significantly greater physical insight than is available using either individually. Since both methods integrate over a large number of particles statistically meaningful data can be obtained in contrast to imaging techniques where typically only small areas are analyzed. The data show that the median particle size increases with annealing at temperatures of 580°C and above. The data also demonstrate that the distribution of particle diameters is significant and increases with annealing temperature. These results allow a comprehensive structural model of the annealed assemblies to be developed in terms of particle sintering and agglomeration. This enhanced understanding will allow new strategies to be pursued in realizing the potential of nanoparticle assemblies as a monodispersed data storage medium.

T. Thomson; S. L. Lee; M. F. Toney; C. D. Dewhurst; F. Y. Ogrin; C. J. Oates; S. Sun

2005-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gated x-ray framing camera image of a direct-drive cylindrical implosion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gated X-ray images of laser-driven implosions can provide movies of typically 16 frames with {approximately} 80 ps time resolution and 10 {micro}m spatial resolution. Cylindrical implosions allow study of convergent hydrodynamics but with excellent diagnostic access down the axis of the cylinder. This example from a recent cylindrical implosion campaign on the OMEGA laser provides quantitative data on the growth of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in convergent geometry.

Voss, S.A.; Barnes, C.W.; Oertel, J.A.; Watt, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Boehly, T.R.; Bradley, D.K.; Knauer, J.P.; Pien, G. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics] [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 ?m, respectively.

Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Femtosecond Single-Shot Imaging of Nanoscale Ferromagnetic Order in Co/Pd Multilayers using Resonant X-ray Holography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first single-shot images of ferromagnetic, nanoscale spin order taken with femtosecond x-ray pulses. X-ray-induced electron and spin dynamics can be outrun with pulses shorter than 80 fs in the investigated fluence regime, and no permanent aftereffects in the samples are observed below a fluence of 25 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Employing resonant spatially-muliplexed x-ray holography results in a low imaging threshold of 5 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Our results open new ways to combine ultrafast laser spectroscopy with sequential snapshot imaging on a single sample, generating a movie of excited state dynamics.

Wang, Tianhan; Zhu, Diling; Benny Wu,; Graves, Catherine; Schaffert, Stefan; Rander, Torbjorn; Muller, leonard; Vodungbo, Boris; Baumier, Cedric; Bernstein, David P.; Brauer, Bjorn; Cros, Vincent; Jong, Sanne de; Delaunay, Renaud; Fognini, Andreas; Kukreja, Roopali; Lee, Sooheyong; Lopez-Flores, Victor; Mohanty, Jyoti; Pfau, Bastian; Popescu, 5 Horia

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

A new two-dimensional X-ray drift chamber for diffraction studies with pulsed synchroton radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-dimensional position-sensitive detector (drift-chamber) for X-ray difraction experiments with pulsed synchrotron radiation is described. For the measurements of drift direction (x), the small drift chamber uses a reference signal generated by the electron bunches circulating in the storage ring. A flat geometry delay-line, inductively connected to the anode, detects the position of avalanche electrons on the anode wire (y-direction). The main features are: spatial resolution in drift direction (x), 100 ?m for 5 keV photons; spatial resolution in y direction, 400 ?m; maximum counting-rate 5×105 cps; quantum efficiency ar 5 keV, 52%. The systems has been succesfully tested at the ADONE storage ring at Frascati by measuring the small-angle diffraction spectrum of a dry tendon collagen.

Mario Iannuzzi; Andrea La Monaca

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Preferred orientation of n-hexane crystallized in silicon nanochannels: A combined x-ray diffraction and sorption isotherm study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an x-ray diffraction study on n-hexane in tubular silicon channels of approximately 10 nm diameter both as a function of the filling fraction f of the channels and as a function of temperature. Upon cooling, confined n-hexane crystallizes in a triclinic phase typical of the bulk crystalline state. However, the anisotropic spatial confinement leads to a preferred orientation of the confined crystallites, where the crystallographic direction coincides with the long axis of the channels. The magnitude of this preferred orientation increases with the filling fraction, which corroborates the assumption of a Bridgman-type crystallization process being responsible for the peculiar crystalline texture. This growth process predicts for a channel-like confinement an alignment of the fastest crystallization direction parallel to the long channel axis. It is expected to be increasingly effective with the length of solidifying liquid parcels and thus with increasing f. In fact, the fastest solidification front...

Henschel, Anke; Hofmann, Tommy; Knorr, Klaus; Huber, Patrick; 10.1103/PhysRevE.79.032601

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Synthesis and single crystal x-ray diffraction study of a Schiff base derived from 4-acylpyrazolone and 2-aminophenol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title compound, (Z)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4[1((2hydroxyphenyl)amino)propylidene] -3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H)-one was synthesized by refluxing compound 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-3-methyl-4-propionyl-5-pyrazolone, with 2-aminophenol in ethanol. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pca2{sub 1} having unit cell parameters: a = 26.2993(8), b = 7.0724(2) and c = 18.7170(5)Å. The structure contains two crystallographically independent molecules, A, and, B, in the asymmetric unit cell. The crystal structure was solved by direct method using single crystal X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature and refined by full-matrix least-squares procedures to a final R- value of 0.049 for 5207 observed reflections.

Sharma, Naresh; Kant, Rajni, E-mail: vivek-gupta2k2@hotmail.com; Gupta, Vivek K., E-mail: vivek-gupta2k2@hotmail.com [Department of Physics and Electronics, University of Jammu, Jammu Tawi - 180006 (India); Jadeja, R. N. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, The M. S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Quantification of mineral matter in the Argonne Premium Coals using interactive Rietveld-based X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mineral matter in the eight reference North American coal samples of the Argonne Premium Coal series has been investigated on a quantitative basis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. X-ray diffraction data obtained from electronic low-temperature (oxygen–plasma) ash (LTA) residues, from ashes produced by heating the coals in air at 370°C, and also from the raw coals themselves, were evaluated using an interactive data processing system (siroquant™) based on Rietveld interpretation methods. The results from the three types of material (LTA, 370°C ash and raw coal) were compared for each sample. This allowed the components present in the raw coals in crystalline form to be recognised separately from mineral artifacts produced, particularly in the low-rank coals, from interaction of organically associated elements (Ca, S, etc.) during the two ashing processes. After the allowance for the production of any artifacts, the quantitative mineral assemblages identified from XRD of the raw coals were found to be consistent, even for coals having a relatively low ash percentage (around 5%), with the results obtained from the respective mineral concentrates prepared by the ashing methods. The effects of heating the coal to 370°C could also be distinguished, relative to the raw coal or the LTA, through changes in components such as pyrite and the clay minerals. Although some areas of uncertainty exist, particularly with magnesium in the low-rank coals, the calculated chemical compositions of the coal ash derived from the mineral mixtures identified for each coal were also found to be consistent with the results of direct chemical analysis of the respective coal ash materials.

Colin R. Ward; John C. Taylor; C.E. Matulis; L.S. Dale

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

287

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

288

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

289

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

290

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

291

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in the film plane and curl around in a closed loop. At the very center of the vortex, a small, stable core exists where the magnetization points either up or down out of the plane. Three years ago, the discovery of an easy core reversal mechanism at the ALS not only made the possibility of using such systems as magnetic memories much more realistic, it also initiated investigation of the core switching mechanism itself. Now, a Belgian-German-ALS collaboration has used high-resolution, time-resolved, magnetic x-ray microscopy to experimentally reveal the first step of the reversal process: the dynamic deformation of the vortex core. The group also measured a critical vortex velocity above which reversal occurs. Both these observations provide the first experimental support for the postulated reversal mechanism.

292

Sensitivity of Stacked Imaging Detectors to Hard X-Ray Polarization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of multi-layer optics which allow to focus photons up to 100 keV and more promises an enormous jump in sensitivity in the hard X-ray energy band. This technology is already planned to be exploited by future missions dedicated to spectroscopy and imaging at energies >10 keV, e.g., Astro-H and NuSTAR. Nevertheless, our understanding of the hard X-ray sky would greatly benefit from carrying out contemporaneous polarimetric measurements, because the study of hard spectral tails and of polarized emission are often two complementary diagnostics of the same non-thermal and acceleration processes. At energies above a few tens of keV, the preferred technique to detect polarization involves the determination of photon directions after a Compton scattering. Many authors have asserted that stacked detectors with imaging capabilities can be exploited for this purpose. If it is possible to discriminate those events which initially interact in the first detector by Compton scattering and are subsequently absorbed by the second layer, then the direction of scattering is singled out from the hit pixels in the two detectors. In this paper, we give the first detailed discussion of the sensitivity of such a generic design to the X-ray polarization. The efficiency and the modulation factor are calculated analytically from the geometry of the instruments and then compared with the performance as derived by means of Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations.

Fabio Muleri; Riccardo Campana

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

An in situ method for the study of strain broadening using synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A tensionometer for in situ powder diffraction studies of foils under stress has been constructed and used in a copper foil on beamline 2.3 of the Daresbury SRS. Both peak asymmetry and broadening were observed which was interpreted as being due to a cellular structure with cell walls and cell interiors possessing high and low dislocation densities.

Tang, C.C.

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

Recent X–ray diffraction studies of muscle contraction and their implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of diffraction studies H. E. Huxley 1881 Phil...yet, that the cross-bridge stroke occurs in more than...78, 134A. Huxley, H. E., Reconditi, M...interferometry to study cross-bridge behavior during rapid mechanical...80, 266A. Huxley, H. E., Reconditi, M...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Water–DNA interactions as studied by X–ray and neutron fibre diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...over the A form by the pres- ence of excess ions in the fibre. This effect is most...Langridge, R. 1965 Fourier synthesis of lithium DNA part III: Hoogsteen models. J...diffraction study of a crystalline form of the lithium salt. J. Mol. Biol. 2, 1937. Langridge...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (CXIDB ID 15)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The file contains 125 images corresponding to different tilts of the sample around the y axis at 1 degree intervals. Each image is the result of 4 exposures merged together. For more details see the citation.

Chapman, Henry N.

297

Usage of CO2 microbubbles as flow-tracing contrast media in X-ray dynamic imaging of blood flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 microbubbles as a contrast agent were fabricated and a velocity field of 40% hematocrit blood flows was acquired using the synchrotron X-ray particle image velocimetry technique.

Lee, S.J.

2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Image stack alignment in full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy using SIFT_PyOCL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An application of the Scale-Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm for image stack alignment in full-field X-ray absorption spectroscopy is described and a Python-OpenCL implementation of this algorithm is presented.

Paleo, P.

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Antifungal Drug Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Wednesday, 24 February 2010 00:00 Humankind has benefitted from a long and productive relationship with yeast. For example, fermentation by yeast is an essential step in the production of bread, beer, wine, and even biofuels. However, not all yeast are beneficial. One strain of yeast, Candida albicans, grows unnoticed on most peoples' skin and in the intestines. In response to certain environmental conditions, C. albicans can switch to a pathogenic phenotype that causes infection. Yeast infections are commonplace, and in otherwise healthy individuals are usually treatable with over-the-counter medications; however, individuals with weakened immune systems can have very serious systemic consequences from a yeast infection. Treating systemic yeast infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing number of yeast strains that have developed resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new types of drugs capable of circumventing yeast drug-resistance mechanisms. To this end Stanford, University of California, San Francisco and LBNL researchers have used soft x-ray tomography to image the 3-D structure of both benign and infectious C. albicans yeast. They then imaged this yeast when treated with peptoids, a class of molecules that mimic the peptides our immune system uses as the first line of defense against microbial attack. Unlike conventional antimicrobials, microbes have yet to develop resistance mechanisms against peptides or peptoids, making them appealing candidates for pharmaceutical development.

300

Synchroton x-ray diffraction study of an interfacial super-structure: a-Si on Ge0.2Si0.8 (111)-5 × 5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interfacial structure between amorphous Si (a-Si) and Ge0.2Si0.8 is investigated by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction with the use of a synchroton radiation X-ray source. The sample, a-Si/Ge0.2Si0.8/Si(111) was prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. An a-Si film of 100 Å in thickness was deposited on the surface of Ge0.2Si0.8/Si(111), whose structure was 5 × 5 as confirmed by a RHEED pattern. The Bragg peaks of the X-ray diffraction wereobserved at (45, 45) and(?45, 85)in the two-dimensional reciprocal lattice space. This result indicates that the period of the 5 × 5 reconstructed surface structure is preserved even when the surface is covered with a-Si.

K. Akimoto; J. Mizuki; T. Tatsumi; N. Aizaki; J. Matsui

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An x-ray diffraction study of some mesoionic 2,3-diphenyltetrazoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An X-my diffraction study is reported for four molecules of mesoionic 2,3-diphenyltetrazoles. The results confirm a dipolar [open quotes]mesoionic[close quotes] structure, aromatic character of the tetrazole ring and no conjugation between the phenyl and tetrazole rings. The geometry of the exocyclic group is discussed in detail. The molecular parameters of the compounds investigated are correlated with [sup 13]C and [sup 15]N nmr data. The results obtained are compared with similar structures which have already been studied.

Luboradzki, R. (Institute of Physical Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland)); Kozminski, W.; Stefaniak, L. (Institute of Organic Chemistry, Warsaw (Poland))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Humankind has benefitted from a long and productive relationship with yeast. For example, fermentation by yeast is an essential step in the production of bread, beer, wine, and even biofuels. However, not all yeast are beneficial. One strain of yeast, Candida albicans, grows unnoticed on most peoples' skin and in the intestines. In response to certain environmental conditions, C. albicans can switch to a pathogenic phenotype that causes infection. Yeast infections are commonplace, and in otherwise healthy individuals are usually treatable with over-the-counter medications; however, individuals with weakened immune systems can have very serious systemic consequences from a yeast infection. Treating systemic yeast infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing number of yeast strains that have developed resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new types of drugs capable of circumventing yeast drug-resistance mechanisms. To this end Stanford, University of California, San Francisco and LBNL researchers have used soft x-ray tomography to image the 3-D structure of both benign and infectious C. albicans yeast. They then imaged this yeast when treated with peptoids, a class of molecules that mimic the peptides our immune system uses as the first line of defense against microbial attack. Unlike conventional antimicrobials, microbes have yet to develop resistance mechanisms against peptides or peptoids, making them appealing candidates for pharmaceutical development.

