National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for x-ray diffraction imaging

  1. Biological imaging by soft x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shapiro, D.; Thibault, P.; Beetz, T.; Elser, V.; Howells, M.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Miao, H.; Neiman, A. M.; et al

    2005-10-25

    We have used the method of x-ray diffraction microscopy to image the complex-valued exit wave of an intact and unstained yeast cell. The images of the freeze-dried cell, obtained by using 750-eV x-rays from different angular orientations, portray several of the cell's major internal components to 30-nm resolution. The good agreement among the independently recovered structures demonstrates the accuracy of the imaging technique. To obtain the best possible reconstructions, we have implemented procedures for handling noisy and incomplete diffraction data, and we propose a method for determining the reconstructed resolution. This work represents a previously uncharacterized application of x-ray diffractionmore »microscopy to a specimen of this complexity and provides confidence in the feasibility of the ultimate goal of imaging biological specimens at 10-nm resolution in three dimensions.« less

  2. X-ray image reconstruction from a diffraction pattern alone

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Marchesini, Stefano

    X-ray diffraction pattern of a sample of 50 nm colloidal gold particles, recorded at a wavelength of 2.1 nm.

  3. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. Coherent x-ray diffraction imaging of paint pigmentparticles by scanning a phase plate modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu Y. S.; Chen B.; Zhang F.; Berenguer F.; Bean R.; Kewish C.; Vila-Comamala J.; Rodenburg J.; Robinson I.

    2011-10-19

    We have implemented a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging technique that scans a phase plate to modulate wave-fronts of the x-ray beam transmitted by samples. The method was applied to measure a decorative alkyd paint containing iron oxide red pigment particles. By employing an iterative algorithm for wave-front modulation phase retrieval, we obtained an image of the paint sample that shows the distribution of the pigment particles and is consistent with the result obtained from a transmission x-ray microscope. The technique has been experimentally proven to be a feasible coherent x-ray imaging method with about 120 nm spatial resolution and was shown to work well with industrially relevant specimens.

  5. High spatial resolution X-ray and gamma ray imaging system using diffraction crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    2011-05-17

    A method and a device for high spatial resolution imaging of a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation are provided. The device comprises a plurality of arrays, with each array comprising a plurality of elements comprising a first collimator, a diffracting crystal, a second collimator, and a detector.

  6. Method for characterizing mask defects using image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hau-Riege, Stefan Peter (Fremont, CA)

    2007-05-01

    The invention applies techniques for image reconstruction from X-ray diffraction patterns on the three-dimensional imaging of defects in EUVL multilayer films. The reconstructed image gives information about the out-of-plane position and the diffraction strength of the defect. The positional information can be used to select the correct defect repair technique. This invention enables the fabrication of defect-free (since repaired) X-ray Mo--Si multilayer mirrors. Repairing Mo--Si multilayer-film defects on mask blanks is a key for the commercial success of EUVL. It is known that particles are added to the Mo--Si multilayer film during the fabrication process. There is a large effort to reduce this contamination, but results are not sufficient, and defects continue to be a major mask yield limiter. All suggested repair strategies need to know the out-of-plane position of the defects in the multilayer.

  7. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  8. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

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  9. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Protein crystallography: From X-ray diffraction spots to a three dimensional image

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Berendzen, J.

    1998-02-25

    Proteins are remarkable molecular machines that are essential for life. They can do many things ranging from the precise control of blood clotting to synthesizing complex organic compounds. Pictures of protein molecules are in high demand in biotechnology because they are important for applications such as drug discovery and for engineering enzymes for commercial use. X-ray crystallography is the most common method for determining the three-dimensional structures of protein molecules. When a crystal of a protein is placed in an X-ray beam, scattering of X-rays off the ordered molecules produces a diffraction pattern that can be measured on a position-sensitive CCD or image-plate detector. Protein crystals typically contain thousands of atoms and the diffraction data are generally measured to relatively low resolution. Consequently the direct methods approaches generally cannot be applied. Instead, if the crystal is modified by adding metal atoms at specific sites or by tuning the wavelength of the X-rays to cross an absorption edge of a metal atom in the crystal, then the information from these additional measurements is sufficient to first identify the /locations of the metal atoms. This information is then used along with the diffraction data to make a three-dimensional picture of electron densities. This picture can be used to determine the position of most or all of the atoms in the protein.

  11. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging and characterization of strain in silicon-on-insulator nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-06

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensions is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices.

  12. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging and characterization of strain in silicon-on-insulator nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Gang; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Reiche, Manfred; Harder, Ross; Robinson, Ian

    2014-12-06

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CDI) has emerged in the last decade as a promising high resolution lens-less imaging approach for the characterization of various samples. It has made significant technical progress through developments in source, algorithm and imaging methodologies thus enabling important scientific breakthroughs in a broad range of disciplines. In this report, we will introduce the principles of forward scattering CDI and Bragg geometry CDI (BCDI), with an emphasis on the latter. BCDI exploits the ultra-high sensitivity of the diffraction pattern to the distortions of crystalline lattice. Its ability of imaging strain on the nanometer scale in three dimensionsmore »is highly novel. We will present the latest progress on the application of BCDI in investigating the strain relaxation behavior in nanoscale patterned strained silicon-on-insulator (sSOI) materials, aiming to understand and engineer strain for the design and implementation of new generation semiconductor devices.« less

  13. Diffraction imaging for in-situ characterization of double-crystal x-ray monochromators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Heald, Steve M; Brewe, Dale; Meron, Mati

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of the Bragg reflected x-ray beam is proposed and validated as an in-situ method for characterization of performance of double-crystal monochromators under the heat load of intense synchrotron radiation. A sequence of images is collected at different angular positions on the reflectivity curve of the second crystal and analyzed. The method provides rapid evaluation of the wavefront of the exit beam, which relates to local misorientation of the crystal planes along the beam footprint on the thermally distorted first crystal. The measured misorientation can be directly compared to results of finite element analysis. The imaging method offers an additional insight on the local intrinsic crystal quality over the footprint of the incident x-ray beam.

  14. Communication: X-ray coherent diffractive imaging by immersion in nanodroplets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tanyag, Rico Mayro P.; Bernando, Charles; Jones, Curtis F.; Bacellar, Camila; Ferguson, Ken R.; Anielski, Denis; Boll, Rebecca; Carron, Sebastian; Cryan, James P.; Englert, Lars; et al

    2015-10-14

    Lensless x-ray microscopy requires the recovery of the phase of the radiation scattered from a specimen. Here, we demonstrate a de novo phase retrieval technique by encapsulating an object in a superfluid helium nanodroplet, which provides both a physical support and an approximate scattering phase for the iterative image reconstruction. The technique is robust, fast-converging, and yields the complex density of the immersed object. As a result, images of xenon clusters embedded in superfluid helium droplets reveal transient configurations of quantum vortices in this fragile system.

  15. Design and imaging performance of achromatic diffractive/refractive X-ray and Gamma-ray Fresnel lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald K. Skinner

    2004-07-21

    Achromatic combinations of a diffractive Phase Fresnel Lens and a refractive correcting element have been proposed for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and for microlithography, but considerations of absorption often dictate that the refractive component be given a stepped profile, resulting in a double Fresnel lens. The imaging performance of corrected Fresnel lenses, with and without `stepping' is investigated and the trade-off between resolution and useful bandwidth in different circumstances is discussed. Provided the focal ratio is large, correction lenses made of low atomic number materials can be used with X-rays in the range approximately 10--100 keV without stepping. The use of stepping extends the possibility of correction to higher aperture systems, to energies as low as a few kilo electron volts and to gamma-rays of $\\sim$ mega electron volt energy.

  16. X-ray Diffraction and Multi-Frame Phase Contrast Imaging Diagnostics for IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, Adam [National Security Technologies, LLC; Carlson, Carl [National Security Technologies, LLC; Young, Jason [National Security Technologies, LLC; Curtis, Alden [National Security Technologies, LLC; Jensen, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, Kyle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yeager, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fezza, Kamel [Argonne National Laboratory

    2013-07-08

    The diagnostic needs of any dynamic loading platform present unique technical challenges that must be addressed in order to accurately measure in situ material properties in an extreme environment. The IMPULSE platform (IMPact system for Ultrafast Synchrotron Experiments) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is no exception and, in fact, may be more challenging, as the imaging diagnostics must be synchronized to both the experiment and the 60 ps wide x-ray bunches produced at APS. The technical challenges of time-resolved x-ray diffraction imaging and high-resolution multi-frame phase contrast imaging (PCI) are described in this paper. Example data from recent IMPULSE experiments are shown to illustrate the advances and evolution of these diagnostics with a focus on comparing the performance of two intensified CCD cameras and their suitability for multi-frame PCI. The continued development of these diagnostics is fundamentally important to IMPULSE and many other loading platforms and will benefit future facilities such as the Dynamic Compression Sector at APS and MaRIE at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  17. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser (CXIDB ID 3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, H. N.

    2011-02-23

    The diffraction pattern of this entry corresponds to the one shown in **figure 2a** of the corresponding citation.

  18. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser (CXIDB ID 3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, H. N.

    The diffraction pattern of this entry corresponds to the one shown in **figure 2a** of the corresponding citation.

  19. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures Print science brief icon Scientists working at ALS Beamline 12.0.2.2 have demonstrated a new x-ray technique for producing...

  20. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Kirz, Janos; Lima, Enju; Marchesini, Stefano; Miao, Huijie; Neiman, Aaron M.; Shapiro, David; Steinbrener, Jan; Stewart, Andrew; et al

    2009-11-01

    We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 °C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

  1. Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of a Frozen Hydrated Yeast Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Xiaojing; Nelson, Johanna; Lima, Enju; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2009-11-06

    We report the first image of an intact, frozen hydrated eukaryotic cell using x-ray diffraction microscopy, or coherent x-ray diffraction imaging. By plunge freezing the specimen in liquid ethane and maintaining it below -170 deg. C, artifacts due to dehydration, ice crystallization, and radiation damage are greatly reduced. In this example, coherent diffraction data using 520 eV x rays were recorded and reconstructed to reveal a budding yeast cell at a resolution better than 25 nm. This demonstration represents an important step towards high resolution imaging of cells in their natural, hydrated state, without limitations imposed by x-ray optics.

  2. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R.

    1997-12-01

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  3. A camera for coherent diffractive imaging and holography with a soft-X-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Alameda, J; Woods, B; Frank, M; Bogan, M J; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Marchesini, S; Hau-Riege, S P; Hajdu, J; Shapiro, D

    2007-09-24

    We describe a camera to record coherent scattering patterns with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser. The camera consists of a laterally-graded multilayer mirror which reflects the diffraction pattern onto a CCD detector. The mirror acts as a bandpass filter both for wavelength and angle, which isolates the desired scattering pattern from non-sample scattering or incoherent emission from the sample. The mirror also solves the particular problem of the extreme intensity of the FEL pulses, which are focused to greater than 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The strong undiffracted pulse passes through a hole in the mirror and propagates on to a beam dump at a distance behind the instrument rather than interacting with a beamstop placed near the CCD. The camera concept is extendable for the full range of the fundamental wavelength of the FLASH FEL (i.e. between 6 nm and 60 nm) and into the water window. We have fabricated and tested various multilayer mirrors for wavelengths of 32 nm, 16 nm, 13.5 nm, and 4.5 nm. At the shorter wavelengths mirror roughness must be minimized to reduce scattering from the mirror. We have recorded over 30,000 diffraction patterns at the FLASH free-electron laser with no observable mirror damage or degradation of performance.

  4. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray diffraction to measure the electron density of complicated molecules. The formula used to make these calculations contains terms that relate to the electron spin of...

  5. X-ray Imaging Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    In Operando X-ray Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy of Lithium Sulfur Batteries Johanna Information ABSTRACT: Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X

  7. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays Print A team of scientists has used x-ray diffraction microscopy at ALS Beamline 9.0.1 to make images of whole yeast...

  8. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  9. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chapman, Henry N.; Barty, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Noy, Aleksandr; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Cui, Congwu; Howells, Malcolm R.; Rosen, Rachel; He, Haifeng; Spence, John C. H.; et al

    2006-01-01

    Coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy is a method of imaging nonperiodic isolated objects at resolutions limited, in principle, by only the wavelength and largest scattering angles recorded. We demonstrate x-ray diffraction imaging with high resolution in all three dimensions, as determined by a quantitative analysis of the reconstructed volume images. These images are retrieved from the three-dimensional diffraction data using no a priori knowledge about the shape or composition of the object, which has never before been demonstrated on a nonperiodic object. We also construct two-dimensional images of thick objects with greatly increased depth of focus (without loss of transverse spatialmore »resolution). These methods can be used to image biological and materials science samples at high resolution with x-ray undulator radiation and establishes the techniques to be used in atomic-resolution ultrafast imaging at x-ray free-electron laser sources.« less

  10. Lensless x-ray imaging in reflection geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, S.; Parks, D.H.; Seu, K.A.; Turner, J.J.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.H.; Cabrini, S.; Kevan, S.D.; Su, R.

    2011-02-03

    Lensless X-ray imaging techniques such as coherent diffraction imaging and ptychography, and Fourier transform holography can provide time-resolved, diffraction-limited images. Nearly all examples of these techniques have focused on transmission geometry, restricting the samples and reciprocal spaces that can be investigated. We report a lensless X-ray technique developed for imaging in Bragg and small-angle scattering geometries, which may also find application in transmission geometries. We demonstrate this by imaging a nanofabricated pseudorandom binary structure in small-angle reflection geometry. The technique can be used with extended objects, places no restriction on sample size, and requires no additional sample masking. The realization of X-ray lensless imaging in reflection geometry opens up the possibility of single-shot imaging of surfaces in thin films, buried interfaces in magnetic multilayers, organic photovoltaic and field-effect transistor devices, or Bragg planes in a single crystal.

  11. Phased Contrast X-Ray Imaging

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Erin Miller

    2012-12-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a range of technologies to broaden the field of explosives detection. Phased contrast X-ray imaging, which uses silicon gratings to detect distortions in the X-ray wave front, may be applicable to mail or luggage scanning for explosives; it can also be used in detecting other contraband, small-parts inspection, or materials characterization.

  12. Lensless imaging of nanoporous glass with soft X-rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turner, Joshua J.; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Jacobsen, Chris

    2013-06-01

    Coherent soft X-ray diffraction has been used to image nanoporous glass structure in two dimensions using different methods. The merit of the reconstructions was judged using a new method of Fourier phase correlation with a final, refined image. The porous structure was found to have a much larger average size then previously believed.

  13. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane andmore »freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.« less

  14. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Marchesini, Stephano; Neiman, Aaron M.; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-04-20

    X-ray diffraction microscopy complements other x-ray microscopy methods by being free of lens-imposed radiation dose and resolution limits, and it allows for high-resolution imaging of biological specimens too thick to be viewed by electron microscopy. We report here the highest resolution (11-13 nm) x-ray diffraction micrograph of biological specimens, and a demonstration of molecular-specific gold labeling at different depths within cells via through-focus propagation of the reconstructed wavefield. The lectin concanavalin A conjugated to colloidal gold particles was used to label the ?-mannan sugar in the cell wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cells were plunge-frozen in liquid ethane and freeze-dried, after which they were imaged whole using x-ray diffraction microscopy at 750 eV photon energy.

  15. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore »using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  16. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Howells, M.S.; Jacobsen, C.

    1997-03-18

    Methods for forming X-ray images having 0.25 {micro}m minimum line widths on X-ray sensitive material are presented. A holographic image of a desired circuit pattern is projected onto a wafer or other image-receiving substrate to allow recording of the desired image in photoresist material. In one embodiment, the method uses on-axis transmission and provides a high flux X-ray source having modest monochromaticity and coherence requirements. A layer of light-sensitive photoresist material on a wafer with a selected surface is provided to receive the image(s). The hologram has variable optical thickness and variable associated optical phase angle and amplitude attenuation for transmission of the X-rays. A second embodiment uses off-axis holography. The wafer receives the holographic image by grazing incidence reflection from a hologram printed on a flat metal or other highly reflecting surface or substrate. In this second embodiment, an X-ray beam with a high degree of monochromaticity and spatial coherence is required. 15 figs.

  17. LINE BROADENING EFFECTS IN X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF AIR PARTICULATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Connor, B.H.

    2012-01-01

    X-RAY POWDER DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF AIR PARTICULATES B. H.Ray Powder Diffraction Analysis Of Air Particulates* B.H. 0X-Ray Powder Diffraction Analysis of Air Particulates* B.H.

  18. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lawrence, Robert M.; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Grant, Thomas D.; Liu, Haiguang; James, Daniel; Nelson, Garrett; Subramanian, Ganesh; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ~700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ~40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is a pertinent step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  19. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E.J.; Huntington, C.M.; Trantham, M.R.; Keiter, P.A; Drake, R.P.; Montgomery, David; Benage, John F.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  1. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  2. A laboratory based system for Laue micro x-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, P. A.; Advanced Light Source

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory based system for Laue micro x-ray diffractionLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road,Berkeley, California 94720 A laboratory diffraction system

  3. Apparatus for X-ray diffraction microscopy and tomography of cryo specimens

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beetz, T.; Howells, M. R.; Jacobsen, C.; Kao, C. -C.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Mentes, T. O.; Miao, H.; Sanchez-Hanke, C.; Sayre, D.; et al

    2005-03-14

    An apparatus for diffraction microscopy of biological and materials science specimens is described. In this system, a coherent soft X-ray beam is selected with a pinhole, and the illuminated specimen is followed by an adjustable beamstop and CCD camera to record diffraction data from non-crystalline specimens. In addition, a Fresnel zone plate can be inserted to allow for direct imaging. The system makes use of a cryogenic specimen holder with cryotransfer capabilities to allow frozen hydrated specimens to be loaded. The specimen can be tilted over a range of ± 80 ° degrees for three-dimensional imaging; this is done bymore »computer-controlled motors, enabling automated alignment of the specimen through a tilt series. The system is now in use for experiments in soft X-ray diffraction microscopy.« less

  4. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: Energy ResourcessourceX-Ray Diffraction

  5. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power >X-Ray Diffraction

  6. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Ray Imaging in

  7. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of WholeX-Ray Imaging

  8. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray Imaging in

  9. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray Imaging

  10. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray ImagingLensless

  11. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B. )

    1992-02-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths.

  12. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  13. Realizing in-plane surface diffraction by x-ray multiple-beam diffraction with large incidence angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xian-Rong Gog, Thomas; Assoufid, Lahsen; Peng, Ru-Wen; Siddons, D. P.

    2014-11-03

    Based on rigorous dynamical-theory calculations, we demonstrate the principle of an x-ray multiple-beam diffraction (MBD) scheme that overcomes the long-lasting difficulties of high-resolution in-plane diffraction from crystal surfaces. This scheme only utilizes symmetric reflection geometry with large incident angles but activates the out-of-plane and in-plane diffraction processes simultaneously and separately in the continuous MBD planes. The in-plane diffraction is realized by detoured MBD, where the intermediate diffracted waves propagate parallel to the surface, which corresponds to an absolute Bragg surface diffraction configuration that is extremely sensitive to surface structures. A series of MBD diffraction and imaging techniques may be developed from this principle to study surface/interface (misfit) strains, lateral nanostructures, and phase transitions of a wide range of (pseudo)cubic crystal structures, including ultrathin epitaxial films and multilayers, quantum dots, strain-engineered semiconductor or (multi)ferroic materials, etc.

  14. Portable Parallel Beam X-Ray Diffraction System | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    than 50 pounds, and uses about 50 watts of power. The X-Beam uses polycapillary x-ray optics to collect x-rays over a large solid angle from a low-power x-ray source and to form...

  15. Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Microwave and hard X-ray imaging observations of energetic electrons in solar flares: event of 2003 to nonthermal energies are seen via microwave and hard X-ray emission from the solar corona. Imaging sophisticated and fully dedicated solar radio telescope operating at microwave frequencies (17 & 34 GHz) capable

  16. X-ray diffraction study of crystalline barium titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zali, Nurazila Mat; Mahmood, Che Seman; Mohamad, Siti Mariam; Foo, Choo Thye; Murshidi, Julie Adrianny

    2014-02-12

    In this study, BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics have been prepared via solid-state reaction method. The powders were calcined for 2 hours at different temperatures ranging from 600°C to 1200°C. Using X-ray diffraction with a Rietveld analysis, the phase formation and crystal structure of the BaTiO{sub 3} powders were studied. Change in crystallite size and tetragonality as a function of calcination temperature were also discussed. It has been found that the formation of pure perovskite phase of BaTiO{sub 3} began at calcination condition of 1000 °C for 2 hours. The crystal structure of BaTiO{sub 3} formed is in the tetragonal structure. The second phases of BaCO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} existed with calcination temperature below 1000 °C. Purity, crystallite size and tetragonality of BaTiO{sub 3} powders were found to increase with increasing calcination temperature.

  17. Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 41 (2010) ISSN 0911-7806 Theoretical Analysis of X-Ray Waveguide Using Fresnel Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun, Kawai

    2010-01-01

    -Ray Waveguide Using Fresnel Diffraction Yusuke MORIKAWA and Jun KAWAI #12;#12;41 145 X Adv. X-Ray. Chem. Anal., Japan 41, pp.145-150 (2010) 606-8501 X Theoretical Analysis of X-Ray Waveguide Using Fresnel Diffraction symmetrical pattern. We regard it as a slit and calculated the Fresnel diffraction. We find

  18. X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray imaging reveals secrets in battery materials June 22, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Imaging and data analysis techniques offer new approach to probing material properties In a new...

  19. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power >X-RayX-RayX-Ray

  20. Anti-contamination device for cryogenic soft X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Nelson, Johanna; Turner, Joshua; Steinbrener, Jan; Shapiro, David; Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Cryogenic microscopy allows one to view frozen hydrated biological and soft matter specimens with good structural preservation and a high degree of stability against radiation damage. We describe a liquid nitrogen-cooled anti-contamination device for cryogenic X-ray diffraction microscopy. The anti-contaminator greatly reduces the buildup of ice layers on the specimen due to condensation of residual water vapor in the experimental vacuum chamber. We show by coherent X-ray diffraction measurements that this leads to fivefold reduction of background scattering, which is important for far-field X-ray diffraction microscopy of biological specimens.

  1. X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

    1999-05-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

  2. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  3. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  4. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  5. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  6. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power >X-RayX-Ray

  7. Quantification of thin film crystallographic orientation using X-ray diffraction with an area detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jessica L

    2010-01-01

    properties of Au thin films by X?ray diffraction and in in  polythiophene thin?film transistors.  Nat Mater 2006, copper  phthalocyanine thin films evaporated on amorphous 

  8. Lattice motions from THz phonon-polaritons measured with femtosecond x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenlein, Robert William; Cavalleri, A.; Wall, S.; Simpson, C.; Statz, E.; Ward, D.W.; Nelson, K.A.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Rini, M.; Dean, N.; Khalil, M.

    2006-08-07

    We use femtosecond x-ray diffraction to measure the coherent lattice displacements associated with the excitation and propagation of THz phonon polaritons in LiTaO3.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Observations of a Charge-Density-Wave Order...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-Ray Diffraction Observations of a Charge-Density-Wave Order in Superconducting Ortho-II YBa2Cu3O6.54 Single Crystals in Zero Magnetic Field Citation Details In-Document Search...

  10. Synthesis and single crystal x-ray diffraction study of a Schiff...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    single crystal x-ray diffraction study of a Schiff base derived from 4-acylpyrazolone and 2-aminophenol Re-direct Destination: The title compound, (Z)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-41((2hydr...

  11. High energy x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for high-throughput analysis of composition spread thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoire, John M. [Department of Physics, and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Dale, Darren; Kazimirov, Alexander [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States); DiSalvo, Francis J. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States); Dover, R. Bruce van [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, New York 14853 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    High-throughput crystallography is an important tool in materials research, particularly for the rapid assessment of structure-property relationships. We present a technique for simultaneous acquisition of diffraction images and fluorescence spectra on a continuous composition spread thin film using a 60 keV x-ray source. Subsequent noninteractive data processing provides maps of the diffraction profiles, thin film fiber texture, and composition. Even for highly textured films, our diffraction technique provides detection of diffraction from each family of Bragg reflections, which affords direct comparison of the measured profiles with powder patterns of known phases. These techniques are important for high throughput combinatorial studies as they provide structure and composition maps which may be correlated with performance trends within an inorganic library.

  12. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  13. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Robert M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cohen, Isadore (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  14. Dose optimization in cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; McMillan, Catherine; Cowen, Arnold R.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to optimize x-ray image quality to dose ratios in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined independently the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp), copper (Cu), and gadolinium (Gd) x-ray beam filtration on the image quality to radiation dose balance for adult patient sizes.Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms representing two adult patient sizes were captured using a modern flat panel detector based x-ray imaging system. Tin and copper test details were used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium and stents/guide wires respectively, which are used in clinical procedures. Noise measurement for a flat field image and test detail contrast were used to calculate the contrast to noise ratio (CNR). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose. This FOM determined the dose efficiency of x-ray spectra investigated. Images were captured with 0.0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm Cu filtration and with a range of gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) filtration.Results: Optimum x-ray spectra were the same for the tin and copper test details. Lower peak tube voltages were generally favored. For the 20 cm phantom, using 2 Lanex Fast Back Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screens as x-ray filtration at 65 kVp provided the highest FOM considering ESD and effective dose. Considering ESD, this FOM was only marginally larger than that from using 0.4 mm Cu at 65 kVp. For the 30 cm phantom, using 0.25 mm copper filtration at 80 kVp was most optimal; considering effective dose the FOM was highest with no filtration at 65 kVp.Conclusions: These settings, adjusted for x-ray tube loading limits and clinically acceptable image quality, should provide a useful option for optimizing patient dose to image quality in cardiac x-ray imaging. The same optimal x-ray beam spectra were found for both the tin and copper details, suggesting that iodine contrast based imaging and visualization of interventional devices could potentially be optimized for dose using similar x-ray beam spectra.

  15. X-ray diffraction characterization of suspended structures forMEMS applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudeau, P.; Tamura, N.; Lavelle, B.; Rigo, S.; Masri, T.; Bosseboeuf, A.; Sarnet, T.; Petit, J.-A.; Desmarres, J.-M.

    2005-09-15

    Mechanical stress control is becoming one of the major challenges for the future of micro and nanotechnologies. Micro scanning X-ray diffraction is one of the promising techniques that allows stress characterization in such complex structures at sub micron scales. Two types of MEMS structure have been studied: a bilayer cantilever composed of a gold film deposited on poly-silicon and a boron doped silicon bridge. X-ray diffraction results are discussed in view of numerical simulation experiments.

  16. A New Scheme for Stigmatic X-ray Imaging with Large Magnification...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F; Beiersdorfer, P; Wang, E; Sanchez del Rio, M; Caughey, T A 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY X-ray Imaging X-ray Imaging This paper describes a new x-ray scheme for...

  17. In-situ X-ray diffraction system using sources and detectors at fixed angular positions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gibson, David M. (Voorheesville, NY); Gibson, Walter M. (Voorheesville, NY); Huang, Huapeng (Latham, NY)

    2007-06-26

    An x-ray diffraction technique for measuring a known characteristic of a sample of a material in an in-situ state. The technique includes using an x-ray source for emitting substantially divergent x-ray radiation--with a collimating optic disposed with respect to the fixed source for producing a substantially parallel beam of x-ray radiation by receiving and redirecting the divergent paths of the divergent x-ray radiation. A first x-ray detector collects radiation diffracted from the sample; wherein the source and detector are fixed, during operation thereof, in position relative to each other and in at least one dimension relative to the sample according to a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample. A second x-ray detector may be fixed relative to the first x-ray detector according to the a-priori knowledge about the known characteristic of the sample, especially in a phase monitoring embodiment of the present invention.

  18. Comparison of two x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods with a microfocus source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and experiments using a liquid-metal-jet x-ray microfocus source. Radiation doses required for detection radiation, simulations show a lower dose requirement for PBI for small object features and a lower dose and implementation of a compact low-dose diffraction enhanced medical imaging system," Acad. Radiol. 16(8), 911

  19. SMB, X-ray Fluorescence Imaging

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV 14800Small Angle X-Ray

  20. X-ray Microscopy and Imaging: FAQs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray

  1. Lensless X-Ray Imaging in Reflection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I CLensless X-Ray

  2. Category:X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID RoadmapInformation UtilityWindX-Ray

  3. X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy of Magnetic Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind Power >X-Ray

  4. X-ray diffraction and EXAFS analysis of materials for lithium-based rechargeable batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkov, M. D., E-mail: mischar@mail.ioffe.ru; Boiko, M. E.; Bobyl, A. V.; Ershenko, E. M.; Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Zubavichus, Y. V. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    Lithium iron phosphate LiFePO{sub 4} (triphylite) and lithium titanate Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} are used as components of a number of active materials in modern rechargeable batteries. Samples of these materials are studied by X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Hypotheses about the phase composition of the analyzed samples are formulated.

  5. Quantitative determination of mineral composition by powder x-ray diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawloski, G.A.

    1984-08-10

    An external standard intensity ratio method is used for quantitatively determining mineralogic compositions of samples by x-ray diffraction. The method uses ratios of x-ray intensity peaks from a single run. Constants are previously determined for each mineral which is to be quantitatively measured. Ratios of the highest intensity peak of each mineral to be quantified in the sample and the highest intensity peak of a reference mineral contained in the sample are used to calculate sample composition.

  6. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    2015-02-10

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  7. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    This entry contains ten diffraction patterns, and reconstructions images, of individual living Cyanobium gracile cells, imaged using 517 eV X-rays from the LCLS XFEL. The Hawk software package was used for phasing. The Uppsala aerosol injector was used for sample injection, assuring very low noise levels. The cells come from various stages of the cell cycle, and were imaged in random orientations.

  8. Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium online xxxx Keywords: Amorphous calcium carbonate; EPSR modelling; Neutron diffraction; X-ray diffraction Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron

  9. X-Ray Microscopy and Imaging: Science and Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingIn the X-ray

  10. Spectrometer for Hard X-Ray Free Electron Laser Based on Diffraction Focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohn, V G; Vartanyants, I A

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) generate sequences of ultra-short, spatially coherent pulses of x-ray radiation. We propose the diffraction focusing spectrometer (DFS), which is able to measure the whole energy spectrum of the radiation of a single XFEL pulse with an energy resolution of $\\Delta E/E\\approx 2\\times 10^{-6}$. This is much better than for most modern x-ray spectrometers. Such resolution allows one to resolve the fine spectral structure of the XFEL pulse. The effect of diffraction focusing occurs in a single crystal plate due to dynamical scattering, and is similar to focusing in a Pendry lens made from the metamaterial with a negative refraction index. Such a spectrometer is easier to operate than those based on bent crystals. We show that the DFS can be used in a wide energy range from 5 keV to 20 keV.

  11. Mapping Strain in Nanocrystalline Nitinol: an X-ray Diffraction Method (SULI paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibee, Mathew; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-01-04

    Understanding the mechanical properties of biomedical devices is critical in predicting and preventing their failure in the body. Such knowledge is essential, for example, in the design of biomedical stents, which must undergo repeated strain over their ten year lifetimes without breaking. Computational models are used to predict mechanical response of a device, but these models are not complete; there are significant deviations from the predictions, especially when devices are subjected to repeated multi-axial loads. Improving these models requires comparisons with actual measurements of strained nitinol. Local measurements of the full strain tensor can be made using X-ray diffraction techniques, but they are currently limited to materials whose grain size is larger than the X-ray beam size or require several diffraction patterns produced by rotation of the sample. Nitinol stents are nanocrystalline, with grains smaller than any available X-ray beam. We present a method for measuring the local strain in a nanocrystalline material from a single X-ray diffraction pattern by extending current powder diffraction techniques. The components of the strain tensor are mapped onto a displacement ellipsoid, which is then reconstructed from diffraction data through Bragg's law and least-squares fitting. Using simulated diffraction data, we performed sensitivity tests to examine how the accuracy of the method depends on how much of the diffraction pattern is measured. We found that strain can be accurately calculated from measurements of at least three diffraction arcs of at least 20{sup o} in length. Thus we believe that our method is a viable approach to calculating strain provided a sufficient amount of diffraction pattern is recorded.

  12. Impulsive solvent heating probed by picosecond x-ray diffraction M. Cammarata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Impulsive solvent heating probed by picosecond x-ray diffraction M. Cammarata European Synchrotron, the solute-solvent cross term, and the solvent-only term. The last term is very sensitive to the thermodynamic state of the bulk solvent, which may change during a chemical reaction due to energy transfer from

  13. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction Olivier F fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold

  14. Phase Effects on Mesoscale Object X-ray Absorption Images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, Jr., H E; Aufderheide, M B; Barty, A; Lehman, S K; Kozioziemski, B J; Schneberk, D J

    2004-09-24

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory particular emphasis is being placed on the nondestructive characterization (NDC) of 'mesoscale' objects.[Martz and Albrecht 2003] We define mesoscale objects as objects that have mm extent with {micro}m features. Here we confine our discussions to x-ray imaging methods applicable to mesoscale object characterization. The goal is object recovery algorithms including phase to enable emerging high-spatial resolution x-ray imaging methods to ''see'' inside or image mesoscale-size materials and objects. To be successful our imaging characterization effort must be able to recover the object function to one micrometer or better spatial resolution over a few millimeters field-of-view with very high contrast.

  15. Diffraction crystals for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1982-06-07

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  16. Diffraction crystal for sagittally focusing x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ice, Gene E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sparks, Jr., Cullie J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a new type of diffraction crystal designed for sagittally focusing photons of various energies. The invention is based on the discovery that such focusing is not obtainable with conventional crystals because of distortion resulting from anticlastic curvature. The new crystal comprises a monocrystalline base having a front face contoured for sagittally focusing photons and a back face provided with rigid, upstanding, stiffening ribs restricting anticlastic curvature. When mounted in a suitable bending device, the reflecting face of the crystal can be adjusted to focus photons having any one of a range of energies.

  17. Twisted X-rays: incoming waveforms yielding discrete diffraction patterns for helical structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesecke, Gero; Jüstel, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Conventional X-ray methods use incoming plane waves and result in discrete diffraction patterns when scattered at crystals. Here we find, by a systematic method, incoming waveforms which exhibit discrete diffraction patterns when scattered at helical structures. As examples we present simulated diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and tobacco mosaic virus. The new incoming waveforms, which we call twisted waves due to their geometric shape, are found theoretically as closed-form solutions to Maxwell's equations. The theory of the ensuing diffraction patterns is developed in detail. A twisted analogue of the Von Laue condition is seen to hold, with the peak locations encoding the symmetry and the helix parameters, and the peak intensities indicating the electronic structure in the unit cell. If suitable twisted X-ray sources can in the future be realized experimentally, it appears from our mathematical results that they will provide a powerful tool for directly determining the detailed atomic structure of ...