303

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Humankind has benefitted from a long and productive relationship with yeast. For example, fermentation by yeast is an essential step in the production of bread, beer, wine, and even biofuels. However, not all yeast are beneficial. One strain of yeast, Candida albicans, grows unnoticed on most peoples' skin and in the intestines. In response to certain environmental conditions, C. albicans can switch to a pathogenic phenotype that causes infection. Yeast infections are commonplace, and in otherwise healthy individuals are usually treatable with over-the-counter medications; however, individuals with weakened immune systems can have very serious systemic consequences from a yeast infection. Treating systemic yeast infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing number of yeast strains that have developed resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new types of drugs capable of circumventing yeast drug-resistance mechanisms. To this end Stanford, University of California, San Francisco and LBNL researchers have used soft x-ray tomography to image the 3-D structure of both benign and infectious C. albicans yeast. They then imaged this yeast when treated with peptoids, a class of molecules that mimic the peptides our immune system uses as the first line of defense against microbial attack. Unlike conventional antimicrobials, microbes have yet to develop resistance mechanisms against peptides or peptoids, making them appealing candidates for pharmaceutical development.

304

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Humankind has benefitted from a long and productive relationship with yeast. For example, fermentation by yeast is an essential step in the production of bread, beer, wine, and even biofuels. However, not all yeast are beneficial. One strain of yeast, Candida albicans, grows unnoticed on most peoples' skin and in the intestines. In response to certain environmental conditions, C. albicans can switch to a pathogenic phenotype that causes infection. Yeast infections are commonplace, and in otherwise healthy individuals are usually treatable with over-the-counter medications; however, individuals with weakened immune systems can have very serious systemic consequences from a yeast infection. Treating systemic yeast infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing number of yeast strains that have developed resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new types of drugs capable of circumventing yeast drug-resistance mechanisms. To this end Stanford, University of California, San Francisco and LBNL researchers have used soft x-ray tomography to image the 3-D structure of both benign and infectious C. albicans yeast. They then imaged this yeast when treated with peptoids, a class of molecules that mimic the peptides our immune system uses as the first line of defense against microbial attack. Unlike conventional antimicrobials, microbes have yet to develop resistance mechanisms against peptides or peptoids, making them appealing candidates for pharmaceutical development.

305

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Humankind has benefitted from a long and productive relationship with yeast. For example, fermentation by yeast is an essential step in the production of bread, beer, wine, and even biofuels. However, not all yeast are beneficial. One strain of yeast, Candida albicans, grows unnoticed on most peoples' skin and in the intestines. In response to certain environmental conditions, C. albicans can switch to a pathogenic phenotype that causes infection. Yeast infections are commonplace, and in otherwise healthy individuals are usually treatable with over-the-counter medications; however, individuals with weakened immune systems can have very serious systemic consequences from a yeast infection. Treating systemic yeast infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing number of yeast strains that have developed resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new types of drugs capable of circumventing yeast drug-resistance mechanisms. To this end Stanford, University of California, San Francisco and LBNL researchers have used soft x-ray tomography to image the 3-D structure of both benign and infectious C. albicans yeast. They then imaged this yeast when treated with peptoids, a class of molecules that mimic the peptides our immune system uses as the first line of defense against microbial attack. Unlike conventional antimicrobials, microbes have yet to develop resistance mechanisms against peptides or peptoids, making them appealing candidates for pharmaceutical development.

306

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography Print Humankind has benefitted from a long and productive relationship with yeast. For example, fermentation by yeast is an essential step in the production of bread, beer, wine, and even biofuels. However, not all yeast are beneficial. One strain of yeast, Candida albicans, grows unnoticed on most peoples' skin and in the intestines. In response to certain environmental conditions, C. albicans can switch to a pathogenic phenotype that causes infection. Yeast infections are commonplace, and in otherwise healthy individuals are usually treatable with over-the-counter medications; however, individuals with weakened immune systems can have very serious systemic consequences from a yeast infection. Treating systemic yeast infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the growing number of yeast strains that have developed resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs. Consequently, there is a pressing need to develop new types of drugs capable of circumventing yeast drug-resistance mechanisms. To this end Stanford, University of California, San Francisco and LBNL researchers have used soft x-ray tomography to image the 3-D structure of both benign and infectious C. albicans yeast. They then imaged this yeast when treated with peptoids, a class of molecules that mimic the peptides our immune system uses as the first line of defense against microbial attack. Unlike conventional antimicrobials, microbes have yet to develop resistance mechanisms against peptides or peptoids, making them appealing candidates for pharmaceutical development.

307

Vibrational spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction of Cd,,OH...2 to 28 GPa at 300 K S.-H. Shim* and S. Rekhi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and infrared absorption spectroscopy along with x-ray diffraction for brucite-type -Cd OH 2 to 28 GPa at 300 K observed in the brucite-type hydroxides. The Raman spectra of the high-pressure phase of Cd OH 2 is similar I. INTRODUCTION High symmetry prompts considering the brucite-type hy- droxides M OH 2, M

308

Energetic electron precipitation in the aurora as determined by x-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work examines two aspects of energetic-particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere through the use of an x-ray imager flown from a stratospheric balloon in the auroral zone. The design and theory of this instrument is completely described, including the technique of image formation using an on-board microprocessor and a statistical analysis of the imaging process. Day-side energetic-electron precipitation is examined in the context of global energy dissipation during the substorm process. It is found that the relationship between events on the night side and the day side are considerably more complex that can be modeled with just a simple picture of drifting particles that induced instabilities, wave growth, and pitch-angle diffusion into the loss cone. The driving force for precipitation is probably not the presence of the energetic electrons (>30 keV) alone, but is influenced either by local effects or the less energetic component. The presence of small-scale structure, including gradients and complex motions in the precipitation region in the morning sector, suggests a local process influencing the rate of electron precipitation. The spatial and temporal evolution of a classic 5-15 second pulsating aurora during the post-breakup phase is also examined with the x-ray imager.

Werden, S.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A soft-X-ray imaging microscope with multilayer-coated Schwarzschild optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We constructed a soft-X-ray imaging microscope based on a multilayer-coated Schwarzschild objective. The Schwarzschild objective was designed to have a 50 x magnification and a numerical aperture of 0.25. The mirrors of the objective were coated with a Mo/Si multilayer to reflect the Si L emission. The overall throughput of the objective was 14% at a peak wavelength of 13.3 nm. The 5-?m wide stripe of SiO 2 lithographically patterned was observed under irradiation with an electron beam of 1 ?A.

M. Toyoda; Y. Shitani; M. Yanagihara; T. Ejima; M. Yamamoto; M. Watanabe

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Extracting core shape from x-ray images at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measuring the shape of implosions is critical to inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We have developed techniques that have proven successful for extracting shape information from images of x-ray self-emission recorded by a variety of diagnostic instruments for both DT-filled targets and low-yield surrogates. These key results help determine optimal laser and target parameters leading to ignition. We have compensated for instrumental response and have employed a variety of image processing methods to remove artifacts from the images while retaining salient features. The implosion shape has been characterized by decomposing intensity contours into Fourier and Legendre modes for different lines of sight. We also describe procedures we have developed for estimating uncertainties in these measurements.

Glenn, S. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94555 (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

X?ray diffraction study of concentrated chromium (III) chloride solutions. I. Complex formation analysis in equilibrium conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrated chromium (III) chloride solutions both acidic and neutral have been examined by x?ray diffraction in equilibrium conditions; i.e. a long period of time after their preparation. Complex formation between Cr3+ and Cl? ions have been quantitatively analyzed through direct comparison of experimental and calculated structure functions. The average number of chloride ions bonded to chromium in each solution has been determined. The values obtained are consistent with the indications given by the distribution curves and in good agreement with those expected on the grounds of equilibrium constants. The average aggregation numbers were determined by assuming the presence in neutral solutions of the charged species Cr(H2O)3+ 6 Cr(H2O)5Cl2+ and Cr(H2O)4Cl+ 2. In addition experimental evidence of the neutral species Cr(H2O)3Cl3 in the acidic solution has been obtained. Octahedral water coordination for chloride ions has been confirmed. Well defined second coordination shell around Cr3+ ions is strongly supported by the structural parameters obtained for water molecules belonging to two subsequent hydration shells of the cations.

Mauro Magini

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Humidity-controlled preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy (CXDM) has the potential to visualize the structures of micro- to sub-micrometer-sized biological particles, such as cells and organelles, at high resolution. Toward advancing structural studies on the functional states of such particles, here, we developed a system for the preparation of frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments. The system, which comprised a moist air generator, microscope, micro-injector mounted on a micromanipulator, custom-made sample preparation chamber, and flash-cooling device, allowed for the manipulation of sample particles in the relative humidity range of 20%-94%rh at 293 K to maintain their hydrated and functional states. Here, we report the details of the system and the operation procedure, including its application to the preparation of a frozen-hydrated chloroplast sample. Sample quality was evaluated through a cryogenic CXDM experiment conducted at BL29XUL of SPring-8. Taking the performance of the system and the quality of the sample, the system was suitable to prepare frozen-hydrated biological samples for cryogenic CXDM experiments.

Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); RIKEN Harima Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikaduki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Time-resolved X-ray diffraction microprobe studies of the conversion of cellulose I to ethylenediamine-cellulose I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural changes during the treatment of films of highly crystalline microfibers of Cladophora cellulose with ethylenediamine (EDA) have been studied by time-resolved X-ray microprobe diffraction methods. As EDA penetrates the sample and converts cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I, the measured profile widths of reflections reveal changes in the shapes and average dimensions of cellulose I and EDA-cellulose I crystals. The (200) direction of cellulose I is most resistant to EDA penetration, with EDA penetrating most effectively at the hydrophilic edges of the hydrogen bonded sheets of cellulose chains. Most of the cellulose chains in the initial crystals of cellulose I are incorporated into crystals of EDA-cellulose I. The size of the emerging EDA-cellulose I crystals is limited to about half of their size in cellulose I, most likely due to strains introduced by the penetration of EDA molecules. There is no evidence of any gradual structural transition from cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I involving a continuously changing intermediate phase. Rather, the results point to a rapid transition to EDA-cellulose I in regions of the microfibrils that have been penetrated by EDA.

Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Wada, Masahisa; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul (Toledo); (U of Tokyo); (CNRS-CRMD); (LANL)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

314

Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 A tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 A tobermorite was calculated, K{sub o} = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 A tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 A tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules.

Oh, Jae Eun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 94720, CA USA (United States); School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan Metropolitan City, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Clark, Simon M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Maquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, 20015, CA (United States); Wenk, Hans-Rudolf [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Maquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 94720, CA USA (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

In-situ x-ray diffraction of layered LiCoO{sub 2}-Type cathode materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have investigated LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} (Sumitomo) and LiNi{sub 5/8}Co{sub 1/4}Mn{sub 1/16}Al{sub 1/16}O{sub 2} (Sandia chemical preparation method) cathode powders via in-situ X-ray Diffraction and Cyclic Voltammetry using a coffee-bag type electrochemical cell. Both cathode materials did not show a monoclinic distortion during de-intercalation but sustained the hexagonal structure up to 4.3 V. The doping of Co into the LiNiO{sub 2} structure appears to stabilize this lattice as the hexagonal structure over the full range of charging (up to 4.3 V). The LiNi{sub 5/8}Co{sub 1/4}Mn{sub 1/16}Al{sub 1/16}O{sub 2} cathode material exhibited a 160 mAh/g capacity (to 4.1 V) on its 1{sup st} cycle, while displaying a much smaller volume change (as compared to LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}) during de-intercalation. This reduced overall volume change (2.5 vol%) may have important implications for cycle life of this material.

Rodriguez, M.A.; Ingersoll, D.; Doughty, D.H.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Investigation of metal dusting mechanism in Fe-base alloys using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metal-dusting phenomenon, which is a metal loss process that occurs in hot reactive gases, was investigated in iron and certain iron-base alloys by Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). Coke from metal dusting exhibits six Raman bands at 1330(D band), 1580(G band), 1617, 2685, 3920, and 3235 cm-1. The bandwidths and the relative intensities of the 1330 and 1580 cm-1 bands are related to the crystallinity and defect structure of the coke. Both Raman and XRD analyses suggest that the metal-dusting process influences the catalytic crystallization of carbon. A new mechanism of metal dusting is, therefore, proposed, based on the premise that coke cannot crystallize well by deposition from carburizing gases at low temperature without catalytic activation because of its strong C-C bonds and high melting temperature. Cementite or iron participates in the coke-crystallizing process in a manner that tends to improve the crystallinity of the coke. At the same time, fine iron or cementite particles are liberated from the pure metal or alloys.

Zeng, Z.; Natesan, K.; Maroni, V. A.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Preferred orientation of n-hexane crystallized in silicon nanochannels: A combined x-ray diffraction and sorption isotherm study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an x-ray diffraction study on n-hexane in tubular silicon channels of approximately 10 nm diameter both as a function of the filling fraction f of the channels and as a function of temperature. Upon cooling, confined n-hexane crystallizes in a triclinic phase typical of the bulk crystalline state. However, the anisotropic spatial confinement leads to a preferred orientation of the confined crystallites, where the crystallographic direction coincides with the long axis of the channels. The magnitude of this preferred orientation increases with the filling fraction, which corroborates the assumption of a Bridgman-type crystallization process being responsible for the peculiar crystalline texture. This growth process predicts for a channel-like confinement an alignment of the fastest crystallization direction parallel to the long channel axis. It is expected to be increasingly effective with the length of solidifying liquid parcels and thus with increasing f. In fact, the fastest solidification front is expected to sweep over the full silicon nanochannel for f=1, in agreement with our observation of a practically perfect texture for entirely filled nanochannels.

Anke Henschel; Pushpendra Kumar; Tommy Hofmann; Klaus Knorr; Patrick Huber

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

318

X-ray Diffraction and Molecular Dynamics Study of Medium-range Order in Ambient and Hot Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have developed x-ray diffraction measurements with high energy-resolution and accuracy to study water structure at three different temperatures (7, 25 and 66 C) under normal pressure. Using a spherically curved Ge crystal an energy resolution better than 15 eV has been achieved which eliminates influence from Compton scattering. The high quality of the data allows a precise oxygen-oxygen pair correlation function (PCF) to be directly derived from the Fourier transform of the experimental data resolving shell structure out to ~12 {\\AA}, i.e. 5 hydration shells. Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the TIP4P/2005 force-field reproduce excellently the experimental shell-structure in the range 4-12 {\\AA} although less agreement is seen for the first peak in the PCF. The Local Structure Index [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 7671 (1996)] identifies a tetrahedral minority giving the intermediate-range oscillations in the PCF and a disordered majority providing a more featureless background in this range. The current study supports the proposal that the structure of liquid water, even at high temperatures, can be described in terms of a two-state fluctuation model involving local structures related to the high-density and low-density forms of liquid water postulated in the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis.

Congcong Huang; K. T. Wikfeldt; D. Nordlund; U. Bergmann; T. McQueen; J. Sellberg; L. G. M. Pettersson; A. Nilsson

2011-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging an Arsenic-Loving  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern Fatale - X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Imaging of an Arsenic-Loving Fern For many people, arsenic is synonymous with poison, so it is perhaps a surprise that some plants, such as the fern Pteris vittata (Figure 1) seem to quite deliberately accumulate large amounts of it. What is more, the plant converts it to the most toxic inorganic form known. How does it do this? First some background; while there is some evidence that arsenic is required for health [1], this is debatable. On the other hand, the poisonous nature of arsenic compounds was understood by the ancient Greeks and Romans, and it has been used throughout history as a homicidal and suicidal agent. It is found in two environmentally common oxy acids; arsenous acid (H3AsO3), and arsenic acid (H3AsO4), whose salts are known as arsenites and arsenates, respectively. Of these, the trivalent arsenic species are the most toxic. The infamous agent of murder is arsenic trioxide (white arsenic or As2O3), which is simply the (reputedly tasteless) anhydride of arsenous acid.

320

Methods development for diffraction and spectroscopy studies of metalloenzymes at X-ray free-electron lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on electrofocusing, an energy dispersive von Hamos X-ray...spectroscopy data collected by us at the Linac Coherent...deposition of radiation energy by the X-ray pulse was...we review the current status of methods developed in...packages developed by us to process both spectroscopic...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient.

Bogdan Neculaes, V., E-mail: neculaes@research.ge.com; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)] [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which automatically selects these parameters.

Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

X-ray tomography and three-dimensional image analysis of epoxy-glass syntactic foams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...voxels). The standard deviation of...the three-dimensional images at the interface between the...phase in three-dimensional was quite straightforward...value of the standard deviation...optical device measuring the diffraction...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Note: Characterization of a high-photon-energy X-ray imager  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bragg angle, rocking curve, and reflection efficiency of a quartz crystal x-ray imager (Miller indices 234) were measured at photon energy of 15.6909 keV, corresponding to the K{sub ?2} line of Zr, using the X15A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. One flat and three spherically curved samples were tested. The peak reflectivity of the best-performing crystal was determined to be (3.6 ± 0.7) × 10{sup ?4} with a rocking-curve full width at half maximum of 0.09°. The Zr K{sub ?2} emission was imaged from a hot Zr plasma generated by a 10-J multiterawatt laser.

Storm, M.; Schiebel, P.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Eichman, B.; Theobald, W.; Mileham, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Fiksel, G. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Zhong, Z. [The National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)] [The National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States); Stephens, R. B. [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121-1200 (United States)] [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121-1200 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research describes advancements in the spectral analysis and error propagation techniques associated with x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) that have enabled this diagnostic to be used to accurately constrain particle, momentum, and heat transport studies in a tokamak for the first time. Doppler tomography techniques have been extended to include propagation of statistical uncertainty due to photon noise, the effect of non-uniform instrumental broadening as well as flux surface variations in impurity density. These methods have been deployed as a suite of modeling and analysis tools, written in interactive data language (IDL) and designed for general use on tokamaks. Its application to the Alcator C-Mod XICS is discussed, along with novel spectral and spatial calibration techniques. Example ion temperature and radial electric field profiles from recent I-mode plasmas are shown, and the impact of poloidally asymmetric impurity density and natural line broadening is discussed in the context of the planned ITER x-ray crystal spectrometer.

Reinke, M. L.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; White, A. E.; Wolfe, S. M. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a well-known imaging error of spherical mirrors. In addition to x rays, the scheme should be applicable to a very broad spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation, including microwaves, infrared and visible light, as well as UV and extreme UV radiation, if the crystals are replaced with appropriate spherical reflectors. The scheme may also be applicable to the imaging with ultrasound.

Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Feder, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Ko, Jinseok; Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Argonne CNM: X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Microscopy Facilities X-Ray Microscopy Facilities The Hard X-Ray Nanoprobe (HXN) facility provides scanning fluorescence, scanning diffraction, and full-field transmission and tomographic imaging capabilities with a spatial resolution of 30 nm over a spectral range of 6-12 keV. Modes of Operation Full-Field Transmission Imaging and Nanotomography X-ray transmission imaging uses both the absorption and phase shift of the X-ray beam by the sample as contrast mechanisms. Absorption contrast is used to map the sample density. Elemental constituents can be located by using differential edge contrast in this mode. Phase contrast can be highly sensitive to edges and interfaces even when the X-ray absorption is weak. These contrast mechanisms are exploited to image samples rapidly in full-field transmission mode under various environmental conditions, or combined with nanotomography methods to study the three-dimensional structure of complex and amorphous nanomaterials with the HXN.

328

In-situ X-ray diffraction study of phase transformations in the Am-O system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of minor actinides recycling, americium can be transmuted by adding it in UO{sub 2} or (U, Pu)O{sub 2} fuels. Americium oxides exhibiting a higher oxygen potential than U or Pu oxides, its addition alters the fuel properties. To comprehend its influence, a thorough knowledge of the Am-O phase equilibria diagram and of thermal expansion behavior is of main interest. Due to americium scarcity and high radiotoxicity, few experimental reports on this topic are available. Here we present in-situ high-temperature XRD results on the reduction from AmO{sub 2} to Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. We show that fluorite (Fm-3m) AmO{sub 2} is reduced to cubic (Ia-3) C Prime -type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3+{delta}}, and then into hexagonal (P6{sub 3}/mmc) A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which remains stable up to 1840 K. We also demonstrate the transitional existence of the monoclinic (C2/m) B-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At last, we describe, for the first time, the thermal expansion behavior of the hexagonal Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} between room temperature and 1840 K. - Graphical abstract: Americium dioxide was in situ studied by high-temperature X-ray diffraction. First, fluorite AmO{sub 2} is reduced to cubic C Prime -type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3+{delta}} and then transforms into hexagonal A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which remains stable up to 1840 K. Then, we demonstrate the transitional existence of monoclinic B-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At last, we describe, for the first time, the thermal expansion of A-type Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} between room temperature and 1840 K. This work may contribute to a better understanding of Am oxide behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We realize an in-situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction study on an AmO{sub 2} sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorite AmO{sub 2} transforms to cubic Am{sub 2}O{sub 3+{delta}} and then to hexagonal Am{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Little-known monoclinic Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} is observed during the cubic-to-hexagonal transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameter thermal expansion of hexagonal Am{sub 2}O{sub 3} is given up to 1840 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We give additional data on AmO{sub 2} lattice parameter expansion under self-irradiation.

Lebreton, Florent, E-mail: florent.lebreton@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France) [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); GEMH, ENSCI, 87065 Limoges (France); Belin, Renaud C., E-mail: renaud.belin@cea.fr [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LMPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Delahaye, Thibaud, E-mail: thibaud.delahaye@cea.fr [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France)] [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Blanchart, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.blanchart@unilim.fr [GEMH, ENSCI, 87065 Limoges (France)] [GEMH, ENSCI, 87065 Limoges (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Resolving Conflicting Crystallographic and NMR Models for Solution-State DNA with Solution X-ray Diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on synchrotron-based high-angle X-ray solution scattering measured to 2 Å resolution for two synthetic DNA sequences for which there are conflicting X-ray crystal and solution NMR models. ... Herein, we report on synchrotron-based high-angle X-ray solution scattering measured to 2 Å resolution for two synthetic DNA sequences for which there are numerous conflicting X-ray crystal and solution NMR models. ... The crystal structure of the synthetic DNA dodecamer d(CpGpCpGpApApTpTpCpGpCpG) was refined to a residual error of R = 17.8% at 1.9-Å resoln. ...

Xiaobing Zuo; David M. Tiede

2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

330

Vibrational Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction of Cd(OH)2 to 28 GPa at 300 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure parameters of the brucite-type hydroxides. Thederivative (K 0 ) of the brucite-type hydroxides. Materialwith X-ray di?raction for brucite- type ?-Cd(OH) 2 to 28 GPa

Shim, Sang-Heon; Rekhi, Sandeep; Martin, Michael C.; Jeanloz, Raymond

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Crystallization and shear modulus of a forming biopolymer film determined by in situ x-ray diffraction and ultrasound reflection methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure and the rigidity of a forming biopolymer film were determined using concurrent x-ray diffraction and ultrasonic reflection measurements. Film formation of a xylan solution (de-ionized water 10 g ? l xylan 4 g ? l glycerol) was studied during water evaporation at 24 ( ± 2 ) ° C 37 ( ± 5 ) % RH . X-ray diffraction(XRD) data showed the crystallization and ultrasonic data the increase of the shear modulus ( G ) during water evaporation. Xylan crystallized into small xylan dihydrate crystallites the number of which increased as water evaporated. Crystallization began earlier than the increase in G during film formation. The increase in G also continued after the crystallites were fully formed indicating still ongoing structural changes in the amorphous parts. The maximum value of G was 0.1 – 0.5 GPa . XRD measurements performed ex situ showed a crystallinity of 16%–19% ( ± 5 % ) and a fairly isotropic crystallite orientation in the surface plane of the films.

Marko Peura; Timo Karppinen; Annemai Soovre; Ari Salmi; Maija Tenkanen; Edward Hæggström; Ritva Serimaa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Center for X-Ray Optics, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: Soft-X-Ray imaging with zone-plate lenses; multilayer reflective optics; and spectroscopy with x-rays.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Blue-enhanced thin-film photodiode for dual-screen x-ray imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on a-Si:H-based low-leakage blue-enhanced photodiodes for dual-screen x-ray imaging detectors. Doped nanocrystalline silicon was incorporated in both the n- and p-type regions to reduce absorption losses for light incoming from the top and bottom screens. The photodiode exhibits a dark current density of 900 pA/cm{sup 2} and an external quantum efficiency up to 90% at a reverse bias of 5 V. In the case of illumination through the tailored p-layer, the quantum efficiency of 60% at a 400 nm wavelength is almost double that for the conventional a-Si:H n-i-p photodiode.

Vygranenko, Y.; Vieira, M. [Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Computer Engineering, ISEL, Lisbon 1949-014 (Portugal); Sazonov, A. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo N2L 3G1 (Canada); Heiler, G.; Tredwell, T. [Carestream Health, Inc., Rochester, New York 14652-3487 (United States); Nathan, A. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of effective temperature in a vibrated granular medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging study of the effective temperature $T_{eff}$ in a vibrated granular medium. By tracking the directed motion and the fluctuation dynamics of the tracers inside, we obtained $T_{eff}$ of the system using Einstein relation. We found that as the system unjams with increasing vibration intensities $\\Gamma$, the structural relaxation time $\\tau$ increases substantially which can be fitted by an Arrhenius law using $T_{eff}$. And the characteristic energy scale of structural relaxation yielded by the Arrhenius fitting is $E = 0.21 \\pm 0.02$ $pd^3$, where $p$ is the pressure and $d$ is the background particle diameter, which is consistent with those from hard sphere simulations in which the structural relaxation happens via the opening up of free volume against pressure.

Yixin Cao; Xiaodan Zhang; Binquan Kou; Xiangting Li; Xianghui Xiao; Kamel Fezzaa; Yujie Wang

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

Calculation of the Johann error for spherically bent x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers, currently operating on Alcator C-Mod, NSTX, EAST, and KSTAR, record spectral lines of highly charged ions, such as Ar{sup 16+}, from multiple sightlines to obtain profiles of ion temperature and of toroidal plasma rotation velocity from Doppler measurements. In the present work, we describe a new data analysis routine, which accounts for the specific geometry of the sightlines of a curved-crystal spectrometer and includes corrections for the Johann error to facilitate the tomographic inversion. Such corrections are important to distinguish velocity induced Doppler shifts from instrumental line shifts caused by the Johann error. The importance of this correction is demonstrated using data from Alcator C-Mod.

Wang, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Podpaly, Y. [Plasma Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10 (1998) 71337144. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-8984(98)92644-3 X-ray diffraction, magnetization and nuclear magnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 10 (1998) 7133­7144. Printed in the UK PII: S0953-8984(98)92644-3 X-ray diffraction, magnetization and nuclear magnetic resonance study of Y2Fe17-xGax N X Shen, T K Daeubler , J I of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610, USA § State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese

Yang, De-Ping

337

Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

Pfeiffer, Franz [Technical University Munich, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB): An Open Repository for CXI Experimental Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Nowadays there are several groups around the world doing excellent work using different kinds of techniques all based on the physics of coherent X-ray imaging (CXI). Due to several reasons, including lack of a standard file format, there has been limited sharing of data which severely limits possible synergies inside the community. At the same time there is a population of researchers who do not have access to the facilities required to make such kinds of experiments, or do not have the expertise and resources necessary to carry them out. But many of them would be able to test new ideas and techniques if they would have access to the experimental data. The main goal of the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank is to address these problems by creating an open repository for CXI experimental data. Such a repository provides several important benefits including: Expansion of the CXI community directly leading to an increase in the science output, the existence of an archival place for all the experimental data would ensure that such data does not gets lost forever when the group that did the experiment is no longer interested in the data, the availability of the experimental data to the entire community greatly facilitates reproducibility, leading to higher quality and more transparent science, the development of a well documented file format for CXI data facilitates data sharing and might one day lead to its emergence as a de facto standard. Current free electron laser facilities such as the LCLS are capable of producing very large amounts of data (20TB a day) and the coming European FEL is expected to increase this rate a factor of 500. The analyzes of such large bodies of data will have to be distributed through a large community to make it manageable, and this repository could be an important facilitator in this process.

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenide x-ray imaging Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrons suffer from significant... collimated beams of X-rays (usually from a synchroton or storage ring). This has the advantage of producing... , proton-beam writing...

340

3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N. (Connecticut); (USARL)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Simultaneous High-Resolution 2-Dimensional Spatial and 1-Dimensional Picosecond Streaked X-ray Pinhole Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Kentech x-ray streak camera was run at the LLNL Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to record simultaneous space- and time-resolved measurements of picosecond laser-produced plasmas. Four different x-ray energy channels were monitored using broad-band filters to record the time history of Cu targets heated at irradiances of 10{sup 16} - 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Through the Cu filter channel, a time-resolution below 3ps was obtained. Additionally, an array of 10 {micro}m diameter pinholes was placed in front of the camera to produce multiple time-resolved x-ray images on the photocathode and time-integrated images on the phosphor with 10 and 15 times magnification, respectively, with spatial resolution of <13 {micro}m.