  18. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Microtubules Buckling and Bundling under Osmotic Stress: A Probe of Interprotofilament Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study of Microtubules Buckling and Bundling under Osmotic Stress the microtubule wall. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction of microtubules under increasing osmotic stress shows (SAXRD) study of MTs subjected to osmotic stress [5] and depletion attraction [6] due to added poly

  19. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Murray, Thomas D.; Koehl, Antoine; Araci, Ismail Emre; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Brewster, Aaron S.; et al

    2015-03-27

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (more »conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.« less

  20. Cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emamzadah, Soheila [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Petty, Tom J. [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Biomedical Graduate Studies Genomics and Computational Biology Group, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); De Almeida, Victor [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Nishimura, Taisuke [Department of Plant Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Joly, Jacques; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Institut de Biologie Structurale J.-P. Ebel, CEA-CNRS-University J. Fourier, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 1 (France); Halazonetis, Thanos D., E-mail: thanos.halazonetis@unige.ch [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland); Department of Biochemistry, University of Geneva, CH-1205 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01

    A cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system has been established for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction. Microfluidics is a promising technology for the rapid identification of protein crystallization conditions. However, most of the existing systems utilize silicone elastomers as the chip material which, despite its many benefits, is highly permeable to water vapour. This limits the time available for protein crystallization to less than a week. Here, the use of a cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics system for protein crystallization and in situ X-ray diffraction is described. Liquid handling in this system is performed in 2 mm thin transparent cards which contain 500 chambers, each with a volume of 320 nl. Microbatch, vapour-diffusion and free-interface diffusion protocols for protein crystallization were implemented and crystals were obtained of a number of proteins, including chicken lysozyme, bovine trypsin, a human p53 protein containing both the DNA-binding and oligomerization domains bound to DNA and a functionally important domain of Arabidopsis Morpheus’ molecule 1 (MOM1). The latter two polypeptides have not been crystallized previously. For X-ray diffraction analysis, either the cards were opened to allow mounting of the crystals on loops or the crystals were exposed to X-rays in situ. For lysozyme, an entire X-ray diffraction data set at 1.5 Å resolution was collected without removing the crystal from the card. Thus, cyclic olefin homopolymer-based microfluidics systems have the potential to further automate protein crystallization and structural genomics efforts.

  1. Final report: high resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-12-07

    Final report on the project "High resolution lensless 3D imaging of nanostructures with coherent x-rays"

  2. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Howells, M.R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H.N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J.M.; Jacobsen, C.J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; Sayre, D.; Shapiro, D.A.; Spence, J.C.H.; Starodub, D.

    2009-03-01

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper we address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.

  3. An assessment of the resolution limitation due to radiation-damage in X-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Howells, M. R.; Beetz, T.; Chapman, H. N.; Cui, C.; Holton, J. M.; Jacobsen, C. J.; Kirz, J.; Lima, E.; Marchesini, S.; Miao, H.; et al

    2008-11-17

    X-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) is a new form of x-ray imaging that is being practiced at several third-generation synchrotron-radiation x-ray facilities. Nine years have elapsed since the technique was first introduced and it has made rapid progress in demonstrating high-resolution three-dimensional imaging and promises few-nm resolution with much larger samples than can be imaged in the transmission electron microscope. Both life- and materials-science applications of XDM are intended, and it is expected that the principal limitation to resolution will be radiation damage for life science and the coherent power of available x-ray sources for material science. In this paper wemore »address the question of the role of radiation damage. We use a statistical analysis based on the so-called "dose fractionation theorem" of Hegerl and Hoppe to calculate the dose needed to make an image of a single life-science sample by XDM with a given resolution. We find that for simply-shaped objects the needed dose scales with the inverse fourth power of the resolution and present experimental evidence to support this finding. To determine the maximum tolerable dose we have assembled a number of data taken from the literature plus some measurements of our own which cover ranges of resolution that are not well covered otherwise. The conclusion of this study is that, based on the natural contrast between protein and water and "Rose-criterion" image quality, one should be able to image a frozen-hydrated biological sample using XDM at a resolution of about 10 nm.« less

  4. X-ray Image Bank Open for Business - NERSC Center News, Feb 22...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    use light sources to shoot intense x-ray beams into molecules, such as proteins, in order to understand their shapes and structures. The resulting diffraction patterns are...

  5. Goniometer-based femtosecond X-ray diffraction of mutant 30S ribosomal subunit crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dao, E. Han; Sierra, Raymond G.; Laksmono, Hartawan; Lemke, Henrik T.; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Coey, Aaron; Larsen, Kevin; Baxter, Elizabeth L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; et al

    2015-04-30

    In this work, we collected radiation-damage-free data from a set of cryo-cooled crystals for a novel 30S ribosomal subunit mutant using goniometer-based femtosecond crystallography. Crystal quality assessment for these samples was conducted at the X-ray Pump Probe end-station of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) using recently introduced goniometer-based instrumentation. These 30S subunit crystals were genetically engineered to omit a 26-residue protein, Thx, which is present in the wild-type Thermus thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit. We are primarily interested in elucidating the contribution of this ribosomal protein to the overall 30S subunit structure. To assess the viability of this study, femtosecondmore »X-ray diffraction patterns from these crystals were recorded at the LCLS during a protein crystal screening beam time. During our data collection, we successfully observed diffraction from these difficult-to-grow 30S ribosomal subunit crystals. Most of our crystals were found to diffract to low resolution, while one crystal diffracted to 3.2 Å resolution. These data suggest the feasibility of pursuing high-resolution data collection as well as the need to improve sample preparation and handling in order to collect a complete radiation-damage-free data set using an X-ray Free Electron Laser.« less

  6. Continuous motion scan ptychography: Characterization for increased speed in coherent x-ray imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Junjing; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Chen, Si; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris; Vine, David J.

    2015-02-23

    Ptychography is a coherent diffraction imaging (CDI) method for extended objects in which diffraction patterns are acquired sequentially from overlapping coherent illumination spots. The object’s complex transmission function can be reconstructed from those diffraction patterns at a spatial resolution limited only by the scattering strength of the object and the detector geometry. Most experiments to date have positioned the illumination spots on the sample using a move-settle-measure sequence in which the move and settle steps can take longer to complete than the measure step. We describe here the use of a continuous “fly-scan” mode for ptychographic data collection in whichmore »the sample is moved continuously, so that the experiment resembles one of integrating the diffraction patterns from multiple probe positions. This allows one to use multiple probe mode reconstruction methods to obtain an image of the object and also of the illumination function. We show in simulations, and in x-ray imaging experiments, some of the characteristics of fly-scan ptychography, including a factor of 25 reduction in the data acquisition time. This approach will become increasingly important as brighter x-ray sources are developed, such as diffraction limited storage rings.« less

  7. Fiber fed x-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hailey, Charles J. (San Francisco, CA); Ziock, Klaus-Peter (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01

    X-ray/gamma ray imaging apparatus is disclosed for detecting the position, energy, and intensity of x-ray/gamma ray radiation comprising scintillation means disposed in the path of such radiation and capable of generating photons in response to such radiation; first photodetection means optically bonded to the scintillation means and capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the intensity, and energy of the radiation detected by the scintillation means; second photodetection means capable of generating an electrical signal indicative of the position of the radiation in the radiation pattern; and means for optically coupling the scintillation means to the second photodetection means. The photodetection means are electrically connected to control and storage means which may also be used to screen out noise by rejecting a signal from one photodetection means not synchronized to a signal from the other photodetection means; and also to screen out signals from scattered radiation.

  8. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarczyk, M., E-mail: mateusz.tokarczyk@fuw.edu.pl; Kowalski, G.; K?pa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabi?ska, A. [University of Warsaw, Institute of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Strupi?ski, W. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (Poland)

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  9. Precise orientation of single crystals by a simple x-ray diffraction rocking curve method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doucette, L.D.; Pereira da Cunha, M.; Lad, R.J.

    2005-03-01

    A simple method has been developed for accurately measuring the crystallographic orientation of a single crystal boule, employing a conventional four-circle x-ray diffraction arrangement in the rocking curve mode which relaxes the need for precise instrument and/or reference alignment. By acquiring a total of eight rocking curve measurements at specific orientations about the specimen azimuth, the absolute miscut angle between a crystal surface and the desired crystallographic plane can be resolved to within {+-}0.01 deg.

  10. X-ray Microscopy and Imaging (XSD-XMI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingInImaging

  11. A versatile high-resolution x-ray imager (HRXI) for laser-plasma...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    x-ray imager (HRXI) devoted to laser-plasma experiments combines two state-of-the-art technologies developed in France: a high-resolution x-ray microscope and a high-speed...

  12. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    problems. Even the best x-ray microscope lenses (concentric circles of metal known as Fresnel zone plates) cannot focus x-rays with high efficiency. To get an image means using...

  13. Measuring the x-ray resolving power of bent potassium acid phthalate diffraction crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haugh, M. J. Jacoby, K. D.; Wu, M.; Loisel, G. P.

    2014-11-15

    This report presents the results from measuring the X-ray resolving power of a curved potassium acid phthalate (KAP(001)) spectrometer crystal using two independent methods. It is part of a continuing effort to measure the fundamental diffraction properties of bent crystals that are used to study various characteristics of high temperature plasmas. Bent crystals like KAP(001) do not usually have the same diffraction properties as corresponding flat crystals. Models that do exist to calculate the effect of bending the crystal on the diffraction properties have simplifying assumptions and their accuracy limits have not been adequately determined. The type of crystals that we measured is being used in a spectrometer on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The first technique for measuring the crystal resolving power measures the X-ray spectral line width of the characteristic lines from several metal anodes. The second method uses a diode X-ray source and a double crystal diffractometer arrangement to measure the reflectivity curve of the KAP(001) crystal. The width of that curve is inversely proportional to the crystal resolving power. The measurement results are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction techniques for bulk polycrystalline materials under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, P. K.; Hustedt, C. J.; Zhao, M.; Ananiadis, A. G.; Hufnagel, T. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Vecchio, K. S. [Department of NanoEngineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Huskins, E. L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Casem, D. T. [US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, Maryland 21005 (United States); Gruner, S. M. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Tate, M. W.; Philipp, H. T.; Purohit, P.; Weiss, J. T. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Woll, A. R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kannan, V.; Ramesh, K. T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Kenesei, P.; Okasinski, J. S.; Almer, J. [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    We have developed two techniques for time-resolved x-ray diffraction from bulk polycrystalline materials during dynamic loading. In the first technique, we synchronize a fast detector with loading of samples at strain rates of ?10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} s{sup ?1} in a compression Kolsky bar (split Hopkinson pressure bar) apparatus to obtain in situ diffraction patterns with exposures as short as 70 ns. This approach employs moderate x-ray energies (10–20 keV) and is well suited to weakly absorbing materials such as magnesium alloys. The second technique is useful for more strongly absorbing materials, and uses high-energy x-rays (86 keV) and a fast shutter synchronized with the Kolsky bar to produce short (?40??s) pulses timed with the arrival of the strain pulse at the specimen, recording the diffraction pattern on a large-format amorphous silicon detector. For both techniques we present sample data demonstrating the ability of these techniques to characterize elastic strains and polycrystalline texture as a function of time during high-rate deformation.

  15. Investigation of surface acoustic wave fields in silicon crystals by x-ray diffraction: A dynamical theory approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Investigation of surface acoustic wave fields in silicon crystals by x-ray diffraction: A dynamical at different x-ray energies from a Si crystal subjected to a deformation produced by surface acoustic wave of the elastic model describing the acoustic wave fields inside the crystal. © 2005 American Institute of Physics

  16. Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

  17. X-ray diffraction in the pulsed laser heated diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, Alexander F.; Struzhkin, Viktor V.; Dalton, D. Allen; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Kantor, Innokenty; Rivers, Mark L.

    2010-11-15

    We have developed in situ x-ray synchrotron diffraction measurements of samples heated by a pulsed laser in the diamond anvil cell at pressure up to 60 GPa. We used an electronically modulated 2-10 kHz repetition rate, 1064-1075 nm fiber laser with 1-100 {mu}s pulse width synchronized with a gated x-ray detector (Pilatus) and time-resolved radiometric temperature measurements. This enables the time domain measurements as a function of temperature in a microsecond time scale (averaged over many events, typically more than 10 000). X-ray diffraction data, temperature measurements, and finite element calculations with realistic geometric and thermochemical parameters show that in the present experimental configuration, samples 4 {mu}m thick can be continuously temperature monitored (up to 3000 K in our experiments) with the same level of axial and radial temperature uniformities as with continuous heating. We find that this novel technique offers a new and convenient way of fine tuning the maximum sample temperature by changing the pulse width of the laser. This delicate control, which may also prevent chemical reactivity and diffusion, enables accurate measurement of melting curves, phase changes, and thermal equations of state.

  18. X-ray Moiré deflectometry using synthetic reference images

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia; Finkenthal, Michael

    2015-06-25

    Moiré fringe deflectometry with grating interferometers is a technique that enables refraction-based x-ray imaging using a single exposure of an object. To obtain the refraction image, the method requires a reference fringe pattern (without the object). Our study shows that, in order to avoid artifacts, the reference pattern must be exactly matched in phase with the object fringe pattern. In experiments, however, it is difficult to produce a perfectly matched reference pattern due to unavoidable interferometer drifts. We present a simple method to obtain matched reference patterns using a phase-scan procedure to generate synthetic Moiré images. As a result, themore »method will enable deflectometric diagnostics of transient phenomena such as laser-produced plasmas and could improve the sensitivity and accuracy of medical phase-contrast imaging.« less

  19. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. We show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffraction patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.

  20. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.

    2010-06-15

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  1. Time-, frequency-, and wavevector-resolved x-ray diffraction from single molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Kochise, E-mail: kcbennet@uci.edu; Biggs, Jason D.; Zhang, Yu; Dorfman, Konstantin E.; Mukamel, Shaul, E-mail: smukamel@uci.edu [University of California, Irvine, California 92697-2025 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Using a quantum electrodynamic framework, we calculate the off-resonant scattering of a broadband X-ray pulse from a sample initially prepared in an arbitrary superposition of electronic states. The signal consists of single-particle (incoherent) and two-particle (coherent) contributions that carry different particle form factors that involve different material transitions. Single-molecule experiments involving incoherent scattering are more influenced by inelastic processes compared to bulk measurements. The conditions under which the technique directly measures charge densities (and can be considered as diffraction) as opposed to correlation functions of the charge-density are specified. The results are illustrated with time- and wavevector-resolved signals from a single amino acid molecule (cysteine) following an impulsive excitation by a stimulated X-ray Raman process resonant with the sulfur K-edge. Our theory and simulations can guide future experimental studies on the structures of nano-particles and proteins.

  2. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  3. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Goodman, Claude A. (Kensington, CA)

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  4. Dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, Robert E.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and test a method to quantify the effect of dimensionality on the noise in energy selective x-ray imaging.Methods: The Cramèr-Rao lower bound (CRLB), a universal lower limit of the covariance of any unbiased estimator, is used to quantify the noise. It is shown that increasing dimensionality always increases, or at best leaves the same, the variance. An analytic formula for the increase in variance in an energy selective x-ray system is derived. The formula is used to gain insight into the dependence of the increase in variance on the properties of the additional basis functions, the measurement noise covariance, and the source spectrum. The formula is also used with computer simulations to quantify the dependence of the additional variance on these factors. Simulated images of an object with three materials are used to demonstrate the trade-off of increased information with dimensionality and noise. The images are computed from energy selective data with a maximum likelihood estimator.Results: The increase in variance depends most importantly on the dimension and on the properties of the additional basis functions. With the attenuation coefficients of cortical bone, soft tissue, and adipose tissue as the basis functions, the increase in variance of the bone component from two to three dimensions is 1.4 × 10{sup 3}. With the soft tissue component, it is 2.7 × 10{sup 4}. If the attenuation coefficient of a high atomic number contrast agent is used as the third basis function, there is only a slight increase in the variance from two to three basis functions, 1.03 and 7.4 for the bone and soft tissue components, respectively. The changes in spectrum shape with beam hardening also have a substantial effect. They increase the variance by a factor of approximately 200 for the bone component and 220 for the soft tissue component as the soft tissue object thickness increases from 1 to 30 cm. Decreasing the energy resolution of the detectors increases the variance of the bone component markedly with three dimension processing, approximately a factor of 25 as the resolution decreases from 100 to 3 bins. The increase with two dimension processing for adipose tissue is a factor of two and with the contrast agent as the third material for two or three dimensions is also a factor of two for both components. The simulated images show that a maximum likelihood estimator can be used to process energy selective x-ray data to produce images with noise close to the CRLB.Conclusions: The method presented can be used to compute the effects of the object attenuation coefficients and the x-ray system properties on the relationship of dimensionality and noise in energy selective x-ray imaging systems.

  5. Fixture for supporting and aligning a sample to be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, L.A.; Heck, J.L. Jr.

    1985-04-23

    A fixture is provided for supporting and aligning small samples of material on a goniometer for x-ray diffraction analysis. A sample-containing capillary is accurately positioned for rotation in the x-ray beam by selectively adjusting the fixture to position the capillary relative to the x and y axes thereof to prevent wobble and position the sample along the z axis or the axis of rotation. By employing the subject fixture relatively small samples of materials can be analyzed in an x-ray diffraction apparatus previously limited to the analysis of much larger samples.

  6. Data preparation and evaluation techniques for x-ray diffraction microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Huang, Xiaojing; Marchesini, Stefano; Shapiro, David; Turner, Joshua J.; Jacobsen, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The post-experiment processing of X-ray Diffraction Microscopy data is often time-consuming and difficult. This is mostly due to the fact that even if a preliminary result has been reconstructed, there is no definitive answer as to whether or not a better result with more consistently retrieved phases can still be obtained. In addition, we show here that the first step in data analysis, the assembly of two-dimensional diffraction patterns from a large set of raw diffraction data, is crucial to obtaining reconstructions of highest possible consistency. We have developed software that automates this process and results in consistently accurate diffractionmore »patterns. We have furthermore derived some criteria of validity for a tool commonly used to assess the consistency of reconstructions, the phase retrieval transfer function, and suggest a modified version that has improved utility for judging reconstruction quality.« less

  7. Investigation of the hard x-ray background in backlit pinhole imagers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fein, J. R. Holloway, J. P.; Peebles, J. L.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Drake, R. P.

    2014-11-15

    Hard x-rays from laser-produced hot electrons (>10 keV) in backlit pinhole imagers can give rise to a background signal that decreases signal dynamic range in radiographs. Consequently, significant uncertainties are introduced to the measured optical depth of imaged plasmas. Past experiments have demonstrated that hard x-rays are produced when hot electrons interact with the high-Z pinhole substrate used to collimate the softer He-? x-ray source. Results are presented from recent experiments performed on the OMEGA-60 laser to further study the production of hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate and how these x-rays contribute to the background signal in radiographs. Radiographic image plates measured hard x-rays from pinhole imagers with Mo, Sn, and Ta pinhole substrates. The variation in background signal between pinhole substrates provides evidence that much of this background comes from x-rays produced in the pinhole substrate itself. A Monte Carlo electron transport code was used to model x-ray production from hot electrons interacting in the pinhole substrate, as well as to model measurements of x-rays from the irradiated side of the targets, recorded by a bremsstrahlung x-ray spectrometer. Inconsistencies in inferred hot electron distributions between the different pinhole substrate materials demonstrate that additional sources of hot electrons beyond those modeled may produce hard x-rays in the pinhole substrate.

  8. An X-ray Imaging Study of the Stellar Population in RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; E. D. Feigelson; L. K. Townsley; P. S. Broos; K. V. Getman; J. Wang; G. P. Garmire; D. Baba; T. Nagayama; M. Tamura; E. B. Churchwell

    2007-05-04

    We present the results of a high-resolution X-ray imaging study of the stellar population in the Galactic massive star-forming region RCW49 and its central OB association Westerlund 2. We obtained a 40 ks X-ray image of a 17'x17' field using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and deep NIR images using the Infrared Survey Facility in a concentric 8'3x8'3 region. We detected 468 X-ray sources and identified optical, NIR, and Spitzer Space Telescope MIR counterparts for 379 of them. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of the X-ray image, enhanced by optical and infrared imaging data, yielded the following results: (1) The central OB association Westerlund 2 is resolved for the first time in the X-ray band. X-ray emission is detected from all spectroscopically-identified early-type stars in this region. (2) Most (86%) X-ray sources with optical or infrared identifications are cluster members in comparison with a control field in the Galactic Plane. (3) A loose constraint (2--5 kpc) for the distance to RCW49 is derived from the mean X-ray luminosity of T Tauri stars. (4) The cluster X-ray population consists of low-mass pre--main-sequence and early-type stars as obtained from X-ray and NIR photometry. About 30 new OB star candidates are identified. (5) We estimate a cluster radius of 6'--7' based on the X-ray surface number density profiles. (6) A large fraction (90%) of cluster members are identified individually using complimentary X-ray and MIR excess emission. (7) The brightest five X-ray sources, two Wolf-Rayet stars and three O stars, have hard thermal spectra.

  9. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapline, Jr., George F. (Alamo, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  10. Monochromatic x-ray sampling streak imager for fast-ignitor plasma observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Fujiwara, Takashi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Mima, Kunioki

    2008-10-15

    Ultrafast two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging is required to investigate the dynamics of fast-heated core plasma in inertial confinement fusion research. A novel x-ray imager, consisting of two toroidally bent Bragg crystals and an ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging camera, has been demonstrated. Sequential and 2D monochromatic x-ray images of laser-imploded core plasma were obtained with a temporal resolution of 20 ps, a spatial resolution of 31 {mu}m, and a spectral resolution of over 200, simultaneously.

  11. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gürsoy, Do?a; Biçer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  12. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gürsoy, Do?a; Biçer, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversionmore »approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.« less

  13. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  14. Dynamic in-situ X-ray Diffraction of Catalyzed Alanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, K.J.; Sandrock, G.; Thomas, G.J.

    2000-11-01

    The discovery that hydrogen can be reversible absorbed and desorbed from NaAlH{sub 4} by the addition of catalysts has created an entirely new prospect for lightweight hydrogen storage. NaAlH{sub 4} releases hydrogen through the following set of decomposition reactions: NaAlH{sub 4} {r_arrow} 1/3({alpha}-Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6}) + 2/3Al + H{sub 2} {r_arrow} NaH + Al + 3/2H{sub 2}. These decomposition reactions as well as the reverse recombination reactions were directly observed using time-resolved in-situ x-ray powder diffraction. These measurements were performed under conditions similar to those found in PEM fuel cell operations (hydrogen absorption: 50--70 C, 10--15 bar Hz, hydrogen resorption: 80--110 C, 5--100 mbar H{sub 2}). Catalyst doping was found to dramatically improve kinetics under these conditions. In this study, the alanate was doped with a catalyst by dry ball-milling NaAlH{sub 4} with 2 mol.% solid TiCl{sub 3}. X-ray diffraction clearly showed that TiCl{sub 3} reacts with NaAlH{sub 4} to form NaCl during the doping process. Partial desorption of NaAlH{sub 4} was even observed to occur during the catalyst doping process.

  15. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called `fixed-target' sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. In addition, the features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  16. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and X-ray emission studies on iron-bearing silicate perovskite under high pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Speciale, Sergio; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Dera, Przemek; Lavina, Babara; Watson, Heather C.

    2010-06-22

    Iron-bearing silicate perovskite is believed to be the most abundant mineral of the Earth's lower mantle. Recent studies have shown that Fe{sup 2+} exists predominantly in the intermediate-spin state with a total spin number of 1 in silicate perovskite in the lower part of the lower mantle. Here we have measured the spin states of iron and the pressure-volume relation in silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}] at pressure conditions relevant to the lowermost mantle using in situ X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction in a diamond cell. Our results showed that the intermediate-spin Fe{sup 2+} is stable in the silicate perovskite up to {approx} 125 GPa but starts to transition to the low-spin state at approximately 135 GPa. Concurrent X-ray diffraction measurements showed a decrease of approximately 1% in the unit cell volume in the silicate perovskite [(Mg{sub 0.6},Fe{sub 0.4})SiO{sub 3}], which is attributed to the intermediate-spin to the low-spin transition. The transition pressure coincides with the pressure conditions of the lowermost mantle, raising the possibility of the existence of the silicate perovskite phase with the low-spin Fe{sup 2+} across the transition from the post-perovskite to the perovskite phases in the bottom of the D{double_prime} layer.

  17. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A.I.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Marinkovic, N.; Chen, J.G.; Barrio, L.; Si, R.; Lopez Camara, A.; Estrella, A.M.; Rodriguez, J.A.

    2011-08-05

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  18. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis:Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Frenkel; Q Wang; N Marinkovic; J Chen; L Barrio; R Si; A Lopez Camara; A Estella; J Rodriquez; J Hanson

    2011-12-31

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  19. Argon Adsorption on MCM-41 Mesoporous Crystal Studied by In Situ Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    -701, Korea, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, New Jersey 08801 powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements at SPring-8. The diffraction intensity data is analyzed. The proposed method of interpretation of XRD data allows one to calculate the density ratio between the silica

  20. In-orbit performance of the XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes: images and spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach

    2001-09-21

    The performance of the three X-ray telescopes on-board of XMM-Newton is evaluated addressing imaging characteristics and effective collecting area. The agreement with ground calibration data is excellent. The analysis of images and spectra of cosmic X-ray sources, emphazising supernova and supernova remnants, prooves that the telescopes are even better than originally required.

  1. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Lee, Wah -Keat; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Papin, Pallas A.; et al

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. This x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  2. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-08-11

    Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (more »to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (« less

  3. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  4. Quantification of thin film crystallographic orientation using X-ray diffraction with an area detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Jessica L; Jimison, Leslie H; Mannsfeld, Stefan; Volkman, Steven; Yin, Shong; Subramanian, Vivek; Salleo, Alberto; Alivisatos, A Paul; Toney, Michael F

    2010-02-19

    As thin films become increasingly popular (for solar cells, LEDs, microelectronics, batteries), quantitative morphological information is needed to predict and optimize the film's electronic, optical and mechanical properties. This quantification can be obtained quickly and easily with X-ray diffraction using an area detector and synchrotron radiation in two simple geometries. In this paper, we describe a methodology for constructing complete pole figures for thin films with fiber texture (isotropic in-plane orientation). We demonstrate this technique on semicrystalline polymer films, self-assembled nanoparticle semiconductor films, and randomly-packed metallic nanoparticle films. This method can be immediately implemented to help understand the relationship between film processing and microstructure, enabling the development of better and less expensive electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  5. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Decomposition Studied via in Situ Low Temperature X-ray Powder Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Keffer, David J.; Mull, Derek L; Payzant, E Andrew; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are known to have a slowed decomposition rate at ambient pressure and temperatures below the melting point of ice termed self-preservation or anomalous preservation. As hydrate exothermically decomposes, gas is released and water of the clathrate cages transforms into ice. Two regions of slowed decomposition for methane hydrate, 180 200 K and 230 260 K, were observed, and the kinetics were studied by in situ low temperature x-ray powder diffraction. The kinetic constants for ice formation from methane hydrate were determined by the Avrami model within each region and activation energies, Ea, were determined by the Arrhenius plot. Ea determined from the data for 180 200 K was 42 kJ/mol and for 230 260 K was 22 kJ/mol. The higher Ea in the colder temperature range was attributed to a difference in the microstructure of ice between the two regions.

  6. Structural Characterization of a Plutonium Sequestering Agent Complex by Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorden, A.E.V. |; Szigethy, G.; Tiedemann, B.E.F.; Xu, J.; Shuh, D.K.; Raymond, K.N. |

    2007-07-01

    New ligands and materials are required that can coordinate, sense, and purify actinides for selective extraction and reduction of toxic, radioactive wastes from the mining and purification of actinides. The similarities in the chemical, biological transport, and distribution properties of Fe(III) and Pu(IV) inspired a bio-mimetic approach to the development of sequestering agents for actinides. A detailed evaluation of the structure and bonding of actinide coordinating ligands like these is important for the design of new selective ligand systems. Knowing the difficulty with working with the crystals resulting from these ligand systems and safe handling considerations for working with Pu, procedures were developed that utilize the Advanced Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to determine the solid-state structures of Pu complexes by X-ray diffraction. (au0011tho.

  7. Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object by use of an X-ray beam having a polychromatic distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parham, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong; Pisano, Etta; Connor, Dean; Chapman, Leroy D.

    2010-06-22

    Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object using an X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution are disclosed. According to one aspect, a method can include detecting an image of an object. The method can include generating a first X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution. Further, the method can include positioning a single monochromator crystal in a predetermined position to directly intercept the first X-ray beam such that a second X-ray beam having a predetermined energy level is produced. Further, an object can be positioned in the path of the second X-ray beam for transmission of the second X-ray beam through the object and emission from the object as a transmitted X-ray beam. The transmitted X-ray beam can be directed at an angle of incidence upon a crystal analyzer. Further, an image of the object can be detected from a beam diffracted from the analyzer crystal.

  8. An X-ray Imaging Study of the Stellar Population in RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Broos, P S; Churchwell, E B; Feigelson, E D; Garmire, G P; Getman, K V; Nagayama, T; Tamura, M; Townsley, L K; Wang, J

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of a high-resolution X-ray imaging study of the stellar population in the Galactic massive star-forming region RCW49 and its central OB association Westerlund 2. We obtained a 40 ks X-ray image of a 17'x17' field using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and deep NIR images using the Infrared Survey Facility in a concentric 8'3x8'3 region. We detected 468 X-ray sources and identified optical, NIR, and Spitzer Space Telescope MIR counterparts for 379 of them. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of the X-ray image, enhanced by optical and infrared imaging data, yielded the following results: (1) The central OB association Westerlund 2 is resolved for the first time in the X-ray band. X-ray emission is detected from all spectroscopically-identified early-type stars in this region. (2) Most (86%) X-ray sources with optical or infrared identifications are cluster members in comparison with a control field in the Galactic Plane. (3) A loose constraint (2--5 kpc) for the distance to...

  9. A semianalytic model to extract differential linear scattering coefficients of breast tissue from energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeClair, Robert J.; Boileau, Michel M.; Wang Yinkun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada) and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this work is to develop a technique to measure the x-ray diffraction signals of breast biopsy specimens. A biomedical x-ray diffraction technology capable of measuring such signals may prove to be of diagnostic use to the medical field. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements coupled with a semianalytical model were used to extract the differential linear scattering coefficients [{mu}{sub s}(x)] of breast tissues on absolute scales. The coefficients describe the probabilities of scatter events occurring per unit length of tissue per unit solid angle of detection. They are a function of the momentum transfer argument, x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}, where {theta}=scatter angle and {lambda}=incident wavelength. The technique was validated by using a 3 mm diameter 50 kV polychromatic x-ray beam incident on a 5 mm diameter 5 mm thick sample of water. Water was used because good x-ray diffraction data are available in the literature. The scatter profiles from 6 deg. to 15 deg. in increments of 1 deg. were measured with a 3 mmx3 mmx2 mm thick cadmium zinc telluride detector. A 2 mm diameter Pb aperture was placed on top of the detector. The target to detector distance was 29 cm and the duration of each measurement was 10 min. Ensemble averages of the results compare well with the gold standard data of A. H. Narten [''X-ray diffraction data on liquid water in the temperature range 4 deg. C-200 deg. C, ORNL Report No. 4578 (1970)]. An average 7.68% difference for which most of the discrepancies can be attributed to the background noise at low angles was obtained. The preliminary measurements of breast tissue are also encouraging.

  10. Proposed (to) EXIST: Hard X-ray Imaging All Sky Survey/Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. E. Grindlay; T. A. Prince; F. Harrison; N. Gehrels; C. J. Hailey; B. Ramsey; M. C. Weisskopf; G. K. Skinner; P. Ubertini

    1998-01-01

    The hard x-ray (10-600 keV) sky is inherently time variable and yet has neither been surveyed nor monitored with a sensitive imaging telescope. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a mission concept, proposed for MIDEX, which would conduct the first imaging all-sky hard x-ray survey as well as provide a sensitive all sky monitor. With $\\sim 60%$ sky coverage each orbit, and full sky coverage each 50 days, hard x-ray studies of gamma-ray bursts, AGN, galactic transients, x-ray binaries and accretion-powered pulsars can be conducted over a wide range of timescales. We summarize the scientific objectives of EXIST for both the survey and monitoring objectives. We describe the mission concept and the instrumentation approach, which would incorporate a large area array of Cd-Zn-Te (CZT) detectors, as well as some of our ongoing development of CZT array detectors.

  11. Imaging Performance of the XMM-Newton X-ray telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aschenbach; U. Briel; F. Haberl; H. Braeuninger; W. Burkert; A. Oppitz; P. Gondoin; D. Lumb

    2000-07-18

    The in-orbit imaging performance of the three X-ray telescopes on board of the X-ray astronomy observatory XMM-Newton is presented and compared with the performance measured on ground at the MPE PANTER test facility. The comparison shows an excellent agreement between the on ground and in-orbit performance.

  12. Identification and quantification of hydride phases in Zircaloy-4 cladding using synchrotron X-ray diffraction q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Identification and quantification of hydride phases in Zircaloy-4 cladding using synchrotron X-ray diffraction q R.S. Daum a,1 , Y.S. Chu b,2 , A.T. Motta c,* a Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National, IL 60439, United States c Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State

  13. Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing of Aqueous Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Investigation of the Anomalous Behavior of Ice During Freezing be used to quantify stresses during freezing, which could improve our understanding of the role of water, such as freeze-induced destabilization of biological systems, and laboratory or industrial practices

  14. X-ray diffraction studies and equation of state of methane at 202 GPa Liling Sun a,*, Wei Yi a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Guoyin

    X-ray diffraction studies and equation of state of methane at 202 GPa Liling Sun a,*, Wei Yi that at room temperature compressed CH4 remains an insulator with cubic structure to 202 GPa. Ó 2009 Elsevier B of planetary interiors and the origin of their magnetic field distribution. CH4 has a very rich phase diagram

  15. Coherent diffractive imaging of single layer microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinh, Khuong Ba Le, Hoang Vu; Van Vuong, Cuong; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap; Ong, Adabelle X. P.; Henderson, Clare A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2015-04-28

    We report the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) coherent diffractive imaging of silica/polymer micro-particle samples illuminated by a table-top high harmonic generation source at the wavelength of 30?nm. We achieve images constructed from diffraction patterns acquired with 13??m × 13??m samples comprising a sparse monolayer of spherical silica and polymer micro-particles. Successful reconstructed image of an aperiodic sample using this HHG source will open the path to the realization of a compact soft x-ray microscope to investigate other complex absorbing samples.