Steel, A B; Nagel, S R; Dunn, J; Baldis, H A

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

Maximum Entropy Method and Charge Flipping, a Powerful Combination to Visualize the True Nature of Structural Disorder from in situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a systematic approach, the ability of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to reconstruct the most probable electron density of highly disordered crystal structures from X-ray powder diffraction data was evaluated. As a case study, the ambient temperature crystal structures of disordered {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] and {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[CO{sub 3}] and ordered {delta}-K{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] were investigated in detail with the aim of revealing the 'true' nature of the apparent disorder. Different combinations of F (based on phased structure factors) and G constraints (based on structure-factor amplitudes) from different sources were applied in MEM calculations. In particular, a new combination of the MEM with the recently developed charge-flipping algorithm with histogram matching for powder diffraction data (pCF) was successfully introduced to avoid the inevitable bias of the phases of the structure-factor amplitudes by the Rietveld model. Completely ab initio electron-density distributions have been obtained with the MEM applied to a combination of structure-factor amplitudes from Le Bail fits with phases derived from pCF. All features of the crystal structures, in particular the disorder of the oxalate and carbonate anions, and the displacements of the cations, are clearly obtained. This approach bears the potential of a fast method of electron-density determination, even for highly disordered materials. All the MEM maps obtained in this work were compared with the MEM map derived from the best Rietveld refined model. In general, the phased observed structure factors obtained from Rietveld refinement (applying F and G constraints) were found to give the closest description of the experimental data and thus lead to the most accurate image of the actual disorder.

Samy, A.; Dinnebier, R; van Smaalen, S; Jansen, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Room-temperature serial crystallography using a kinetically optimized microfluidic device for protein crystallization and on-chip X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An emulsion-based serial crystallographic technology has been developed, in which single crystals are grown in nanolitre-sized droplets inside an X-ray semi-transparent microfluidic chip exploiting a negative feedback mechanism. Diffraction data are measured, one crystal at a time, from a series of room-temperature crystals stored in the chip, and a 93% complete data set is obtained by merging single diffraction frames taken from different unoriented crystals to solve the structure of glucose isomerase to 2.1 ?.

Heymann, M.

2014-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

X-ray-diffraction determination of the Ni-dopant site in single-crystal YBa2Cu3O7-?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anomalous dispersive x-ray-diffraction measurements have determined the dopant-site distribution in Ni-doped single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-?. The data from a YBa2(Cu0.83Ni0.17)3O7-? crystal show that over 95% of the Ni dopants occupy the Cu(2) site in the copper oxide planes, with negligible occupation of the Cu(1) copper oxide chain sites. General guidelines are presented for selecting the most effective hkl diffraction planes for measuring dopant concentration profiles. Direct measurement of the energy dependence of the dopant atomic scattering forces is also demonstrated.

S. A. Hoffman; M. A. Castro; G. C. Follis; S. M. Durbin

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

X-ray Crystallographic, Scanning Microprobe X-ray Diffraction, and Cross-Polarized/Magic Angle Spinning [superscript 13]C NMR Studies of the Structure of Cellulose III[subscript II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X-ray crystallographic structure of cellulose III{sub II} is characterized by disorder; the unit cell (space group P2{sub 1}; a = 4.45 {angstrom}, b = 7.64 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 106.96{sup o}) is occupied by one chain that is the average of statistically disordered antiparallel chains. {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR studies reveal the presence of three distinct molecular conformations that can be interpreted as a mixture of two different crystal forms, one equivalent to cellulose III{sub I}, and another with two independent glucosyl conformations in the asymmetric unit. Both X-ray crystallographic and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic results are consistent with an aggregated microdomain structure for cellulose III{sub II}. This structure can be generated from a new crystal form (space group P2{sub 1}; a = 4.45 {angstrom}, b = 14.64 {angstrom}, c = 10.36 {angstrom}, {alpha} = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 90.05{sup o}; two crystallographically independent and antiparallel chains; gt hydroxymethyl groups) by multiple dislocation defects. These defects produce microdomains of the new crystal form and cellulose III{sub I} that scanning microprobe diffraction studies show are distributed consistently through the cellulose III{sub II} fiber.

Wada, Masahisa; Heux, Laurent; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Langan, Paul; (U of Tokyo); (CNRS-CRMD); (LANL)

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers is described for implementation on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on the ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion-charge state distributions, and impurity transport. These data are derived from observations of the satellite spectra of heliumlike argon, ArthinspXVII, which is the dominant charge state for electron temperatures in the range from 0.4 to 3.0 keV and which is accessible to NSTX. Experiments at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) demonstrate that a throughput of 2{times}10{sup 5}thinspphotons/s (corresponding to the count-rate limit of the present detectors) can easily be obtained with small, nonperturbing argon gas puffs of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}3}thinspTorrthinspscr(l)/s, so that it is possible to record spectra with a small statistical error and a good time resolution (typically 50 and 1 ms in some cases). Employing a novel design, which is based on the imaging properties of spherically bent crystals, the spectrometers will provide spectrally and spatially resolved images of the plasma for all experimental conditions, which include ohmically heated discharges as well as plasmas with rf and neutral-beam heating. The conceptual design, experimental results on the focusing properties, and relevant spectral data from TEXTOR are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Roquemore, A.L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beiersdorfer, P. [Department of Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kahn, S.M. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Elliott, S.R. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Fraenkel, B. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)] [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-temperature X-ray diffraction study of crystallization and phase segregation on spinel-type lithium manganese oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To study crystallization process of spinel-type Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4}, in-situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction technique (HT-XRD) was utilized for the mixture consisting of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} as starting material in the temperature range of 25-700 deg. C. In-situ HT-XRD analysis directly revealed that crystallization process of Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} was significantly affected by the difference in the Li/Mn molar ratio in the precursor. Single phase of stoichiometric LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} formed at 700 deg. C. The formation of single phase of spinel was achieved at the lower temperature than the stoichiometric sample as Li/Mn molar ratio in the precursor increased. Lattice parameter of the stoichiometric LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} at 25 deg. C was 8.24 A and expanded to 8.31 A at 700 deg. C, which corresponds to the approximately 3% expansion in the unit cell volume. From the slope of the lattice parameter change as a function of temperatures, linear thermal expansion coefficient of the stoichiometric LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} was calculated to be 1.2x10{sup -5} deg. C{sup -1} in this temperature range. When the Li/Mn molar ratio in Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} increased (x > 0.1), the spinel phase segregated into the Li{sub 1+y}Mn{sub 2-y}O{sub 4} (x > y) and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} during heating, which involved the oxygen loss from the materials. During the cooling process from 700 deg. C, and the segregated phase merged into Li{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} with oxygen incorporation. Such trend directly observed by in-situ HT-XRD was supported by thermal gravimetric analysis as reversible weight (oxygen) loss/gain at higher temperature (500-700 deg. C). - Graphical abstract: Non-linear variation of lattice parameters of the Li excess LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinels was observed during cooling process from 700 to 25 deg. C.

Komaba, Shinichi, E-mail: komaba@rs.kagu.tus.ac.j [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan); Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Ikemoto, Sachi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Developments in limited data image reconstruction techniques for ultrahigh-resolution x-ray tomographic imaging of microchips  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of soft x-ray (about 1.8 KeV) nanotomography techniques for the evaluation and failure mode analysis of microchips was investigated. Realistic numerical simulations of the imaging process were performed and a specialized approach to image reconstruction from limited projection data was devised. Prior knowledge of the structure and its component materials was used to eliminate artifacts in the reconstructed images so that defects and deviations from the original design could be visualized. Simulated data sets were generated with a total of 21 projections over three different angular ranges: -50 to +50, - 80 to +80 and -90 to +90 degrees. In addition, a low level of illumination was assumed. It was shown that sub-micron defects within one cell of a microchip (< 10 pm3) could be imaged in 3-D using such an approach.

Haddad, W.S.; Trebes, J.E.

1997-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

Methods development for diffraction and spectroscopy studies of metalloenzymes at X-ray free-electron lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Coherent Light Source, taking...Coherent Light Source (LCLS...radiation energy by the X-ray...developed by us to process...large sample consumption is not sustainable...Coherent Light Source (LCLS...operated for the US Department of Energy Office of...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new method of observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar, for observing weak extended x-ray sources with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager RHESSI. INTRODUCTION The Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI,1 is a space-based solar x

California at Berkeley, University of

352

Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Combined Neutron and Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the BaCe0.85-xZrxY0.15O3-? (0.1 ? x ? 0.4) Proton Conductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combined Neutron and Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the BaCe0.85-xZrxY0.15O3-? (0.1 ? x ? 0.4) Proton Conductors ... § Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, ETHZ and PSI, CH-5232, Villigen PSI, Switzerland ... Combined neutron and X-ray synchrotron diffraction have been used to unveil the structural properties for the BaCe0.85-xZrxY0.15O3-? ...

Lorenzo Malavasi; Cristina Tealdi; Clemens Ritter; Vladimir Pomjakushin; Fabia Gozzo; Yuri Diaz-Fernandez

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a cell. This use of soft x-ray tomography is now generating considerable interest in the pharmaceutical industry as a potential method for reducing the cost and time it takes to...

355

Superbright/fast X-rays image single layer of proteins | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which have been overlooked because of their inability to stack properly. EMSL Scientist James Evans and a team of researchers report their results with this unique form of X-ray...

356

Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation dose compared with the X- ray examinations commonly used in routine clinical practice for the estimationradiation dose data and appropriate risk coef?cients provided by scienti?c committees. Risk estimation

Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Shi, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, MS37-B332, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Reflection nebulae in the Galactic Center: the case for soft X-ray imaging polarimetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of irradiation and fluorescence of the 6.4 keV bright giant molecular clouds surrounding Sgr A*, the central supermassive black hole of our Galaxy, remains enigmatic. Testing the theory of a past active period of Sgr A* requires X-ray polarimetry. In this paper, we show how modern imaging polarimeters could revolutionize our understanding of the Galactic Center. Through Monte Carlo modeling, we produce a 4-8 keV polarization map of the Galactic Center, focusing on the polarimetric signature produced by Sgr B1, Sgr B2, G0.11-0.11, Bridge E, Bridge D, Bridge B2, MC2, MC1, Sgr C3, Sgr C2, and Sgr C1. We estimate the resulting polarization, include polarized flux dilution by the diffuse plasma emission detected toward the GC, and simulate the polarization map that modern polarimetric detectors would obtain assuming the performances of a mission prototype. The eleven reflection nebulae investigated in this paper present a variety of polarization signatures, ranging from nearly unpolarized to highly pola...

Marin, F; Soffitta, P; Karas, V; Kunneriath, D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Production of wavelength-selective, time-resolved, x-ray images of a neon plasma in the SPEED 2 plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of pinching of a neon plasma in the SPEED 2 facility has been investigated by recording wavelength-selective, x-ray images of the plasma with good space and time resolution. A series of images of the...

S. V. Bobashev; D. M. Simanovskii; G. Decker; W. Kies…

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Robustness of phase retrieval methods in x-ray phase contrast imaging: A comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The robustness of the phase retrieval methods is of critical importance for limiting and reducing radiation doses involved in x-ray phase contrast imaging. This work is to compare the robustness of two phase retrieval methods by analyzing the phase maps retrieved from the experimental images of a phantom. Methods: Two phase retrieval methods were compared. One method is based on the transport of intensity equation (TIE) for phase contrast projections, and the TIE-based method is the most commonly used method for phase retrieval in the literature. The other is the recently developed attenuation-partition based (AP-based) phase retrieval method. The authors applied these two methods to experimental projection images of an air-bubble wrap phantom for retrieving the phase map of the bubble wrap. The retrieved phase maps obtained by using the two methods are compared. Results: In the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the TIE-based method, no bubble is recognizable, hence, this method failed completely for phase retrieval from these bubble wrap images. Even with the help of the Tikhonov regularization, the bubbles are still hardly visible and buried in the cluttered background in the retrieved phase map. The retrieved phase values with this method are grossly erroneous. In contrast, in the wrap's phase map retrieved by using the AP-based method, the bubbles are clearly recovered. The retrieved phase values with the AP-based method are reasonably close to the estimate based on the thickness-based measurement. The authors traced these stark performance differences of the two methods to their different techniques employed to deal with the singularity problem involved in the phase retrievals. Conclusions: This comparison shows that the conventional TIE-based phase retrieval method, regardless if Tikhonov regularization is used or not, is unstable against the noise in the wrap's projection images, while the AP-based phase retrieval method is shown in these experiments to be superior to the TIE-based method for the robustness in performing the phase retrieval.

Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States); Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

X-ray grating interferometer for materials-science imaging at a low-coherent wiggler source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray phase-contrast radiography and tomography enable to increase contrast for weakly absorbing materials. Recently x-raygratinginterferometers were developed that extend the possibility of phase-contrast imaging from highly brilliant radiation sources like third-generation synchrotron sources to non-coherent conventional x-ray tube sources. Here we present the first installation of a three gratingx-rayinterferometer at a low-coherence wigglersource at the beamline W2 (HARWI II) operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht at the second-generation synchrotron storage ring DORIS (DESY Hamburg Germany). Using this type of the wiggler insertion device with a millimeter-sized source allows monochromatic phase-contrast imaging of centimeter sized objects with high photon flux. Thus biological and materials-science imaging applications can highly profit from this imaging modality. The specially designed gratinginterferometer currently works in the photon energy range from 22 to 30 keV and the range will be increased by using adapted x-ray optical gratings. Our results of an energy-dependent visibility measurement in comparison to corresponding simulations demonstrate the performance of the new setup.

Julia Herzen; Tilman Donath; Felix Beckmann; Malte Ogurreck; Christian David; Jürgen Mohr; Franz Pfeiffer; Andreas Schreyer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager: FOXSI Sam Kruckera,b, Steven Christec, Lindsay Glesenera,d, Shin-nosuke Ishikawaa, Stephen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial, solar physics, solar flares, silicon strip detectors, grazing-incidence optics, high-energy x-ray optics

California at Berkeley, University of

363

Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Relationship between dislocations and residual stresses in cold-drawn pearlitic steel analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed the dislocation distribution of cold-drawn pearlitic-steel wire by using the line-profile analysis based on the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD). Although this line-profile analysis requires a high resolution in reciprocal space, the resolution for EDXD is generally poor due to the energy resolution of the detector. Our analysis demonstrated that the resolution in the reciprocal space can be maximized at small scattering angles. Using the line-profile analysis based on the EDXD, the microstructural parameters such as the crystallite size and the dislocation density of the ferrite phase in the pearlitic steel were successfully analyzed. In addition, the distribution of the residual stress of the ferrite phase of a pearlitic steel wire was also analyzed using the EDXD measurement. - Highlights: • Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction is applied to the line-profile analysis. • Distribution of dislocations in ferrite in the pearlitic steel wire is analyzed. • Relationship between dislocations and residual stress is discussed.