  16. Tamper to delay motion and decrease ionization of a sample during short pulse x-ray imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Szoke; Abraham (Fremont, CA), Hau-Riege; Stefan P. (Fremont, CA), Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-06-26

    A system for x-ray imaging of a small sample comprising positioning a tamper so that it is operatively connected to the sample, directing short intense x-ray pulses onto the tamper and the sample, and detecting an image from the sample. The tamper delays the explosive motion of the sample during irradiation by the short intense x-ray pulses, thereby extending the time to obtain an x-ray image of the original structure of the sample.

  17. FIRST IMAGES FROM THE FOCUSING OPTICS X-RAY SOLAR IMAGER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay; Turin, Paul; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Fermin, Jose; Lin, Robert; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Saito, Shinya; Tanaka, Takaaki; White, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload flew for the first time on 2012 November 2, producing the first focused images of the Sun above 5 keV. To enable hard X-ray (HXR) imaging spectroscopy via direct focusing, FOXSI makes use of grazing-incidence replicated optics combined with fine-pitch solid-state detectors. On its first flight, FOXSI observed several targets that included active regions, the quiet Sun, and a GOES-class B2.7 microflare. This Letter provides an introduction to the FOXSI instrument and presents its first solar image. These data demonstrate the superiority in sensitivity and dynamic range that is achievable with a direct HXR imager with respect to previous, indirect imaging methods, and illustrate the technological readiness for a spaceborne mission to observe HXRs from solar flares via direct focusing optics.

  18. Novel X-ray imaging diagnostics of high energy nanosecond pulse accelerators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Graham W.; Gallegos, Roque Rosauro; Hohlfelder, Robert James; Beutler, David Eric; Dudley, John; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Bell, John D.

    2004-08-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE's and Sandia National Laboratories radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  19. Versatile wide angle diffraction setup for simultaneous wide and small angle x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rueda, D.R.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.C.; Nogales, A.; Capitan, M.J.; Ezquerra, T.A.; Labrador, A.; Fraga, E.; Beltran, D.; Juanhuix, J.; Herranz, J.F.; Bordas, J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); LLS, BM16-ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 Grenoble (France)

    2006-03-15

    Here we present a novel, simple, and versatile experimental setup aimed to perform wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements alone or in simultaneous combination with small angle x-ray scattering measurements. The design of the WAXS goniometer allows one to obtain high resolution diffraction patterns in a broad angular range. The setup can incorporate a hot stage in order to evaluate temperature resolved experiments. The performance of the equipment has been verified in the BM16 beam line of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility with different well known samples such as alumina, isotropic film of high density polyethylene (HDPE), and oriented HPDE fiber.

  20. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, Jonathan B; Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Donald C; Montgomery, David S; Offermann, Dustin T

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  1. X-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy for use in plasma transport research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitter, M.

    This research describes advancements in the spectral analysis and error propagation techniques associated with x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) that have enabled this diagnostic to be used to accurately constrain ...

  2. Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Daniel Larsson, Stanford Program Description...

  3. An experimental apparatus for diffraction-limites soft x-ray nanofocusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merthe, Daniel; Goldberg, Kenneth; Yashchuk, Valeriy; Yuan, Sheng; McKinney, Wayne; Celestre, Richard; Mochi, Iacopo; Macdougall, James; Morrison, Gregory; Rakawa, Senajith; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard

    2011-10-21

    Realizing the experimental potential of high-brightness, next generation synchrotron and free-electron laser light sources requires the development of reflecting x-ray optics capable of wavefront preservation and high-resolution nano-focusing. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of wavefront-sensing tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity, including scanning-slit Hartmann tests, grating-based lateral shearing interferometry, and quantitative knife-edge testing. We describe the original experimental techniques and alignment methodology that have enabled us to optimally set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused, FWHM spot size of 150 nm, with 1 nm (1.24 keV) photons at 3.7 mrad numerical aperture. The predictions of wavefront measurement are confirmed by the knife-edge testing.The side-profiled elliptically bent mirror used in these one-dimensional focusing experiments was originally designed for a much different glancing angle and conjugate distances. This work demonstrates that high-accuracy, at-wavelength wavefront-slope feedback can be used to optimize the pitch, roll, and mirror-bending forces in situ, using procedures that are deterministic and repeatable.

  4. Pressure-temperature stability studies of FeOOH using x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, Arianna E.; Jeanloz, Raymond; Kunz, Martin

    2008-07-21

    The Mie-Gruneisen formalism is used to fit a Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to high-temperature (T), high-pressure (P) X-ray diffraction unit-cell volume (V) measurements on synthetic goethite (alpha-FeOOH) to combined conditions of T = 23-250o C and P = 0-29.4 GPa. We find the zero-pressure thermal expansion coefficient of goethite to be alpha0 = 2.3 (+-0.6) x 10-5 K-1 over this temperature range. Our data yield zero-pressure compressional parameters: V0 = 138.75 (+- 0.02) Angstrom3, bulk modulus K0 = 140.3 (+- 3.7) GPa, pressure derivative K0' = 4.6 (+- 0.4), Gruneisen parameter gamma0 = 0.91 (+- 0.07), and Debye temperature Theta0 = 740 (+- 5) K. We identify decomposition conditions for 2alpha-FeOOH --> alpha-Fe2O3 + H2O at 1 - 8 GPa and 100-400oC, and the polymorphic transition from alpha-FeOOH (Pbnm) to epsilon-FeOOH (P21mn). The non-quenchable, high-pressure epsilon-FeOOH phase P-V data are fitted to a second-order (Birch) equation of state yielding, K0 = 158 (+- 5) GPa and V0 = 66.3 (+- 0.5) Angstrom3.

  5. Boron phosphide under pressure: In situ study by Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solozhenko, Vladimir L.; Kurakevych, Oleksandr O.; Le Godec, Yann; Kurnosov, Aleksandr V.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2014-07-21

    Cubic boron phosphide, BP, has been studied in situ by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering up to 55?GPa at 300?K in a diamond anvil cell. The bulk modulus of B{sub 0}?=?174(2) GPa has been established, which is in excellent agreement with our ab initio calculations. The data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state (EOS) data, allowed us to estimate the Grüneisen parameters of the TO and LO modes of zinc-blende structure, ?{sub G}{sup TO?}=?1.26 and ?{sub G}{sup LO?}=?1.13, just like in the case of other A{sup III}B{sup V} diamond-like phases, for which ?{sub G}{sup TO?}>??{sub G}{sup LO?}??1. We also established that the pressure dependence of the effective electro-optical constant ? is responsible for a strong change in relative intensities of the TO and LO modes from I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???0.25 at 0.1?MPa to I{sub TO}/I{sub LO}???2.5 at 45?GPa, for which we also find excellent agreement between experiment and theory.

  6. Probing Martensitic Transition in Nitinol Wire: A Comparison of X-ray Diffraction and Other Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.; Tiernan, P.; Tofail, S. A. M.; Ghandi, A. A. [Materials and Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland)

    2011-01-17

    Martensitic to austenite transformation in Nitinol wire can be measured by a number of techniques such as XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), BFR (Bend and Free Recovery) and Vickers indentation recovery. A comparison of results from these varied characterisation techniques is reported here to obtain a greater understanding of the thermal-elastic-structural changes associated with martensitic transformation. The transformation temperatures measured by DSC were found to correspond well with the structural and mechanical information obtained from XRD, BFR and Vickers indent recovery methods. Indent recovery is a relatively new and accurate method of monitoring stress induced martensitic transformations in NiTi and is one of only a few methods of stress inducing martensitic transformation in large scale samples. It is especially useful for NiTi in the as-cast billet form, where tensile testing is impossible. BFR is uniquely popular in the NiTi wire manufacturing sector and is recognised as the most accurate method of measuring the transformation temperature. Here the material is stressed to a representative in-service stress level during the test. No other test uses the shape memory effect for measuring the transformation temperature of NiTi. The results show that the DSC thermogram and XRD diffractogram have a peak overlap which is a common occurrence in NiTi that has been extensively processed. The XRD method further explains the observations in the DSC thermogram and in combination they confirm the transformation temperature.

  7. X-ray tomographic image magnification process, system and apparatus therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kinney, J.H.; Bonse, U.K.; Johnson, Q.C.; Nichols, M.C.; Saroyan, R.A.; Massey, W.N.; Nusshardt, R.

    1993-09-14

    A computerized three-dimensional x-ray tomographic microscopy system is disclosed, comprising: (a) source means for providing a source of parallel x-ray beams, (b) staging means for staging and sequentially rotating a sample to be positioned in the path of the (c) x-ray image magnifier means positioned in the path of the beams downstream from the sample, (d) detecting means for detecting the beams after being passed through and magnified by the image magnifier means, and (e) computing means for analyzing values received from the detecting means, and converting the values into three-dimensional representations. Also disclosed is a process for magnifying an x-ray image, and apparatus therefor. 25 figures.

  8. Note: Dynamic strain field mapping with synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, L. [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Fan, D.; Luo, S. N., E-mail: sluo@pims.ac.cn [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Bie, B. X. [The Peac Institute of Multiscale Sciences, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Ran, X. X.; Qi, M. L., E-mail: qiml@whut.edu.cn [School of Science, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430070 (China); Parab, N.; Sun, J. Z.; Liao, H. J.; Hudspeth, M. C.; Claus, B. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Fezzaa, K.; Sun, T. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, W. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Material Science Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Gong, X. L., E-mail: gongxl@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China)

    2014-07-15

    We present a dynamic strain field mapping method based on synchrotron X-ray digital image correlation (XDIC). Synchrotron X-ray sources are advantageous for imaging with exceptional spatial and temporal resolutions, and X-ray speckles can be produced either from surface roughness or internal inhomogeneities. Combining speckled X-ray imaging with DIC allows one to map strain fields with high resolutions. Based on experiments on void growth in Al and deformation of a granular material during Kolsky bar/gas gun loading at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 32ID, we demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic XDIC. XDIC is particularly useful for dynamic, in-volume, measurements on opaque materials under high strain-rate, large, deformation.

  9. X-ray tests of a two-dimensional stigmatic imaging scheme with variable magnifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, J.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Efthimion, P. C.; Pablant, N. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Caughey, T. A.; Brunner, J.

    2014-11-15

    A two-dimensional stigmatic x-ray imaging scheme, consisting of two spherically bent crystals, one concave and one convex, was recently proposed [M. Bitter et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 10E527 (2012)]. The Bragg angles and the radii of curvature of the two crystals of this imaging scheme are matched to eliminate the astigmatism and to satisfy the Bragg condition across both crystal surfaces for a given x-ray energy. In this paper, we consider more general configurations of this imaging scheme, which allow us to vary the magnification for a given pair of crystals and x-ray energy. The stigmatic imaging scheme has been validated for the first time by imaging x-rays generated by a micro-focus x-ray source with source size of 8.4 ?m validated by knife-edge measurements. Results are presented from imaging the tungsten L?1 emission at 8.3976 keV, using a convex Si-422 crystal and a concave Si-533 crystal with 2d-spacings of 2.21707 Å and 1.65635 Å and radii of curvature of 500 ± 1 mm and 823 ± 1 mm, respectively, showing a spatial resolution of 54.9 ?m. This imaging scheme is expected to be of interest for the two-dimensional imaging of laser produced plasmas.

  10. Image plates as x-ray detectors in plasma physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gales, S.G.; Bentley, C.D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-01

    The performance of image plates based on the photostimulable phosphor BaF(Br,l):Eu{sup 2+} has been investigated and compared with x-ray film. Evaluation of detective quantum efficiency (DQE), sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity was carried out for several types of commercially available image plate, using the Excalibur soft x-ray calibration facility at AWE. Image plate response was found to be linear over a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. One type of image plate was found to have a number of advantages for soft x-ray detection, with a measured sensitivity 1 order of magnitude greater than that of Kodak Industrex CX and DEF-5 x-ray film. The DQE of this plate was found to be superior to that of film at low [less than 10{sup 3} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}] and high fluxes [greater than 10{sup 4} photons/(50 {mu}m){sup 2}]. The spatial resolution of image plates, scanned with several models of commercial image plate readers, has been evaluated using a USAF resolution test target. The highest spatial resolution measured is 35 {mu}m. Though this is significantly lower than the resolution possible with film, it is sufficient for many applications. Image plates were fielded in a refractive x-ray lens imaging diagnostic on the 1 TW Helen laser and these results are discussed.

  11. Structural hysteresis in dragline spider silks induced by supercontraction: an X-ray fiber micro-diffraction study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sampath, Sujatha; Yarger, Jeffery L.

    2014-11-27

    Interaction with water causes shrinkage and significant changes in the structure of spider dragline silks, which has been referred to as supercontraction in the literature. Preferred orientation or alignment of protein chains with respect to the fiber axis is extensively changed during this supercontraction process. Synchrotron X-ray micro-fiber diffraction experiments have been performed on Nephila clavipes and Argiope aurantia major and minor ampullate dragline spider fibers in the native dry, contracted (by immersion in water) and restretched (from contracted) states. Changes in the orientation of ?-sheet nanocrystallites and the oriented component of the amorphous network have been determined from wide-anglemore »X-ray diffraction patterns. While both the crystalline and amorphous components lose preferred orientation on wetting with water, the nano-crystallites regain their orientation on wet-restretching, whereas the oriented amorphous components only partially regain their orientation. Dragline major ampullate silks in both the species contract more than their minor ampullate silks.« less

  12. The Coherent X-ray Imaging instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Mengning; Williams, Garth J.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Hayes, Matt; Milathianaki, Despina; Aquila, Andrew; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument specializes in hard X-ray, in-vacuum, high power density experiments in all areas of science. Two main sample chambers, one containing a 100 nm focus and one a 1 µm focus, are available, each with multiple diagnostics, sample injection, pump–probe and detector capabilities. The flexibility of CXI has enabled it to host a diverse range of experiments, from biological to extreme matter.

  13. Analysis of surface integrity of grinded gears using Barkhausen noise analysis and x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrkoslavová, Lucie; Louda, Petr; Malec, Ji?i

    2014-02-18

    The contribution is focused to present results of study grinded gears made of 18CrNiMo7-6 steel used in the wind power plant for support (service) purposes. These gears were case-hardened due to standard hard case and soft core formation. This heat treatment increases wear resistance and fatigue strength of machine parts. During serial production some troubles with surface integrity have occurred. When solving complex problems lots of samples were prepared. For grinding of gears were used different parameters of cutting speed, number of material removal and lots from different subsuppliers. Material characterization was carried out using Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) device; X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement of surface residual stresses was done as well. Depth profile of measured characteristics, e.g. magnetoelastic parameter and residual stress was obtained by step by step layers' removing using electrolytic etching. BNA software Viewscan was used to measure magnetizing frequency sweep (MFS) and magnetizing voltage sweep (MVS). Scanning of Magnetoelastic parameter (MP) endwise individual teeth were also carried out with Viewscan. These measurements were done to find problematic surface areas after grinding such as thermal damaged locations. Plots of the hardness and thickness of case-hardened layer on cross sections were measurered as well. Evaluation of structure of subsurface case-hardened layer and core was made on etched metallographic patterns. The aim of performed measurements was to find correlation between conditions of grinding, residual stresses and structural and magnetoelastic parameters. Based on correlation of measured values and technological parameters optimizing the production of gears will be done.

  14. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY AND X-RAY DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF TANK 18 SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; O'Rourke, P.; Ajo, H.

    2012-03-08

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) Performance Assessment (PA) utilizes waste speciation in the waste release model used in the FTF fate and transport modeling. The waste release modeling associated with the residual plutonium in Tank 18 has been identified as a primary contributor to the Tank 18 dose uncertainty. In order to reduce the uncertainty related to plutonium in Tank 18, a better understanding of the plutonium speciation in the Tank 18 waste (including the oxidation state and stoichiometry) is desired. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilized Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) to analyze Tank 18 samples to provide information on the speciation of plutonium in the waste material. XRD analysis of the Tank 18 samples did not identify any plutonium mineral phases in the samples. These indicates the crystalline mineral phases of plutonium are below the detection limits of the XRD method or that the plutonium phase(s) lack long range order and are present as amorphous or microcrystalline solids. SEM analysis of the Tank 18 samples did locate particles containing plutonium. The plutonium was found as small particles, usually <1 {micro}m but ranging up to several micrometers in diameter, associated with particles of an iron matrix and at low concentration in other elemental matrices. This suggests the plutonium has an affinity for the iron matrix. Qualitatively, the particles of plutonium found in the SEM analysis do not appear to account for all of the plutonium in the sample based on concentrations determined from the chemical analysis of the Tank 18 samples. This suggests that plutonium is also distributed throughout the solids in low concentrations.

  15. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ?2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ?10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (?100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ?64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  16. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Thermotropic Uniaxial and Biaxial Nematic Liquid Crystal Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-08-27

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  17. Role of Molecular Structure on X-ray Diffraction in Uniaxial and Biaxial Phases of Thermotropic Liquid Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acharya, Bharat R.; Kang, Shin-Woong; Prasad, Veena; Kumar, Satyendra

    2009-04-29

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most definitive methods to determine the structure of condensed matter phases, and it has been applied to unequivocally infer the structures of conventional calamitic and lyotropic liquid crystals. With the advent of bent-core and tetrapodic mesogens and the discovery of the biaxial nematic phase in them, the experimental results require more careful interpretation and analysis. Here, we present ab-initio calculations of X-ray diffraction patterns in the isotropic, uniaxial nematic, and biaxial nematic phases of bent-core mesogens. A simple Meier-Saupe-like molecular distribution function is employed to describe both aligned and unaligned mesophases. The distribution function is decomposed into two, polar and azimuthal, distribution functions to calculate the effect of the evolution of uniaxial and biaxial nematic orientational order. The calculations provide satisfactory semiquantitative interpretations of experimental results. The calculations presented here should provide a pathway to more refined and quantitative analysis of X-ray diffraction data from the biaxial nematic phase.

  18. Optimization of X-ray Radiographic Imaging Birsen Yazici, Il-Young Son, An Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazici, Birsen

    Visible Human CT data set. To produce a realistic image, the software simulates quantum noise, blurring effects to the patient. All radiographic x-ray examinations require the selection of beam parameters, which affect both by an observer with respect to a quantitative image quality criteria and determine if the images meet

  19. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hantke, Max, F.

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  20. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hantke, Max, F.

    2014-11-17

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  1. X-ray Diffraction of Photonic Colloidal Single Crystals Willem L. Vos,*, Mischa Megens, Carlos M. van Kats,, and Peter Bosecke,|

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vos, Willem L.

    X-ray Diffraction of Photonic Colloidal Single Crystals Willem L. Vos,*, Mischa Megens, Carlos M of Bragg peaks of photonic colloidal single crystals by synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We find that charge-stabilized colloids form face-centered cubic crystals at all densities up to 60 vol

  2. Single-particle structure determination by correlations of snapshot X-ray diffraction patterns (CXIDB ID 20)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Starodub, D.

    2013-03-25

    This deposition includes the diffraction images generated by the paired polystyrene spheres in random orientations. These images were used to determine and phase the single particle diffraction volume from their autocorrelation functions.

  3. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  4. A criterion for the dynamical to kinematical transition of x-ray diffraction on a bent crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushnir, V.I.; Macrander, A.T.

    1993-09-01

    It is well known that the peak reflectivity of a bent crystal, generally speaking, is smaller than that of a plane crystal, and it goes to zero when the crystal curvature goes to infinity. The reason for this is the transition between dynamical and kinematical diffraction that takes place as the crystal curvature increases. The physical explanation is as follows: the deviation from exact Bragg position along the beam changes so fast that the thickness over which the beam is within a Darwin width becomes too small to reflect the beam. Bent crystals are widely used as focusing elements in X-ray optics, and estimation of whether or not a bent crystal is still perfect enough to provide good reflectivity is of great importance. Currently the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is considering a number of bent crystals as focusing elements for future APS beamlines, including a sagittaly focusing monochromator and bent backscattering analyzer for inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. A criterion is given in answer to the question: To what extent is it possible to bend a crystal without loss of X-ray peak reflectivity? An expression based on the work of Chukhovskii, Gabrielyan and Petrashen, is formulated that applies to anisotropic cubic crystal and that can be used not only for conventional asymmetric Bragg diffraction, but also for inclined crystal diffraction. The following special cases are treated as examples: isotropic crystal, standard symmetrical Bragg diffraction, extremely asymmetric diffraction, and backscattering with Bragg angles near 90{degree}. In addition, an asymptotic behavior for high energies is detailed.

  5. Mirrors for X-ray telescopes: Fresnel diffraction-based computation of Point Spread Functions from metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raimondi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The imaging sharpness of an X-ray telescope is chiefly determined by the optical quality of its focusing optics, which in turn mostly depends on the shape accuracy and the surface finishing of the grazing incidence X-ray mirrors that compose the optical modules. In order to ensure the imaging performance during the mirror manufacturing, a fundamental step is represented by the prediction of the mirror Point Spread Function (PSF) from the metrology of its surface. Traditionally, the PSF computation in X-rays is assumed to be different depending on whether the surface defects are classified as figure errors or roughness [...] The aim of this work is to overcome this limit, providing analytical formulae, valid at any light wavelength, to compute the PSF of an X-ray mirror shell from the measured longitudinal profiles and the roughness Power Spectral Density (PSD), without distinguishing spectral ranges with different treatments. The method we adopted is based on the Huygens-Fresnel principle to compute the diffr...

  6. X-ray diffraction study of the structure of detonation nanodiamonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozerin, A. N. Kurkin, T. S.; Ozerina, L. A.; Dolmatov, V. Yu.

    2008-01-15

    The spatial structure of aggregates formed by detonation nanodiamonds is investigated using the wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering techniques. The effective sizes of crystallites and the crystallite size distribution function are determined. The shape of scattering aggregates is restored from the small-angle X-ray scattering data. An analysis of the results obtained allowed the conclusion that the nanodiamond aggregates have an extended spatial structure composed of nine to ten clusters, each involving four to five crystallites with a crystal lattice of the diamond type.

  7. Using a Microcapillary Refractive X-Ray Lens for Focusing And Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudchik, Y.I.; Komarov, F.F.; Piestrup, M.A.; Gary, C.K.; Park, H.; Cremer, J.T.

    2009-06-03

    The microcapillary lens, formed by air bubbles in a hollow core glass capillary filled with epoxy, is a novel design of a compound refractive lens for X-rays. The epoxy enclosed between two air bubbles has the form of a biconcave lens and acts as a positive lens for X-rays. Each individual lens is spherical with radius of curvature equal to the inner radius of the capillary. Up to 500 individual biconcave lenses can be formed in a single capillary with diameters from 50 to 500 {mu}m. Due to the small radius of curvatures that can be achieved, microcapillary lenses typically have shorter focal lengths than those made by compression or injection molding. For example, microcapillary lenses with a focal length about 5 cm for 8 keV X-rays and 50-micron aperture are readily available. We have produced a set of lenses in a 200-micron inner-diameter glass capillary with 100--350 individual microlenses and measured their parameters at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory and at the Advanced Photon Source. Our investigations have also shown that the lenses are suitable for imaging applications with an X-ray tube as a source of X-rays. A simple X-ray microscope is discussed. The microscope consists of a copper anode X-ray tube, X-ray lens and CCD-camera. The object, lens and CCD-camera were placed in-line at distances to satisfy the lens formula. It is shown that the field of view of the microscope is about 1 mm and resolution is equal to 3--5 {mu}m.

  8. Formation of delta ferrite in 9 wt.% Cr steel investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayr, P.

    In-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements using high energy synchrotron radiation were performed to monitor in real time the formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pct chromium steel under simulated weld thermal ...

  9. Effects of Plant Cell Wall Matrix Polysaccharides on Bacterial Cellulose Structure Studied with Vibrational Sum Frequency Generation Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Christopher M; Kafle, Kabindra; Park, Sunkyu; Cosgrove, Daniel; Kim, Seong H

    2014-07-14

    The crystallinity, allomorph content, and mesoscale ordering of cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter xylinus cultured with different plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides were studied with vibrational sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  10. SEMI-AUTOMATIC SUPERVISED CLASSIFICATION OF MINERALS FROM X-RAY MAPPING IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in siliciclastic and car- bonate rocks. Twelve chemical elements are mapped from thin sections by energy dispersive or energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Here, an x-ray spectrum, long image acquisition times has made use of EDS images for mineral classification difficult. #12;New

  11. X-ray diffraction, spectroscopic and DFT studies of 1-(4-bromophenyl)-3,5-diphenylformazan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tezcan, H.; Tokay, N.; Alpaslan, G.; Erdönmez, A.

    2013-12-15

    The crystal structure of 1-(4-bromophenyl)-3,5-diphenylformazan was determined by X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. The crystals are orthorhombic, a = 23.0788(9), b = 7.9606(3), c = 18.6340(12) Å, Z = 8, sp. gr. Pbca, R{sub 1} = 0.074. The structure was also examined using the density-functional theory. Its structure stability, and frontier molecular orbital components were discussed and the results were compared with X-ray and spectral results. The maximum absorbtion peaks of the UV-vis spectrum of the compound have been calculated using the time-dependent density-functional theory. It was found a good agreement between the calculated and experimental maximum absorption wavelength.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the x-ray diffraction intensities of undulated smectic phases in bent-core liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folcia, C. L.; Etxebarria, J.; Ortega, J.

    2007-07-15

    X-ray diffraction diagrams of undulated smectic phases in bent-core liquid crystals have been theoretically studied. The intensities of the reflections have been obtained for different layer modulations, and a general expression has been deduced for orthogonal cells in terms of the different harmonics of the distortion. The case of sinusoidal modulation is especially simple and has been studied also in oblique cells. High-quality x-ray measurements of three compounds reported in the literature have been analyzed as examples. In all cases it has been deduced that the modulation is sinusoidal and its amplitude has been easily obtained by fitting the experimental intensities. Equatorial (h0) reflections have been also considered to obtain information about the structure of defects at the maxima and minima of the undulation.

  13. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  14. Strip Velocity Measurements for Gated X-Ray Imagers Using Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, P. W. [NSTec; Cardenas, M. [NSTec; Griffin, M. [NSTec; Mead, A. [NSTec; Silbernagel, C. T. [NSTec; Bell, P. [LLNL; Haque, S. H. [UNR

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time-resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  15. To the Graduate Council: I am submitting herewith a thesis written by Yue Zheng entitled "X-Ray Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    -ray imaging for airport luggage inspection and the characteristics of single-energy and dual-energy x-ray data single energy and dual energy x-ray images, are then presented in four categories: (1) gray based color-coding approaches and dual-energy image fusion algorithms --spatial information- based

  16. COMBINING CLASSIFIERS FOR BONE FRACTURE DETECTION IN X-RAY IMAGES Vineta Lai Fun Lum, Wee Kheng Leow, Ying Chen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Wee Kheng

    COMBINING CLASSIFIERS FOR BONE FRACTURE DETECTION IN X-RAY IMAGES Vineta Lai Fun Lum, Wee Kheng combination methods ap- plied to the detection of bone fractures in x-ray images. Test results show, only about 12% of them contained fractured femurs. For radius images, about 30% of 145 consecu- tive

  17. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu; Gamboa, E. J. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Streit, J. [Schafer Corporation, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-? x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  18. Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Sherwood (Berkeley, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z.sub.1 above upper collimator plane, distance z.sub.2 above the lower collimator plane, and distance z.sub.3 above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v.sub.1, v.sub.2, v.sub.3 proportional to z.sub.1, z.sub.2 and z.sub.3, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site.

  19. Method and apparatus for enhanced sensitivity filmless medical x-ray imaging, including three-dimensional imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, S.

    1995-10-24

    A filmless X-ray imaging system includes at least one X-ray source, upper and lower collimators, and a solid-state detector array, and can provide three-dimensional imaging capability. The X-ray source plane is distance z{sub 1} above upper collimator plane, distance z{sub 2} above the lower collimator plane, and distance z{sub 3} above the plane of the detector array. The object to be X-rayed is located between the upper and lower collimator planes. The upper and lower collimators and the detector array are moved horizontally with scanning velocities v{sub 1}, v{sub 2}, v{sub 3} proportional to z{sub 1}, z{sub 2} and z{sub 3}, respectively. The pattern and size of openings in the collimators, and between detector positions is proportional such that similar triangles are always defined relative to the location of the X-ray source. X-rays that pass through openings in the upper collimator will always pass through corresponding and similar openings in the lower collimator, and thence to a corresponding detector in the underlying detector array. Substantially 100% of the X-rays irradiating the object (and neither absorbed nor scattered) pass through the lower collimator openings and are detected, which promotes enhanced sensitivity. A computer system coordinates repositioning of the collimators and detector array, and X-ray source locations. The computer system can store detector array output, and can associate a known X-ray source location with detector array output data, to provide three-dimensional imaging. Detector output may be viewed instantly, stored digitally, and/or transmitted electronically for image viewing at a remote site. 5 figs.

  20. Performance of CID camera X-ray imagers at NIF in a harsh neutron environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, N. E. [LLNL; Schneider, M. B. [LLNL; Bell, P. M. [LLNL; Piston, K. W. [LLNL; Moody, J. D. [LLNL; James, D. L. [LLNL; Ness, R. A. [LLNL; Haugh, M. J. [NSTec; Lee, J. J. [NSTec; Romano, E. D. [NSTec

    2013-09-01

    Charge-injection devices (CIDs) are solid-state 2D imaging sensors similar to CCDs, but their distinct architecture makes CIDs more resistant to ionizing radiation.1–3 CID cameras have been used extensively for X-ray imaging at the OMEGA Laser Facility4,5 with neutron fluences at the sensor approaching 109 n/cm2 (DT, 14 MeV). A CID Camera X-ray Imager (CCXI) system has been designed and implemented at NIF that can be used as a rad-hard electronic-readout alternative for time-integrated X-ray imaging. This paper describes the design and implementation of the system, calibration of the sensor for X-rays in the 3 – 14 keV energy range, and preliminary data acquired on NIF shots over a range of neutron yields. The upper limit of neutron fluence at which CCXI can acquire useable images is ~ 108 n/cm2 and there are noise problems that need further improvement, but the sensor has proven to be very robust in surviving high yield shots (~ 1014 DT neutrons) with minimal damage.

  1. Multiferroic CuCrO? under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, Alka B. Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2014-10-07

    The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO? has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34 GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ~23 GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, ?{sub c} = 1.26 × 10?³(1) GPa?¹ and a-axis compressibility, ?{sub a} = 8.90 × 10?³(6) GPa?¹. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B? = 156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B?{sup ’} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ~24 GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the kinase domain of human tousled-like kinase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrote, Ana M.; Redondo, Pilar; Montoya, Guillermo; Muñoz, Inés G.

    2014-02-19

    The C-terminal kinase domain of TLK2 (a human tousled-like kinase) has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-?-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in chromatin dynamics, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and chromosome segregation. The two members of the family reported in humans, namely TLK1 and TLK2, localize to the cell nucleus and are capable of forming homo- or hetero-oligomers by themselves. To characterize the role of TLK2, its C-terminal kinase domain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-?-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. The latter produced the best diffracting crystal (3.4 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation), with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 126.05 Å, ? = ? = ? = 90°. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, with a Matthews coefficient of 4.59 Å{sup 3} Da{sup ?1} and a solvent content of 73.23%.

  3. X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

  4. In-situ stoichiometry determination using x-ray fluorescence generated by reflection-high-energy-electron-diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenan, Cameron; Chandril, Sandeep; Lederman, David [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Myers, T. H. [Department of Physics and Multifunctional Materials Laboratory, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Materials Science, Engineering, and Commercialization Program, Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    A major challenge in the stoichiometric growth of complex oxide compounds is the control of the relative compositions of the constituent materials. A potential avenue for compositional analysis during growth is the use of x-ray fluorescence generated during reflection high energy electron diffraction measurements. Using this technique, relative compositions of Y and Mn in molecular beam epitaxy grown YMnO{sub 3} samples were studied. Comparing the results with Rutherford back scattering spectroscopy suggests that the technique has the potential for real-time analysis of elemental fluxes and stoichiometry control during sample growth.

  5. An Ultradeep High Resolution X-ray Image of M101 The X-ray Source Population in a Late-type Spiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q D; Pietsch, W; Immler, Stefan; Pietsch, Wolfgang

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the X-ray source population of the face-on spiral galaxy M101 (NGC 5457). Within a field of radius 17' (36 kpc at the distance of 7.2 Mpc), covered by an ultradeep (229 ks) ROSAT HRI image, 51 X-ray sources are detected with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 3.5. About half of these sources are associated with the galaxy. We determine the average luminosity distribution of the sources. We have examined spatial, spectral, and timing properties of the X-ray sources. In particular, we have explored the nature of various superluminous X-ray sources with luminosities significantly greater than the Eddington limit for a $\\sim 1.6 M_\\odot$ object (neutron star). These X-ray sources, detected in various ROSAT HRI and PSPC observations, are not transients and appear to result from recent massive star formation in outer spiral arms. 3 superluminous PSPC sources are associated with giant HII complexes and are clearly resolved. 2 other superluminous RHRI sources are likely associated with shell-like sup...

  6. Installation of soft X-ray array diagnostics and its application to tomography reconstruction using synthetic KSTAR X-ray images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung Hun; Jang, Juhyeok; Hong, Joohwan; Jang, Siwon; Choe, Wonho; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Kim, Junghee

    2014-11-15

    Four-array system of soft X-ray diagnostics was installed on KSTAR tokamak. Each array has 32 viewing chords of two photo-diode array detectors with spatial resolution of 2 cm. To estimate signals from the soft X-ray radiation power, typical n{sub e}, T{sub e}, and argon impurity line radiation profiles in KSTAR are chosen. The photo-diodes were absolutely calibrated as a function of the incident photon energy in 2–40 keV range with a portable X-ray tube. Two-dimensional T{sub e} image properties by multi-energy method were simulated and visualized with six combinations of beryllium filter sets within the dynamic range of signal ratio.

  7. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-RayX-Ray Imaging of

  8. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray ImagingX-Ray

  9. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-Ray Imaging

  10. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Paul, S; Ince-Cushmann, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2007-11-07

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  11. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  12. SIMULATION OF ENERGY SELECTIVE X-RAY IMAGES FOR MATERIAL DIS-CRIMINATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    SIMULATION OF ENERGY SELECTIVE X-RAY IMAGES FOR MATERIAL DIS- CRIMINATION Rune S Thing1 , Syen J model can be applied to any material combination and any number of energy bins. Figure: Top row Carlo model is presented to evaluate the clinical benefits of optimal energy bins in spectral X

  13. Narrow coronal holes in Yohkoh soft X-ray images and the slow solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Narrow coronal holes in Yohkoh soft X-ray images and the slow solar wind C.N. Arge , K.L. Harvey of this phenomenon, and have found several candidates. From observations of the associated solar wind, and from modeling, we find these regions to be sources of slow solar wind. INTRODUCTION The solar wind arguably

  14. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|Bilayer GrapheneW.Help Table of ContentsBiological

  15. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|Bilayer GrapheneW.Help Table of

  16. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|Bilayer GrapheneW.Help Table ofBiological

  17. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|Bilayer GrapheneW.Help Table ofBiologicalBiological

  18. Biological Imaging by Soft X-Ray Diffraction Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|Bilayer GrapheneW.Help Table

  19. ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE VISIBILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    ELECTRON FLUX SPECTRAL IMAGING OF SOLAR FLARES THROUGH REGULARIZED ANALYSIS OF HARD X-RAY SOURCE a new method for imaging spectroscopy analysis of hard X-ray emission during solar flares. The method the method to a solar flare observed on 2002 February 20 by the RHESSI instrument. The event is characterized

  20. Hard X-Ray Imaging of Individual Spectral Components in Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, Amir; McTiernan, James M; Krucker, Säm

    2015-01-01

    We present a new analytical technique, combining Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) high-resolution imaging and spectroscopic observations, to visualize solar flare emission as a function of spectral component (e.g., isothermal temperature) rather than energy. This computationally inexpensive technique is applicable to all spatially-invariant spectral forms and is useful for visualizing spectroscopically-determined individual sources and placing them in context, e.g., comparing multiple isothermal sources with nonthermal emission locations. For example, while extreme ultraviolet images can usually be closely identified with narrow temperature ranges, due to the emission being primarily from spectral lines of specific ion species, X-ray images are dominated by continuum emission and therefore have a broad temperature response, making it difficult to identify sources of specific temperatures regardless of the energy band of the image. We combine RHESSI calibrated X-ray visibilities wi...

  1. Soft x ray/extreme ultraviolet images of the solar atmosphere with normal incidence multilayer optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The first high resolution Soft X-Ray/Extreme Ultraviolet (XUV) images of the Sun with normal incidence multilayer optics were obtained by the Standford/MSFC Rocket X-Ray Spectroheliograph on 23 Oct. 1987. Numerous images at selected wavelengths from 8 to 256 A were obtained simultaneously by the diverse array of telescopes flown on-board the experiment. These telescopes included single reflection normal incidence multilayer systems (Herschelian), double reflection multilayer systems (Cassegrain), a grazing incidence mirror system (Wolter-Schwarzschild), and hybrid systems using normal incidence multilayer optics in conjunction with the grazing incidence primary (Wolter-Cassegrain). Filters comprised of approximately 1700{Angstrom} thick aluminum supported on a nickel mesh were used to transmit the soft x ray/EUV radiation while preventing the intense visible light emission of the Sun from fogging the sensitive experimental T-grain photographic emulsions. These systems yielded high resolution soft x ray/EUV images of the solar corona and transition region, which reveal magnetically confined loops of hot solar plasma, coronal plumes, polar coronal holes, supergranulation, and features associated with overlying cool prominences. The development, testing, and operation of the experiments, and the results from the flight are described. The development of a second generation experiment, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array, which is scheduled to fly in the summer of 1990, and a recently approved Space Station experiment, the Ultra-High Resolution XUV Spectroheliograph, which is scheduled to fly in 1996 are also described.

  2. EXIST: A High Sensitivity Hard X-ray Imaging Sky Survey Mission for ISS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grindlay; L. Bildsten; D. Chakrabarty; M. Elvis; A. Fabian; F. Fiore; N. Gehrels; C. Hailey; F. Harrison; D. Hartmann; T. Prince; B. Ramsey; R. Rothschild; G. Skinner; S. Woosley

    1999-12-18

    A deep all-sky imaging hard x-ray survey and wide-field monitor is needed to extend soft (ROSAT) and medium (ABRIXAS2) x-ray surveys into the 10-100 keV band (and beyond) at comparable sensitivity (~0.05 mCrab). This would enable discovery and study of >3000 obscured AGN, which probably dominate the hard x-ray background; detailed study of spectra and variability of accreting black holes and a census of BHs in the Galaxy; Gamma-ray bursts and associated massive star formation (PopIII) at very high redshift and Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters throughout the Local Group; and a full galactic survey for obscured supernova remnants. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) is a proposed array of 8 x 1m^2 coded aperture telescopes fixed on the International Space Station (ISS) with 160deg x 40deg field of view which images the full sky each 90 min orbit. EXIST has been included in the most recent NASA Strategic Plan as a candidate mission for the next decade. An overview of the science goals and mission concept is presented.

  3. Reconstruction of a yeast cell from x-ray diffraction data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thibault, Pierre; Elser, Veit; Jacobsen, Chris; Shapiro, David; Sayre, David

    2006-06-21

    We provide details of the algorithm used for the reconstruction of yeast cell images in the recent demonstration of diffraction microscopy by Shapiro, Thibault, Beetz, Elser, Howells, Jacobsen, Kirz, Lima, Miao, Nieman & Sayre. Two refinements of the iterative constraint-based scheme are developed to address the current experimental realities of this imaging technique, which include missing central data and noise. A constrained power operator is defined whose eigenmodes allow the identification of a small number of degrees of freedom in the reconstruction that are negligibly constrained as a result of the missing data. To achieve reproducibility in the algorithm's output,more »a special intervention is required for these modes. Weak incompatibility of the constraints caused by noise in both direct and Fourier space leads to residual phase fluctuations. This problem is addressed by supplementing the algorithm with an averaging method. The effect of averaging may be interpreted in terms of an effective modulation transfer function, as used in optics, to quantify the resolution. The reconstruction details are prefaced with simulations of wave propagation through a model yeast cell. These show that the yeast cell is a strong-phase-contrast object for the conditions in the experiment.« less

  4. X-Ray Powder Diffraction Study of Synthetic Palmierite, K{sub 2}Pb(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TISSOT JR.,RALPH G.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; SIPOLA,DIANA L.; VOIGT,JAMES A.

    2000-12-19

    Palmierite (K{sub 2}Pb(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}) has been prepared via a chemical synthesis method. Intensity differences were observed when X-ray powder data from the newly synthesized compound were compared to the published powder diffraction card (PDF) 29-1015 for Palmierite. Investigation of these differences indicated the possibility of preferred orientation and/or chemical inhomogeneity affecting intensities, particularly those of the basal (00{ell}) reflections. Annealing of the Palmierite was found to reduce the effects of preferred orientation. Electron microprobe analysis confirmed K:Pb:S as 2:1:2 for the annealed Palmierite powder. Subsequent least-squares refinement and Rietveld analysis of the annealed powder showed peak intensities very close to that of a calculated Palmierite pattern (based on single crystal data), yet substantially higher than many of the PDF 29-1015 published intensities. Further investigation of peak intensity variation via calculated patterns suggested that the intensity discrepancies between the annealed sample and those found in PDF 29-1015 were potentially due to chemical variation in the K{sub 2}Pb(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} composition. X-ray powder diffraction and crystal data for Palmierite are reported for the annealed sample. Palmierite is Trigonal/Hexagonal with unit cell parameters a = 5.497(1){angstrom}, c = 20.864(2) {angstrom}, space group R-3m (166), and Z = 3.

  5. X-ray diffraction study of Penicillium Vitale catalase in the complex with aminotriazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borovik, A. A.; Grebenko, A. I.; Melik-Adamyan, V. R.

    2011-07-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme catalase from Penicillium vitale in a complex with the inhibitor aminotriazole was solved and refined by protein X-ray crystallography methods. An analysis of the three-dimensional structure of the complex showed that the inhibition of the enzyme occurs as a result of the covalent binding of aminotriazole to the amino-acid residue His64 in the active site of the enzyme. An investigation of the three-dimensional structure of the complex resulted in the amino-acid residues being more precisely identified. The binding sites of saccharide residues and calcium ions in the protein molecule were found.

  6. High resolution monochromatic X-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.

    1997-05-05

    We have developed a new X-ray imaging system based on spherically curved crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser. The imaging system is used for plasma diagnostics of the main target and for characterization of potential backlighters. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.687 A, R=200 mm) is used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the X-ray optical system is 3-4 {mu}m. Time resolved backlit monochromatic images of CH planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with 6-7 {mu}m spatial resolution.

  7. High resolution monochromatic X-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Brown, C.M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.

    1997-05-01

    We have developed a new X-ray imaging system based on spherically curved crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser [1,2]. The imaging system is used for plasma diagnostics of the main target and for characterization of potential backlighters. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.687{Angstrom}, R=200mm) is used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the X-ray optical system is 3{endash}4 {mu}m. Time resolved backlit monochromatic images of CH planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with 6{endash}7 {mu}m spatial resolution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Chandra Imaging of the X-ray Core of the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Young; A. S. Wilson; C. G. Mundell

    2002-07-15

    We report sub-arcsecond X-ray imaging spectroscopy of M87 and the core of the Virgo cluster with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The X-ray morphology shows structure on arcsecond (~100 pc) to ten arcminute (~50 kpc) scales, the most prominent feature being an "arc" running from the east, across the central region of M87 and off to the southwest. A ridge in the radio map, ending in an "ear"-shaped structure, follows the arc to the east. Depressions in the X-ray surface brightness correspond to the inner radio lobes and there is no evidence of shock-heated gas surrounding them. There are also at least two approximately circular (centered near the nucleus) "edges" in the X-ray brightness distribution, the radii of which are slightly larger than the nuclear distances of the inner radio lobes and intermediate radio ridges, respectively. We speculate that these discontinuities may be spherical pulses or "fronts" driven by the same jet activity as is responsible for the radio structure; such pulses are found in recent numerical simulations. All these results provide good evidence that the nuclear activity affects the intra-cluster medium. We present a temperature map of the intra-cluster medium, and obtain the temperature, pressure and cooling time as a function of nuclear distance for the arcs and the ambient intra-cluster medium. We show that the gas in the arcs is cooler than, and probably over-pressured with respect to, the ambient intra-cluster medium. The metal abundances of the cooler gas in the arc are somewhat enhanced relative to the ambient intra-cluster medium, favoring a ``buoyant plume'' origin for the X-ray arc, in which ambient gas near the nucleus is entrained by buoyant radio plasma and carried to larger nuclear distances. (Abstract truncated).

  9. History and Solution of the Phase Problem in theTheory of Structure Determination of Crystals from X-ray Diffraction Experiments

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wolf, Emil [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, United States

    2010-09-01

    Since the pioneering work of Max von Laue on interference and diffraction of x-rays, carried out almost 100 years ago, numerous attempts have been made to determine structures of crystalline media from x-ray diffraction experiments. The usefulness of all of them has been limited by the inability of measuring phases of the diffracted beams. In this talk, the most important research carried out in this field will be reviewed and a recently obtained solution of the phase problem will be presented.

  10. High efficiency, high quality x-ray optic based on ellipsoidally bent highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal for ultrafast x-ray diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uschmann, I.; Nothelle, U.; Foerster, E.; Arkadiev, V.; Langhoff, N.; Antonov, A.; Grigorieva, I.; Steinkopf, R.; Gebhardt, A

    2005-08-20

    By the use of a thin highly oriented pyrolytic graphite crystal (HOPG) bent to a high-performance ellipsoidal shape it was possible to focus monochromatic x-rays of 4.5 keV photon energy with an efficiency of 0.0033, which is 30 times larger than for previously used bent crystals. Isotropic TiK{sub a}lpha radiation of a 150 {mu}m source was focused onto a 450 {mu}m spot. The size of the focal spot can be explained by broadening due to the mosaic crystal rocking curve. The rocking curve width (FWHM) of the thin graphite foil was determined to 0.11 deg. . The estimated temporal broadening of an ultrashort Kalpha pulse by the crystal is not larger than 300 fs. These properties make the x-ray optic very attractive for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray measurements.

  11. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL); McKay, Timothy A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

  12. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

    1998-04-21

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

  13. X-ray phase-contrast methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lider, V. V., E-mail: lider@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kovalchuk, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    This review is devoted to a comparative description of the methods for forming X-ray phase-contrast images of weakly absorbing (phase) objects. These include the crystal interferometer method, the Talbot interferometer method, diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging, and the in-line method. The potential of their practical application in various fields of science and technology is discussed. The publications on the development and optimization of X-ray phase-contrast methods and the experimental study of phase objects are analyzed.

  14. Simulation of X-ray diffraction profiles for bent anisotropic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Rio, Manuel Sanchez; Shi, Xianbo; Honkimaki, Veijo; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The equations for calculating diffraction profiles for bent crystals are revisited for both meridional and sagittal bending. Two approximated methods for computing diffraction profiles are treated: multilamellar and Penning-Polder. A common treatment of crystal anisotropy is included in these models. The formulation presented is implemented into the XOP package, completing and updating the crystal module that simulates diffraction profiles for perfect, mosaic and now distorted crystals by elastic bending.

  15. High-resolution monochromatic x-ray imaging system based on spherically bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Lehecka, T.; Obenschain, S.; Bodner, S.; Pawley, C.; Gerber, K.; Sethian, J.; Brown, C.M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.; Holland, G.

    1998-08-01

    We have developed an improved x-ray imaging system based on spherically curve crystals. It is designed and used for diagnostics of targets ablatively accelerated by the Nike KrF laser. A spherically curved quartz crystal (2d=6.687 {Angstrom}, R=200 mm) has been used to produce monochromatic backlit images with the He-like Si resonance line (1865 eV) as the source of radiation. The spatial resolution of the x-ray optical system is 1.7 {mu}m in selected places and 2{endash}3 {mu}m over a larger area. Time-resolved backlit monochromatic images of polystyrene planar targets driven by the Nike facility have been obtained with a spatial resolution of 2.5 {mu}m in selected places and 5 {mu}m over the focal spot of the Nike laser. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  16. Two-bent-crystal schemes for monochromatic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foerster, E.; Chang, W.Z.; Dirksmoeller, M.

    1995-12-31

    For monochromatic imaging applications the advantages of combining two bent crystals in one system are demonstrated in comparison to a single crystal. The investigation shows that considerable improvements in resolution and spectral selectivity can be achieved by successive reflections from two bent crystals. The x-ray imaging device can be designed to a compact optical device mounted with the detector to a single port of the experimental chamber. This type of arrangement is of particular interest to large laser facilities such as those at LLNL, ILE and CEA where a high X-ray photon flux is available but the space available for diagnostics is restricted. A design for an experimental setup planned for imaging of indirect driven fusion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will be discussed here as an example. In general, improvements of spatial resolution by a factor of about 4 and spectral selectivity by a factor of about 10 can be achieved.

  17. A concept to collect neutron and x-ray images on the same line of sight at NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F. E., E-mail: fmerrill@lanl.gov; Danly, C. R.; Grim, G. P.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Izumi, N.; Jedlovec, D.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Neutron and x-ray images are collected at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the size and shape of inertial confinement fusion implosions. The x-ray images provide a measure of the size and shape of the hot region of the deuterium-tritium fuel while the neutron images provide a measure of the size and shape of the burning plasma. Although these two types of images are collected simultaneously, they are not collected along the same line of sight (LOS). One 14 MeV neutron image is collected on the NIF equator, and two x-ray images are collected along the polar axis and nearly perpendicular to the neutron imaging line of sight on the equator. Both measurements use pinhole apertures to form the images, but existing x-ray imaging provides time-resolved measurements while the neutron images are time-integrated. Detailed comparisons of the x-ray and neutron images can provide information on the fuel assembly, but these studies have been limited because the implosions are not azimuthally symmetric and the images are collected along different LOS. We have developed a conceptual design of a time-integrated x-ray imaging system that could be added to the existing neutron imaging LOS. This new system would allow these detailed studies, providing important information on the fuel assembly of future implosions. Here we present this conceptual design and the expected performance characteristics.

  18. A Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    A Combinational Approach to the Fusion, De-noising and Enhancement of Dual-Energy X-Ray Luggage dual-energy X-ray images for better object classification and threat detection. The fusion step, background noise often gets amplified during the fusion process. This paper applies a background- subtraction

  19. {ital In} {ital situ} x-ray diffraction analysis of the C49--C54 titanium silicide phase transformation in narrow lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, R.A.; Clevenger, L.A.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Saenger, K.L.; Brauer, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Bucchignano, J.; Stephenson, G.B.; Morales, G.; Ludwig, K.F. Jr.

    1995-04-03

    The transformation of titanium silicide from the C49 to the C54 structure was studied using x-ray diffraction of samples containing arrays of narrow lines of preformed C49 TiSi{sub 2}. Using a synchrotron x-ray source, diffraction patterns were collected at 1.5--2 {degree}C intervals during sample heating at rates of 3 or 20 {degree}C/s to temperatures of 1000--1100 {degree}C. The results show a monotonic increase in the C54 transition temperature by as much as 180 {degree}C with a decreasing linewidth from 1.0 to 0.1 {mu}m. Also observed is a monotonic increase in (040) preferred orientation of the C54 phase with decreasing linewidth. The results demonstrate the power of {ital in} {ital situ} x-ray diffraction of narrow line arrays as a tool to study finite size effects in thin-film reactions.

  20. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    and nonradiologists in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometrymorphometry studies using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.dose measurements in dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA).

  1. Beyond 3-D X-ray Imaging: Methodology Development and Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the availability of the new generation of X-ray sources and the advanced X-ray optics. The advanced X-ray Optics along with novel methodology has made it possible to...

  2. Imaging nanoscale magnetic structures with polarized soft x-ray photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, P.

    2010-01-01

    with polarized soft X-ray photons Peter Fischer and Mi -polarized soft X-ray photons which provide a strong X-rayhigh intense soft X-ray photon pulses hold the promise of

  3. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5?nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  4. Thermoelastic study of nanolayered structures using time-resolved X-ray diffraction at high repetition rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navirian, H. A.; Schick, D. Leitenberger, W.; Bargheer, M.; Gaal, P.; Shayduk, R.

    2014-01-13

    We investigate the thermoelastic response of a nanolayered sample composed of a metallic SrRuO{sub 3} electrode sandwiched between a ferroelectric Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3} film with negative thermal expansion and a SrTiO{sub 3} substrate. SrRuO{sub 3} is rapidly heated by fs-laser pulses with 208?kHz repetition rate. Diffraction of X-ray pulses derived from a synchrotron measures the transient out-of-plane lattice constant c of all three materials simultaneously from 120?ps to 5??s with a relative accuracy up to ?c/c?=?10{sup ?6}. The in-plane propagation of sound is essential for understanding the delayed out-of-plane compression of Pb(Zr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8})O{sub 3}.

  5. Synthesis and single crystal x-ray diffraction study of a Schiff base derived from 4-acylpyrazolone and 2-aminophenol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Naresh; Kant, Rajni Gupta, Vivek K.; Jadeja, R. N.

    2014-04-24

    The title compound, (Z)-1-(3-chlorophenyl)-4[1((2hydroxyphenyl)amino)propylidene] -3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5(4H)-one was synthesized by refluxing compound 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-3-methyl-4-propionyl-5-pyrazolone, with 2-aminophenol in ethanol. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pca2{sub 1} having unit cell parameters: a = 26.2993(8), b = 7.0724(2) and c = 18.7170(5)Å. The structure contains two crystallographically independent molecules, A, and, B, in the asymmetric unit cell. The crystal structure was solved by direct method using single crystal X-ray diffraction data collected at room temperature and refined by full-matrix least-squares procedures to a final R- value of 0.049 for 5207 observed reflections.

  6. Frustrated smectic layer structures in bent-shaped dimer liquid crystals studied by x-ray microbeam diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takanishi, Yoichi; Toshimitsu, Megumi; Nakata, Michi; Takada, Naoki; Izumi, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo; Watanabe, Junji; Takahashi, Yumiko; Iida, Atsuo

    2006-11-15

    The layer structures in bent-shaped liquid crystal dimers mOAM5AMOm (m=6-16) have been investigated by x-ray microbeam diffraction. These liquid crystal molecules have two rodlike mesogens connected with an odd-numbered alkylene spacer and form a bent shape. In these compounds it is found that the structure changes from the single (m=6) to frustrated-layer structures (m=8, 10, and 12) and switchable frustrated-layer structures (m=14 and 16) with increasing terminal chain length. An anticlinic antiferroelectric structure is suggested in the compound with m=16, based on the different electric-field-induced reorientation behavior from those in the other dimers.

  7. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

  8. X-ray diffraction and electron microscope studies of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic coatings exposed to vanadia. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondos, K.G.

    1992-09-01

    The U.S. Navy sometimes has the requirement to use low cost fuels containing significant amounts of vanadium and sulfur in gas turbine engines. Unfortunately the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) witch is used as a thermal barrier coating on gas turbine blades can be severely attacked by vanadia. Powders of YSZ containing 8-mol% Y203 and pure zirconia containing various and mounts Of V205 were annealed at 900 deg. C. These were then examined by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy, as well as single crystals of pure Zro2 and YSZ ( 20% Wt Y203 ) exposed to V205 Melts, to study how the vanadia degrades the YSZ by reacting with the stabilizer to form YVO4 and how the vanadium transforms the cubic and tetragonal YSZ crystal structures to monoclinic which degrades rapidly as a gas turbine blade coating.

  9. Taheri-Saramad x-ray detector (TSXD): A novel high spatial resolution x-ray imager based on ZnO nano scintillator wires in polycarbonate membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taheri, A., E-mail: at1361@aut.ac.ir; Saramad, S.; Ghalenoei, S.; Setayeshi, S. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran 15875-4413 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    A novel x-ray imager based on ZnO nanowires is designed and fabricated. The proposed architecture is based on scintillation properties of ZnO nanostructures in a polycarbonate track-etched membrane. Because of higher refractive index of ZnO nanowire compared to the membrane, the nanowire acts as an optical fiber that prevents the generated optical photons to spread inside the detector. This effect improves the spatial resolution of the imager. The detection quantum efficiency and spatial resolution of the fabricated imager are 11% and <6.8 ?m, respectively.

  10. Feasibility Study of Gas Electron Multiplier Detector as an X-Ray Image Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukyoung Shin; Jaehoon Jung; Soonhyouk Lee

    2015-03-12

    For its ease manufacturing, flexible geometry, and cheap manufacturing cost, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector can be used as an x-ray image sensor. For this purpose, we acquired relative detection efficiencies and suggested a method to increase the detection efficiency in order to study the possibility of GEM detector as an x-ray image sensor. The GEM detector system is composed of GEM foils, the instrument system, the gas system, and the negative power supply. The instrument system consists of the A225 charge sensitive preamp, A206 discriminator, and MCA8000D multichannel analyzer. For the gas system, Argon gas was mixed with CO2 to the ratio of 8:2, and for the negative 2,000 volts, the 3106D power supply was used. The CsI-coated GEM foil was used to increase the detection efficiency. Fe-55 was used as an x-ray source and the relative efficiency was acquired by using the ratio of GEM detector to the CdTe detector. The total count method and the energy spectrum method were used to calculate the relative efficiency. The relative detection efficiency of GEM detector for Fe-55 by using total count method was 32 % and by using energy spectrum method, the relative efficiencies were 5, 43, 33, 37, 35, and 36 % respectively according to the energy spectrum of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 KeV. In conclusion, we found that the detection efficiency of the two layered GEM detector is insufficient for the x-ray image sensor, so we suggested a CsI coated GEM foil to increase the efficiency rate and the result value was increased to 41 %.

  11. Feasibility Study of Gas Electron Multiplier Detector as an X-Ray Image Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Sukyoung; Lee, Soonhyouk

    2015-01-01

    For its ease manufacturing, flexible geometry, and cheap manufacturing cost, the gas electron multiplier (GEM) detector can be used as an x-ray image sensor. For this purpose, we acquired relative detection efficiencies and suggested a method to increase the detection efficiency in order to study the possibility of GEM detector as an x-ray image sensor. The GEM detector system is composed of GEM foils, the instrument system, the gas system, and the negative power supply. The instrument system consists of the A225 charge sensitive preamp, A206 discriminator, and MCA8000D multichannel analyzer. For the gas system, Argon gas was mixed with CO2 to the ratio of 8:2, and for the negative 2,000 volts, the 3106D power supply was used. The CsI-coated GEM foil was used to increase the detection efficiency. Fe-55 was used as an x-ray source and the relative efficiency was acquired by using the ratio of GEM detector to the CdTe detector. The total count method and the energy spectrum method were used to calculate the rel...

  12. An x-ray diffraction study of microstructural deformation induced by cyclic loading of selected steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fourspring, P.M. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States); Pangborn, R.N. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    X-ray double crystal diffractometry (XRDCD) was used to assess cyclic microstructural deformation in a face centered cubic (fcc) steel (AISI304) and a body centered cubic (bcc) steel (SA508 class 2). The first objective of the investigation was to determine if XRDCD could be used to effectively monitor cyclic microstructural deformation in polycrystalline Fe alloys. A second objective was to study the microstructural deformation induced by cyclic loading of polycrystalline Fe alloys. The approach used in the investigation was to induce fatigue damage in a material and to characterize the resulting microstructural deformation at discrete fractions of the fatigue life of the material. Also, characterization of microstructural deformation was carried out to identify differences in the accumulation of damage from the surface to the bulk, focusing on the following three regions: near surface (0--10 {micro}m), subsurface (10--300 {micro}m), and bulk. Characterization of the subsurface region was performed only on the AISI304 material because of the limited availability of the SA508 material. The results from the XRDCD data indicate a measurable change induced by fatigue from the initial state to subsequent states of both the AISI304 and the SA508 materials. Therefore, the XRDCD technique was shown to be sensitive to the microstructural deformation caused by fatigue in steels; thus, the technique can be used to monitor fatigue damage in steels. In addition, for the AISI304 material, the level of cyclic microstructural deformation in the bulk material was found to be greater than the level in the near surface material. In contrast, previous investigations have shown that the deformation is greater in the near surface than the bulk for Al alloys and bcc Fe alloys.

  13. High-resolution ab initio three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy (CXIDB ID 15)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chapman, Henry N.

    The file contains 125 images corresponding to different tilts of the sample around the y axis at 1 degree intervals. Each image is the result of 4 exposures merged together. For more details see the citation.

  14. Regularization of soft-X-ray imaging in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingen, Andreas; Shafer, Morgan W; Unterberg, Ezekial A; Hill, Judith C; Hillis, Donald Lee

    2015-01-01

    An image inversion scheme for the soft X-ray imaging system (SXRIS) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak is developed to obtain the local soft X-ray emission at a poloidal cross-section from the spatially line-integrated image taken by the SXRIS camera. The scheme uses the Tikhonov regularization method since the inversion problem is generally ill-posed. The regularization technique uses the generalized singular value decomposition to determine a solution that depends on a free regularization parameter. The latter has to be chosen carefully, and the so called {\\it L-curve} method to find the optimum regularization parameter is outlined. A representative test image is used to study the properties of the inversion scheme with respect to inversion accuracy, amount/strength of regularization, image noise and image resolution. The optimum inversion parameters are identified, while the L-curve method successfully computes the optimum regularization parameter. Noise is found to be the most limiting issue, but sufficient regularization is still possible at noise to signal ratios up to 10%-15%. Finally, the inversion scheme is applied to measured SXRIS data and the line-integrated SXRIS image is successfully inverted.

  15. Imaging method based on attenuation, refraction and ultra-small-angle-scattering of x-rays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wernick, Miles N.; Chapman, Leroy Dean; Oltulu, Oral; Zhong, Zhong

    2005-09-20

    A method for detecting an image of an object by measuring the intensity at a plurality of positions of a transmitted beam of x-ray radiation emitted from the object as a function of angle within the transmitted beam. The intensity measurements of the transmitted beam are obtained by a crystal analyzer positioned at a plurality of angular positions. The plurality of intensity measurements are used to determine the angular intensity spectrum of the transmitted beam. One or more parameters, such as an attenuation property, a refraction property and a scatter property, can be obtained from the angular intensity spectrum and used to display an image of the object.

  16. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-Ray ImagingImaging

  17. X-ray microstructural analysis of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films by diffraction pattern modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escobar, D.; Ospina, R.; Gómez, A.G.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P.J.

    2014-02-15

    A detailed microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films grown at different substrate temperatures (T{sub S}) was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total diffraction pattern modeling based on more meaningful microstructural parameters, such as crystallite size distribution and dislocation density, was performed to describe the microstructure of the thin films more precisely. This diffraction modeling has been implemented and used mostly to characterize powders, but the technique can be very useful to study hard thin films by taking certain considerations into account. Nanocrystalline films were grown by using the cathodic pulsed vacuum arc technique on stainless steel 316L substrates, varying the temperature from room temperature to 200 °C. Further surface morphology analysis was performed to study the dependence of grain size on substrate temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The crystallite and surface grain sizes obtained and the high density of dislocations observed indicate that the films underwent nanostructured growth. Variations in these microstructural parameters as a function of T{sub S} during deposition revealed a competition between adatom mobility and desorption processes, resulting in a specific microstructure. These films also showed slight anisotropy in their microstructure, and this was incorporated into the diffraction pattern modeling. The resulting model allowed for the films' microstructure during synthesis to be better understood according to the experimental results obtained. - Highlights: • Mobility and desorption competition generates a critical temperature. • A microstructure anisotropy related to the local strain was observed in thin films. • Adatom mobility and desorption influence grain size and microstrain.

  18. Explosives under pressure - the crystal structure of gamma-RDX as determined by high-pressure X-ray and neutron diffraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, A.J.; Oswald, Iain D H; Francis, A.R.; Pulham, Colin

    Using a combination of X-ray single crystal and neutron powder diffraction, the crystal structure of the high-pressure ?-form of RDX has been determined at 5.2 GPa and shows that the RDX molecules adopt different conformations ...

  19. Research on a logarithmically bent Laue crystal analyzer for X-ray monochromatic backlight imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yufen; Xiao, Shali; Lu, Jian; Liu, Lifeng; Yang, Qingguo; Huang, Xianbin

    2013-07-15

    A new logarithmically bent Laue imaging crystal analyzer (LBLICA) was proposed to obtain the monochromatic image of plasmas and exhibited a great potential for application in the Inertial Confinement Fusion experiment over a large field of view (FOV) and with a high spatial resolution. The imaging geometry of the LBLICA has been discussed. According to the Bragg condition and the equation of the logarithmic spiral, the key image parameters of the crystal analyzer, including the system magnification, the spatial resolution, and the FOV, have been analyzed theoretically. An experiment has been performed with a Cu target X-ray tube as a backlighter to backlight a mesh grid consisting of 50-?m Cu wires, and the monochromatic image of the grid has been obtained with a spatial resolution of approximately 30 ?m.

  20. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prilliman, Gerald Stephen

    2003-09-01

    The behavior of nanocrystals under extreme pressure was investigated using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A major part of this investigation was the testing of a prototype synchrotron endstation on a bend magnet beamline at the Advanced Light Source for high pressure work using a diamond anvil cell. The experiments conducted and documented here helped to determine issues of efficiency and accuracy that had to be resolved before the construction of a dedicated ''super-bend'' beamline and endstation. The major conclusions were the need for a cryo-cooled monochromator and a fully remote-controllable pressurization system which would decrease the time to change pressure and greatly reduce the error created by the re-placement of the diamond anvil cell after each pressure change. Two very different types of nanocrystal systems were studied, colloidal iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and thin film TiN/BN. Iron oxide nanocrystals were found to have a transition from the {gamma} to the {alpha} structure at a pressure strongly dependent on the size of the nanocrystals, ranging from 26 GPa for 7.2 nm nanocrystals to 37 GPa for 3.6 nm nanocrystals. All nanocrystals were found to remain in the {alpha} structure even after release of pressure. The transition pressure was also found, for a constant size (5.7 nm) to be strongly dependent on the degree of aggregation of the nanocrystals, increasing from 30 GPa for completely dissolved nanocrystals to 45 GPa for strongly aggregated nanocrystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction pattern of the pressure induced {alpha} phase demonstrated a decrease in intensity for certain select peaks. Together, these observations were used to make a complete picture of the phase transition in nanocrystalline systems. The size dependence of the transition was interpreted as resulting from the extremely high surface energy of the {alpha} phase which would increase the thermodynamic offset and thereby increase the kinetic barrier to transition that must be overridden with pressure. The anomalous intensities in the x-ray diffraction patterns were interpreted as being the result of stacking faults, indicating that the mechanism of transition proceeds by the sliding of {gamma}(111) planes to form {alpha}(001) planes. The increasing transition pressure for more aggregated samples may be due to a positive activation volume, retarding the transition for nanocrystals with less excess (organic) volume available to them. The lack of a reverse transition upon decompression makes this interpretation more difficult because of the lack of an observable hysteresis, and it is therefore difficult to ascertain kinetic effects for certain. In the case TiN/BN nanocomposite systems, it was found that the bulk modulus (B{sub 0}) of the TiN nanoparticles was not correlated to the observed hardness or Young's modulus of the macroscopic thin film. This indicates that the origin of the observed super-hard nature of these materials is not due to any change in the Ti-N interatomic potential. Rather, the enhanced hardness must be due to nano-structural effects. It was also found that during pressurization the TiN nanoparticles developed a great deal of strain. This strain can be related to defects induced in individual nanoparticles which generates strain in adjacent particles due to the highly coupled nature of the system.

  1. Soft x-ray backlighting of cryogenic implosions using a narrowband crystal imaging system (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoeckl, C. Bedzyk, M.; Brent, G.; Epstein, R.; Fiksel, G.; Guy, D.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Ingraham, S.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Jungquist, R. K.; Marshall, F. J.; Mileham, C.; Nilson, P. M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Theobald, W.

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance cryogenic DT inertial confinement fusion implosion experiment is an especially challenging backlighting configuration because of the high self-emission of the core at stagnation and the low opacity of the DT shell. High-energy petawatt lasers such as OMEGA EP promise significantly improved backlighting capabilities by generating high x-ray intensities and short emission times. A narrowband x-ray imager with an astigmatism-corrected bent quartz crystal for the Si He{sub ?} line at ?1.86 keV was developed to record backlit images of cryogenic direct-drive implosions. A time-gated recording system minimized the self-emission of the imploding target. A fast target-insertion system capable of moving the backlighter target ?7 cm in ?100 ms was developed to avoid interference with the cryogenic shroud system. With backlighter laser energies of ?1.25 kJ at a 10-ps pulse duration, the radiographic images show a high signal-to-background ratio of >100:1 and a spatial resolution of the order of 10 ?m. The backlit images can be used to assess the symmetry of the implosions close to stagnation and the mix of ablator material into the dense shell.