Sato, Shigeo, E-mail: s.sato@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Wagatsuma, Kazuaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kumagai, Masayoshi; Imafuku, Muneyuki [Faculty of Engineering, Tokyo City University, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Tashiro, Hitoshi [Gyoda 361-0011 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo 679-5198 (Japan); Shobu, Takahiasa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo 679-5184 (Japan)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

In situ apparatus for the study of clathrate hydrates relevant to solar system bodies using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clathrate hydrates are believed to play a significant role in various solar system environments, e.g. comets, and the surfaces and interiors of icy satellites, however the structural factors governing their formation and dissociation are poorly understood. We demonstrate the use of a high pressure gas cell, combined with variable temperature cooling and time-resolved data collection, to the in situ study of clathrate hydrates under conditions relevant to solar system environments. Clathrates formed and processed within the cell are monitored in situ using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction allows the formation of clathrate hydrates to be observed as CO2 gas is applied to ice formed within the cell. Complete conversion is obtained by annealing at temperatures just below the ice melting point. A subsequent rise in the quantity of clathrate is observed as the cell is thermally cycled. Four regions between 100-5000cm-1 are present in the Raman spectra that carry feature...

Day, Sarah J; Evans, Aneurin; Parker, Julia E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Characterization of room temperature recrystallization kinetics in electroplated copper thin films with concurrent x-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concurrent in-situ four-point probe resistivity and high resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were used to characterize room temperature recrystallization in electroplated Cu thin films. The x-ray data were used to obtain the variation with time of the integrated intensities and the peak-breadth from the Cu 111 and 200 reflections of the transforming grains. The variation of the integrated intensity and resistivity data with time was analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. For both 111-textured and non-textured electroplated Cu films, four-point probe resistivity measurements yielded shorter transformation times than the values obtained from the integrated intensities of the corresponding Cu 111 reflections. In addition, the JMAK exponents fitted to the resistivity data were significantly smaller. These discrepancies could be explained by considering the different material volumes from which resistivity and diffraction signals originated, and the physical processes which linked these signals to the changes in the evolving microstructure. Based on these issues, calibration of the resistivity analysis with direct structural characterization techniques is recommended.

Treger, Mikhail; Noyan, I. C. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States)] [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York 10027 (United States); Witt, Christian [GlobalFoundries, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)] [GlobalFoundries, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Cabral, Cyril; Murray, Conal; Jordan-Sweet, Jean [IBM, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)] [IBM, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Rosenberg, Robert [State University of New York, the University at Albany, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)] [State University of New York, the University at Albany, Albany, NY 12203 (United States); Eisenbraun, Eric [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

Schot, Gijs, vander

368

High-resolution chemical imaging of gold nanoparticles using hard x-ray ptychography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine resonant scattering with (ptychographic) scanning coherent diffraction microscopy to determine the chemical state of gold nanoparticles with high spatial resolution. Ptychographic images of the sample are recorded for a series of energies around the gold L{sub 3} absorption edge. From these data, chemical information in the form of absorption and resonant scattering spectra is reconstructed at each location in the sample. For gold nanoparticles of about 100 nm diameter, a spatial resolution of about 20-30 nm is obtained. In the future, this microscopy approach will open the way to operando studies of heterogeneous catalysts on the nanometer scale.

Hoppe, R.; Patommel, J.; Schroer, C. G. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)] [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Reinhardt, J. [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany) [Institute of Structural Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Germany; Hofmann, G.; Grunwaldt, J.-D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, D-76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Damsgaard, C. D. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark)] [Center for Electron Nanoscopy and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Wellenreuther, G.; Falkenberg, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Modeling the imaging performance of prototype organic x-ray imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unified Monte Carlo and cascaded systems model for the simulation of active-matrix flat-panel imagers is presented. With few input parameters, the model simulated the imaging performance of previously measured flat-panel imagers with reasonable accuracy. The model is used to predict the properties of conceptual flat-panel imagers based on organic semiconductors on plastic substrates. The model suggests that significant improvements in resolution and detective quantum efficiency could be achieved by operating such a detector in a back-side illuminated configuration, or by employing two imaging arrays arranged face-to-face. The effect of semiconductor properties on the conceptual imagers is investigated. According to the model, a photodiode quantum efficiency of 25% and dark current of less than 100 pA mm{sup -2} would be satisfactory for a prototype imager, while a competitive imager would require a photodiode quantum efficiency of 40-50% with a dark current of less than 10 pA mm{sup -2} to be quantum limited over the radiographic exposure range.

Blakesley, J. C.; Speller, R. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom); Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

The electron distribution and SXT images of a coronal soft X-ray source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The soft X-ray emission may be thermal or non-thermal. The fact that the rise time remains constant as a function of energy points to the same acceleration process for electrons from 2 to 100 keV. For either ... ...

J. M. McTiernan; S. R. Kane; J. M. Loran

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the catalytic subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato tuber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic subunit of potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase has been crystallized with one crystal form diffracting to 2.8 Å belonging to a space group P2. Another crystal form obtained in the presence of the substrate analog Cr-ATP, belongs to space group and diffracted to 2.2 Å.

Binderup, K.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Simultaneous measurement of bubble size, velocity and void fraction in two-phase bubbly flows with time-resolved X-ray imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Key parameters of two-phase flows, such as void fraction and microscale bubble size, shape and velocity, were simultaneously measured using time-resolved X-ray imaging.

Jung, S.Y.

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

3-Dimensional rotational X-ray imaging, 3D-RX: image quality and patient dose simulation for optimisation studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also affects the IQ. The influence of the basic 3D reconstruction processes on sharpness...1922). 8. Kramers, H. A. On the theory of X-ray absorption of the continuous...tank irradiated by X-rays. Arkiv fur Fysik 14 (32), 497-511 (1958). 14. Magalhaes......

J. N. Kroon

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein from Chenopodium album  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A water-soluble chlorophyll-binding protein with photoconvertibility from C. album was extracted, purified and crystallized in a darkroom. The crystal diffracted to around 2.0 Å resolution.

Ohtsuki, T.

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Crystal Structure and Hydrogen-Bonding System in Cellulose I? from Synchrotron X-ray and Neutron Fiber Diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The crystal and molecular structure together with the hydrogen-bonding system in cellulose I? has been determined using synchrotron and neutron diffraction data recorded from oriented fibrous samples prepared by aligning cellulose microcrystals from ...?

Yoshiharu Nishiyama; Paul Langan; Henri Chanzy

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

379

The High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Detector Planes for the MIRAX Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment ...

Rodrigues, Barbara H G; Allen, Branden; Hong, Jaesub; Barthelmy, Scott; Braga, Joao; D'Amico, Flavio; Rothschild, Richard E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Development of a Microchannel Plate-Based Gated X-ray Imager for Imaging and Spectroscopy Experiments on Z  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster describes a microchannelplate (MCP)–based, gated x-ray imager developed by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), and Sandia National Laboratories(SNL) over the past several years. The camera consists of a 40 mm × 40 mm MCP, coated with eight 4 mm wide microstrips. The camera is gated by sending subnanosecond high-voltage pulses across the striplines. We have performed an extensive characterization of the camera, the results of which we present here. The camera has an optical gate profile width (time resolution) as narrow as 150 ps and detector uniformity of better than 30% along the length of a strip, far superior than what was achieved in previous designs. The spatial resolution is on the order of 40 microns for imaging applications and a dynamic range of between ~100 and ~1000. We also present results from a Monte Carlo simulation code developed by NSTec over the last several years. Agreement between the simulation results and the experimental measurements is very good.

Wu, M., Kruschwitz, C. A., Tibbitts, A., Rochau, G.

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

X-ray diffraction study of (TlInSe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TlGaTe{sub 2}){sub x} crystal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystallographic and dynamic characteristics of TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals have been studied by X-ray diffraction in the temperature range of 85-320 K. The temperature dependences of the unit-cell parameters a of TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals, as well as their coefficients of thermal expansion along the [100] direction, are determined. The concentration dependences of the unit-cell parameters a and c for (TlInSe{sub 2}){sub 1-x}(TlGaTe{sub 2}){sub x} crystals are measured. Anomalies are found in the temperature dependences of the unit-cell parameters a and, correspondingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion, indicating the existence of phase transitions in TlInSe{sub 2} and TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals.

Sheleg, A. U., E-mail: sheleg@ifttp.bas-net.by; Zub, E. M.; Yachkovskii, A. Ya. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, State Scientific and Production Association, Scientific and Practical Materials Research Center (Belarus); Mustafaeva, S. N.; Kerimova, E. M. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Calcium binding in. alpha. -amylases: An X-ray diffraction study at 2. 1- angstrom resolution of two enzymes from Aspergillus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction analysis (at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution) of an acid alpha-amylase from Aspergillus niger allowed a detailed description of the stereochemistry of the calcium-binding sites. The primary site (which is essential in maintaining proper folding around the active site) contains a tightly bound Ca{sup 2+} with an unusually high number of eight ligands. A secondary binding site was identified at the bottom of the substrate binding cleft; it involves the residues presumed to play a catalytic role (Asp206 and Glu230). This explains the inhibitory effect of calcium observed at higher concentrations. Neutral Aspergillus oryzae (TAKA) {alpha}-amylase was also refined in a new crystal at 2.1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure of this homologous (over 80%) enzyme and addition kinetic studies support all the structural conclusions regarding both calcium-binding sites.

Boel, E.; Jensen, V.J.; Petersen, S.B.; Thim, L. Woldike, H.F. (NOVO-Nordisk Industri AS, Bagsvaerd (Denmark)); Brady, L.; Brzozowski, AM.; Derewenda, Z.; Dodson, G.G.; Swift, H. (Univ. of York (England))

1990-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Investigation of the near-surface structures of polar InN films by chemical-state-discriminated hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface structures of polar InN films were investigated by laboratory-based hard X-ray photoelectron diffraction (HXPD) with chemical-state-discrimination. HXPD patterns from In 3d{sub 5/2} and N 1s core levels of the In-polar and N-polar InN films were different from each other and compared with the simulation results using a multiple-scattering cluster model. It was found that the near-surface structure of the In-polar InN film was close to the ideal wurtzite structure. On the other hand, on the N-polar InN film, defects-rich surface was formed. In addition, the existence of the In-polar domains was observed in the HXPD patterns.

Yang, A. L.; Yamashita, Y.; Kobata, M.; Yoshikawa, H.; Sakata, O.; Kobayashi, K. [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)] [Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, National Institute for Materials Science, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Matsushita, T. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)] [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Pis, I. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)] [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, 18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Imura, M. [Wide Bandgap Materials Group, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)] [Wide Bandgap Materials Group, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)] [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Nanishi, Y. [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, South Korea and Research Organization of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)] [WCU Hybrid Materials Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, South Korea and Research Organization of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Noji Higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

In-situ x-ray diffraction study of the growth of highly strained epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3} thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction was performed during the growth of BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates using both off-axis RF magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition techniques. It was found that the films were ferroelectric during the growth process, and the presence or absence of a bottom SrRuO{sub 3} electrode played an important role in the growth of the films. Pulsed laser deposited films on SrRuO{sub 3} displayed an anomalously high tetragonality and unit volume, which may be connected to the previously predicted negative pressure phase of BaTiO{sub 3}.

Sinsheimer, J.; Callori, S. J.; Ziegler, B.; Bein, B.; Dawber, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Chinta, P. V.; Ashrafi, A.; Headrick, R. L. [Department of Physics, Cook Physical Science Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Cook Physical Science Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

High-Temperature Phase Transitions in CsH2PO4 Under Ambient and High-Pressure Conditions: A Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To clarify the microscopic origin of the temperature-induced three-order-of-magnitude jump in the proton conductivity of CsH2PO4 (superprotonic behavior), we have investigated its crystal structure modifications within the 25-300 C temperature range under both ambient- and high-pressure conditions using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Our high-pressure data show no indication of the thermal decomposition/polymerization at the crystal surface recently proposed as the origin of the enhanced proton conductivity. Instead, we found direct evidence that the superprotonic behavior of the title material is associated with a polymorphic structural transition to a high-temperature cubic phase. Our results are in excellent agreement with previous high-pressure ac impedance measurements.

Botez,C.; Hermosillo, J.; Zhang, J.; Qian, J.; Zhao, Y.; Majzlan, J.; Chianelli, R.; Pantea, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Crystal Structures of the Trifluoromethyl Sulfonates M(SO3CF3)2 (M = Mg, Ca, Ba, Zn, Cu) from Synchrotron X-ray Powder Diffraction Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal structures of divalent metal salts of trifluoromethyl sulfonic acid ('trifluoromethyl sulfonates') M(SO{sub 3}CF{sub 3}){sub 2} (M = Mg, Ca, Ba, Zn, Cu) were determined from high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data. Magnesium, calcium and zinc trifluoromethyl sulfonate crystallize in the rhombohedral space group R{bar 3}. Barium trifluoromethyl sulfonate crystallizes in the monoclinic space group I2/a(C2/c) and copper trifluoromethyl sulfonate crystallizes in the triclinic group P{bar 1}. Within the crystal structures the trifluoromethyl sulfonate anions are arranged in double layers with the apolar CF{sub 3} groups pointing towards each other. The cations are located next to the SO{sub 3} groups. The symmetry relations between the different crystal structures have been analyzed.

Dinnebier,R.; Sofina, N.; Hildebrandt, L.; Jansen, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

X-ray diffraction study on pressure-induced phase transformations and the equation of state of ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements up to 19.8?GPa in zinc digallium telluride (ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4}) at room temperature. An irreversible structural phase transition takes place at pressures above 12.1?GPa and upon decompression a third polymorph of ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} was recovered as a metastable phase at pressures below 2.9?GPa. Rietveld refinements were carried out for the three detected polymorphs, being their possible crystal structures reported. The axial compressibilities for the low-pressure phase of ZnGa{sub 2}Te{sub 4} have been determined as well as the equation of state of the low- and high-pressure phases. The reported results are compared with those available in the literature for related compounds. Pressure-induced coordination changes and transition mechanisms are also discussed.

Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada-ICMUV, MALTA Consolider Team, Universidad de Valencia, Edificio de Investigación, C/Dr. Moliner 50, Burjassot, 46100 Valencia (Spain); Kumar, R. S. [High Pressure Science and Engineering Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4002 (United States); Gomis, O. [Centro de Tecnologías Físicas: Acústica, Materiales y Astrofísica, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Manjón, F. J. [Instituto de Diseño para la Fabricación y Producción Automatizada, MALTA Consolider Team, Universitat Politècnica de València, 46022 València (Spain); Ursaki, V. V.; Tiginyanu, I. M. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, 2028 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Phase transitions in heated Sr{sub 2}MgTeO{sub 6} double perovskite oxide probed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Double-perovskite oxide Sr{sub 2}MgTeO{sub 6} has been synthetized, and its crystal structure was probed by the technique of X-ray diffraction at room temperature. The structure is monoclinic, space group I2/m. Temperature-induced phase transitions in this compound were investigated by Raman spectroscopy up to 550?°C. Two low-wavenumber modes corresponding to external lattice vibrations merge at temperature of around 100?°C, indicating a phase transition from the monoclinic (I2/m) to the tetragonal (I4/m) structure. At 300?°C, changes in the slopes of temperature dependencies of external and O–Te–O bending modes are detected and interpreted as a second phase transition from the tetragonal (I4/m) to the cubic (Fm-3m) structure.