  2. Soft x-ray reduction camera for submicron lithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawryluk, Andrew M. (2708 Rembrandt Pl., Modesto, CA 95356); Seppala, Lynn G. (7911 Mines Rd., Livermore, CA 94550)

    1991-01-01

    Soft x-ray projection lithography can be performed using x-ray optical components and spherical imaging lenses (mirrors), which form an x-ray reduction camera. The x-ray reduction is capable of projecting a 5x demagnified image of a mask onto a resist coated wafer using 4.5 nm radiation. The diffraction limited resolution of this design is about 135 nm with a depth of field of about 2.8 microns and a field of view of 0.2 cm.sup.2. X-ray reflecting masks (patterned x-ray multilayer mirrors) which are fabricated on thick substrates and can be made relatively distortion free are used, with a laser produced plasma for the source. Higher resolution and/or larger areas are possible by varying the optic figures of the components and source characteristics.

  3. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  4. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  5. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de [BioMol-Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Caixa Postal 6043, CEP 60455-970 (Brazil); Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista [Programa de Pós-graduação em Biofísica Molecular, Departamento de Física, UNESP, São José do Rio Preto, SP 15054-000 (Brazil); Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Cajazeiras, João Batista; Rocha, Bruno Anderson M. da [BioMol-Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Caixa Postal 6043, CEP 60455-970 (Brazil); Rustiguel, Joane Kathelen Rodrigues [Programa de Pós-graduação em Biofísica Molecular, Departamento de Física, UNESP, São José do Rio Preto, SP 15054-000 (Brazil); Freitas, Beatriz Tupinamba [BioMol-Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Caixa Postal 6043, CEP 60455-970 (Brazil); Grupo de Química Biológica, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Regional do Cariri, Crato, CE 63195-000 (Brazil); Canduri, Fernanda [Programa de Pós-graduação em Biofísica Molecular, Departamento de Física, UNESP, São José do Rio Preto, SP 15054-000 (Brazil); Delatorre, Plínio [BioMol-Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Caixa Postal 6043, CEP 60455-970 (Brazil); Grupo de Química Biológica, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Regional do Cariri, Crato, CE 63195-000 (Brazil); Azevedo, Walter Filgueira Jr de, E-mail: walterfa@df.ibilce.unesp.br [Programa de Pós-graduação em Biofísica Molecular, Departamento de Física, UNESP, São José do Rio Preto, SP 15054-000 (Brazil); Cavada, Benildo S., E-mail: walterfa@df.ibilce.unesp.br [BioMol-Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Fortaleza, CE, Caixa Postal 6043, CEP 60455-970 (Brazil)

    2005-01-01

    A lectin from C. maritima was crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method and crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. A molecular-replacement search found a solution with a correlation coefficient of 69.2% and an R factor of 42.5%, refinement is in progress. A lectin from Canavalia maritima seeds (ConM) was purified and submitted to crystallization experiments. The best crystals were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method at a constant temperature of 293 K and grew in 7 d. A complete structural data set was collected to 2.1 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The ConM crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 67.15, b = 70.90, c = 97.37 Å. A molecular-replacement search found a solution with a correlation coefficient of 69.2% and an R factor of 42.5%. Crystallographic refinement is under way.

  7. A scaled gradient projection method for the X-ray imaging of solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonettini, S

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new optimization algorithm for the reconstruction of X-ray images of solar flares by means of the data collected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The imaging concept of the satellite is based of rotating modulation collimator instruments, which allow the use of both Fourier imaging approaches and reconstruction techniques based on the straightforward inversion of the modulated count profiles. Although in the last decade a greater attention has been devoted to the former strategies due to their very limited computational cost, here we consider the latter model and investigate the effectiveness of a scaled gradient projection method for the solution of the corresponding constrained minimization problem. Moreover, regularization is introduced through either an early stopping of the iterative procedure, or a Tikhonov term added to the discrepancy function, by means of a discrepancy principle accounting for the Poisson nature of the noise affecting th...

  8. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical absorption of deuterium into palladium by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron-wiggler radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominguez, D.D.; Hagans, P.L.; Skelton, E.F.; Qadri, S.B.; Nagel, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    With low energy x-rays, such as those from a Cu x-ray tube, only the outer few microns of a metallic sample can be probed. This low penetrating power prohibits structural studies from being carried out on the interior of an electrode in an electrochemical cell because of absorption by the cell material, electrodes and the electrolyte. The work described in this paper circumvents this problem by utilizing high energy, high brightness x-rays produced on the superconducting wiggler beam line, X-17C, at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The penetrating power of the higher energy x-rays allowed Pd diffraction spectra to be obtained in-situ on a 1 mm diameter Pd wire cathode during electrolysis of heavy water. Moreover, the beam (28 x 28 {micro}m in cross-section) allowed diffraction spectra to be acquired as a function of distance across the sample. Spectra were recorded in 50 {micro}m steps from the edge of the Pd wire to its core. This was done at 2 minute intervals as a function of electrolysis time. The {alpha}-{beta} phase transition induced in the Pd while deuterium was electrochemically absorbed was observed by monitoring the Pd-(422) diffraction peaks. Results allowed the diffusion rate and the diffusivity of deuterium atoms in the Pd wire to be determined. Other features of the structural changes associated with the absorption of deuterium into Pd are reported.

  9. Revisiting the blocking force test on ferroelectric ceramics using high energy x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, L.; Hall, D. A.; Withers, P. J.; Koruza, J.; Webber, K. G.; King, A.

    2015-05-07

    The blocking force test is a standard test to characterise the properties of piezoelectric actuators. The aim of this study is to understand the various contributions to the macroscopic behaviour observed during this experiment that involves the intrinsic piezoelectric effect, ferroelectric domain switching, and internal stress development. For this purpose, a high energy diffraction experiment is performed in-situ during a blocking force test on a tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic (Pb{sub 0.98}Ba{sub 0.01}(Zr{sub 0.51}Ti{sub 0.49}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3}). It is shown that the usual macroscopic linear interpretation of the test can also be performed at the single crystal scale, allowing the identification of local apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties. It is also shown that despite this apparent linearity, the blocking force test involves significant non-linear behaviour mostly due to domain switching under electric field and stress. Although affecting a limited volume fraction of the material, domain switching is responsible for a large part of the macroscopic strain and explains the high level of inter- and intra-granular stresses observed during the course of the experiment. The study shows that if apparent piezoelectric and elastic properties can be identified for PZT single crystals from blocking stress curves, they may be very different from the actual properties of polycrystalline materials due to the multiplicity of the physical mechanisms involved. These apparent properties can be used for macroscopic modelling purposes but should be considered with caution if a local analysis is aimed at.

  10. 3-dimensional imaging system using crystal diffraction lenses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, Robert K. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A device for imaging a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. Diffracting crystals are used for focussing the radiation and directing the radiation to a detector which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for a method for imaging x-ray and gamma radiation by supplying a plurality of sources of radiation; focussing the radiation onto a detector; analyzing the focused radiation to collect data as to the type and location of the radiation; and producing an image using the data.

  11. 3-dimensional imaging system using crystal diffraction lenses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smither, R.K.

    1999-02-09

    A device for imaging a plurality of sources of x-ray and gamma-ray radiation is provided. Diffracting crystals are used for focusing the radiation and directing the radiation to a detector which is used for analyzing their addition to collect data as to the location of the source of radiation. A computer is used for converting the data to an image. The invention also provides for a method for imaging x-ray and gamma radiation by supplying a plurality of sources of radiation; focusing the radiation onto a detector; analyzing the focused radiation to collect data as to the type and location of the radiation; and producing an image using the data. 18 figs.

  12. Generalized Uncertainty Quantification for Linear Inverse Problems in X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Michael James

    2014-04-25

    In industrial and engineering applications, X-ray radiography has attained wide use as a data collection protocol for the assessment of material properties in cases where direct observation is not possible. The direct measurement of nuclear materials, particularly when they are under explosive or implosive loading, is not feasible, and radiography can serve as a useful tool for obtaining indirect measurements. In such experiments, high energy X-rays are pulsed through a scene containing material of interest, and a detector records a radiograph by measuring the radiation that is not attenuated in the scene. One approach to the analysis of these radiographs is to model the imaging system as an operator that acts upon the object being imaged to produce a radiograph. In this model, the goal is to solve an inverse problem to reconstruct the values of interest in the object, which are typically material properties such as density or areal density. The primary objective in this work is to provide quantitative solutions with uncertainty estimates for three separate applications in X-ray radiography: deconvolution, Abel inversion, and radiation spot shape reconstruction. For each problem, we introduce a new hierarchical Bayesian model for determining a posterior distribution on the unknowns and develop efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for sampling from the posterior. A Poisson likelihood, based on a noise model for photon counts at the detector, is combined with a prior tailored to each application: an edge-localizing prior for deconvolution; a smoothing prior with non-negativity constraints for spot reconstruction; and a full covariance sampling prior based on a Wishart hyperprior for Abel inversion. After developing our methods in a general setting, we demonstrate each model on both synthetically generated datasets, including those from a well known radiation transport code, and real high energy radiographs taken at two U. S. Department of Energy laboratories.

  13. Study of microstress state of P91 steel using complementary mechanical Barkhausen, magnetoacoustic emission, and X-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustyniak, Boles?aw, E-mail: bolek@mif.pg.gda.pl; Piotrowski, Leszek; Maciakowski, Pawe?; Chmielewski, Marek [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Lech-Grega, Marzena; ?elechowski, Janusz [The Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, 32-050 Skawina (Poland)

    2014-05-07

    The paper deals with assessment of microstress state of martensite P91 steel using three complementary techniques: mechanical Barkhausen emission, magnetoacoustic emission (MAE), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. Magnetic coercivity Hc and microstructure were investigated with inductive magnetometry and magnetic force microscopy (MFM), respectively. Internal stress level of P91 steel was modified by heat treatment. Steel samples were austenitized, quenched, and then tempered at three temperatures (720?°C, 750?°C, and 780?°C) during increasing time (from 15?min up to 240?min). The microstrain level ?{sub i} was evaluated using Williamson–Hall method. It was revealed that during tempering microstrain systematically decreases from ?{sub i}?=?2.5 × 10{sup ?3} for as quenched state down to ?{sub i}?=?0.3?×?10{sup ?3} for well tempered samples. Both mechanical hardness (Vicker's HV) and magnetic hardness (coercivity) decrease almost linearly with decreasing microstrain while the MAE and MBE intensities strongly increase. Tempering leads to evident shift of the MeBN intensity maximum recorded for the first load towards lower applied strain values and to increase of MAE intensity. This indicates that the microstress state deduced by magnetic techniques is correlated with microstrains evaluated with XRD technique.

  14. X-ray Diffraction and Molecular Dynamics Study of Medium-range Order in Ambient and Hot Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Congcong Huang; K. T. Wikfeldt; D. Nordlund; U. Bergmann; T. McQueen; J. Sellberg; L. G. M. Pettersson; A. Nilsson

    2011-07-24

    We have developed x-ray diffraction measurements with high energy-resolution and accuracy to study water structure at three different temperatures (7, 25 and 66 C) under normal pressure. Using a spherically curved Ge crystal an energy resolution better than 15 eV has been achieved which eliminates influence from Compton scattering. The high quality of the data allows a precise oxygen-oxygen pair correlation function (PCF) to be directly derived from the Fourier transform of the experimental data resolving shell structure out to ~12 {\\AA}, i.e. 5 hydration shells. Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the TIP4P/2005 force-field reproduce excellently the experimental shell-structure in the range 4-12 {\\AA} although less agreement is seen for the first peak in the PCF. The Local Structure Index [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 7671 (1996)] identifies a tetrahedral minority giving the intermediate-range oscillations in the PCF and a disordered majority providing a more featureless background in this range. The current study supports the proposal that the structure of liquid water, even at high temperatures, can be described in terms of a two-state fluctuation model involving local structures related to the high-density and low-density forms of liquid water postulated in the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis.

  15. Ferrocyanide Safety Project Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction studies of sodium nickel ferrocyanide reactions with equimolar nitrate/nitrite salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodds, J.N. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[UNOCAL, Brea, CA (United States). Hartley Research Center

    1994-07-01

    Dynamic X-ray Diffraction (DXRD) has been to used to identify and quantify the solid state reactions that take place between sodium nickel ferrocyanide, Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}, and equimolar concentrations of sodium nitrate/nitrite, reactions of interest to the continued environmental safety of several large underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington. The results are supportive of previous work, which indicated that endothermic dehydration and melting of the nitrates take place before the occurrence of exothermic reactions that being about 300{degrees}C. The DXRD results show that a major reaction set at these temperatures is the occurrence of a series reaction that produces sodium cyanate, NaCNO, as an intermediate in a mildly exothermic first step. In the presence of gaseous oxygen, NaCNO subsequently reacts exothermally and at a faster rate to form metal oxides. Measurements of the rate of this reaction are used to estimate the heat release. Comparisons of this estimated heat release rate with heat transfer rates from a hypothetical ``hot spot`` show that, even in a worst-case scenario, the heat transfer rates are approximately eight times higher than the rate of energy release from the exothermic reactions.

  16. Atomic Resolution Coherent Diffractive Imaging and Ultrafast Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Jian-min (University of Illinois) [University of Illinois

    2011-01-12

    A major scientific challenge is determining the 3-D atomic structure of small nanostructures, including single molecules. Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a promising approach. Recent progress has demonstrated coherent diffraction patterns can be recorded from individual nanostructures and phased to reconstruct their structure. However, overcoming the dose limit imposed by radiation damage is a major obstacle toward the full potential of CDI. One approach is to use ultrafast x-ray or electron pulses. In electron diffraction, amplitudes recorded in a diffraction pattern are unperturbed by lens aberrations, defocus, and other microscope resolution-limiting factors. Sub-A signals are available beyond the information limit of direct imaging. Significant contrast improvement is obtained compared to high-resolution electron micrographs. progress has also been made in developing time-resolved electron diffraction and imaging for the study of ultrafast dynamic processes in materials. This talk will cover these crosscutting issues and the convergence of electron and x-ray diffraction techniques toward structure determination of single molecules.

  17. A knowledge-based cone-beam x-ray CT algorithm for dynamic volumetric cardiac imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    A knowledge-based cone-beam x-ray CT algorithm for dynamic volumetric cardiac imaging Ge Wanga, and wider coverage with multislice/cone- beam CT indicate a great potential for dynamic volumetric imaging/ helical multislice/cone-beam CT approach for dynamic volumetric cardiac imaging. This approach assumes

  18. Design and characterization of electron beam focusing for X-ray generation in novel medical imaging architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdan Neculaes, V., E-mail: neculaes@research.ge.com; Zou, Yun; Zavodszky, Peter; Inzinna, Louis; Zhang, Xi; Conway, Kenneth; Caiafa, Antonio; Frutschy, Kristopher; Waters, William; De Man, Bruno [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)] [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York 12309 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel electron beam focusing scheme for medical X-ray sources is described in this paper. Most vacuum based medical X-ray sources today employ a tungsten filament operated in temperature limited regime, with electrostatic focusing tabs for limited range beam optics. This paper presents the electron beam optics designed for the first distributed X-ray source in the world for Computed Tomography (CT) applications. This distributed source includes 32 electron beamlets in a common vacuum chamber, with 32 circular dispenser cathodes operated in space charge limited regime, where the initial circular beam is transformed into an elliptical beam before being collected at the anode. The electron beam optics designed and validated here are at the heart of the first Inverse Geometry CT system, with potential benefits in terms of improved image quality and dramatic X-ray dose reduction for the patient.

  19. A Comparison of Image Quality Evaluation Techniques for Transmission X-Ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolgert, Peter J; /Marquette U. /SLAC

    2012-08-31

    Beamline 6-2c at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) is capable of Transmission X-ray Microscopy (TXM) at 30 nm resolution. Raw images from the microscope must undergo extensive image processing before publication. Since typical data sets normally contain thousands of images, it is necessary to automate the image processing workflow as much as possible, particularly for the aligning and averaging of similar images. Currently we align images using the 'phase correlation' algorithm, which calculates the relative offset of two images by multiplying them in the frequency domain. For images containing high frequency noise, this algorithm will align noise with noise, resulting in a blurry average. To remedy this we multiply the images by a Gaussian function in the frequency domain, so that the algorithm ignores the high frequency noise while properly aligning the features of interest (FOI). The shape of the Gaussian is manually tuned by the user until the resulting average image is sharpest. To automatically optimize this process, it is necessary for the computer to evaluate the quality of the average image by quantifying its sharpness. In our research we explored two image sharpness metrics, the variance method and the frequency threshold method. The variance method uses the variance of the image as an indicator of sharpness while the frequency threshold method sums up the power in a specific frequency band. These metrics were tested on a variety of test images, containing both real and artificial noise. To apply these sharpness metrics, we designed and built a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) called 'Blur Master.' We found that it is possible for blurry images to have a large variance if they contain high amounts of noise. On the other hand, we found the frequency method to be quite reliable, although it is necessary to manually choose suitable limits for the frequency band. Further research must be performed to design an algorithm which automatically selects these parameters.

  20. Wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Feder, R.; Ko, Jinseok; Ince-Cushman, A.; Rice, J. E.

    2008-10-15

    The paper describes a new scheme for wide-angle point-to-point x-ray imaging with almost arbitrarily large angles of incidence by a matched pair of spherically bent crystals to eliminate the astigmatism, which is a well-known imaging error of spherical mirrors. In addition to x rays, the scheme should be applicable to a very broad spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation, including microwaves, infrared and visible light, as well as UV and extreme UV radiation, if the crystals are replaced with appropriate spherical reflectors. The scheme may also be applicable to the imaging with ultrasound.

  1. Looptop Hard X-Ray Emission in Solar Flares: Images and Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahe' Petrosian; Timothy Q. Donaghy; James M. McTiernan

    2001-12-14

    The discovery of hard X-ray sources near the top of a flaring loop by the HXT instrument on board the YOHKOH satellite represents a significant progress towards the understanding of the basic processes driving solar flares. In this paper we extend the previous study of limb flares by Masuda (1994) by including all YOHKOH observations up through August 1998. We report that from October 1991 to August 1998, YOHKOH observed 20 X-ray bright limb flares (where we use the same selection criteria as Masuda), of which we have sufficient data to analyze 18 events, including 8 previously unanalyzed flares. Of these 18 events, 15 show detectable impulsive looptop emission. Considering that the finite dynamic range (about a decade) of the detection introduces a strong bias against observing comparatively weak looptop sources, we conclude that looptop emission is a common feature of all flares. We summarize the observations of the footpoint to looptop flux ratio and the spectral indices. We present light curves and images of all the important newly analyzed limb flares. Whenever possible we present results for individual pulses in multipeak flares and for different loops for multiloop flares. We then discuss the statistics of the fluxes and spectral indices of the looptop and footpoint sources taking into account observational selection biases. The importance of these observations (and those expected from the scheduled HESSI satellite with its superior angular spectral and temporal resolution) in constraining acceleration models and parameters is discussed briefly.

  2. Deep X-ray spectroscopy and imaging of the Seyfert 2 galaxy, ESO 138-G001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cicco, M; Bianchi, S; Piconcelli, E; Violino, G; Vignali, C; Nicastro, F

    2015-01-01

    We present a spectral and imaging analysis of the XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy ESO138-G001, with the aim of characterizing the circumnuclear material responsible for the soft (0.3-2.0 keV) and hard (5-10 keV) X-ray emission. We confirm that the source is absorbed by Compton-thick gas. However, if a self-consistent model of reprocessing from cold toroidal material is used (MYTorus), a possible scenario requires the absorber to be inhomogenous, its column density along the line of sight being larger than the average column density integrated over all lines- of-sight through the torus. The iron emission line may be produced by moderately ionised iron (FeXII-FeXIII), as suggested by the shifted centroid energy and the low K{\\beta}/K{\\alpha} flux ratio. The soft X-ray emission is dominated by emission features, whose main excitation mechanism appears to be photoionisation, as confirmed by line diagnostics and the use of self-consistent models (CLOUDY).

  3. Investigation of the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas; Haas, Wilhelm; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Wucherer, Lukas; Braun, Jan Matthias; Durst, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising modality increasing the soft tissue contrast in medical imaging. In this work, the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based physe-contrast imaging is investigated. Methods: We used a Talbot-Lau interferometer for our investigations of two C57BL/6 mice. Both underwent projection imaging and computed tomography. Results: The results show that the three images obtained by X-ray phase-contrast imaging show complementary anatomical structures. Especially the dark field image allows a more-exact determination of the position of the lung in the chest cavity. Conclusion: Due to its sensitivity to granular structures, the dark field image may be used for the diagnosis of lung diseases in earlier stages or without a CT scan. Furthermore, X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also have great potential in the application of animal laboratory sciences to reduce the number of required animals used in long-term translational, toxicity, and regenerative med...

  4. A new background correction method in X-ray phase contrast imaging with Talbot-Lau interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shenghao; Momose, Atsushi; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Han, Huajie; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer has been used widely to conduct X-ray phase contrast imaging with a conventional low-brilliance X-ray source. Typically, in this X-ray phase contrast imaging technique, a background correction process has to be performed in order to obtain the pure signal of the sample. In this manuscript, we reported on an experimental research on the background correction strategies within this X-ray imaging technique, especially we introduced a new way to perform background correction, the key point of this new method is changing the initial phase of each pixel by a cyclic shift operation on the raw images collected by phase stepping scan. Experimental result and numerical analysis show that this new method could successfully realize background correction without error, moreover, a potential advantage of this new method is that its effective phase measuring range could be tuned flexibly in some degree for example to (-{\\pi}+3, {\\pi}+3], thus it would find potential advantage in certain case ...

  5. K{sub ?} x-ray imaging of laser-irradiated, limited-mass zirconium foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, M.; Orban, C.; Jiang, S.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Road, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Eichman, B.; Fiksel, G.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Delettrez, J. A. [The Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Dyer, G.; Ditmire, T. [The Texas Center of High Energy Density Science, The University of Texas at Austin, 2511 Speedway Street, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Stephens, R. [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, San Diego, California 92121-1200 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    X-ray fluorescence measurements to determine the effect of target heating on imaging efficiency, at a photon energy of 15.7 keV corresponding to the K{sub ?} line of zirconium, have been carried out using limited-mass foils irradiated by the Texas Petawatt Laser. Zirconium foils that ranged in volume from 3000?×?3000?×?21 ?m{sup 3} to 150?×?150?×?6 ?m{sup 3} were irradiated with 100 J, 8 ps-long pulses and a mean intensity of 4?×?10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The K{sub ?} emission was measured simultaneously using a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite crystal spectrometer and a curved quartz imaging crystal. The measured ratio of the integrated image signal to the integrated spectral signal was, within the experimental error, constant, indicating that the imaging efficiency's dependence on temperature is weak throughout the probed range. Based on our experience of target heating under similar conditions, we estimate a temperature of ?200 eV for the smallest targets. The successful imaging of K{sub ?} emission for temperatures this high represents an important proof of concept for Zr K{sub ?} imaging. At these temperatures, the imaging of K{sub ?} emission from lower-Z materials (such as Cu) is limited by temperature-dependent shifts in the K{sub ?} emission energy.

  6. High-pressure behavior and thermoelastic properties of niobium studied by in situ x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Yongtao E-mail: yongtaozou6@gmail.com; Li, Baosheng; Qi, Xintong; Wang, Xuebing; Chen, Ting; Li, Xuefei; Welch, David

    2014-07-07

    In situ synchrotron energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments on Nb have been conducted at pressures up to 6.4 GPa and temperatures up to 1073 K. From the pressure-volume-temperature measurements, thermoelastic parameters were derived for the first time for Nb based on the thermal pressure (?P{sub th}) equation of state (EOS), modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan EOS, and Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS. With the pressure derivative of the bulk modulus K{sub T}{sup ´} fixed at 4.0, we obtained the ambient isothermal bulk modulus K{sub T0}=174(5) GPa, the temperature derivative of bulk modulus at constant pressure (?K{sub T}/?T){sub P}=-0.060(8) GPa K?¹ and at constant volume (?K{sub T}/?T){sub V}=-0.046(8) GPa K?¹, the volumetric thermal expansivity ?{sub T}(T)=2.3(3)×10??+0.3(2)×10??T (K?¹), as well as the pressure dependence of thermal expansion (??/?P){sub T}=(?2.0±0.4)×10?? K?¹ GPa?¹. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye EOS with Debye temperature ??=276.6 K gives ??=1.27(8) and K{sub T0}=171(3) GPa at a fixed value of q=3.0. The ambient isothermal bulk modulus and Grüneisen parameter derived from this work are comparable to previously reported values from both experimental and theoretical studies. An in situ high-resolution, angle dispersive XRD study on Nb did not indicate any anomalous behavior related to pressure-induced electronic topological transitions at ~5 GPa as has been reported previously.

  7. Development of a PCI Express Based Readout Electronics for the XPAD3 X-Ray Photon Counting Image

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawiec, A; Breugnon, P; Arnaud, K; Duval, P -Y; Godiot, S; Hustache, S; Medjoubi, K; Berar, J -F; Boudet, N; Morel, C; Bompard, F

    2011-01-01

    XPAD3 is a large surface X-ray photon counting imager with high count rates, large counter dynamics and very fast data readout. Data are readout in parallel by a PCI Express interface using DMA transfer. The readout frame rate of the complete detector comprising 0.5 MPixels amounts to 500 images per second without dead-time.

  8. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of palladium(II) 1,3-diphenyl-5-(benzothiazol-2-yl)formazanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaidman, A. V., E-mail: biosphera@usfeu.ru; Pervova, I. G.; Rezinskikh, Z. G.; Lipunov, I. N. [Ural State Forest Engineering University (Russian Federation); Slepukhin, P. A., E-mail: slepukhin@ios.uran.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Postovsky Institute of Organic Synthesis, Ural Division (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15

    The behavior of 1,3-diphenyl-5-(benzothiazol-2-yl)formazan as a bidentate ligand in the synthesis of the mononuclear palladium complex was investigated using slow diffusion. According to the X-ray diffraction study, the PdN4 coordination unit has a distorted square structure. The ligands form two six-membered chelate rings formed through the N1 and N4 atoms of the formazan fragment.

  9. Experimental validation of a kilovoltage x-ray source model for computing imaging dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.poirier@cancercare.mb.ca [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada)] [CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Kouznetsov, Alexei; Koger, Brandon [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tambasco, Mauro, E-mail: mtambasco@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-1233 and Department of Physics and Astronomy and Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To introduce and validate a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source model and characterization method to compute absorbed dose accrued from kV x-rays. Methods: The authors propose a simplified virtual point source model and characterization method for a kV x-ray source. The source is modeled by: (1) characterizing the spatial spectral and fluence distributions of the photons at a plane at the isocenter, and (2) creating a virtual point source from which photons are generated to yield the derived spatial spectral and fluence distribution at isocenter of an imaging system. The spatial photon distribution is determined by in-air relative dose measurements along the transverse (x) and radial (y) directions. The spectrum is characterized using transverse axis half-value layer measurements and the nominal peak potential (kVp). This source modeling approach is used to characterize a Varian{sup ®} on-board-imager (OBI{sup ®}) for four default cone-beam CT beam qualities: beams using a half bowtie filter (HBT) with 110 and 125 kVp, and a full bowtie filter (FBT) with 100 and 125 kVp. The source model and characterization method was validated by comparing dose computed by the authors’ inhouse software (kVDoseCalc) to relative dose measurements in a homogeneous and a heterogeneous block phantom comprised of tissue, bone, and lung-equivalent materials. Results: The characterized beam qualities and spatial photon distributions are comparable to reported values in the literature. Agreement between computed and measured percent depth-dose curves is ?2% in the homogeneous block phantom and ?2.5% in the heterogeneous block phantom. Transverse axis profiles taken at depths of 2 and 6 cm in the homogeneous block phantom show an agreement within 4%. All transverse axis dose profiles in water, in bone, and lung-equivalent materials for beams using a HBT, have an agreement within 5%. Measured profiles of FBT beams in bone and lung-equivalent materials were higher than their computed counterparts resulting in an agreement within 2.5%, 5%, and 8% within solid water, bone, and lung, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed virtual point source model and characterization method can be used to compute absorbed dose in both the homogeneous and heterogeneous block phantoms within of 2%–8% of measured values, depending on the phantom and the beam quality. The authors’ results also provide experimental validation for their kV dose computation software, kVDoseCalc.

  10. Calculation of the Johann error for spherically bent x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Podpaly, Y.

    2010-10-15

    New x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers, currently operating on Alcator C-Mod, NSTX, EAST, and KSTAR, record spectral lines of highly charged ions, such as Ar{sup 16+}, from multiple sightlines to obtain profiles of ion temperature and of toroidal plasma rotation velocity from Doppler measurements. In the present work, we describe a new data analysis routine, which accounts for the specific geometry of the sightlines of a curved-crystal spectrometer and includes corrections for the Johann error to facilitate the tomographic inversion. Such corrections are important to distinguish velocity induced Doppler shifts from instrumental line shifts caused by the Johann error. The importance of this correction is demonstrated using data from Alcator C-Mod.

  11. Deciphering Ni sequestration in soil ferromanganese nodules by combining x-ray fluorescence, absorption and diffraction at micrometer scales of resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manceau, Alain; Tamura, Nobumichi; Marcus, Matthew A.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Sublett, Robert E.; Sposito, Garrison; Padmore, Howard A.

    2002-11-06

    X-ray microprobes are among the most important new analytical techniques to emerge from third generation synchrotron facilities. Here we show how X-ray fluorescence, diffraction, and absorption can be used in parallel to determine the structural form of trace elements in heterogeneous matrices at the micrometer-scale of resolution. Scanning X-ray microfluorescence (microSXRF) and microdiffraction (microSXRD) first are used to identify the host solid phase by mapping the distributions of elements and solid species, respectively. Micro-extended X-ray absorption fine structure (microEXAFS) spectroscopy is then used to determine the mechanism of trace element binding by the host phase at the molecular scale. To illustrate the complementary application of these three techniques, we studied how nickel is sequestered in soil ferromanganese nodules, an overwhelmingly complex natural matrix consisting of submicrometer to nanometer sized particles with varying structures and chemical composition s. We show that nickel substitutes for Mn3+ in the manganese layer of the MnO2-Al(OH)3 mixed-layer oxide lithiophorite. The affinity of Ni for lithiophorite was characteristic of micromodules sampled from soils across the U.S.A. and Europe. Since many natural and synthetic materials are heterogeneous at nanometer to micrometer scales, the synergistic use of microSXRF, microSXRD and microEXAFS is expected to have broad applications to earth and materials science.

  12. 3D Imaging of Nickel Oxidation States using Full Field X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Nanotomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, George; Harris, William; Izzo, John; Grew, Kyle N.

    2012-01-20

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) cycling of the nickel electrocatalyst phase in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode can lead to performance degradation and cell failure. A greater understanding of nickel redox mechanisms at the microstructural level is vital to future SOFC development. Transmission x-ray microscopy (TXM) provides several key techniques for exploring oxidation states within SOFC electrode microstructure. Specifically, x-ray nanotomography and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy have been applied to study samples of varying nickel (Ni) and nickel oxide (NiO) compositions. The imaged samples are treated as mock SOFC anodes containing distinct regions of the materials in question. XANES spectra presented for the individual materials provide a basis for the further processing and analysis of mixed samples. Images of composite samples obtained are segmented, and the distinct nickel and nickel oxide phases are uniquely identified using full field XANES spectroscopy. Applications to SOFC analysis are discussed.

  13. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-RayX-RayX-Ray

  14. Performance assessment of CsI(Tl) screens on various substrates for X-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhaodong; Zhang, Hongkai; Zhao, Bozhen; Qin, Xiubo; Wei, Cunfeng; Liu, Yu; Wei, Long

    2015-01-01

    Thallium-doped cesium iodide (CsI(Tl)) screens are widely used in X-ray imaging devices because of the columnar structure of CsI(Tl) layer, but few reports focus on the optical role of the substrate in the screen system. In this paper, four substrates including fused silica (SiO2), silver-film coated SiO2, graphite (C) and fiber optic plate (FOP) are used to fabricate CsI(Tl) screens by thermal evaporation. Their imaging performance is evaluated by relative light output (RLO), modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and noise equivalent quanta (NEQ). The results reveal that although CsI(Tl) film on graphite plate yields images with the lowest light output, it presents relatively higher spatial resolution and better signal-to-noise characteristics. However, films on SiO2 plate obtain low MTF but high NNPS curves, whether or not coated with silver film. Furthermore, scintillation screens on FOP have bright images with low NNPS and high NEQ, but have the lowest MTF. By controll...

  15. Imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Roquemore, A.L.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Kahn, S.M.; Elliott, S.R.; Fraenkel, B.

    1999-01-01

    A new type of high-resolution x-ray imaging crystal spectrometers is described for implementation on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on the ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion-charge state distributions, and impurity transport. These data are derived from observations of the satellite spectra of heliumlike argon, ArthinspXVII, which is the dominant charge state for electron temperatures in the range from 0.4 to 3.0 keV and which is accessible to NSTX. Experiments at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR) demonstrate that a throughput of 2{times}10{sup 5}thinspphotons/s (corresponding to the count-rate limit of the present detectors) can easily be obtained with small, nonperturbing argon gas puffs of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}3}thinspTorrthinspscr(l)/s, so that it is possible to record spectra with a small statistical error and a good time resolution (typically 50 and 1 ms in some cases). Employing a novel design, which is based on the imaging properties of spherically bent crystals, the spectrometers will provide spectrally and spatially resolved images of the plasma for all experimental conditions, which include ohmically heated discharges as well as plasmas with rf and neutral-beam heating. The conceptual design, experimental results on the focusing properties, and relevant spectral data from TEXTOR are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. 1682 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 31, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2012 Low-Dose X-ray CT Reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ge

    1682 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 31, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2012 Low-Dose X-ray CT and other diseases. How to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the diagnostic per- formance is a major- straint in terms of total variation (TV) minimization has already led to promising results for low-dose CT

  17. RHESSI MICROFLARE STATISTICS. II. X-RAY IMAGING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS I. G. Hannah, S. Christe,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    RHESSI MICROFLARE STATISTICS. II. X-RAY IMAGING, SPECTROSCOPY, AND ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS I. G distribution of RHESSI flares and compare it to previous thermal energy distributions of transient events. We flares down to nanoflares. The fre- quency distribution of the energy in these events has been studied

  18. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  19. A practical global distortion correction method for an image intensifier based x-ray fluoroscopy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Luis F.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Lab of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 and Biomedical Engineering Institute, Bogazici University, Istanbul (Turkey); Lab of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    X-ray images acquired on systems with image intensifiers (II) exhibit characteristic distortion which is due to both external and internal factors. The distortion is dependent on the orientation of the II, a fact particularly relevant to II's mounted on C arms which have several degrees of freedom of motion. Previous descriptions of distortion correction strategies have relied on a dense sampling of the C-arm orientation space, and as such have been limited mostly to a single arc of the primary angle, {alpha}. We present a new method which smooths the trajectories of the segmented vertices of the grid phantom as a function of {alpha} prior to solving the two-dimensional warping problem. It also shows that the same residual errors of distortion correction could be achieved without fitting the trajectories of the grid vertices, but instead applying the previously described global method of distortion correction, followed by directly smoothing the values of the polynomial coefficients as functions of the C-arm orientation parameters. When this technique was applied to a series of test images at arbitrary {alpha}, the root-mean-square (RMS) residual error was 0.22 pixels. The new method was extended to three degrees of freedom of the C-arm motion: the primary angle, {alpha}; the secondary angle, {beta}; and the source-to-intensifier distance, {lambda}. Only 75 images were used to characterize the distortion for the following ranges: {alpha}, {+-}45 deg. ({delta}{alpha}=22.5 deg.); {beta}, {+-}36 deg. ({delta}{beta}=18 deg.); {lambda}, 98-118 cm ({delta}{lambda}=10 cm). When evaluated on a series of test images acquired at arbitrary ({alpha},{beta},{lambda}), the RMS residual error was 0.33 pixels. This method is targeted at applications such as guidance of catheter-based interventions and treatment planning for brachytherapy, which require distortion-corrected images over a large range of C-arm orientations.

  20. Masked-backlighter technique used to simultaneously image x-ray absorption and x-ray emission from an inertial confinement fusion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, F. J., E-mail: fredm@lle.rochester.edu; Radha, P. B. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A method to simultaneously image both the absorption and the self-emission of an imploding inertial confinement fusion plasma has been demonstrated on the OMEGA Laser System. The technique involves the use of a high-Z backlighter, half of which is covered with a low-Z material, and a high-speed x-ray framing camera aligned to capture images backlit by this masked backlighter. Two strips of the four-strip framing camera record images backlit by the high-Z portion of the backlighter, while the other two strips record images aligned with the low-Z portion of the backlighter. The emission from the low-Z material is effectively eliminated by a high-Z filter positioned in front of the framing camera, limiting the detected backlighter emission to that of the principal emission line of the high-Z material. As a result, half of the images are of self-emission from the plasma and the other half are of self-emission plus the backlighter. The advantage of this technique is that the self-emission simultaneous with backlighter absorption is independently measured from a nearby direction. The absorption occurs only in the high-Z backlit frames and is either spatially separated from the emission or the self-emission is suppressed by filtering, or by using a backlighter much brighter than the self-emission, or by subtraction. The masked-backlighter technique has been used on the OMEGA Laser System to simultaneously measure the emission profiles and the absorption profiles of polar-driven implosions.

  1. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-RayX-Ray

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of YidC, a membrane-protein chaperone and insertase from Bacillus halodurans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumazaki, Kaoru [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsukazaki, Tomoya, E-mail: ttsukaza@bs.naist.jp [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama-cho, Ikoma-shi, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Nishizawa, Tomohiro [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tanaka, Yoshiki [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama-cho, Ikoma-shi, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Kato, Hideaki E. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Nakada-Nakura, Yoshiko [Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hirata, Kunio [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Mori, Yoshihiro; Suga, Hiroaki [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Dohmae, Naoshi [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu, E-mail: ttsukaza@bs.naist.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-07-23

    YidC, a membrane-protein chaperone/insertase from B. halodurans, was expressed, purified and crystallized in the lipidic cubic phase. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected to 2.4 Å resolution. YidC, a member of the YidC/Oxa1/Alb3 family, inserts proteins into the membrane and facilitates membrane-protein folding in bacteria. YidC plays key roles in both Sec-mediated integration and Sec-independent insertion of membrane proteins. Here, Bacillus halodurans YidC2, which has five transmembrane helices conserved among the other family members, was identified as a target protein for structure determination by a fluorescent size-exclusion chromatography analysis. The protein was overexpressed, purified and crystallized in the lipidic cubic phase. The crystals diffracted X-rays to 2.4 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.9, b = 60.6, c = 58.9 Å, ? = 100.3°. The experimental phases were determined by the multiwavelength anomalous diffraction method using a mercury-derivatized crystal.

  3. Imaging X-ray spectroscopy with micro-X and Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutherford, John (John Morton)

    2013-01-01

    High spectral resolution observations of X-ray phenomena have the potential to uncover new physics. Currently, only point sources can be probed with high resolution spectra, using gratings. Extended objects like supernova ...

  4. High-Pressure Synchtron Radiation X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate C(CH[subscript 2]ONO[subscript 2 ])[subscript 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinska-Kalita, K.E.; Pravica, M.; Nicol, M.

    2006-02-02

    A high-pressure x-ray diffraction study of nanocrystalline pentaerythritol tetranitrate, C(CH{sub 2}ONO{sub 2}){sub 4}, (PETN), has been performed in a diamond-anvil cell at ambient temperature using synchrotron radiation. Pressure-induced alterations in the profiles of the diffraction lines, including their positions, widths and intensities were followed up to 30 GPa in a compressino cycle. The spectral changes in the diffraction patterns at low pressures indicated continuous densification of the tetragonal structure (space group P{bar 4}2{sub 1}c). The diffraction patterns confirmed that PETN compressed from ambient pressure to 7.4 GPa by 17%. At 8.2 GPa and above, several new diffraction lines appeared in the patterns. These lines suggest that the lattice undergoes an incomplete stress-induced structural transformation from the tetragonal to an orthorhombic structure (most probably space group P2{sub 1}22{sub 1}). The mixture of both structures appeared to persist to 30 GPa. The progressive broadening of the diffraction lines as the pressure increased beyond 10 GPa is attributed to the combined diffraction lines of a mixture of two coexisting PETN phases and inhomogeneous pressure distribution within the sample.

  5. High-speed X-ray imaging of a ball impacting on loose sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homan, Tess; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2014-01-01

    When a ball is dropped in fine, very loose sand, a splash and subsequently a jet are ob- served above the bed, followed by a granular eruption. To directly and quantitatively determine what happens inside the sand bed, high-speed X-ray tomography measurements are carried out in a custom-made setup that allows for imaging of a large sand bed at atmospheric pressures. Herewith we show that the jet originates from the pinch-off point created by the collapse of the air cavity formed behind the penetrating ball.Subsequently we measure how the entrapped air bubble rises through the sand and show that this is consistent with bubbles rising in continuously fluidized beds. Finally, we measure the packing fraction variation throughout the bed. From this we show that there is (i) a compressed area of sand in front of and next to the ball while the ball is moving down, (ii) a strongly compacted region at the pinch-off height after the cavity collapse; and (iii) a relatively loosely packed center in the wake of the rising...

  6. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B.; Shi, Y.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Lee, S. G.

    2012-10-15

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  7. Multivariate statistics applications in scanning transmission electron microscopy X-ray spectrum imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A modern scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) fitted with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) system can quickly and easily produce spectrum image (SI) datasets containing so much information (hundreds to thousands of megabytes) that they cannot be comprehensively interrogated by a human analyst. Therefore, advanced mathematical techniques are needed to glean materials science and engineering insight into the processing-structure-properties relationship of the examined material from the SI data. This review will discuss recent advances in the application of multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) methods to STEM-EDS SI experiments. In particular, the fundamental mathematics of principal component analysis (PCA) and related methods are reviewed, and advanced methods such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR) are discussed. The applications of PCA and MCR-based techniques to solve difficult materials science problems, such as the analysis of a particle fully embedded in a matrix phase are discussed, as well as confounding effects such as rank deficiency that can confuse the results of MVSA computations. Possible future advances and areas in need of study are also mentioned.

  8. TAILORING X-RAY BEAM ENERGY SPECTRUM TO ENHANCE IMAGE QUALITY OF NEW RADIOGRAPHY CONTRAST AGENTS BASED ON GD OR OTHER LANTHANIDES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DILMANIAN,F.A.; WEINMANN,H.J.; ZHONG,Z.; BACARIAN,T.; RIGON,L.; BUTTON,T.M.; REN,B.; WU,X.Y.; ZHONG,N.; ATKINS,H.L.

    2001-02-17

    Gadovist, a 1.0-molar Gd contrast agent from Schering AG, Berlin Germany, in use in clinical MPI in Europe, was evaluated as a radiography contrast agent. In a collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Schering AG is developing several such lanthanide-based contrast agents, while BNL evaluates them using different x-my beam energy spectra. These energy spectra include a ''truly'' monochromatic beam (0.2 keV energy bandwidth) from the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), BNL, tuned above the Gd K-edge, and x-ray-tube beams from different kVp settings and beam filtrations. Radiographs of rabbits' kidneys were obtained with Gadovist at the NSLS. Furthermore, a clinical radiography system was used for imaging rabbits' kidneys comparing Gadovist and Conray, an iodinated contrast agent. The study, using 74 kVp and standard Al beam filter for Conray and 66 kVp and an additional 1.5 mm Cu beam filter for Gadovist, produced comparable images for Gadovist and Conray; the injection volumes were the same, while the radiation absorbed dose for Gadovist was slightly smaller. A bent-crystal silicon monochromator operating in the Laue diffraction mode was developed and tested with a conventional x-ray tube beam; it narrows the energy spectrum to about 4 keV around the anode tungsten's Ku line. Preliminary beam-flux results indicate that the method could be implemented in clinical CT if x-ray tubes with {approximately} twice higher output become available.

  9. Rietveld Analysis of X-ray Powder Diffraction Patterns as a Potential Tool for the Identification of Impact-deformed Carbonate Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huson, Sarah A.; Foit, Franklin F.; Watkinson, A. J.; Pope, Michael C.

    2009-11-01

    Previous X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies revealed that shock deformed carbonates and quartz have broader XRD patterns than those of unshocked samples. Entire XRD patterns, single peak profiles and Rietveld refined parameters of carbonate samples from the Sierra Madera impact crater, west Texas, unshocked equivalent samples from 95 miles north of the crater and the Mission Canyon Formation of southwest Montana and western Wyoming were used to evaluate the use of X-ray powder diffraction as a potential tool for distinguishing impact deformed rocks from unshocked and tectonically deformed rocks. At Sierra Madera dolostone and limestone samples were collected from the crater rim (lower shock intensity) and the central uplift (higher shock intensity). Unshocked equivalent dolostone samples were collected from well cores drilled outside of the impact crater. Carbonate rocks of the Mission Canyon Formation were sampled along a transect across the tectonic front of the Sevier and Laramide orogenic belts. Whereas calcite subjected to significant shock intensities at the Sierra Madera impact crater can be differentiated from tectonically deformed calcite from the Mission Canyon Formation using Rietveld refined peak profiles, weakly shocked calcite from the crater rim appears to be indistinguishable from the tectonically deformed calcite. In contrast, Rietveld analysis readily distinguishes shocked Sierra Madera dolomite from unshocked equivalent dolostone samples from outside the crater and tectonically deformed Mission Canyon Formation dolomite.

  10. Characterization of morphology and hydration products of high-volume fly ash paste by monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (?-SXRD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bae, Sungchul; Meral, Cagla; Oh, Jae-eun; Moon, Juhyuk; Kunz, Martin; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on identification and micro-structural characterization of the hydration products formed in high-volume fly ash (HVFA)/portland cement (PC) systems using monochromatic scanning x-ray micro-diffraction (?-SXRD) and SEM-EDS. Pastes with up to 80% fly ash replacement were studied. Phase maps for HVFA samples using ?-SXRD patterns prove that ?-SXRD is an effective method to identify and visualize the distribution of phases in the matrix. ?-SXRD and SEM-EDS analysis shows that the C-S-H formed in HVFA system containing 50% or more of fly ash has a similar structure as C-S-H(I) with comparatively lower Ca/Si ratio than the one produced in PC system. Moreover, coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite is observed in the system containing 80% of fly ash, confirming that the amount of alumina and silicate phases provided by the fly ash is a major factor for the formation of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in HVFA system. - Highlights: • High-volume fly ash (HVFA) paste was studied by scanning x-ray micro-diffraction. • Coexistence of C-S-H(I) and strätlingite in the HVFA system is clearly shown. • The distribution of minor phases in the HVFA system is shown. • Differences between inner and outer products of fly ash are observed by SEM-EDS.

  11. In situ apparatus for the study of clathrate hydrates relevant to solar system bodies using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Sarah J; Evans, Aneurin; Parker, Julia E

    2015-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are believed to play a significant role in various solar system environments, e.g. comets, and the surfaces and interiors of icy satellites, however the structural factors governing their formation and dissociation are poorly understood. We demonstrate the use of a high pressure gas cell, combined with variable temperature cooling and time-resolved data collection, to the in situ study of clathrate hydrates under conditions relevant to solar system environments. Clathrates formed and processed within the cell are monitored in situ using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction allows the formation of clathrate hydrates to be observed as CO2 gas is applied to ice formed within the cell. Complete conversion is obtained by annealing at temperatures just below the ice melting point. A subsequent rise in the quantity of clathrate is observed as the cell is thermally cycled. Four regions between 100-5000cm-1 are present in the Raman spectra that carry feature...

  12. Characterization of room temperature recrystallization kinetics in electroplated copper thin films with concurrent x-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treger, Mikhail; Noyan, I. C.; Witt, Christian; Cabral, Cyril; Murray, Conal; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Rosenberg, Robert; Eisenbraun, Eric

    2013-06-07

    Concurrent in-situ four-point probe resistivity and high resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were used to characterize room temperature recrystallization in electroplated Cu thin films. The x-ray data were used to obtain the variation with time of the integrated intensities and the peak-breadth from the Cu 111 and 200 reflections of the transforming grains. The variation of the integrated intensity and resistivity data with time was analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. For both 111-textured and non-textured electroplated Cu films, four-point probe resistivity measurements yielded shorter transformation times than the values obtained from the integrated intensities of the corresponding Cu 111 reflections. In addition, the JMAK exponents fitted to the resistivity data were significantly smaller. These discrepancies could be explained by considering the different material volumes from which resistivity and diffraction signals originated, and the physical processes which linked these signals to the changes in the evolving microstructure. Based on these issues, calibration of the resistivity analysis with direct structural characterization techniques is recommended.

  13. Structure of N-acetyl-L-cysteine: X-ray (T = 295 K) and neutron (T = 16 K) diffraction studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takusagawa, Fusao; Koetzle, Thomas F.; Kou, W. W. H.; Parthasarathy, R.

    1981-08-01

    . & LEVY, H. A. (1962). ORFLS. Report ORNL-TM-305. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee. CHEN, C.-S. & PARTHASARATHY, R. (1978). Int. J. Pept. Protein Res. 11, 9-18. COPPENS, P. (1970) . Crystallographic Computing, edited by F. R. AHMED, pp. 2 5 5... 1096-1102. International Tables for X-ray Crystallography ( 1968) . VoL III, pp. 197-198. Birmingham: Kynoch Press. JOCELYN, P. C. (1972). Biochemistry of the SH Groups. New York: Academic Press. JOHNSON, C. K. (1976). ORTEP II. Report ORNL-5138, Oak...

  14. Diffuse X-ray Emission in a Deep Chandra Image of the Galactic Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Muno; F. K. Baganoff; M. W. Bautz; E. D. Feigelson; G. P. Garmire; M. R. Morris; S. Park; G. R. Ricker; L. K. Townsley

    2004-06-01

    We examine the spectrum of diffuse emission detected in the 17' by 17' field around Sgr A* during 625 ks of Chandra observations. The spectrum exhibits He-like and H-like lines from Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe, that are consistent with originating in a two-temperature plasma, as well as a prominent low-ionization Fe line. The cooler, kT=0.8 keV plasma differs in surface brightness across the image by a factor of 9. This soft plasma is probably heated by supernovae. The radiative cooling rate of the plasma within the inner 20 pc of the Galaxy could be balanced by 1% of the kinetic energy of one supernova every 300,000 y. The hotter, kT=8 keV component is more spatially uniform, ranging over a factor of 2 in surface brightness. The intensity of the hard plasma is correlated with that of the soft, but they are probably only indirectly related, because supernova remnants are not observed to produce thermal plasma hotter than kT=3 keV. Moreover, a kT=8 keV plasma is too hot to be bound to the Galactic center, and therefore would form a slow wind or fountain of plasma. The energy required to sustain such a freely-expanding plasma within the inner 20 pc of the Galaxy is ~10^40 erg/s, which corresponds to the entire kinetic energy of one supernova every 3000 y. This rate is unreasonably high. However, alternative explanations for the kT=8 keV diffuse emission are equally unsatisfying. We are left to conclude that either the diffuse emission is heated by an unanticipated source of energy, or that a population of faint (< 10^31 erg/s), hard X-ray sources that are a factor of 10 more numerous than CVs remains to be discovered. (Abridged)

  15. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest singleX-RayX-Ray

  16. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-RayX-Ray

  17. X-ray microtomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landis, Eric N.; Keane, Denis T.

    2010-12-15

    In this tutorial, we describe X-ray microtomography as a technique to nondestructively characterize material microstructure in three dimensions at a micron level spatial resolution. While commercially available laboratory scale instrumentation is available, we focus our attention on synchrotron-based systems, where we can exploit a high flux, monochromatic X-ray beam to produce high fidelity three-dimensional images. A brief description of the physics and the mathematical analysis behind the technique is followed by example applications to specific materials characterization problems, with a particular focus on the utilization of three-dimensional image processing that can be used to extract a wide range of useful information.

  18. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    2015-02-10

    Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

  19. Imaging single cells in a beam of live cyanobacteria with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schot, Gijs, vander

    Diffraction pattern of a micron-sized S. elongatus cell at 1,100 eV photon energy (1.13 nm wavelength) with ~10^11 photons per square micron on the sample in ~70 fs. The signal to noise ratio at 4 nm resolution is 3.7 with 0.24 photons per Nyquist pixel. The cell was alive at the time of the exposure. The central region of the pattern (dark red) is saturated and this prevented reliable image reconstruction.

  20. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  1. A NOVEL X-RAY IMAGING CRYSTAL SPECTROMETER FOR DOPPLER MEASUREMENTS OF ION TEMPERATURE AND PLASMA ROTATION VELOCITY PROFILES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Ince-Cushman, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J E; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2008-06-06

    A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer has been implemented on Alcator CMod for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity profiles. The instrument consists of two spherically bent (102)-quartz crystals with radii of curvature of 1444 and 1385 mm and four 'PILATUS II' detector modules. It records spectra of He-like argon from the entire, 72 cm high, elongated plasma cross-section and spectra of H-like argon from a 20 cm high, central region of the plasma, with a spatial resolution of 1.3 cm and a time resolution of less than 20 ms. The new spectrometer concept is also of interest for the diagnosis of burning plasmas on future machines. This paper presents recent experimental results from Aclator C-Mod and discusses challenges in X-ray spectroscopy for the diagnosis of fusion plasmas on future machines.

  2. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyu, B., E-mail: blu@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); WCI for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, M. Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 × 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  3. Simultaneous near-field and far-field imaging of the 11.9-nm Ni-like Sn soft-x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staub, F.; Braud, M.; Balmer, J.E.; Nilsen, J.; Bajt, S.

    2004-07-01

    We report on two-dimensional near-field imaging experiments of the 11.9-nm Sn x-ray laser that were performed with a set of Mo/Y multilayer mirrors having reflectivities of up to {approx}45% at normal and at 45 deg. incidence. Second-moment analysis of the x-ray laser emission was used to determine values of the x-ray beam propagation factor M{sup 2} for a range of irradiation parameters. The results reveal a reduction of M{sup 2} with increasing prepulse amplitude. The spatial size of the output is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than previously measured for the 14.7-nm Pd x-ray laser, while the distance of the x-ray emission with respect to the target surface remains roughly the same.

  4. Highly lead-loaded red plastic scintillators as an X-ray imaging system for the Laser Mega Joule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, M.; Normand, S.; Turk, G.; Darbon, S.

    2011-07-01

    The scope of this project intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at Laser Mega Joule facility (LMJ). We need to develop an X-ray imaging system which can operate in the radiative background generated by an ignition shot of ICF. The scintillator is a part of the imaging system and has to gather a compromise of scintillating properties (scintillating efficiency, decay time, emission wavelength) so as to both operate in the hard radiative environment and to allow the acquisition of spatially resolved images. Inorganic scintillators cannot be used because no compromise can be found regarding the expected scintillating properties, most of them are not fast enough and emit blue light. Organic scintillators are generally fast, but present low X-ray absorption in the 10 to 40 keV range, that does not permit the acquisition of spatially resolved images. To this aim, we have developed highly lead-loaded and red-fluorescent fast plastic scintillators. Such a combination is not currently available via scintillator suppliers, since they propose only blue-fluorescent plastic scintillators doped with up to 12%w Pb. Thus, incorporation ratio up to 27%w Pb has been reached in our laboratory, which can afford a plastic scintillator with an outstanding Z{sub eff} close to 50. X-rays in the 10 to 40 keV range can thus be detected with a higher probability of photoelectric effect than for classic organic scintillators, such as NE102. The strong orange-red fluorescence can be filtered, so that we can eliminate residual Cerenkov light, generated by {gamma}-ray absorption in glass parts of the imaging system. Decay times of our scintillators evaluated under UV excitation were estimated to be in the range 10 to 13 ns. (authors)

  5. Mapping the ionization state of laser-irradiated Ar gas jets with multiwavelength monochromatic x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N. L.; Niemann, C.; Doeppner, T.; Kemp, A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Schaeffer, D.

    2010-10-15

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx_equal}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultrahigh intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 50 TW) Ti:sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {mu}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {mu}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {mu}m along the laser axis.

  6. X-ray imaging of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials at the Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakins, D. E. Chapman, D. J.

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we describe a new approach enabling study of subsurface dynamics in high-Z materials using the unique combination of high-energy synchrotron X-rays, a hybrid bunch structure, and a new dynamic loading platform. We detail the design and operation of the purpose-built, portable small bore gas-gun, which was installed on the I12 high-energy beamline at the Diamond Light Source and used to drive compression waves into solid and porous metal targets. Using a hybrid bunch structure and broadband X-ray pulses of up to 300 keV, radiographic snapshots were captured during various dynamic deformation processes in cm-scale specimens, thereby contributing to a more complete understanding of the evolution of mesoscale damage. Importantly, we highlight strategies for overcoming the challenges associated with using high-energy X-rays, and suggest areas for improvement needed to advance dynamic imaging through large-scale samples of relevance to engineering scenarios. These preliminary measurements demonstrate the feasibility of probing highly transient phenomena using the presented methodology.

  7. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7?GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ?8.9?GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0}?=?132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24?GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  8. Phase transitions in heated Sr{sub 2}MgTeO{sub 6} double perovskite oxide probed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manoun, Bouchaib Tamraoui, Y.; Lazor, P.; Yang, Wenge

    2013-12-23

    Double-perovskite oxide Sr{sub 2}MgTeO{sub 6} has been synthetized, and its crystal structure was probed by the technique of X-ray diffraction at room temperature. The structure is monoclinic, space group I2/m. Temperature-induced phase transitions in this compound were investigated by Raman spectroscopy up to 550?°C. Two low-wavenumber modes corresponding to external lattice vibrations merge at temperature of around 100?°C, indicating a phase transition from the monoclinic (I2/m) to the tetragonal (I4/m) structure. At 300?°C, changes in the slopes of temperature dependencies of external and O–Te–O bending modes are detected and interpreted as a second phase transition from the tetragonal (I4/m) to the cubic (Fm-3m) structure.

  9. In-situ x-ray diffraction study of the growth of highly strained epitaxial BaTiO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinsheimer, J.; Callori, S. J.; Ziegler, B.; Bein, B.; Dawber, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Chinta, P. V.; Ashrafi, A.; Headrick, R. L. [Department of Physics, Cook Physical Science Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Cook Physical Science Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

    2013-12-09

    In-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction was performed during the growth of BaTiO{sub 3} thin films on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates using both off-axis RF magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition techniques. It was found that the films were ferroelectric during the growth process, and the presence or absence of a bottom SrRuO{sub 3} electrode played an important role in the growth of the films. Pulsed laser deposited films on SrRuO{sub 3} displayed an anomalously high tetragonality and unit volume, which may be connected to the previously predicted negative pressure phase of BaTiO{sub 3}.

  10. Magnetoelastics of a spin liquid : x-ray diffraction studies of Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} in pulsed magnetic fields.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruff, J. P. C.; Islam, Z.; Clancy, J. P.; Ross, K. A.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Dabkowska, H. A.; Dabkowski, A. D.; Gaulin, B. D.; X-Ray Science Division; McMaster Univ.; Tohoku Univ.; Univ. of Tokyo; Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research; Brockhouse Inst. for Materials Research

    2010-08-13

    We report high resolution single crystal x-ray diffraction measurements of the frustrated pyrochlore magnet Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, collected using a novel low temperature pulsed magnet system. This instrument allows characterization of structural degrees of freedom to temperatures as low as 4.4 K, and in applied magnetic fields as large as 30 T. We show that Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} manifests intriguing structural effects under the application of magnetic fields, including strongly anisotropic giant magnetostriction, a restoration of perfect pyrochlore symmetry in low magnetic fields, and ultimately a structural phase transition in high magnetic fields. It is suggested that the magnetoelastic coupling thus revealed plays a significant role in the spin liquid physics of Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} at low temperatures.

  11. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  12. Fabrication of high aspect grating using bonded substrate for X-ray refraction imaging by Talbot-Lau interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tada, Takuji; Murakoshi, Dai; Ishii, Hiroyasu; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Ito, Wataru; Agano, Toshitaka [Medical Systems Research and Development Center, R and D Management Headquarters, FUJIFILM Corp., 798, Miyanodai, Kaisei-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 258-8538 (Japan); Imaging Technology Center, R and D Management Headquarters, FUJIFILM Corp., 798, Miyanodai, Kaisei-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 258-8538 (Japan)

    2012-07-31

    In order to improve the image quality of X-ray refraction images using a Talbot-Lau interferometer, we have been attempting to fabricate gratings with high aspect ratio. In our attempt, deep grooves of grating structure were channeled on a Si substrate bonded by Au diffusion bonding method, and the grooves were filled with Au where the Au layer used for the bonding Si substrate was acting as a seed layer of Au electroplating. From the results of a visibility measurement and a cross sectional SEM image, it was confirmed that the grooves with a pitch of 5.8 {mu}m and a depth of 100 {mu}m could be successfully filled with Au over a large area of 72 Multiplication-Sign 80 mm{sup 2}. Using this grating, the X-ray refraction images for the cartilage of a knee joint of a livestock pig could be obtained where SPS method was employed for the single-shot image acquisition.

  13. Microscale electromagnetic heating in heterogeneous energetic materials based on X-ray CT imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kort-Kamp, W J M; Ionita, A; Glover, B B; Duque, A L Higginbotham; Perry, W L; Patterson, B M; Dalvit, D A R; Moore, D S

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation of energetic materials provides a noninvasive and nondestructive tool for detecting and identifying explosives. We combine structural information based on X-ray computed tomography, experimental dielectric data, and electromagnetic full-wave simulations, to study microscale electromagnetic heating of realistic three-dimensional heterogeneous explosives. We analyze the formation of electromagnetic hot spots and thermal gradients in the explosive-binder meso-structures, and compare the heating rate for various binder systems.

  14. X-ray Doppler Imaging of 44i Boo with Chandra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. S. Brickhouse; A. K. Dupree; P. R. Young

    2001-10-25

    Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating observations of the bright eclipsing contact binary 44i Boo show X-ray line profiles which are Doppler-shifted by orbital motions. The X-ray emission spectrum contains a multitude of lines superimposed on a weak continuum, with strong lines of O VIII, Ne X, Fe XVII, and Mg XII. The profiles of these lines from the total observed spectrum show Doppler-broadened widths of ~ 550 km s^{-1}. Line centroids vary with orbital phase, indicating velocity changes of > 180 km s^{-1}. The first-order light curve shows significant variability, but no clear evidence for either primary or secondary eclipses. Flares are observed for all spectral ranges; additionally, the light curve constructed near the peak of the emission measure distribution (T_e = 5 to 8 X 10^6 K) shows quiescent variability as well as flares. The phase-dependences of line profiles and light curves together imply that at least half of the emission is localized at high latitude. A simple model with two regions on the primary star at relatively high latitude reproduces the observed line profile shifts and quiescent light curve. These first clear X-ray Doppler shifts of stellar coronal material illustrate the power of Chandra.

  15. Evaluation of partial coherence correction in X-ray ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Parks, Daniel; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Kevan, Stephen D.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-02-23

    Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CDI) and X-ray ptychography both heavily rely on the high degree of spatial coherence of the X-ray illumination for sufficient experimental data quality for reconstruction convergence. Nevertheless, the majority of the available synchrotron undulator sources have a limited degree of partial coherence, leading to reduced data quality and a lower speckle contrast in the coherent diffraction patterns. It is still an open question whether experimentalists should compromise the coherence properties of an X-ray source in exchange for a higher flux density at a sample, especially when some materials of scientific interest are relatively weak scatterers. Amore »previous study has suggested that in CDI, the best strategy for the study of strong phase objects is to maintain a high degree of coherence of the illuminating X-rays because of the broadening of solution space resulting from the strong phase structures. In this article, we demonstrate the first systematic analysis of the effectiveness of partial coherence correction in ptychography as a function of the coherence properties, degree of complexity of illumination (degree of phase diversity of the probe) and sample phase complexity. We have also performed analysis of how well ptychographic algorithms refine X-ray probe and complex coherence functions when those variables are unknown at the start of reconstructions, for noise-free simulated data, in the case of both real-valued and highly-complex objects.« less

  16. X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largestX-Ray

  17. X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWind PowerX-Ray

  18. Studies of Dynamic Properties of Shock Compressed FCC Crystals by in Situ Dynamic X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldis, H.; Kalantar, D.H.; Remington, B.A.; Belak, J.; Colvin, J.; Boehly, T.R.; Meyers, M.A.; Wark, J.S.; Paisley, D.; Hollan, B.; Lomdahl, P.; German, T.

    2001-08-14

    There were 5 laser experiments conducted to date in FY-01 under the ongoing project to study the response of single crystal fcc materials under shock compression. An additional 10 laser shots are planned for August, 2001. This work has focused on developing capability to record diffraction from multiple lattice planes during the passage of a shock through a thin foil of single crystal copper, while simultaneously performing separate shock sample recovery experiments to study the residual deformation structure in the recovered samples.

  19. Structural phase transition and magnetism in hexagonal SrMnO{sub 3} by magnetization measurements and by electron, x-ray, and neutron diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daoud-Aladine, A.; Chapon, L. C.; Knight, K. S.; Martin, C.; Hervieu, M.; Brunelli, M.; Radaelli, P. G.

    2007-03-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of the hexagonal four-layer form of SrMnO{sub 3} have been investigated by combining magnetization measurements, electron diffraction, and high-resolution synchrotron x-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Below 350 K, there is subtle structural phase transition from hexagonal symmetry (space group P6{sub 3}/mmc) to orthorhombic symmetry (space group C222{sub 1}) where the hexagonal metric is preserved. The second-order phase transition involves a slight tilting of the corner-sharing Mn{sub 2}O{sub 9} units composed of two face-sharing MnO{sub 6} octahedra and the associated displacement of Sr{sup 2+} cations. The phase transition is described in terms of symmetry-adapted displacement modes of the high symmetry phase. Upon further cooling, long range magnetic order with propagation vector k=(0,0,0) sets in below 300 K. The antiferromagnetic structure, analyzed using representation theory, shows a considerably reduced magnetic moment indicating the crucial role played by direct exchange between Mn centers of the Mn{sub 2}O{sub 9} units.

  20. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging and elemental mapping from biological samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D Rao; M Swapna; R Cesareo; A Brunetti; T Akatsuka; T Yuasa; T Takeda; G Gigante

    2011-12-31

    The present study utilized the new hard X-ray microspectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS, BNL, USA, for elemental mapping. This facility provided the primary beam in a small spot of the order of {approx}10 {mu}m, for focussing. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, the synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescent intensities for Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Ti and Cu were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. The sample is scanned in a 'step-and-repeat' mode for fast elemental mapping measurements and generated elemental maps at 8, 10 and 12 keV, from a small animal shell (snail). The accumulated trace elements, from these biological samples, in small areas have been identified. Analysis of the small areas will be better suited to establish the physiology of metals in specific structures like small animal shell and the distribution of other elements.

  1. Pyroelectric crystal-based X-ray diffractometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Louis Edward

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the use of an Amptek Cool-X X-ray Generator for an instructional tool in the physics of x-rays, as well as a source for x-rays for crystal diffraction experiments. The x-ray source is a solid-state two-phase ...

  2. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Rv3708c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyas, Rajan; Panjikar, Santosh; Kishan, K. V. Radha; Tewari, Rupinder; Weiss, Manfred S.

    2008-03-01

    The enzyme aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from M. tuberculosis has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Asd, ASADH, Rv3708c), which is the second enzyme in the lysine/homoserine-biosynthetic pathways, has been expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was purified using affinity and gel-filtration chromatographic techniques and crystallized in two different crystal forms. Preliminary diffraction data analysis suggested the presence of up to four monomers in the asymmetric unit of the orthorhombic crystal form A and of one or two monomers in the cubic crystal form B.

  3. Superficial dosimetry imaging based on ?erenkov emission for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Fox, Colleen J.; Pogue, Brian W.; Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766; Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: ?erenkov radiation emission occurs in all tissue, when charged particles (either primary or secondary) travel at velocity above the threshold for the ?erenkov effect (about 220 KeV in tissue for electrons). This study presents the first examination of optical ?erenkov emission as a surrogate for the absorbed superficial dose for MV x-ray beams.Methods: In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of flat and curved surfaces were studied to analyze the energy spectra of charged particles produced in different regions near the surfaces when irradiated by MV x-ray beams. ?erenkov emission intensity and radiation dose were directly simulated in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms. The sampling region of superficial dosimetry based on ?erenkov radiation was simulated in layered skin models. Angular distributions of optical emission from the surfaces were investigated. Tissue mimicking phantoms with flat and curved surfaces were imaged with a time domain gating system. The beam field sizes (50 × 50–200 × 200 mm{sup 2}), incident angles (0°–70°) and imaging regions were all varied.Results: The entrance or exit region of the tissue has nearly homogeneous energy spectra across the beam, such that their ?erenkov emission is proportional to dose. Directly simulated local intensity of ?erenkov and radiation dose in voxelized flat and cylindrical phantoms further validate that this signal is proportional to radiation dose with absolute average discrepancy within 2%, and the largest within 5% typically at the beam edges. The effective sampling depth could be tuned from near 0 up to 6 mm by spectral filtering. The angular profiles near the theoretical Lambertian emission distribution for a perfect diffusive medium, suggesting that angular correction of ?erenkov images may not be required even for curved surface. The acquisition speed and signal to noise ratio of the time domain gating system were investigated for different acquisition procedures, and the results show there is good potential for real-time superficial dose monitoring. Dose imaging under normal ambient room lighting was validated, using gated detection and a breast phantom.Conclusions: This study indicates that ?erenkov emission imaging might provide a valuable way to superficial dosimetry imaging in real time for external beam radiotherapy with megavoltage x-ray beams.