Manoun, Bouchaib, E-mail: manounb@gmail.com; Tamraoui, Y. [Equipe Ingénierie et environnement, Laboratoire de Chimie Appliquée et Environnement, Université Hassan 1er, Settat 26000 (Morocco)] [Equipe Ingénierie et environnement, Laboratoire de Chimie Appliquée et Environnement, Université Hassan 1er, Settat 26000 (Morocco); Lazor, P. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)] [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Yang, Wenge [High Pressure Synergetic Consortium, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA and Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China)] [High Pressure Synergetic Consortium, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA and Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

389

Influence of geometrical factors on phase contrast fiber images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray field phase differences caused by an object can induce edge enhancement in a radiological image Phase contrast effects have been interpreted using a model based on x-ray Fresnel diffraction The dependence of edge-enhancement on x-ray energy, object ... Keywords: digital mammography, edge enhancement, phase contrast, x-ray diffraction

Margarita Chevalier; Lorena Chanes; Eduardo Guibelalde; María-Ester Brandan; Tatiana Alieva

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

X-ray Phase Contrast analysis - Digital wavefront development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical schemes that enable imaging of the phase shift produced by an object have become popular in the x-ray region, where phase can be the dominant contrast mechanism. The propagation-based technique consists of recording the interference pattern produced by choosing one or several sample-to-detector distances. Pioneering studies, carried out making use of synchrotron radiation, demonstrated that this technique results in a dramatic increase of image contrast and detail visibility, allowing the detection of structures invisible with conventional techniques. An experimental and theoretical study of in-line hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging had been performed. The theoretical description of the technique is based on Fresnel diffraction. As an illustration of the potential of this quantitative imaging technique, high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of simple objects will be presented.

Idir, Mourad [Metrology Beamline, Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Potier, Jonathan [Phaseview, Palaiseau (France); Universite Paul Sabatier-Toulouse III, Metrology Beamline, Synchrotron SOLEIL, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fricker, Sebastien [Phaseview, Palaiseau (France); Snigirev, Anatoly; Snigireva, Irina [ESRF, Grenoble (France); Modi, M. H. [X-ray Optics Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore (India)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

LJournal of Alloys and Compounds 291 (1999) 94101 The simultaneous powder X-ray and neutron diffraction refinement of two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

melting of metals in the The intermetallic ternary transition metal nitrides and presence of carbon]. These phases are of interest decomposition of transition metal tris­ethylenediamine to the solid state chemist diffraction refinement of two h-carbide type nitrides, Fe Mo N and Co Mo N, prepared by3 3 3 3 ammonolysis

zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

392

The high resolution X-ray imaging detector planes for the MIRAX mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5–200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-masks telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm2, a large field of view (60° ? 60° FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution ( ~ 2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~ 2.1 keV @ 60 keV and 2.3 @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.

B H G Rodrigues; J E Grindlay; B Allen; J Hong; S Barthelmy; J Braga; F D'Amico; R E Rothschild

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Detector Planes for the MIRAX Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MIRAX X-ray observatory, the first Brazilian-led astrophysics space mission, is designed to perform an unprecedented wide-field, wide-band hard X-ray (5-200 keV) survey of Galactic X-ray transient sources. In the current configuration, MIRAX will carry a set of four coded-mask telescopes with high spatial resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detector planes, each one consisting of an array of 64 closely tiled CZT pixelated detectors. Taken together, the four telescopes will have a total detection area of 959 cm^2, a large field of view (60x60 degrees FWHM), high angular resolution for this energy range (6 arcmin) and very good spectral resolution (~2 keV @ 60 keV). A stratospheric balloon-borne prototype of one of the MIRAX telescopes has been developed, tested and flown by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) as part of the ProtoEXIST program. In this paper we show results of validation and calibration tests with individual CZT detectors of the ProtoEXIST second generation experiment (P2). Each one of 64 detector units of the P2 detector plane consists of an ASIC, developed by Caltech for the NuSTAR telescope, hybridized to a CZT crystal with 0.6 mm pixel size. The performance of each detector was evaluated using radioactive sources in the laboratory. The calibration results show that the P2 detectors have average energy resolution of ~2.1 keV @ 60 keV and ~2.3 keV @ 122 keV. P2 was also successfully tested on near-space environment on a balloon flight, demonstrating the detector unit readiness for integration on a space mission telescope, as well as satisfying all MIRAX mission requirements.

Barbara H. G. Rodrigues; Jonathan E. Grindlay; Branden Allen; Jaesub Hong; Scott Barthelmy; Joao Braga; Flavio D'Amico; Richard E. Rothschild

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

Arraying compact pixels of transition-edge microcalorimeters for imaging x-ray spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are developing superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters for astronomical x-ray spectroscopy. We have obtained very high energy resolution (2.4 eV at 1.5 keV and 3.7 eV at 3.3 keV) in large isolated TES pixels using Mo/Au proximity-effect bilayers on silicon-nitride membranes several mm wide. In order to be truly suitable for use behind an x-ray telescope however such devices need to be arrayed with a pixel size and focal-plane coverage matched to the telescope focal length and spatial resolution. For the Constellation-X mission this requires fitting the TES its thermal link and contact wiring into a 0.25 mm square a far more compact geometry than has previously been investigated. We have demonstrated that the weak thermal link can be restricted to a narrow (?10 micron) perimeter of membrane around the TES and still provide a thermal conductance in the acceptable range. Varying the size and placement of slits in that nitride perimeter we can tune that value.

C. K. Stahle; M. A. Lindeman; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; M. J. Li; N. Tralshawala; F. M. Finkbeiner; R. P. Brekosky; J. A. Chervenak

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

X-Ray Spectra for Bone Quality Assessment Using Energy Dispersive Counting and Imaging Detectors with Dual Energy Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the present study was the optimization of dual energy x-ray spectra through the estimation of ... monoenergetic x-ray beams provides the optimum dual energy pairs minimizing the CV. Single and double ....

P. Sotiropoulou; G. Fountos; N. Martini…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Analysis of the KROTOS KFC test by coupling X-Ray image analysis and MC3D calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a hypothetical severe accident sequence in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), the hot molten materials (corium) issuing from the degraded reactor core may generate a steam explosion if they come in contact with water and may damage the structures and threaten the reactor integrity. The SERENA program is an international OECD project that aims at helping the understanding of this phenomenon also called Fuel Coolant Interaction (FCI) by providing data. CEA takes part in this program by performing tests in its KROTOS facility where steam explosions using prototypic corium can be triggered. Data about the different phases in the premixing are extracted from the KROTOS X-Ray radioscopy images by using KIWI software (KROTOS Image analysis of Water-corium Interaction) currently developed by CEA. The MC3D code, developed by IRSN, is a thermal-hydraulic multiphase code mainly dedicated to FCI studies. It is composed of two applications: premixing and explosion. An overall FCI calculation with MC3D requires a premixing calculation followed by an explosion calculation. The present paper proposes an alternative approach in which all the features of the premixing are extracted from the X-Ray pictures using the KIWI software and transferred to an MC3D dataset for a direct simulation of the explosion. The main hypothesis are discussed as well as the first explosion results obtained with MC3D for the KROTOS KFC test. These results are rather encouraging and are analyzed on the basis of comparisons with the experimental data. (authors)

Brayer, C.; Charton, A.; Grishchenko, D.; Fouquart, P.; Bullado, Y.; Compagnon, F.; Correggio, P.; Cassiaut-Louis, N.; Piluso, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA Cadarache, DEN, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Les-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Superficial dosimetry imaging based on ?erenkov emission for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: ?erenkov radiation emission occurs in all tissue, when charged particles (either primary or secondary) travel at velocity above the threshold for the ?erenkov effect (about 220 KeV in tissue for electrons). This study presents the first examination of optical ?erenkov emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose for MV x-ray beams.Methods: In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of flat and curved surfaces were studied to analyze the energy spectra of charged particles produced in different regions near the surfaces when irradiated by MV x-ray beams. ?erenkov emission intensity and radiation dose were directly simulated in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms. The sampling region of superficial dosimetry based on ?erenkov radiation was simulated in layered skin models. Angular distributions of optical emission from the surfaces were investigated. Tissue mimicking phantoms with flat and curved surfaces were imaged with a time domain gating system. The beam field sizes (50 × 50–200 × 200 mm{sup 2}), incident angles (0°–70°) and imaging regions were all varied.Results: The entrance or exit region of the tissue has nearly homogeneous energy spectra across the beam, such that their ?erenkov emission is proportional to dose. Directly simulated local intensity of ?erenkov and radiation dose in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms further validate that this signal is proportional to radiation dose with absolute average discrepancy within 2%, and the largest within 5% typically at the beam edges. The effective sampling depth could be tuned from near 0 up to 6 mm by spectral filtering. The angular profiles near the theoretical Lambertian emission distribution for a perfect diffusive medium, suggesting that angular correction of ?erenkov images may not be required even for curved surface. The acquisition speed and signal to noise ratio of the time domain gating system were investigated for different acquisition procedures, and the results show there is good potential for real-time superficial dose monitoring. Dose imaging under normal ambient room lighting was validated, using gated detection and a breast phantom.Conclusions: This study indicates that ?erenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable way to superficial dosimetry imaging in real time for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beams.

Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 and Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Glaser, Adam K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J.; Fox, Colleen J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 and Department of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)] [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 and Department of Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States) [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St 200 million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UAH/M.Sun et al; Optical: NASA, ESA, & the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Caption: This composite image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue

399

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA http://chandra.harvard.edu Four Supernova Remnants: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory's Chandra X-ray Observatory, four newly processed images of supernova remnants dramatically illustrate

400

Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic study of disproportionating enzyme from potato  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disproportionating enzyme from potato was crystallized and preliminarily analyzed using X-ray diffraction.

Imamura, K.

2004-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Evaluation of X-ray Diffraction of Bit Cuttings as a Proxy for Core Data in Determining Bulk Mineralogy and Clay Species, Bakken Formation, Williston Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The principal question addressed in this study concerns the applicability of x-ray diffractometry to determine bulk rock mineralogy and clay species in the absence of… (more)

Barnes, Stuart Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Automated X-ray image annotation: single versus ensemble of support vector machines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in the medical imaging technology has lead to an exponential growth in the number of digital images that needs to be acquired, analyzed, classified, stored and retrieved in medical centers. As a result, medical image classification and retrieval ...

Devrim Unay; Octavian Soldea; Sureyya Ozogur-Akyuz; Mujdat Cetin; Aytul Ercil

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Saturation and Dynamic Range of Microchannel Plate-Based X-Ray Imagers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes recent advances in Monte Carlo simulations of microchannel plate (MCP)–based x-ray detectors, a continuation of ongoing work in this area. A Monte Carlo simulation model has been developed over the past several years by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The model simulates the secondary electron emission process in an MCP pore and includes the effects of gain saturation. In this work we focus on MCP gain saturation and dynamic range. We have performed modeling and experimental characterizations of L/D = 46, 10-micron diameter, MCP-based detectors. The detectors are typically operated by applying a subnanosecond voltage pulse, which gates the detector on. Agreement between the simulations and experiment is very good for a variety of voltage pulse waveforms ranging in width from 150 to 300 ps. The results indicate that such an MCP begins to show nonlinear gain around 5 × 10^4 electrons per pore and hard saturation around 105 electrons per pore. The simulations show a difference in MCP sensitivity vs voltage for high flux of photons producing large numbers of photoelectrons on a subpicosecond timescale. Simulations and experiments both indicate an MCP dynamic range of 1 to 10,000, and the dynamic range depends on how the voltage is applied.

,

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Diffraction and Transmission Synchrotron Imaging at the German Light Source ANKA--Potential Industrial Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffraction and transmission synchrotron imaging methods have proven to be highly suitable for investigations in materials research and non-destructive evaluation. The high flux and spatial coherence of X-rays from modern synchrotron light sources allows one to work using high resolution and different contrast modalities. This article gives a short overview of different transmission and diffraction imaging methods with high potential for industrial applications, now available for commercial access via the German light source ANKA (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and its new department ANKA Commercial Service (ANKA COS, http://www.anka-cos.de)

Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation-ANKA, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe/K.I.T., Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Helfen, Lukas; Simon, Rolf; Luebbert, Daniel; Baumbach, Tilo [Institute for Synchrotron Radiation-ANKA, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe/K.I.T., Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Danilewsky, Andreas N. [Crystallographic Institute, University Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 5, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hydration and complex formation study on concentrated MCl2 solutions [M=Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II)] by x?ray diffraction technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrated aqueous chloride solutions containing equal amounts of transition metal ions of almost equal ionic radii (Co2+ Ni2+ and Cu2+) have been examined by the x?ray diffraction technique. CoCl2 and Nicl2solutions show distribution curves very similar to each other which leads to the conclusion that the same dominant species should occur in both systems. The analysis of the structure functions can be achieved by considering M(H2O)2+ 6 (M=Co2+ Ni2+) as the dominant species although indication is given in favor of the presence of about 50% of the M(H2O)5Cl+ complex [and the rest M(H2O)2+ 6] in both solutions. The distribution curve of CuCl2solution is markedly different from those of cobalt and nickel. Equatorial positions in the distorted octahedral copper coordination are on the average occupied by about 2.8 water molecules (at 1.95 Å) and about 1.2 chloride ions (at 2.25 Å). Occupancy of the axial copper positions is discussed though no unique conclusion can be obtained with respect to this point from the scattering data.

Mauro Magini

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

In-situ x-ray diffraction studies of host-guest properties in nanoporous zinc-triazolate-based framework materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two nanoporous metal-organic framework materials incorporating the exotridentate bridging ligand 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolate (AmTAZ) have been synthesized through variation of secondary bridging anions: [Zn{sub 3}(AmTAZ){sub 3}S](NO{sub 3}) {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O) (1 {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O)) and Zn{sub 7}(AmTAZ){sub 8}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} 2(EtOH) (2 {center_dot} 2(EtOH); EtOH = ethanol). 1 {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O) crystallizes in the cubic space group I23 and is constructed from triangular Zn{sub 3}S units that are bridged through AmTAZ ligands into a cationic three-dimensional (3D) network with nitrate and water molecules residing in the cavities. 2 {center_dot} 2(EtOH) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c and shows a complex 3D network constructed from seven crystallographically unique zinc centers bridged by AmTAZ, carbonate, and hydroxide anions. The porous nature of both materials has been explored by thermogravimetric analysis, nitrogen sorption, and in situ synchrotron-based powder X-ray diffraction.