  4. Broadband diffractive lens or imaging element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Hawryluk, A.M.; London, R.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1993-10-26

    A broadband diffractive lens or imaging element produces a sharp focus and/or a high resolution image with broad bandwidth illuminating radiation. The diffractive lens is sectored or segmented into regions, each of which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length. Alternatively, a serial stack of minus filters, each with a diffraction pattern which focuses or images a distinct narrowband of radiation but all of which have a common focal length, is used. The two approaches can be combined. Multifocal broadband diffractive elements can also be formed. Thin film embodiments are described. 21 figures.

  5. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction study of ultra-fast structural dynamics in laser-excited solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    bent Si (311)-crystal to form a monochromatic, 1:1 image of the plasma that was generated-ray pulse width of about (300 ± 50) fs. 3. Transient Thermo-Acoustic Effects Additional insight

  6. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the histone chaperone cia1 from fission yeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umehara, Takashi; Otta, Yumi; Tsuganezawa, Keiko; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Tanaka, Akiko; Horikoshi, Masami; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2005-11-01

    The histone chaperone cia1 from fission yeast has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. In fission yeast, cia1{sup +} is an essential gene that encodes a histone chaperone, a homologue of human CIA (CCG1-interacting factor A) and budding yeast Asf1p (anti-silencing function-1), which both facilitate nucleosome assembly by interacting with the core histones H3/H4. The conserved domain (residues 1–161) of the cia1{sup +}-encoded protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to near-homogeneity and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The protein was crystallized in the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 79.16, b = 40.53, c = 69.79 Å, ? = 115.93° and one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystal diffracted to beyond 2.10 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  7. Monochromatic x-ray imaging experiments on the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinars, D.B.; Bennett, G.R.; Wenger, D.F.; Cuneo, M.E.; Hanson, D.L.; Porter, J.L.; Adams, R.G.; Rambo, P.K.; Rovang, D.C.; Smith, I.C.

    2004-10-01

    The Z facility is a 20 MA, 100 ns rise time, pulsed power driver for z-pinch plasma radiation sources. The Z facility can make >200 TW, 1-2 MJ, near-blackbody radiation sources through the compression of cylindrical wire arrays. These sources are being used as drivers to study inertial-confinement fusion capsule implosions, complex radiation-hydrodynamic jet experiments, and wire-array z-pinch physics tests. To backlight plasmas in this environment we have built diagnostics based on spherically bent crystals that provide high spatial resolution (9-10 {mu}m), a narrow spectral bandpass (<0.5 eV), and a large field of view (4 mmx20 mm). These diagnostics use the 2 TW, multi-kJ Z-Beamlet laser to produce x-ray emission sources at 1.865 or 6.151 keV for backlighting.

  8. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) from Oryza sativa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, Tracy; Krol, Adam; Campanaro, Danielle; Malkowski, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The heme-containing membrane-associated fatty-acid ?-dioxygenase pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) from O. sativa has been crystallized and a data set collected to 3.0 Å using a rotating-anode generator and R-AXIS IV detector. Pathogen-inducible oxygenase (PIOX) is a heme-containing membrane-associated protein found in monocotyledon and dicotyledon plants that utilizes molecular oxygen to convert polyunsaturated fatty acids into their corresponding 2R-hydroperoxides. PIOX is a member of a larger family of fatty-acid ?-dioxygenases that includes the mammalian cyclooxygenase enzymes cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (COX-1 and COX-2). Single crystals of PIOX from rice (Oryza sativa) have been grown from MPD using recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently extracted utilizing decyl maltoside as the solubilizing detergent. Crystals diffract to 3.0 Å resolution using a rotating-anode generator and R-AXIS IV detector, and belong to space group P1. Based on the Matthews coefficient and self-rotation function analyses, there are presumed to be four molecules in the asymmetric unit related by noncrystallographic 222 symmetry.

  9. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  10. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 03: A novel ?erenkov detector based on air-spaced light guiding taper for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teymurazyan, A; Rowlands, J A; Pang, G

    2014-08-15

    Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) have been used in radiation therapy and are still needed on linear accelerators (Linacs) equipped with kilovoltage cone beam CT (kV-CBCT) or MRI systems. Recently a new concept of a high quantum efficiency (QE) ?erenkov Portal Imaging Device (CPID) for MV x-ray imaging in radiation therapy was introduced. It relies on ?erenkov effect for x-ray detection. The proposed design consisted of a matrix of optical fibres aligned with the incident x-rays and coupled to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. A weakness of such design is that too few ?erenkov light photons reach the AMFPI for each incident x-ray and an AMFPI with an avalanche gain is required. In this work we propose to replace the optical fibers in the CPID with light guides without a cladding layer that are suspended in air. The air between the light guides takes on the role of the cladding layer found in a regular optical fiber. Since air has a significantly lower refractive index, a much superior light collection efficiency is achieved. Our Monte Carlo studies have shown that the modified new CPID has a QE more than an order of magnitude greater than that of current clinical systems and yet a spatial resolution similar to that of current flat-panel based EPIDs. Furthermore it has been demonstrated that the new CPID does not require an avalanche gain in the AMFPI and is quantum noise limited at dose levels corresponding to a single Linac pulse.

  11. Development of a diffraction imaging flow cytometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , of the laminar flow and the sheath fluid usually has a large curvature and refrac- tive index difference. Often morphology of a particle. We present a jet-in-fluid design of flow chamber for acquisition of clear diffraction images in a laminar flow. Diffraction images of polystyrene spheres of different diameters were

  12. Effects of Fresnel fringes on TEM images of interfaces in X-ray multil ayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Tai D.; O'Keefe, Michael A.; Kilaas, Roar; Gronsky, Ronald; Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    1992-01-01

    and J.B. Kortright, Fresnel Fringe Effects at Interfaces ofand T.F. Page, A TEM Fresnel Diffraction-Based Method forW/Si Multilayers Using The Fresnel Method, Ultramicroscopy

  13. In-situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction study of the growth of CuO nanowires by annealing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Deb, S. K.; Sant, Tushar; Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2013-10-14

    The in-situ growth of CuO nanowires was studied by Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to observe the mechanism of growth. The study was carried out for comparison at two temperatures—at 500 °C, the optimum temperature of the nanowires growth, and at 300 °C just below the temperature range of the growth. The in situ observation revealed the successive oxidation of Cu foil to Cu{sub 2}O layer and finally to CuO layer. Further analysis showed the presence of a compressive stress in CuO layer due to interface at CuO and Cu{sub 2}O layers. The compressive stress was found to increase with the growth of the nanowires at 500 °C while it relaxed with the growth of CuO layer at 300 °C. The present results do not support the existing model of stress relaxation induced growth of nanowires. Based on the detailed Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, and EDXRD results, a microstructure based growth model has been suggested.

  14. Obtaining aluminas from the thermal decomposition of their different precursors: An {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and X-ray powder diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chagas, L.H.; De Carvalho, G.S.G.; San Gil, R.A.S.; Chiaro, S.S.X.; Leitão, A.A.; Diniz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We synthesized three precursors of alumina from different methods. • The calcination of the precursors generated several alumina polymorphs. • XRD and NMR were used for structural investigation of the polymorphs. • The synthesis route determines the structural and textural properties of the solids. - Abstract: A commercial sample of Boehmite was used as precursor of alumina polymorphs. For comparison, three other precursors were synthesized from different methods. Particularly, the use of excess of urea promoted a very crystalline form of basic aluminum carbonate. The characteristics of the four precursors were investigated by thermal, vibrational and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis. Additionally, the nuclear magnetic resonance, with magic angle spinning ({sup 27}Al MAS NMR), was used to verify the coordination of aluminum cations. Each precursor was calcined at various temperatures generating alumina polymorphs, which were structurally analyzed by XRD and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR. Due to interest in catalysis supports, special attention was given to the ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase, which in addition to structural investigation was subjected to textural analysis. The results showed that, from different synthesis procedures and common route of calcination, one can obtain materials with the same composition but with different structural and textural properties, which in turn can significantly influence the performance of a supported catalyst.

  15. Synthesis, X-ray diffraction study and physico-chemical characterizations of KLaP{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belam, W. Mechergui, J.

    2008-08-04

    Crystals of KLaP{sub 4}O{sub 12} have been synthesized by flux technique and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This material crystallizes in the orthorhombic Cmc2{sub 1} space group with lattice parameters: a = 8.547(3) A, b = 11.668(1) A, c = 13.351(2) A, V = 1331.4(5) A{sup 3} and Z = 4. The crystal structure has been refined yielding a final R(F) = 0.015 and wR(F{sup 2})=0.039 for 1303 independent reflections. The three-dimensional framework with intersecting tunnels of KLaP{sub 4}O{sub 12} can be regarded as a succession of alternated [P{sub 4}O{sub 12}]{sup 4-} anionic and K{sup +}, La{sup 3+} cationic layers parallel to the (a and b) plane which are centered by the planes z = 0, 1/2 and 1/4, 3/4, respectively. The title compound has been also characterized by different physico-chemical techniques: IR, NMR and CI spectroscopies and DTA-TGA-DSC thermal analysis.

  16. Direct observation of intrinsic piezoelectricity of Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} by time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurement using single-crystalline films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, Takashi; Ehara, Yoshitaka; Yasui, Shintaro; Kamo, Takafumi; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tomoaki; Sakata, Osami

    2014-07-07

    Lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} or PZT, is one of the most widely investigated ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials due to its superior properties. However, the intrinsic properties of PZT have not been directly measured due to the lack of fabrication of single crystals even though a basic understanding of intrinsic properties has been of interest developing lead-free piezoelectric materials. We demonstrated the direct observation of the intrinsic piezoelectric property by means of the detection of electric-field induced crystal lattice distortion of thick Pb(Zr{sub 0.35}Ti{sub 0.65})O{sub 3} single-crystalline films with single polar-axis orientation and negligible residual strain using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) together with the polarization response. Consequently, the effective converse piezoelectric response was experimentally revealed; hence, the electrostrictive coefficient, which is the conversion coefficient between the electrical and mechanical response, was determined. The obtained effective electrostrictive coefficient was 5.2–6.3?×?10{sup ?2} m{sup 4}/C{sup 2}, which agrees with theoretical prediction.

  17. Phase formation sequences in the silicon-phosphorous system : determined by in-situ synchrotron andj conventional x-ray diffraction measurements and predicted by a theoretical model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsson, J. R. A.; Clevenger, L.; Madsen, L. D.; Hultman, L.; Li, X.-H.; Jordan-Sweet, J.; Lavoie, C.; Roy, R. A.; Cabral, C., Jr.; Morales, G.; Ludwig, K. L.; Stephenson, G. B.; Hentzell, H. T. G.; Materials Science Division; Linkoeping Univ.; IBM T. J. Watson Research Center; Boston Univ.

    1997-01-01

    The phase formation sequences of Si-P alloy thin films with P concentrations between 20 and 44 at. % have been studied. The samples were annealed at progressively higher temperatures and the newly formed phases were identified both after each annealing step by ex-situ conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) and continuously by in-situ synchrotron XRD. It was found that Si was the only phase to form in a sample with 20 at.% P since the evaporation of P at the crystallization temperature prevented phosphides from forming. For a sample with 30at.% P, the Si{sub 12}P{sub 5} phase formed prior to the SiP phase. For samples with 35 and 44at.%P, the formation of SiP preceded the formation of the Si{sub 12}P{sub 5} phase. The experimentally determined phase formation sequences were successfully predicted by a proposed model. According to the model, the first and second crystalline phases to form are those with the lowest and next-lowest crystallization temperatures of the competing compounds predicted by the Gibbs free-energy diagram.

  18. Upgraded high time-resolved x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy system for J-TEXT ohmic plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Huang, D. W.; Li, Q. L.; Yan, W.; Luo, Y. H.; Huang, Y. H.; Tong, R. H.; Yang, Z. J.; Rao, B.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents the upgraded x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) system on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) tokamak and the latest experimental results obtained in last campaign. With 500 Hz frame rate of the new Pilatus detector and 5 cm × 10 cm spherically bent crystal, the XICS system can provide core electron temperature (T{sub e}), core ion temperature (T{sub i}), and plasma toroidal rotation (V{sub ?}) with a maximum temporal resolution of 2 ms for J-TEXT pure ohmic plasmas. These parameters with high temporal resolution are very useful in tokamak plasma research, especially for rapidly changed physical processes. The experimental results from the upgraded XICS system are presented.

  19. 3D tumor localization through real-time volumetric x-ray imaging for lung cancer radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijiang; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Folkerts, Michael; Men, Chunhua; Song, William Y; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Recently we have developed an algorithm for reconstructing volumetric images and extracting 3D tumor motion information from a single x-ray projection. We have demonstrated its feasibility using a digital respiratory phantom with regular breathing patterns. In this work, we present a detailed description and a comprehensive evaluation of the improved algorithm. The algorithm was improved by incorporating respiratory motion prediction. The accuracy and efficiency were then evaluated on 1) a digital respiratory phantom, 2) a physical respiratory phantom, and 3) five lung cancer patients. These evaluation cases include both regular and irregular breathing patterns that are different from the training dataset. For the digital respiratory phantom with regular and irregular breathing, the average 3D tumor localization error is less than 1 mm. On an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card, the average computation time for 3D tumor localization from each projection ranges between 0.19 and 0.26 seconds, for both regular and irreg...

  20. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D X-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Labate; P. Koester; T. Levato; L. A. Gizzi

    2012-11-02

    A novel X-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any X-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named Energy-encoded Pinhole Camera - EPiC) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available X-ray spectral domain is only limited by the Quantum Efficiency of scientific-grade X-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any X-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent ICF related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  1. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D X-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the Inertial Confinement Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labate, L; Levato, T; Gizzi, L A

    2012-01-01

    A novel X-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any X-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named Energy-encoded Pinhole Camera - EPiC) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available X-ray spectral domain is only limited by the Quantum Efficiency of scientific-grade X-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any X-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent ICF related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  2. A novel technique for single-shot energy-resolved 2D x-ray imaging of plasmas relevant for the inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labate, L.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pisa (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    A novel x-ray diagnostic of laser-fusion plasmas is described, allowing 2D monochromatic images of hot, dense plasmas to be obtained in any x-ray photon energy range, over a large domain, on a single-shot basis. The device (named energy-encoded pinhole camera) is based upon the use of an array of many pinholes coupled to a large area CCD camera operating in the single-photon mode. The available x-ray spectral domain is only limited by the quantum efficiency of scientific-grade x-ray CCD cameras, thus extending from a few keV up to a few tens of keV. Spectral 2D images of the emitting plasma can be obtained at any x-ray photon energy provided that a sufficient number of photons had been collected at the desired energy. Results from recent inertial confinement fusion related experiments will be reported in order to detail the new diagnostic.

  3. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  4. A theoretical comparison of x-ray angiographic image quality using energy-dependent and conventional subtraction methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is widely used for vascular imaging. However, the need to subtract a mask image can result in motion artifacts and compromised image quality. The current interest in energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors offers the promise of eliminating motion artifacts and other advanced applications using a single exposure. The authors describe a method of assessing the iodine signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that may be achieved with energy-resolved angiography (ERA) to enable a direct comparison with other approaches including DSA and dual-energy angiography for the same patient exposure. Methods: A linearized noise-propagation approach, combined with linear expressions of dual-energy and energy-resolved imaging, is used to describe the iodine SNR. The results were validated by a Monte Carlo calculation for all three approaches and compared visually for dual-energy and DSA imaging using a simple angiographic phantom with a CsI-based flat-panel detector. Results: The linearized SNR calculations show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results. While dual-energy methods require an increased tube heat load of 2x to 4x compared to DSA, and photon-counting detectors are not yet ready for angiographic imaging, the available iodine SNR for both methods as tested is within 10% of that of conventional DSA for the same patient exposure over a wide range of patient thicknesses and iodine concentrations. Conclusions: While the energy-based methods are not necessarily optimized and further improvements are likely, the linearized noise-propagation analysis provides the theoretical framework of a level playing field for optimization studies and comparison with conventional DSA. It is concluded that both dual-energy and photon-counting approaches have the potential to provide similar angiographic image quality to DSA.

  5. Radiation damage in a micron-sized protein crystal studied via reciprocal space mapping and Bragg coherent diffractive imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlan, H. D.; Darmanin, C.; Phillips, N. W.; Hofmann, F.; Clark, J. N.; Harder, R. J.; Vine, D. J.; Abbey, B.

    2015-04-29

    For laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray sources, radiation damage has posed a significant barrier to obtaining high-resolution structural data from biological macromolecules. The problem is particularly acute for micron-sized crystals where the weaker signal often necessitates the use of higher intensity beams to obtain the relevant data. Here, we employ a combination of techniques, including Bragg coherent diffractive imaging to characterise the radiation induced damage in a micron-sized protein crystal over time. The approach we adopt here could help screen for potential protein crystal candidates for measurement at X-ray free election laser sources.

  6. Hidden Superlattice in Tl2(SC6H4S) and Tl2(SeC6H4Se) Solved from Powder X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K Stone; D Turner; M Singh; T Vaid; P Stephens

    2011-12-31

    The crystal structures of the isostructural title compounds poly[({mu}-benzene-1,4-dithiolato)dithallium], Tl{sub 2}(SC{sub 6}H{sub 4}S), and poly[({mu}-benzene-1,4-diselenolato)dithallium], Tl{sub 2}(SeC{sub 6}H{sub 4}Se), were solved by simulated annealing from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. Rietveld refinements of an initial structure with one formula unit per triclinic cell gave satisfactory agreement with the data, but led to a structure with impossibly close non-bonded contacts. A disordered model was proposed to alleviate this problem, but an alternative supercell structure leads to slightly improved agreement with the data. The isostructural superlattice structures were confirmed for both compounds through additional data collection, with substantially better counting statistics, which revealed the presence of very weak superlattice peaks not previously seen. Overall, each structure contains Tl-S or Tl-Se two-dimensional networks, connected by phenylene bridges. The sulfur (or selenium) coordination sphere around each thallium is a highly distorted square pyramid or a 'see-saw' shape, depending upon how many Tl-S or Tl-Se interactions are considered to be bonds. In addition, the two compounds contain pairs of Tl{sup I} ions that interact through a closed-shell 'thallophilic' interaction: in the sulfur compound there are two inequivalent pairs of Tl atoms with Tl-Tl distances of 3.49 and 3.58 {angstrom}, while in the selenium compound those Tl-Tl interactions are at 3.54 and 3.63 {angstrom}.

  7. Cation Movements during Dehydration and NO2 Desorption in a Ba-Y,FAU zeolite: an in situ Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xianqin; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-02-28

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and Rietveld analysis were used to probe the interactions between BaY, FAU zeolite frameworks and H2O or NO2 molecules. These results provided information about the migration of the Ba2+ cations in the zeolite framework during dehydration and during NO2 adsorption/desorption processes in a water free zeolite. In the hydrated structure water molecules form four double rings of hexagonal ice-like clusters [(H2O)6] in the 12-ring openings of the super-cage. These water rings interacted with the cations and the zeolite framework through four cation/water clusters centered over the four 6-membered rings of the super-cage (site II). Interpenetrating tetrahedral water clusters [(H2O)4] and tetrahedral Ba+2 cation clusters were observed in the sodalite cage. Consistent with the reported FT-IR results, three different ionic NOx species (NO+, NO+-NO2, and NO3-) were observed following NO2 adsorption by the dehydrated Ba-Y,FAU zeolite. The structure of the water and the NOx species were correlated with the interactions between the adsorbates, the cations, and the framework. The population of Ba2+ ions at different cationic positions strongly depended on the amount of bound water or NOx species. Both dehydration and NO2 adsorption/desorption resulted in facile migration of Ba2+ ions among the different cationic positions. Data obtained in this work have provided direct evidence for the Ba2+ cation migration to accommodate the binding of gas molecules. This important feature may play a pivotal role in the strong binding of NO2 to Ba-Y,FAU zeolite, a prerequisite for high catalytic activity in lean NOx reduction catalysis.

  8. Spectroscopic and X-ray diffraction investigation of the behavior of hanksite and tychite at high pressures, and a model for the compressibility of sulfate minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palaich, SEM; Manning, CE; Schauble, E; Kavner, A

    2013-01-01

    Physics and Chemistry of Minerals, 37, 5, 265–282. Chen,and Smith, G.I. (1965) Mineral equilibria in the Searlesstudy of the behavior of mineral barite by X?ray dif-

  9. Capabilities and limitations of Phase Contrast Imaging techniques with X-rays and neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damato, Antonio Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) was studied with the goal of understanding its relevance and its requirements. Current literature does not provide insight on the effect of a relaxation in coherence requirements on the PCI ...

  10. X-ray imaging with grazing-incidence microscopes developed for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    on the Laser MegaJoule facility P. A. Holstein et al., Laser Part. Beams 17, 403 (1999) (1.8 MJ) which is under construction. Two eight-image Kirkpatrick-Baez...

  11. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    , STEFANO MARCHESINI1,2 , BRUCE W. WOODS1 , SASA BAJT1 , W. HENRY BENNER1 , RICHARD A. LONDON1,2 , ELKE PL Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park

  12. Patent: High resolution x-ray and gamma ray imaging using diffraction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall Reactor for Deep SpaceConditioningprimary aminolenses

  13. Femtosecond diffractive imaging with a soft-X-ray free-electron laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtransScientificEnergyBattlefieldFemtosecond

  14. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hui E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M. E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W.; Kerr, S.

    2014-11-15

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  15. Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImagingImaging

  16. X-ray phase-contrast CO angiography for sub-10 m vessel imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation dose. In this paper we further investigate the potential and limitations of this method times less radiation dose than conventional iodine-based absorption contrast for observing sub-50 m (Lundstr¨om et al 2012). In this paper we demonstrate such low-dose imaging of microvasculature down to 8 m

  17. Computers & Geosciences 29 (2003) 823836 Image optimization and analysis of synchrotron X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorne, Michael

    2003-01-01

    algorithms for digital image optimization and three-dimensional analysis of porosity, pore connectivity, and pore structure within a CmT volume. The algorithm Tomo optimize optimizes digital data by utilizing a series of matrix filters and contrast transforms. Tomo classify labels individual voxels within the data

  18. Multi-Material Decomposition Using Statistical Image Reconstruction in X-Ray CT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    propose a penalized- likelihood (PL) method with edge-preserving regularizers for each material image reconstruction I. INTRODUCTION Dual-energy (DE) CT reconstruction methods typically re- construct. It obtains a dual-material-density pair through projection-based decomposition approach from DECT

  19. X-ray Astronomy with CCDs: Calibration of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    efficiency of CCDs used as ref- erence standards for ACIS characterization. I also discuss a novel "mesh Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), one of the two primary focal plane instruments on the Chandra X inside certain regions of the ACIS detectors. Guided by the results of the mesh experiments, I performed

  20. X-ray Astronomy with CCDs: Calibration of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Æciency of CCDs used as ref- erence standards for ACIS characterization. I also discuss a novel \\mesh" technique I of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), one of the two primary focal plane instruments on the Chandra X certain regions of the ACIS detectors. Guided by the results of the mesh experiments, I performed

  1. Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHusseinSOLICWfATION/MODIFICATlON OFMA!n!NEZ9,036,866Imaging

  2. Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging PrintIMGImaging

  3. Imaging Antifungal Drug Molecules in Action using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,PrincipalIdahoImaging

  4. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells

  5. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of Whole Biological

  6. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of Whole BiologicalLensless

  7. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp GraduateResidentialLensless Imaging of Whole

  8. Lensless Imaging of Whole Biological Cells with Soft X-Rays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E C H N I C AFAQLensless4Lensless Imaging

  9. Detection of melting by X-ray imaging at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Li; Weidner, Donald J.

    2014-06-15

    The occurrence of partial melting at elevated pressure and temperature is documented in real time through measurement of volume strain induced by a fixed temperature change. Here we present the methodology for measuring volume strains to one part in 10{sup ?4} for mm{sup 3} sized samples in situ as a function of time during a step in temperature. By calibrating the system for sample thermal expansion at temperatures lower than the solidus, the onset of melting can be detected when the melting volume increase is of comparable size to the thermal expansion induced volume change. We illustrate this technique with a peridotite sample at 1.5 GPa during partial melting. The Re capsule is imaged with a CCD camera at 20 frames/s. Temperature steps of 100 K induce volume strains that triple with melting. The analysis relies on image comparison for strain determination and the thermal inertia of the sample is clearly seen in the time history of the volume strain. Coupled with a thermodynamic model of the melting, we infer that we identify melting with 2 vol.% melting.

  10. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-01-29

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1 MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and uclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  11. Development of a High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Measurement of Ion-Temperature and Rotation-Velocity Profiles in Fusion Energy Research Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, K W; Broennimann, Ch; Eikenberry, E F; Ince-Cushman, A; Lee, S G; Rice, J E; Scott, S

    2008-02-27

    A new imaging high resolution x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) has been developed to measure continuous profiles of ion temperature and rotation velocity in fusion plasmas. Following proof-of-principle tests on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak and the NSTX spherical tokamak, and successful testing of a new silicon, pixilated detector with 1MHz count rate capability per pixel, an imaging XCS is being designed to measure full profiles of Ti and v? on C-Mod. The imaging XCS design has also been adopted for ITER. Ion-temperature uncertainty and minimum measurable rotation velocity are calculated for the C-Mod spectrometer. The affects of x-ray and nuclear-radiation background on the measurement uncertainties are calculated to predict performance on ITER.

  12. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  13. X-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowicz, A.A.; Van Grieken, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    In the period under review, i.e, through 1984 and 1985, some 600 articles on XRS (X-ray spectrometry) were published; most of these have been scanned and the most fundamental ones are discussed. All references will refer to English-language articles, unless states otherwise. Also general books have appeared on quantitative EPXMA (electron-probe X-ray microanalysis) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) as well as an extensive review on the application of XRS to trace analysis of environmental samples. In the period under review no radically new developments have been seen in XRS. However, significant improvements have been made. Gain in intensities has been achieved by more efficient excitation, higher reflectivity of dispersing media, and better geometry. Better understanding of the physical process of photon- and electron-specimen interactions led to complex but more accurate equations for correction of various interelement effects. Extensive use of micro- and minicomputers now enables fully automatic operation, including qualitative analysis. However, sample preparation and presentation still put a limit to further progress. Although some authors find XRS in the phase of stabilization or even stagnation, further gradual developments are expected, particularly toward more dedicated equipment, advanced automation, and image analysis systems. Ways are outlined in which XRS has been improved in the 2 last years by excitation, detection, instrumental, methodological, and theoretical advances. 340 references.

  14. Real-time volumetric image reconstruction and 3D tumor localization based on a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H; Gu, Xuejun; Folkerts, Michael; Men, Chunhua; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an algorithm for real-time volumetric image reconstruction and 3D tumor localization based on a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Given a set of volumetric images of a patient at N breathing phases as the training data, we perform deformable image registration between a reference phase and the other N-1 phases, resulting in N-1 deformation vector fields (DVFs). These DVFs can be represented efficiently by a few eigenvectors and coefficients obtained from principal component analysis (PCA). By varying the PCA coefficients, we can generate new DVFs, which, when applied on the reference image, lead to new volumetric images. We then can reconstruct a volumetric image from a single projection image by optimizing the PCA coefficients such that its computed projection matches the measured one. The 3D location of the tumor can be derived by applying the inverted DVF on its position in the reference image. Our algorithm was implemented on graphics processing units...

  15. Sensing the wavefront of x-ray free-electron lasers using aerosol spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, N.Duane; Starodub, Dimitri; Lomb, Lukas; Hampton, Christina Y.; Martin, Andrew V.; Sierra, Raymond G.; Barty, Anton; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Rudek, Benedikt; Foucar, Lutz

    2014-04-22

    Characterizing intense, focused x-ray free electron laser (FEL) pulses is crucial for their use in diffractive imaging. We describe how the distribution of average phase tilts and intensities on hard x-ray pulses with peak intensities of 10 21 W/m2 can be retrieved from an ensemble of diffraction patterns produced by 70 nm-radius polystyrene spheres, in a manner that mimics wave-front sensors. Besides showing that an adaptive geometric correction may be necessary for diffraction data from randomly injected sample sources, the paper demonstrates the possibility of collecting statistics on structured pulses using only the diffraction patterns they generate and highlights the imperative to study its impact on single-particle diffractive imaging.

  16. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  17. Structure of a B{sub 6}-like phase formed from bent-core liquid crystals determined by microbeam x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Sungmin; Tokita, Masatoshi; Takanishi, Yoichi; Takezoe, Hideo; Watanabe, Junji

    2007-10-15

    We studied the structure of the B{sub x} phase formed from the short terminal homolog, 1,3-(4-bromobenzene) bis[4-(4-n-butoxyphenylliminomethyl)benzoate] (4Br-P-4-O-PIMB), by focusing a microbeam of x ray on the well-developed fan-shaped texture. From the highly oriented x-ray patterns detected at the two states of DC-ON and DC-OFF, the B{sub x} structure was definitely illustrated. It is a kind of frustrated one similar to the B{sub 1} phase: the molecules lie perpendicularly to the layer, and the frustration takes place perpendicularly to the bent direction. Unlike in the B{sub 1} phase, however, the size of the resulting antidomain is not definite, but fluctuates from position to position as observed in the B{sub 6} phase.

  18. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loo Jr., Billy W.

    2000-06-09

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  19. Application of PILATUS II Detector Modules for High Resolution X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Bitter, Ch. Borennimann, E.F. Eikenberry, K.W. Hill, A. Ince-Chushman, S.G. Lee, J.E. Rice, and S. Scott.

    2007-07-23

    A new type of X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for Doppler measurements of the radial profiles of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity in tokamak plasmas is presently being developed in a collaboration between various laboratories. The spectrometer will consist of a spherically bent crystal and a two-dimensional position sensitive detector; and it will record temporally and spatially resolved X-ray line spectra from highly-charged ions. The detector must satisfy challenging requirements with respect to count rate and spatial resolution. The paper presents the results from a recent test of a PILATUS II detector module on Alcator C-Mod, which demonstrate that the PILATUS II detector modules will satisfy these requirements.

  20. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5?lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5?lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52?mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V?s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup ?13} A) and OPD (<10{sup ?8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75??m pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ?10?lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50??m. Moreover, the detector entrance exposure per projection can be reduced from 1 to 0.3 mR without a significant reduction of DQE. The signal-to-noise ratio of the a-IGZO APS imager under 0.3 mR x-ray exposure is comparable to that of a-Si:H passive pixel sensor imager under 1 mR, indicating good image quality under low dose. A threefold reduction of current tomosynthesis dose is expected if proposed technology is combined with an advanced DBT image reconstruction method. Conclusions: The proposed a-IGZO APS x-ray imager with a pixel pitch <75??m is capable to achieve a high spatial frequency (>6.67 lp/mm) and a low dose (<0.4 mGy) in next generation DBT systems.

  1. Chest x-Rays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The B-reading is a special reading of a standard chest x-ray film performed by a physician certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The reading looks for changes on the chest x-ray that may indicate exposure and disease caused by agents such as asbestos or silica.

  2. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  3. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  4. Comparison of the TIP4P-2005, SWM4-DP and BK3 interaction potentials of liquid water with respect to their consistency with neutron and X-ray diffraction data of pure water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Steinczinger; L. Pusztai

    2013-12-16

    Following a fairly comprehensive study on popular interaction potentials of water (Pusztai et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2008, 129, 184103), here two more recent polarizable potential sets, SWM4-DP (Lamoureux et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 2006, 418, 245) and BK3 (Kiss et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 138, 204507) are compared to the TIP4P-2005 water potential (Abascal et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 234505) that had previously appeared to be most favoravble. The basis of comparison was the compatibility with the results of neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments on pure water, using the scheme applied by Pusztai et al. (2008). The scheme combines the experimental total scattering structure factors (TSSF) and partial radial distribution functions (PRDF) from molecular dynamics simulations in a single structural model. Goodness-of-fit values to the O-O, O-H and H-H simulated PRDF-s and to the experimental neutron and X-ray TSSF provided a measure that can characterize the level of consistency between interaction potentials and diffraction experiments. Among the sets of partial RDF-s investigated here, the ones corresponding to the SWM4-DP potential parameters have proven to be the most consistent with the particular diffraction results taken for the present study, by a hardly significant margin ahead of BK3. Perhaps more importantly, it is shown that the three sets of potential parameters produce nearly equivalent PRDF-s that may all be made consistent with diffraction data at a very high level. The largest differences can be detected in terms of the O-O partial radial distribution function.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of a quantum noise limited ?erenkov detector based on air-spaced light guiding taper for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teymurazyan, A.; Rowlands, J. A.; Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute , Thunder Bay P7A 7T1; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3E2 ; Pang, G.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) have been widely used in radiation therapy and are still needed on linear accelerators (Linacs) equipped with kilovoltage cone beam CT (kV-CBCT) or MRI systems. Our aim is to develop a new high quantum efficiency (QE) ?erenkov Portal Imaging Device (CPID) that is quantum noise limited at dose levels corresponding to a single Linac pulse. Methods: Recently a new concept of CPID for MV x-ray imaging in radiation therapy was introduced. It relies on ?erenkov effect for x-ray detection. The proposed design consisted of a matrix of optical fibers aligned with the incident x-rays and coupled to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. A weakness of such design is that too few ?erenkov light photons reach the AMFPI for each incident x-ray and an AMFPI with an avalanche gain is required in order to overcome the readout noise for portal imaging application. In this work the authors propose to replace the optical fibers in the CPID with light guides without a cladding layer that are suspended in air. The air between the light guides takes on the role of the cladding layer found in a regular optical fiber. Since air has a significantly lower refractive index (?1 versus 1.38 in a typical cladding layer), a much superior light collection efficiency is achieved. Results: A Monte Carlo simulation of the new design has been conducted to investigate its feasibility. Detector quantities such as quantum efficiency (QE), spatial resolution (MTF), and frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency (DQE) have been evaluated. The detector signal and the quantum noise have been compared to the readout noise. Conclusions: Our studies show that the modified new CPID has a QE and DQE more than an order of magnitude greater than that of current clinical systems and yet a spatial resolution similar to that of current low-QE flat-panel based EPIDs. Furthermore it was demonstrated that the new CPID does not require an avalanche gain in the AMFPI and is quantum noise limited at dose levels corresponding to a single Linac pulse.