Halder, G. J.; Park, H.; Funk, R. J.; Chapman, K. W.; Engerer, L. K.; Geiser, U.; Schlueter, J. A.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Metal-like heat conduction in laser-excited InSb probed by picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A semiconductor (InSb) showed transient metal-like heat conduction after excitation of a dense electron-hole plasma via short and intense light pulses. A related ultrafast strain relaxation was detected using picosecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The deduced heat conduction was, by a factor of 30, larger than the lattice contribution. The anomalously high heat conduction can be explained once the contribution from the degenerate photocarrier plasma is taken into account. The magnitude of the effect could provide the means for guiding heat in semiconductor nanostructures. In the course of this work, a quantitative model for the carrier dynamics in laser-irradiated semiconductors has been developed, which does not rely on any adjustable parameters or ad hoc assumptions. The model includes various light absorption processes (interband, free carrier, two photon, and dynamical Burstein-Moss shifts), ambipolar diffusion, energy transport (heat and chemical potential), electrothermal effects, Auger recombination, collisional excitation, and scattering (elastic and inelastic). The model accounts for arbitrary degrees of degeneracy.

P. Sondhauss, O. Synnergren, T. N. Hansen, S. E. Canton, H. Enquist, A. Srivastava, and J. Larsson

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Growth sequence and interface formation in the Fe/MgO/Fe(001) tunnel junction analyzed by surface x-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a surface x-ray diffraction study of the interface geometric structure in the Fe/MgO/Fe(001) magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). While the lower MgO/Fe(001) interface is characterized by a substoichiometric FeO{sub x} (x=0.6{+-}0.1) layer in agreement with previous studies, growth of Fe on the MgO spacer and the upper Fe/MgO interface structure strongly depends on the preparation method. If 0.4 monolayers of Fe are initially deposited in ambient oxygen atmosphere (p=10{sup -7} mbar) followed by Fe deposition under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions, structural coherence across the trilayer junction is observed. In this case, substoichiometric FeO{sub x} layers are present at both Fe/MgO interfaces corresponding to a symmetric MTJ structure. In contrast, lattice registry is not preserved if Fe deposition is carried out solely under UHV conditions. Our results might have important implications for the preparation of magnetic tunnel junctions optimized to achieve giant tunneling-magnetoresistance amplitudes.

Tusche, C.; Meyerheim, H. L.; Kirschner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Jedrecy, N. [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, Universites Paris 6 et 7 et CNRS-UMR 7588, 4 place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Renaud, G. [CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Class H Oil Well Cement Hydration at Elevated Temperatures in the Presence of Retarding Agents: An In Situ High-Energy X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ powder X-ray diffraction was used to examine the hydration of API Class H cement slurries, with a water-to-cement ratio of 0.394, at 66, 93, 121, and 177 C under autogenous pressure in the presence of varying amounts of the additives tartaric acid, modified lignosulfonate, and AMPS (2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) copolymer. All of these retarding agents inhibited the hydration of crystalline C{sub 3}S (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}), but other modes of action were also apparent. The formation of ettringite was suppressed when tartaric acid was used by itself or in combination with other additives. Changes in the hydration of C{sub 3}S vs time could not be correlated in a simple way with the observed pumping times for the cement slurries. The largest changes in pumping time as a function of temperature occurred in a temperature interval where ettringite/monosulfate decomposes and crystalline hydrogarnet starts to be formed.

Jupe, Andrew C.; Wilkinson, Angus P.; Luke, Karen; Funkhouser, Gary P. (Halliburton); (GIT)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

410

High energy X-ray diffraction study of a dental ceramics–titanium functional gradient material prepared by field assisted sintering technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A functional gradient material with eleven layers composed of a dental ceramics and titanium was successfully consolidated using field assisted sintering technique in a two-step sintering process. High energy X-ray diffraction studies on the gradient were performed at High Energy Material Science beamline at Desy in Hamburg. Phase composition, crystal unit edges and lattice mismatch along the gradient were determined applying Rietveld refinement procedure. Phase analysis revealed that the main crystalline phase present in the gradient is ?-Ti. Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient with a decreasing increment between every next layer, following rather the weight fraction of titanium. The crystal unit edge a of titanium remains approximately constant with a value of 2.9686(1) Å, while c is reduced with increasing amount of titanium. In the layer with pure titanium the crystal unit edge c is constant with a value of 4.7174(2) Å. The lattice mismatch leading to an internal stress was calculated over the whole gradient. It was found that the maximal internal stress in titanium embedded in the studied gradient is significantly smaller than its yield strength, which implies that the structure of titanium along the whole gradient is mechanically stable.

K. Witte; W. Bodnar; N. Schell; H. Lang; E. Burkel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Upgraded high time-resolved x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy system for J-TEXT ohmic plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the upgraded x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) system on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) tokamak and the latest experimental results obtained in last campaign. With 500 Hz frame rate of the new Pilatus detector and 5 cm × 10 cm spherically bent crystal, the XICS system can provide core electron temperature (T{sub e}), core ion temperature (T{sub i}), and plasma toroidal rotation (V{sub ?}) with a maximum temporal resolution of 2 ms for J-TEXT pure ohmic plasmas. These parameters with high temporal resolution are very useful in tokamak plasma research, especially for rapidly changed physical processes. The experimental results from the upgraded XICS system are presented.

Jin, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Huang, D. W.; Li, Q. L.; Yan, W.; Luo, Y. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhuang, G. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

412

Two dimensionally space-resolved electron temperature measurement of fusion plasma by x-ray monochromatic imaging method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron temperature distributions of laser created fusion plasma were measured by using toroidally bent Bragg crystals. A tiny amount of argon was seeded in deuterium fuel gas and monochromatic images of Ar{sup +17} (1{ital s}{minus}3{ital p}) Ly{beta} and Ar{sup +16} (1{ital s}{sup 2}{minus}1{ital s}3{ital p}) He{beta} lines were taken to provide temperature distribution of the compressed core from their intensity ratios. A fusion core created by laser-generated x rays in a micro-cavity showed the temperature structure corresponding to the illumination asymmetry caused by the cavity irradiation geometry. The experimental distribution of the line-ratio of Ly{beta} to He{beta} was compared with the postprocessed outputs from one dimensional simulation, assuming perfect spherical implosion, to discuss degradation of pellet implosion. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Fujita, K.; Nishimura, H.; Uschmann, I.; Foerster, E.; Takabe, H.; Kato, Y.; Nakai, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

High aspect ratio hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have fielded a multi-pinhole, hard x-ray (> 100 keV) imager to measure the spatially-resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions, and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel that could limit the compressibility required for ignition and burn. Our hard x-ray imaging measurements allow to set an upper limit to the DT fuel preheat, which we find is acceptable in current capsule implosions on the NIF.

Doppner, T; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Burns, S; Izumi, N; Kline, J; LaCaille, G; McNaney, J; Prasad, R; Thomas, C A; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O; Author, A; Author, S G; Author, T

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

X-ray instrumentation for the photon factory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Photon Factory is one of the world's largest synchroton radiation light sources, the beam lines of which supply intense sources of vacuum UV, soft and hard X-rays. About 30 measuring instruments have been purpose-built, and this book describes the development and construction of the X-ray instrumentation. Given the multifunctional nature of the Photon Factory, it may be expected that the instrumentation serving it fulfills a variety of purposes including: reflection imaging systems; diffraction grating fabrication; monochromators; polarizers; analyzers; detectors; data collection systems; cameras; and goniometers.

Hosoya, S.; Iitaka, Y.; Hashizume, H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

2D grating simulation for X-ray phase-contrast and dark-field imaging with a Talbot interferometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Talbot interferometry is a recently developed and an extremely powerful X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique. Besides giving access to ultra-high sensitivity differential phase contrast images, it also provides the dark field image, which is a map of the scattering power of the sample. In this paper we investigate the potentialities of an improved version of the interferometer, in which two dimensional gratings are used instead of standard line grids. This approach allows to overcome the difficulties that might be encountered in the images produced by a one dimensional interferometer. Among these limitations there are the phase wrapping and quantitative phase retrieval problems and the directionality of the differential phase and dark-field signals. The feasibility of the 2D Talbot interferometer has been studied with a numerical simulation on the performances of its optical components under different circumstances. The gratings can be obtained either by an ad hoc fabrication of the 2D structures or by a superposition of two perpendicular linear grids. Through this simulation it has been possible to find the best parameters for a practical implementation of the 2D Talbot interferometer.

Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon [Paul Scherrer Insitute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Instrument Series: Spectroscopy and Diffraction XPS Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XPS Imaging XPS Imaging The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) imaging system provides fast, quantitative, real-time parallel imaging with highest resolution spectroscopy at all analysis areas. In addition, the system is equipped with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), a cluster/Ar + ion gun, and a five-axis automated stage with variable temperature sample environment at the analysis chamber. The system is also integrated with a radial distribution chamber (RDC), a full-size glove box, and a cold-stage at the sample introduction for air-sensitive, liquid-semisolid, biological and environmental sample transfers. In addition, the RDC has a simple sample transfer mechanism to the

417

Coded aperture imaging system optimized for hard x-ray and gamma ray astronomy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coded aperture imaging system has been designed for the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS). The system is optimized for imaging 511-keV positron-annihilation photons. For a galactic center 511-keV source strength of 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/, the source location accuracy is expected to be +-0.2/sup 0/.

Gehrels, N.; Cline, T.L.; Huters, A.F.; Leventhal, M.; MacCallum, C.J.; Reber, J.D.; Stang, P.D.; Teegarden, B.J.; Tueller, J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Computer simulation study of Siemens star x?ray image artifacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Siemens star image exact determination of the first disappearance frequency which is used to measure the focal spot size is difficult since the disappearance band has a finite width and the image also has other artifacts. The origin of these artifacts and their appearance was studied by Siemens star image simulation on a digital computer. The simulated images were manipulated by using many different modulation and phase transfer functions. It is shown that the bending of spokes is not related to zero contrast; exact triplet splitting can occur only at the disappearance frequency and therefore splitting is a valuable indicator of that frequency.

Sharad R. Amtey; Robert K. Tyson

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was ob...

Watanabe, Shin; Aono, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Onishi, Mitsunobu; Kuroda, Yoshikatsu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

3D printing in X-ray and gamma-ray imaging: A novel method for fabricating high-density imaging apertures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in 3D rapid-prototyping printers, 3D modeling software, and casting techniques allow for cost-effective fabrication of custom components in gamma-ray and X-ray imaging systems. Applications extend to new fabrication methods for custom collimators, pinholes, calibration and resolution phantoms, mounting and shielding components, and imaging apertures. Details of the fabrication process for these components, specifically the 3D printing process, cold casting with a tungsten epoxy, and lost-wax casting in platinum are presented.

Brian W. Miller; Jared W. Moore; Harrison H. Barrett; Teresa Fryé; Steven Adler; Joe Sery; Lars R. Furenlid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "x-ray diffraction imaging" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Optical Design in Phase-Space for the I13L X-Ray Imaging and Coherence Beamline at Diamond using XPHASY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I13L is a 250 m long beamline for imaging and coherent diffraction currently under construction at the Diamond Light Source. For modeling the beamline optics the phase-space based ray-tracing code XPHASY was developed, as general ray-tracing codes for x-rays do not easily allow studying the propagation of coherence along the beamline. In contrast to computational intensive wave-front propagation codes, which fully describe the propagation of a photon-beam along a beamline but obscure the impact of individual optical components onto the beamline performance, this code allows to quickly calculate the photon-beam propagation along the beamline and estimate the impact of individual components.In this paper we will discuss the optical design of the I13L coherence branch from the perspective of phase-space by using XPHASY. We will demonstrate how the phase-space representation of a photon-beam allows estimating the coherence length at any given position along the beamline. The impact of optical components on the coherence length and the effect of vibrations on the beamline performance will be discussed. The paper will demonstrate how the phase-space representation of photon-beams allows a more detailed insight into the optical performance of a coherence beamline than ray-tracing in real space.

Wagner, Ulrich H. [Science, Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Rau, Christoph [Science, Diamond Light Source Ltd., Didcot, Oxon OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Northwestern University, Chicago (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

422

Application of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence imaging combined with histochemical staining to the renal section of mercury-treated rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A biomedical application of synchrotron radiation comprising X-ray fluorescence imaging and histochemical staining was employed to examine the detailed distribution of metal elements and morphological changes in the kidney section of mercury-treated rats. The spatial resolution was improved to 5 × 5 m2.

Homma-Takeda, S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

RHESSI HARD X-RAY IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF EXTENDED SOURCES AND THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ELECTRON ACCELERATION REGIONS IN SOLAR FLARES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RHESSI HARD X-RAY IMAGING SPECTROSCOPY OF EXTENDED SOURCES AND THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ELECTRON of the acceleration region but also allows an empirical study of the physics of electron tran- sport within the source acceleration and propagation of bremsstrahlung- producing electrons in solar flares. The method involves

California at Berkeley, University of

424

Generation of continuous and pulsed diagnostic imaging x-ray radiation using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission cathode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ray radiation can be generated using a carbon nanotube CNT -based field-emission cathode. The device can readilyGeneration of continuous and pulsed diagnostic imaging x-ray radiation using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission cathode G. Z. Yue Department of Physics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North

425

Structural characterization of the CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixed system by synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural determination of the CeO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixed system is a non-trivial problem because of the close resemblance between the ionic sizes of Ce{sup 4+} and Gd{sup 3+} and between the crystal structures of CeO{sub 2} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. (Ce{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2-x/2} powder samples with x ranging between 0 and 1 have been synthesized by coprecipitation of mixed oxalates and subsequent thermal decomposition in air at 1200 Degree-Sign C followed by slow cooling. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were collected and refined by the Rietveld method. Lattice parameters do not follow Vegard's law and no peak splitting has been observed for any composition, meaning that no biphasic regions exist over the whole compositional range. The same hybrid structural model - a proper mixture of the structures of the two pure oxides - was used for the refinements, allowing to account for the data observed. - graphical abstract: Substituting Ce{sup 4+} by Gd{sup 3+}, a gradual transition from the F structure (typical of CeO{sub 2}) to the C structure (typical of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) takes place. The lattice parameters do not follow Vegard's law. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A structural study of Ce-Gd mixed oxides has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In (Ce{sub 1-x}Gd{sub x})O{sub 2-x/2} a solid solution forms for 0{<=}x{<=}0.3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For x>0.3 a gradual transition from the C to the F structure is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lattice parameters do not follow Vegard's law.

Artini, Cristina, E-mail: c.artini@ge.ieni.cnr.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Costa, Giorgio A., E-mail: costa@chimica.unige.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); CNR-SPIN Genova, Corso Perrone 24, 16152 Genova (Italy); Pani, Marcella, E-mail: marcella@chimica.unige.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Universita degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lausi, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.lausi@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., ss 14, km 163, 5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Plaisier, Jasper, E-mail: jasper.plaisier@elettra.trieste.it [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., ss 14, km 163, 5, 34149 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Pressure-induced phase transition of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}: X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy were employed to investigate structural stability of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} under high pressure. Measurements were performed up to about 24 GPa at room temperature using diamond anvil cell. Experimental results demonstrate that Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} undergoes a series of phase transitions from cubic (Fd3-bar m) to tetragonal (I4{sub 1}/amd) at 8.7 GPa, and then to orthorhombic structure (Cmcm) at 16.0 GPa. The high-pressure phase (Cmcm) of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} is kept on decompression to ambient pressure. In all polymorphs of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}, iron cations present a high-spin ferrous property without electric charge exchange with titanium cations at high pressure supported by Moessbauer evidences. - Graphical abstract: A series of phase transition of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} occurs from cubic (a) to tetragonal (b and c) then to orthorhombic phase (d-f) at high pressure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High pressure behaviors of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4} were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transitions were observed from cubic to tetragonal and then to orthorhombic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Orthorhombic phase can be kept on decompression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In all polymorphs of Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}, iron ions are ferrous with high-spin state.

Wu Ye [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wu Xiang, E-mail: xiang.wu@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Qin Shan [Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, MOE, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Brucite [Mg(OH2)] carbonation in wet supercritical CO2: An in situ high pressure X-ray diffraction study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding mechanisms and kinetics of mineral carbonation reactions relevant to sequestering carbon dioxide as a supercritical fluid (scCO2) in geologic formations is crucial to accurately predicting long-term storage risks. Most attention so far has been focused on reactions occurring between silicate minerals and rocks in the aqueous dominated CO2-bearing fluid. However, water-bearing scCO2 also comprises a reactive fluid, and in this situation mineral carbonation mechanisms are poorly understood. Using in situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction, the carbonation of brucite [Mg(OH)2] in wet scCO2 was examined at pressure (82 bar) as a function of water concentration and temperature (50 and 75 °C). Exposing brucite to anhydrous scCO2 at either temperature resulted in little or no detectable reaction over three days. However, addition of trace amounts of water resulted in partial carbonation of brucite into nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] within a few hours at 50 °C. By increasing water content to well above the saturation level of the scCO2, complete conversion of brucite into nesquehonite was observed. Tests conducted at 75 °C resulted in the conversion of brucite into magnesite [MgCO3] instead, apparently through an intermediate nesquehonite step. Raman spectroscopy applied to brucite reacted with 18O-labeled water in scCO2 show it was incorporated into carbonate at a relatively high concentration. This supports a carbonation mechanism with at least one step involving a direct reaction between the mineral and water molecules without mediation by a condensed aqueous layer.

H.T. Schaef; C.F. Windisch Jr.; B.P. McGrail; P.F. Martin; K.M. Rosso

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Uppsala University, the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton (DESY), and Technische Universitt Berlin. The FLASH FEL began operations at DESY...

429

Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University...experiment was performed in a vacuum with a pressure of...Suzuki M Ishikawa T ( 2001 ) Nuclear Instr & Methods A 467–468 : 686...Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University...

Jianwei Miao; Keith O. Hodgson; Tetsuya Ishikawa; Carolyn A. Larabell; Mark A. LeGros; Yoshinori Nishino

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

X-ray Imaging of Shock Waves Generated by High-Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-speed sprays are an es- sential technology for many applications, in- cluding fuel injection systems, thermal if not impossible with optical imaging. Under injection conditions similar to those found in operating engines of fuel injection, an under- standing of the structure and dynamics of the fuel sprays is critical

Gruner, Sol M.

431

Soft-x-ray projection imaging with a 1:1 ring-field optic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- fraction limit has recently been demonstrated with multilayer-coated Schwarzschild optics.1-3 Unfor- tunately, a Schwarzschild optic possesses a central obscuration and a small image field and hence the surfaces are spherical, so the requirements on mirror fabrication and alignment are not overly stringent

Bokor, Jeffrey

432

Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Rosser, Roy (Princeton, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

High-energy radiation visualizer (HERV): A new system for imaging in x-ray and gamma-ray emission regions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a description and results of the operation for {gamma}-ray and X-ray objects for the compact visualization system high-energy radiation visualizer (HERV). The imaging in this system is based on use of a conical collimator, scintillator plate, and image intensifier as a detector and CCD matrix as a readout device. The use of HERV as a two-dimensional X-ray image visualizer for the Compton scatter inspection system was considered and first results are discussed. The possibility of using different hexagonal-coded apertures imaging for HERV is discussed and results of Monte Carlo simulation and experiments with optical analog of coded aperture are presented.

Sudarkin, A.N.; Ivanov, O.P.; Stepanov, V.E.; Volkovich, A.G.; Turin, A.S.; Danilovich, A.S.; Rybakov, D.D.; Urutskoev, L.I. [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)] [RECOM Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Chromatic X-Ray imaging with a fine pitch CdTe sensor coupled to a large area photon counting pixel ASIC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An innovative X-ray imaging sensor with intrinsic digital characteristics is presented. It is based on Chromatic Photon Counting technology. The detector is able to count individually the incident X-ray photons and to separate them according to their energy (two 'color' images per exposure). The energy selection occurs in real time and at radiographic imaging speed (GHz global counting rate). Photon counting, color mode and a very high spatial resolution (more than 10 l.p./mm at MTF50) allow to obtain an optimal ratio between image quality and absorbed dose. The individual block of the imaging system is a two-side buttable semiconductor radiation detector made of a thin pixellated CdTe crystal (the sensor) coupled to a large area VLSI CMOS pixel ASIC. 1, 2, 4, 8 tile units have been built. The 8 tiles unit has 25cm x 2.5cm sensitive area. Results and images obtained from in depth testing of several configurations of the system are presented. The X-Ray imaging system is the technological platform of PIXIRAD Im...

Bellazzini, R; Brez, A; Minuti, M; Pinchera, M; Mozzo, P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

High energy resolution hard X-ray and gamma-ray imagers using CdTe diode devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed CdTe double-sided strip detectors (DSDs or cross strip detectors) and evaluated their spectral and imaging performance for hard X-rays and gamma-rays. Though the double-sided strip configuration is suitable for imagers with a fine position resolution and a large detection area, CdTe diode DSDs with indium (In) anodes have yet to be realized due to the difficulty posed by the segmented In anodes. CdTe diode devices with aluminum (Al) anodes were recently established, followed by a CdTe device in which the Al anodes could be segmented into strips. We developed CdTe double-sided strip devices having Pt cathode strips and Al anode strips, and assembled prototype CdTe DSDs. These prototypes have a strip pitch of 400 micrometer. Signals from the strips are processed with analog ASICs (application specific integrated circuits). We have successfully performed gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy with a position resolution of 400 micrometer. Energy resolution of 1.8 keV (FWHM: full width at half maximum) was obtained at 59.54 keV. Moreover, the possibility of improved spectral performance by utilizing the energy information of both side strips was demonstrated. We designed and fabricated a new analog ASIC, VA32TA6, for the readout of semiconductor detectors, which is also suitable for DSDs. A new feature of the ASIC is its internal ADC function. We confirmed this function and good noise performance that reaches an equivalent noise charge of 110 e- under the condition of 3-4 pF input capacitance.

Shin Watanabe; Shin-nosuke Ishikawa; Hiroyuki Aono; Shin'ichiro Takeda; Hirokazu Odaka; Motohide Kokubun; Tadayuki Takahashi; Kazuhiro Nakazawa; Hiroyasu Tajima; Mitsunobu Onishi; Yoshikatsu Kuroda

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Caliste 64, a new CdTe micro-camera for hard X-ray spectro-imaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the frame of the Simbol-X mission of hard X-ray astrophysics, a prototype of micro-camera with 64 pixels called Caliste 64 has been designed and several samples have been tested. The device integrates ultra-low-noise IDeF-X V1.1 \\{ASICs\\} from CEA and a 1 cm2 Al Schottky CdTe detector from Acrorad because of its high uniformity and spectroscopic performance. The process of hybridization, mastered by the 3D Plus company, respects space applications standards. The camera is a spectro-imager with time-tagging capability. Each photon interacting in the semiconductor is tagged with a time, a position and an energy. Time resolution is better than 100 ns rms for energy deposits greater than 20 keV, taking into account electronic noise and technological dispersal of the front-end electronics. The spectrum summed across the 64 pixels results in an energy resolution of 664 eV fwhm at 13.94 keV and 842 eV fwhm at 59.54 keV, when the detector is cooled down to ?10 °C and biased at ?500 V.

A. Meuris; O. Limousin; F. Lugiez; O. Gevin; C. Blondel; F. Pinsard; M.C. Vassal; F. Soufflet; I. Le Mer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Spectroscopic ellipsometric modeling of a Bi–Te–Se write layer of an optical data storage device as guided by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Conventional magnetic tape is the most widely used medium for archival data storage. However, data stored on it need to be migrated every ca. 5 years. Recently, optical discs that store information for hundreds, or even more than 1000 years, have been introduced to the market. We recently proposed that technology in these optical discs be used to make an optical tape that would show greater permanence than its magnetic counterpart. Here we provide a detailed optical characterization of a sputtered thin film of bismuth, tellurium, and selenium (BTS) that is a proposed data storage layer for these devices. The methodology described herein should be useful in the future development of related materials. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) data are obtained using interference enhancement, and the modeling of this data is guided by results from atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray reflectivity (XRR). By AFM, ca. 40 nm BTS films show ca. 10 nm roughness. SEM images also suggest considerable roughness in the films and indicate that they are composed of 13.1 ± 5.9 nm grains. XRD confirms that the films are crystalline and predicts a grain size of 17 ± 2 nm. XRD results are consistent with the composition of the films — a mildly oxidized BTS material. Three models of increasing complexity are investigated to explain the SE data. The first model consists of a smooth, homogeneous BTS film. The second model adds a roughness layer to the previous model. The third model also has two layers. The bottom layer is modeled as a mixture of BTS and void using a Bruggeman effective medium approximation. The upper layer is similarly modeled, but with a gradient. The first model was unable to adequately model the SE data. The second model was an improvement — lower MSE (4.4) and good agreement with step height measurements. The third model was even better — very low MSE (2.6) and good agreement with AFM results. The third SE model predicted ca. 90% void at the film surface. XRR modeling of the film agreed well with the predictions from SE. The uniquenesses of the SE models were confirmed.

Hao Wang; Nitesh Madaan; Jacob Bagley; Anubhav Diwan; Yiqun Liu; Robert C. Davis; Barry M. Lunt; Stacey J. Smith; Matthew R. Linford

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Influence of Geometrical Factors on Phase Contrast Fiber Images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

X-ray field phase differences caused by an object can induce edge enhancement in a radiological image. Phase contrast effects have been interpreted using a model based on x-ray Fresnel diffraction. The depende...

Margarita Chevalier; Lorena Chanes; Eduardo Guibelalde…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Applications of soft x-ray lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high brightness and short pulse duration of soft x-ray lasers provide unique advantages for novel applications. Imaging of biological specimens using x-ray lasers has been demonstrated by several groups. Other applications to fields such as chemistry, material science, plasma diagnostics, and lithography are beginning to emerge. We review the current status of soft x-ray lasers from the perspective of applications, and present an overview of the applications currently being developed.

Skinner, C.H.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Three-dimensional imaging of copper pillars using x-ray tomography within a scanning electron microscope: A simulation study based on synchrotron data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While microelectronic devices are frequently characterized with surface-sensitive techniques having nanometer resolution, interconnections used in 3D integration require 3D imaging with high penetration depth and deep sub-micrometer spatial resolution. X-ray tomography is well adapted to this situation. In this context, the purpose of this study is to assess a versatile and turn-key tomographic system allowing for 3D x-ray nanotomography of copper pillars. The tomography tool uses the thin electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to provoke x-ray emission from specific metallic targets. Then, radiographs are recorded while the sample rotates in a conventional cone beam tomography scheme that ends up with 3D reconstructions of the pillar. Starting from copper pillars data, collected at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, we build a 3D numerical model of a copper pillar, paying particular attention to intermetallics. This model is then used to simulate physical radiographs of the pillar using the geometry of the SEM-hosted x-ray tomography system. Eventually, data are reconstructed and it is shown that the system makes it possible the quantification of 3D intermetallics volume in copper pillars. The paper also includes a prospective discussion about resolution issues.

Martin, N.; Bertheau, J.; Charbonnier, J.; Hugonnard, P.; Lorut, F. [ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38920 Crolles (France); Bleuet, P.; Tabary, J. [CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Laloum, D. [ST Microelectronics, 850 Rue Jean Monnet, 38920 Crolles (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

In situ X-ray diffraction study of the lithium excess layered oxide compound Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O-2 during electrochemical cycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ X-ray diffraction patterns were collected using a laboratory X-ray diffractometer during the first electrochemical charge/discharge cycle of the layered lithium excess compound Li[Li{sub 0.2}Ni{sub 0.2}Mn{sub 0.6}]O{sub 2} in the family of Li[Ni{sub x}Li{sub 1/3 - 2x/3}Mn{sub 2/3 - x/3}]O{sub 2} (x = 1/5). Dynamic changes in peak positions, lattice parameters, and microstrain help to explain the lithium de-intercalation mechanism in this class of materials. Strong anisotropy is observed in the shifts of the lattice parameters during the first cycle. The in situ electrochemical measurement shows dynamically changing strain during the first electrochemical cycle that is explained by known lithium and transition metal (TM) migration mechanisms.

Fell, Christopher [University of Florida, Gainesville; Meng, Ying Shirley [University of California, San Diego; Jones, Jacob [University of Florida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

In situ X-ray diffraction study of the lithium excess layered oxide compound Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 during electrochemical cycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ X-ray diffraction patterns were collected using a laboratory X-ray diffractometer during the first electrochemical charge/discharge cycle of the layered lithium excess compound Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 in the family of Li[NixLi1/3 ? 2x/3Mn2/3 ? x/3]O2 (x = 1/5). Dynamic changes in peak positions, lattice parameters, and microstrain help to explain the lithium de-intercalation mechanism in this class of materials. Strong anisotropy is observed in the shifts of the lattice parameters during the first cycle. The in situ electrochemical measurement shows dynamically changing strain during the first electrochemical cycle that is explained by known lithium and transition metal (TM) migration mechanisms.

Christopher R. Fell; Miaofang Chi; Ying Shirley Meng; Jacob L. Jones

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

X-ray micro-diffraction studies on biological samples at the BioCAT Beamline 18-ID at the Advanced Photon Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advances in synchrotron beamlines bring opportunities with accompanying challenges for the study of soft condensed (biological) matter. This article describes improvements to the BioCAT beamline that include micro-focus, scanning and cryo-cooling of soft connective tissues yielding X-ray data from whole rat-tail tendons to better than 4 ?.

Barrea, R.A.

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

445

Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to kn