  6. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shin Mihye [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bennett, N. Robert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also evaluated to determine its stability during acceleration, and a pulse width modulation algorithm was implemented to control the rotation speed of the motor. Results: At a magnetic flux density of 41 mT orthogonal to the axis of rotation (on the lower end of the expected flux density in the MR suite) the maximum speed of the motor was found to be 5150 revolutions per minute (rpm). The acceleration time necessary to reach 3000 rpm was found to be approximately 10 s at 59 mT. The resonance frequency of the assembly with the anode attached was 1310 rpm (21.8 Hz) which is far below the desired operating speeds. Pulse width modulation provides an effective method to control the speed of the motor with a resolution of 100 rpm. Conclusions: The proposed design can serve as a direct replacement to the conventional induction motor used in rotating anode x-ray tubes. It does not suffer from a reduced rotation speed when operating in a MR environment. The presence of chromic steel bearings in the prototype prevented testing at the higher field strengths, and future iterations of the design could eliminate this shortcoming. The prototype assembly demonstrates proof of concept of the authors' design and overcomes one of the major obstacles for a MR compatible rotating anode x-ray tube.

  7. X-ray laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  8. Measuring the depth profiles of strain/composition in AlGaN-graded layer by high-resolution x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchuk, A. V.; Stanchu, H. V.; Kladko, V. P.; Belyaev, A. E.; Li, Chen; Ware, M. E.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Salamo, G. J.

    2014-12-14

    Here, we demonstrate X-ray fitting through kinematical simulations of the intensity profiles of symmetric reflections for epitaxial compositionally graded layers of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy pseudomorphically on [0001]-oriented GaN substrates. These detailed simulations depict obvious differences between changes in thickness, maximum concentration, and concentration profile of the graded layers. Through comparison of these simulations with as-grown samples, we can reliably determine these parameters, most important of which are the profiles of the concentration and strain which determine much of the electrical properties of the film. In addition to learning about these parameters for the characterization of thin film properties, these fitting techniques create opportunities to calibrate growth rates and control composition profiles of AlGaN layers with a single growth rather than multiple growths as has been done traditionally.

  9. Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salah, Wa'el; Sanchez del Rio, M.; Hoorani, H.

    2009-09-15

    The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

  10. Oriented polyvinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene (P(VDF–TrFE)) films by Langmuir–Blodgett deposition: A synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindemann, W. R.; Philiph, R. L.; Chan, D. W. W.; Ayers, C. T.; Perez, E. M.; Beckman, S. P.; Strzalka, J.; Chaudhary, S.; Vaknin, D.

    2015-10-07

    Langmuir–Blodgett films of polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene – P(VDF–TrFE)-copolymers possess substantially improved electrocaloric and pyroelectric properties, when compared with conventionally spin-cast films. In order to rationalize this, we prepared single-layered films of P(VDF–TrFE) (70:30) using both deposition techniques. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS), reveals that Langmuir–Blodgett deposited films have a higher concentration of the ferroelectric ?-phase crystals, and that these films are highly oriented with respect to the substrate. Based on these observations, we suggest alternative means of deposition, which may substantially enhance the electrocaloric effect in P(VDF–TrFE) films. As a result, this development has significant implications for the potentialmore »use of P(VDF–TrFE) in solid-state refrigeration.« less

  11. X-ray transmission movies of spontaneous dynamic events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Holmes, M.; Novak, A.; Oschwald, D.; Dolgonos, P.; Qualls, B.

    2014-11-15

    We describe a new x-ray radiographic imaging system which allows for continuous x-ray transmission imaging of spontaneous dynamic events. We demonstrate this method on thermal explosions in three plastic bonded formulations of the energetic material octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. We describe the x-ray imaging system and triggering developed to enable the continuous imaging of a thermal explosion.

  12. SU-C-18C-02: Specifcation of X-Ray Projection Angles Which Are Aligned with the Aortic Valve Plane From a Planar Image of a Valvuloplasty Balloon Inflated Across the Aortic Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fetterly, K; Mathew, V [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures provide a method to implant a prosthetic aortic valve via a minimallyinvasive, catheter-based procedure. TAVR procedures require use of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane to minimize prosthetic valve positioning error due to x-ray imaging parallax. The purpose of this work is to calculate the continuous range of interventional fluoroscopy c-arm projection angles which are aligned with the aortic valve plane from a single planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve. Methods: Computational methods to measure the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve were developed. Required inputs include a planar x-ray image of a known valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and specifications of x-ray imaging geometry from the DICOM header of the image. A-priori knowledge of the species-specific typical range of aortic orientation is required to specify the sign of the angle of the long axis of the balloon with respect to the x-ray beam. The methods were validated ex-vivo and in a live pig. Results: Ex-vivo experiments demonstrated that the angular orientation of a stationary inflated valvuloplasty balloon can be measured with precision less than 1 degree. In-vivo pig experiments demonstrated that cardiac motion contributed to measurement variability, with precision less than 3 degrees. Error in specification of x-ray geometry directly influences measurement accuracy. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that the 3D angular orientation of the aortic valve can be calculated precisely from a planar image of a valvuloplasty balloon inflated across the aortic valve and known x-ray geometry. This method could be used to determine appropriate c-arm angular projections during TAVR procedures to minimize x-ray imaging parallax and thereby minimize prosthetic valve positioning errors.

  13. Instrument Series: Spectroscopy and Diffraction XPS Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electronic structure and energy level alignments Chemistry, materials science, and engineering ­ understand, and mechanisms Quick Specs Ì Dual Al K (1486.6 eV) / Ag L (2984.7 eV) monochromatic X-ray sources Ì Highest-of-site to the XPS analysis position to enable simultaneous XPS/TPD measurements Resistive heating sample holders

  14. Mass-ablation-rate measurements in direct-drive cryogenic implosions using x-ray self-emission images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. K., E-mail: adavi@lle.rochester.edu; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A technique to measure the mass ablation rate in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a pinhole x-ray framing camera is presented. In target designs consisting of two layers of different materials, two x-ray self-emission peaks from the coronal plasma were measured once the laser burned through the higher-Z outer layer. The location of the inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the location of the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak was used to measure the burnthrough time of the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material and instantaneous mass remaining. By varying the thickness of the outer layer, the mass ablation rate can be obtained as a function of time. Simulations were used to validate the methods and verify that the measurement techniques are not sensitive to perturbation growth at the ablation surface.

  15. X-Ray diffraction and vibrational spectroscopic study of 2-chloro-N-{l_brace}4-[3-(2,5-dimethylphenyl)-3-methylcyclobutyl] -thiazol-2-yl{r_brace}-acetamide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caliskan, Nezihe Guentepe, Feyizan; Yueksektepe, Cigdem; Cukurovali, Alaaddin; Bueyuekguengoer, Orhan

    2010-12-15

    The title compound C{sub 18}H{sub 21}ClN{sub 2}SO crystallizes with Z = 4 in space group P2{sub 1}/c. The structure of the title compound was characterized by {sup 1}H-NMR, {sup 13}C-NMR, IR and single crystal diffraction. There are an intermolecular N-H-O hydrogen bond and a C-H-{pi} interactions in crystal packing. In addition to the molecular geometry and packing obtained from X-ray experiment, the molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the title compound in ground state have been calculated using density functional theory method DFT (B3LYP) with 6-31G (d, p) basis set. Calculated frequencies, bond lengths, angles and dihedral angles are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  16. Experimental Study of Polarization Clusters in 0.72Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.28PbTiO3 Relaxor Ferroelectrics by means of Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Zhi; Tai Renzhong; Xu Hongjie; Gao Chen; Pan Guoqiang; Hu Chuansheng; Fan Rong; Li Ruipeng; Luo Haosu; Lin Di; Namikawa, Kazumichi

    2007-01-19

    X-ray diffraction has been conducted to study the microscopic-scale structures for 0.72Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.28PbTiO3 relaxor ferroelectrics in a high external DC field during phase transition. Clear quasi-periodic structures were observed along <111> and <1-11> directions near Tc induced by the high external DC field. The formation of these periodic structures are interpreted as a type of Coulomb interaction among adjacent polar clusters. The cluster size was estimated to be 17nm. It was also found that the dominating interaction direction among clusters (periodic direction) were changeable among <111> and <1-11> as temperature changed.

  17. Absence of Structural Impact of Noble Nanoparticles on P3HT: PCBM Blends for Plasmon Enhanced Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells Probed by Synchrotron Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuele Lilliu; Mejd Alsari; Oier Bikondoa; J. Emyr Macdonald; Marcus S. Dahlem

    2014-10-18

    The incorporation of noble metal nanoparticles, displaying localized surface plasmon resonance, in the active area of donor-acceptor bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices is an industrially compatible light trapping strategy, able to guarantee better absorption of the incident photons and give an efficiency improvement between 12% and 38%. In the present work, we investigate the effect of Au and Ag nanoparticles blended with P3HT: PCBM on the P3HT crystallization dynamics by synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. We conclude that the presence of (1) 80nm Au, (2) mix of 5nm, 50nm, 80nm Au, (3) 40nm Ag, and (4) 10nm, 40nm, 60nm Ag colloidal nanoparticles, at different concentrations below 0.3 wt% in P3HT: PCBM blends, does not affect the behaviour of the blends themselves.

  18. Mathematical simulation and X-ray diffraction investigation of the crystal structure of (R)-[(R)-o-(1-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)phenyl]-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl(phenyl) methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maleev, A. V., E-mail: andr_mal@mail.ru; Chesnova, A. V.; Potekhin, K. A. [Vladimir State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    The crystal structure of (R)-[(R)-o-(1-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)phenyl]-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl(phenyl) methanol is mathematically simulated by the discrete modeling of molecular packings. A complete set of possible model variants is analyzed using the proposed algorithm with the aim of choosing the appropriate models that can serve as starting models for solving and refining the crystal structure from X-ray diffraction data. The crystals of the compound under investigation are monoclinic, a = 9.268(2) A, b = 8.802(2) A, c = 13.176(3) A, {beta} = 94.01(3) deg., space group P2{sub 1}, and Z = 2. The structure is solved for a starting model calculated using the discrete modeling method and refined by the full-matrix least-squares procedure to R(F) = 0.037 and {omega}R(F{sup 2}) = 0.097.

  19. In-situ synchrotron energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction study of thin Pd foils with Pd:D and Pd:H concentrations up to 1:1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Dominguez, D. D.; Qadri, S. B.; Hubler, G. K.; Violante, V.; Hu, J. Z.; He, J. H.

    2012-10-15

    Time resolved, in-situ, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was performed in an electrolysis cell during electrochemical loading of palladium foil cathodes with hydrogen and deuterium. Concentrations of H:Pd (D:Pd) up to 1:1 in 0.1 M LiOH (LiOD) in H{sub 2}O (D{sub 2}O) electrolyte were obtained, as determined by both the Pd lattice parameter and cathode resistivity. In addition, some indications on the kinetics of loading and deloading of hydrogen from the Pd surface were obtained. The alpha-beta phase transformations were clearly delineated but no new phases at high concentration were determined.

  20. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  1. Crystal structure of fluorite-related Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} (Ln=La–Dy) ceramics studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siqueira, K.P.F.; Borges, R.M.; Granado, E.; Malard, L.M.; Paula, A.M. de; Moreira, R.L.; Bittar, E.M.; Dias, A.

    2013-07-15

    Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb and Dy) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction in optimized conditions of temperature and time to yield single-phase ceramics. The crystal structures of the obtained ceramics were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, second harmonic generation (SHG) and Raman scattering. All samples exhibited fluorite-type orthorhombic structures with different oxygen arrangements as a function of the ionic radius of the lanthanide metal. For ceramics with the largest ionic radii (La–Nd), the ceramics crystallized into the Cmcm space group, while the ceramics with intermediate and smallest ionic radii (Sm–Dy) exhibited a different crystal structure belonging to the same space group, described under the Ccmm setting. The results from SHG and Raman scattering confirmed these settings and ruled out any possibility for the non-centrosymmetric C222{sub 1} space group describing the structure of the small ionic radii ceramics, solving a recent controversy in the literature. Besides, the Raman modes for all samples are reported for the first time, showing characteristic features for each group of samples. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectrum for La{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} ceramics showing their 22 phonon modes adjusted through Lorentzian lines. According to synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, this material belongs to the space group Cmcm. - Highlights: • Ln{sub 3}SbO{sub 7} ceramics belonging to the space groups Cmcm and Ccmm are synthesized. • SXRD, SHG and Raman scattering confirmed the orthorhombic structures. • Ccmm instead of C222{sub 1} is the correct one based on SHG and Raman data.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm-Lu) ceramics obtained by molten-salt synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siqueira, K.P.F.; Soares, J.C.; Granado, E.; Bittar, E.M.; Paula, A.M. de; Moreira, R.L.; Dias, A.

    2014-01-15

    Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} (Ln=La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu) ceramics were obtained by molten-salt synthesis and their structures were systematically investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD), second harmonic generation (SHG) and Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that ceramics with the largest ionic radii (La, Pr, Nd) crystallized into the Pmcn space group, while the ceramics with intermediate ionic radii (Sm-Gd) exhibited a different crystal structure belonging to the Ccmm space group. For this last group of ceramics, this result was corroborated by SHG and Raman scattering and ruled out any possibility for the non-centrosymmetric C 222{sub 1} space group, solving a recent controversy in the literature. Finally, according to SXRD, Tb-Lu containing samples exhibited an average defect fluorite structure (Fm3{sup ¯}m space group). Nonetheless, broad scattering at forbidden Bragg reflections indicates the presence of short-range domains with lower symmetry. Vibrational spectroscopy showed the presence of six Raman-active modes, inconsistent with the average cubic fluorite structure, and in line with the existence of lower-symmetry nano-domains immersed in the average fluorite structure of these ceramics. - Graphical abstract: Raman spectrum for Sm{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} ceramics showing their 27 phonon modes adjusted through Lorentzian lines. According to synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering, this material belongs to the space group Cmcm. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} ceramics were obtained by molten-salt synthesis. • SXRD, SHG and Raman scattering confirmed orthorhombic and cubic structures. • Ccmm instead of C222{sub 1} is the correct structure for Sm–Gd ceramics. • Pmcn space group was confirmed for La-, Pr- and Nd-based ceramics. • For Tb–Lu ceramics, ordered domains of a pyrochlore structure were observed.

  3. Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01

    alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-Bass (Ed. ), Handbook of Optics, third ed. , vol. V, ch. 46,wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS* Valeriy V.

  4. Development of procedures for refurbishing x-ray optics at the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2013-01-01

    and Setting of Bendable Optics for Diffraction- Limitedof Soft X-Rays,” Abstract to SPIE Optics and Photonics 2012,Metrology for X-Ray and EUV Optics IV (San Diego, August 12-

  5. Advances in X-Ray Diagnostics of Diesel Fuel Sprays

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent advances in high-speed X-ray imaging has shown several distinct behaviors of commercial fuel injectors that cannot be seen with more conventional techniques.

  6. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, Clinton M. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray source utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms.

  7. X-ray source for mammography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-20

    An x-ray source is described utilizing anode material which shifts the output spectrum to higher energy and thereby obtains higher penetrating ability for screening mammography application, than the currently utilized anode material. The currently used anode material (molybdenum) produces an energy x-ray spectrum of 17.5/19.6 keV, which using the anode material of this invention (e.g. silver, rhodium, and tungsten) the x-ray spectrum would be in the 20-35 keV region. Thus, the anode material of this invention provides for imaging of breasts with higher than average x-ray opacity without increase of the radiation dose, and thus reduces the risk of induced breast cancer due to the radiation dose administered for mammograms. 6 figures.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of tetrameric malate dehydrogenase from the novel Antarctic psychrophile Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, Tomomi [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Oikawa, Tadao; Muraoka, Ikuo [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Soda, Kenji [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering, Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Hata, Yasuo, E-mail: hata@scl.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2007-11-01

    A psychrophilic malate dehydrogenase from the novel Antarctic bacterium F. frigidimaris KUC-1 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals contained one tetrameric molecule per asymmetric unit. The best crystal diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Flavobacterium frigidimaris KUC-1 is a novel psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from Antarctic seawater. Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) is an essential metabolic enzyme in the citric acid cycle and has been cloned, overexpressed and purified from F. frigidimaris KUC-1. In contrast to the already known dimeric form of MDH from the psychrophile Aquaspirillium arcticum, F. frigidimaris MDH exists as a tetramer. It was crystallized at 288 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 1.80 Å. It contains one tetrameric molecule in the asymmetric unit.

  9. Workshops on Science Enabled by a Coherent, CW, Synchrotron X-ray Source, June 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brock, Joel

    2012-01-03

    In June of 2011 we held six two-day workshops called "XDL-2011: Science at the Hard X-ray Diffraction Limit". The six workshops covered (1) Diffraction-based imaging techniques, (2) Biomolecular structure from non-crystalline materials, (3) Ultra-fast science, (4) High-pressure science, (5) Materials research with nano-beams and (6) X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS), In each workshop, invited speaker from around the world presented examples of novel experiments that require a CW, diffraction-limited source. During the workshop, each invited speaker provided a one-page description of the experiment and an illustrative graphic. The experiments identified by the workshops demonstrate the broad and deep scientific case for a CW coherent synchrotron x-ray source. The next step is to perform detailed simulations of the best of these ideas to test them quantitatively and to guide detailed x-ray beam-line designs. These designs are the first step toward developing detailed facility designs and cost estimates.

  10. Hydrogen in polar intermetallics: Syntheses and structures of the ternary Ca5Bi3D0.93, Yb5Bi3Hx, and Sm5Bi3H~1 by powder neutron or single crystal X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon-Escamilla, E. Alejandro; Dervenagas, Panagiotis; Stasis, Constantine; Corbett, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The syntheses of the title compounds are described in detail. Structural characterizations from refinements of single crystal X-ray diffraction data for Yb{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub x} and Sm{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}H{sub 1} and of powder neutron diffraction data for Ca{sub 5}Bi{sub 3}D{sub 0.93(3)} are reported. These confirm that all three crystallize with the heavy atom structure type of {beta}-Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}, and the third gives the first proof that the deuterium lies in the center of nominal calcium tetrahedra, isostructural with the Ca{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}F-type structure. These Ca and Yb phases are particularly stable with respect to dissociation to Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type product plus H{sub 2}. Some contradictions in the literature regarding Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} and Yb{sub 5}Sb{sub 3}H{sub x} phases are considered in terms of adventitious hydrogen impurities that are generated during reactions in fused silica containers at elevated temperatures.

  11. A decade of radio imaging the relativistic outflow in the peculiar X-ray binary Circinus X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tudose; R. P. Fender; A. K. Tzioumis; R. E. Spencer; M. van der Klis

    2008-07-31

    We present observations of the neutron star X-ray binary and relativistic jet source Circinus X-1 made at 4.8 and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array during a time interval of almost 10 years. The system shows significant variations in the morphology and brightness of the radio features on all timescales from days to years. Using the time delay between the successive brightening of the different components of the radio emission we were able to provide further evidence for the relativistic nature of the arcsec scale outflow, with an apparent velocity beta_app >= 12. No compelling evidence for an evolution of the orientation of the jet axis was found. We also place an upper limit on the proper motion of the system which is consistent with previous optical studies. Besides the previously reported radio flares close to the orbital phase 0.0 (interpreted as enhanced accretion at periastron passage), we also identified outbursts with similar properties near the orbital phase 0.5. The global spectral index revealed a preferentially steep spectrum over the entire period of monitoring with a mean value and standard deviation alpha=-0.9 +/- 0.6 (F_nu ~ nu^{alpha}), which became significantly flatter during the outbursts. Polarization was detected in one third of the epochs and in one case Faraday rotation close to the core of the system was measured.

  12. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping [Sandia National Laboratories; Zhou, Lin [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Smith, David J. [Arizona State University

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  13. Time-resolved x-ray imaging of high-power laser-irradiated under-dense silica aerogels and agar foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J.A.; Estabrook, K.G.; Bauer, J.D. [and others

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents the results of experiments in which a high-power laser was used to irradiate low density (4 - 9 mg/cm{sup 3}) silica aerogel and agar foam targets. The laser-solid interaction and energy transport through the material were monitored with time-resolved imaging diagnostics, and the data show the production and propagation of an x-ray emission front in the plasma. The emission-front trajectory data are found to be in significant disagreement with detailed simulations, which predict a much more rapid heating of the cold material, and the data suggest that this discrepancy is not explainable by target inhomogeneities. Evidence suggests that energy transport into the cold material may be dominated by thermal conduction; however, no completely satisfactory explanation for the discrepancies is identified, and further experimental and theoretical research is necessary in order to resolve this important problem in laser-plasma interaction physics.

  14. X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X-Ray Data Booklet X-RAY DATA BOOKLET Center for X-ray Optics and Advanced Light Source Lawrence Electromagnetic Relations Radioactivity and Radiation Protection Useful Formulas CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home in PDF format Data Booklet Authors CXRO Home | ALS Home | LBL Home Privacy and Security Notice Please

  15. Design and development of a 3D X-ray microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

    2006-01-01

    The rapid development of needle-free injection systems demands better and faster imaging systems, capable of imaging the transient and steady state response of an injection into real tissue. X-ray radiography, x-ray ...

  16. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  17. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  18. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  19. Tunable X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  20. Segmented crystalline scintillators: An initial investigation of high quantum efficiency detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Ian

    -tissue contrast at very low doses in megavoltage tomographic and, potentially, projection imaging. In this work we Wang, Jin Yamamoto, and Hong Du Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 Ian Cunningham Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6

  1. X-ray interferometry with spherically bent crystals (abstract)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    Recent progress in manufacturing high-quality spherically bent crystals allows highly monochromatic x-ray beams to be produced, and allows efficient x-ray imaging with {mu}m-scale resolution. This article explores some of the constraints for x-ray interferometry utilizing spherically bent crystals and laser-produced plasma sources, and discusses several shearing interferometer concepts that might be experimentally investigated.

  2. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumptionmore »by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.« less

  3. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bak, Seong Min [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Senanayake, Sanjaya D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering; Nam, Kyung-Wan [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy and Materials Engineering] (ORCID:0000000162786369); Zhang, Lulu [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay (Hong Kong); Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  4. Temperature, pressure, and size dependence of Pd-H interaction in size selected Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles: In-situ X-ray diffraction studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Kulriya, P. K.

    2014-03-21

    In this study, in-situ X-ray diffraction has been carried out to investigate the effect of temperature and pressure on hydrogen induced lattice parameter variation in size selected Pd-Ag and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles. The nanoparticles of three different mobility equivalent diameters (20, 40, and 60?nm) having a narrow size distribution were prepared by gas phase synthesis method. In the present range of temperature (350?K to 250?K) and pressure (10{sup ?4} to 100 millibars), no ? (H/Pd???0.03) ? ? (H/Pd???0.54) phase transition is observed. At temperature higher than 300?°C or pressure lower than 25 millibars, there is a large difference in the rate at which lattice constant varies as a function of pressure and temperature. Further, the lattice variation with temperature and pressure is also observed to depend upon the nanoparticle size. At lower temperature or higher pressure, size of the nanoparticle seems to be relatively less important. These results are explained on the basis of the relative dominance of physical absorption and diffusion of H in Pd alloy nanoparticles at different temperature and pressure. In the present study, absence of ? ? ? phase transition points towards the advantage of using Pd-alloy nanoparticles in applications requiring long term and repeated hydrogen cycling.

  5. CCD(charge-coupled device)-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10/sup 4/ x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm/sup 2/ detector is expected to be >10/sup 9/ photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10/sup 6/ could be obtained in approx.0.5 s. With an additional approx.0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be approx.1 s so that ninety 1/sup 0/ diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min.

  6. X-ray lithography source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  7. X-Ray Diagnostics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentationsWorld's largest singleX-Ray

  8. Electromagnetic Application: X-RAY Alawi H. Ba-Surrah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    , Pulyui published high-quality x-ray images in journals in Paris and London. · Nikola Tesla In April 1887, Nikola Tesla began to investigate X-rays using high voltages and tubes of his own design, as well. The principle behind Tesla's device is called the Bremsstrahlung process, in which a high-energy secondary X

  9. X-rays from Hot Stars: Stellar Astronomy Research with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    emission lines Hot stars*: massive outflows ("stellar winds") ­ are the x-rays associated with these winds can actually take an image of its "wind nebula" ­ in all other cases, we infer the presence of a wind a model for fitting the detailed shapes of x-ray emission line profiles from hot star winds The very hot

  10. Experiences with making diffraction image data available: what metadata do we need to archive?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J., E-mail: l.m.j.kroon-batenburg@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M14 9PL (United Kingdom); Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    A local raw ‘diffraction data images’ archive was made available and some data sets were retrieved and reprocessed, which led to analysis of the anomalous difference densities of two partially occupied Cl atoms in cisplatin as well as a re-evaluation of the resolution cutoff in these diffraction data. General questions on storing raw data are discussed. It is also demonstrated that often one needs unambiguous prior knowledge to read the (binary) detector format and the setup of goniometer geometries. Recently, the IUCr (International Union of Crystallography) initiated the formation of a Diffraction Data Deposition Working Group with the aim of developing standards for the representation of raw diffraction data associated with the publication of structural papers. Archiving of raw data serves several goals: to improve the record of science, to verify the reproducibility and to allow detailed checks of scientific data, safeguarding against fraud and to allow reanalysis with future improved techniques. A means of studying this issue is to submit exemplar publications with associated raw data and metadata. In a recent study of the binding of cisplatin and carboplatin to histidine in lysozyme crystals under several conditions, the possible effects of the equipment and X-ray diffraction data-processing software on the occupancies and B factors of the bound Pt compounds were compared. Initially, 35.3 GB of data were transferred from Manchester to Utrecht to be processed with EVAL. A detailed description and discussion of the availability of metadata was published in a paper that was linked to a local raw data archive at Utrecht University and also mirrored at the TARDIS raw diffraction data archive in Australia. By making these raw diffraction data sets available with the article, it is possible for the diffraction community to make their own evaluation. This led to one of the authors of XDS (K. Diederichs) to re-integrate the data from crystals that supposedly solely contained bound carboplatin, resulting in the analysis of partially occupied chlorine anomalous electron densities near the Pt-binding sites and the use of several criteria to more carefully assess the diffraction resolution limit. General arguments for archiving raw data, the possibilities of doing so and the requirement of resources are discussed. The problems associated with a partially unknown experimental setup, which preferably should be available as metadata, is discussed. Current thoughts on data compression are summarized, which could be a solution especially for pixel-device data sets with fine slicing that may otherwise present an unmanageable amount of data.

  11. 1-to 10-keV x-ray backlighting of annular wire arrays on the Sandia Z-machine using bent-crystal imaging techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rambo, Patrick K.; Wenger, David Franklin; Bennett, Guy R.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Smith, Ian Craig; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Anderson, Jessica E.

    2003-07-01

    Annular wire array implosions on the Sandia Z-machine can produce >200 TW and 1-2 MJ of soft x rays in the 0.1-10 keV range. The x-ray flux and debris in this environment present significant challenges for radiographic diagnostics. X-ray backlighting diagnostics at 1865 and 6181 eV using spherically-bent crystals have been fielded on the Z-machine, each with a {approx}0.6 eVspectral bandpass, 10 {micro}m spatial resolution, and a 4 mm by 20mm field of view. The Z-Beamlet laser, a 2-TW, 2-kJ Nd:glass laser({lambda} = 527 nm), is used to produce 0.1-1 J x-ray sources for radiography. The design, calibration, and performance of these diagnostics is presented.

  12. Chemically sensitive 3D imaging at sub 100 nm spatial resolution using tomography in a scanning transmission x-ray microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    transmission x-ray microscope, at BL 5.3.2 of the Advanced Light Source. These glass capillaries are similar a complex community of bacteria and algae in river water. The capillaries were then centrifuged for 5

  13. Detection of improvised explosive devices at long-range using coded aperture imaging of backscattered X-rays with dynamic reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Jayna T. (Jayna Teresa)

    2009-01-01

    Standoff detection of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is a continuing problem for the U.S. military. Current X-ray detection systems cannot detect explosives at distances above a few meters and with a source-detector ...

  14. Synchrotron X-ray 2D and 3D Elemental Imaging of CdSe/ZnS Quantum dot Nanoparticles in Daphnia Magna

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B.; Pace, H; Lanzirotti, A; Smith, R; Ranville, J

    2009-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles to aquatic organisms is of interest given that increased commercialization will inevitably lead to some instances of inadvertent environmental exposures. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (QDs) capped with zinc sulfide are used in the semiconductor industry and in cellular imaging. Their small size (<10 nm) suggests that they may be readily assimilated by exposed organisms. We exposed Daphnia magna to both red and green QDs and used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to study the distribution of Zn and Se in the organism over a time period of 36 h. The QDs appeared to be confined to the gut, and there was no evidence of further assimilation into the organism. Zinc and Se fluorescence signals were highly correlated, suggesting that the QDs had not dissolved to any extent. There was no apparent difference between red or green QDs, i.e., there was no effect of QD size. 3D tomography confirmed that the QDs were exclusively in the gut area of the organism. It is possible that the QDs aggregated and were therefore too large to cross the gut wall.

  15. SU-E-I-37: Low-Dose Real-Time Region-Of-Interest X-Ray Fluoroscopic Imaging with a GPU-Accelerated Spatially Different Bilateral Filtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, H; Lee, J; Pua, R; Cho, S; Jung, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study is to reduce imaging radiation dose while maintaining image quality of region of interest (ROI) in X-ray fluoroscopy. A low-dose real-time ROI fluoroscopic imaging technique which includes graphics-processing-unit- (GPU-) accelerated image processing for brightness compensation and noise filtering was developed in this study. Methods: In our ROI fluoroscopic imaging, a copper filter is placed in front of the X-ray tube. The filter contains a round aperture to reduce radiation dose to outside of the aperture. To equalize the brightness difference between inner and outer ROI regions, brightness compensation was performed by use of a simple weighting method that applies selectively to the inner ROI, the outer ROI, and the boundary zone. A bilateral filtering was applied to the images to reduce relatively high noise in the outer ROI images. To speed up the calculation of our technique for real-time application, the GPU-acceleration was applied to the image processing algorithm. We performed a dosimetric measurement using an ion-chamber dosimeter to evaluate the amount of radiation dose reduction. The reduction of calculation time compared to a CPU-only computation was also measured, and the assessment of image quality in terms of image noise and spatial resolution was conducted. Results: More than 80% of dose was reduced by use of the ROI filter. The reduction rate depended on the thickness of the filter and the size of ROI aperture. The image noise outside the ROI was remarkably reduced by the bilateral filtering technique. The computation time for processing each frame image was reduced from 3.43 seconds with single CPU to 9.85 milliseconds with GPU-acceleration. Conclusion: The proposed technique for X-ray fluoroscopy can substantially reduce imaging radiation dose to the patient while maintaining image quality particularly in the ROI region in real-time.

  16. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  17. Scanning standing-wave illumination microscopy : a path to nanometer resolution in X-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Stanley Seokjong, 1977-

    2005-01-01

    X-ray microscopy can potentially combine the advantages of light microscopy with resolution approaching that of electron microscopy. In theory, x-ray microscopes can image unsectioned hydrated cells with nanometer resolution. ...

  18. Bent Crystal X-Ray Mirrors for Time-Resolved Experiments with Femtosecond Laser-Produced X-ray Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    Bent Crystal X-Ray Mirrors for Time-Resolved Experiments with Femtosecond Laser-Produced X@iep.physik.uni-essen.de Abstract. In the last few years, bent crystal X-ray mirrors have played an important role in time, for example, with the help of toroidally bent crystals which allow a monochromatic point-to-point imaging

  19. Thermal stability in the blended lithium manganese oxide – Lithium nickel cobalt manganese oxide cathode materials: An in situ time-resolved X-Ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong Min; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Zhang, Lulu; Shao, Minhua

    2015-03-01

    Thermal stabilities of a series of blended LiMn2O4(LMO)-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM) cathode materials with different weight ratios were studied by in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with mass spectroscopy in the temperature range of 25°C-580°C under helium atmosphere. Upon heating, the electrochemically delithiated LMO changed into Mn3O4 phase at around 250°C. Formation of MnO with rocksalt structure started at 520°C. This observation is in contrast to the previous report for chemically delithiate LMO in air, in which a process of ?-MnO2 transforming to ?-MnO2 was observed. Oxygen peak was not observed in all cases, presumably as a result of either consumption by the carbon or detection limit. CO2 profile correlates well with the phase transition and indirectly suggests the oxygen release of the cathode. Introducing NCM into LMO has two effects: first, it makes the high temperature rock-salt phase formation more complicated with more peaks in CO2 profile due to different MO (M = Ni, Mn, Co) phases; secondly, the onset temperature of CO2 release is lowered, implying lowered oxygen release temperature. Upon heating, XRD patterns indicate the NCM part reacts first, followed by the LMO part. This confirms the better thermal stability of LMO over NCM.

  20. High-energy X-ray imaging of the pulsar wind nebula MSH 15–52: constraints on particle acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    An, Hongjun; Kaspi, Victoria M.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Fryer, Chris L.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first images of the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) MSH 15–52 in the hard X-ray band (?8 keV), as measured with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). Overall, the morphology of the PWN as measured by NuSTAR in the 3-7 keV band is similar to that seen in Chandra high-resolution imaging. However, the spatial extent decreases with energy, which we attribute to synchrotron energy losses as the particles move away from the shock. The hard-band maps show a relative deficit of counts in the northern region toward the RCW 89 thermal remnant, with significant asymmetry. We find that the integrated PWN spectra measured with NuSTAR and Chandra suggest that there is a spectral break at 6 keV, which may be explained by a break in the synchrotron-emitting electron distribution at ?200 TeV and/or imperfect cross calibration. We also measure spatially resolved spectra, showing that the spectrum of the PWN softens away from the central pulsar B1509–58, and that there exists a roughly sinusoidal variation of spectral hardness in the azimuthal direction. We discuss the results using particle flow models. We find non-monotonic structure in the variation with distance of spectral hardness within 50'' of the pulsar moving in the jet direction, which may imply particle and magnetic-field compression by magnetic hoop stress as previously suggested for this source. We also present two-dimensional maps of spectral parameters and find an interesting shell-like structure in the N {sub H} map. We discuss possible origins of the shell-like structure and their implications.

  1. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore »using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  2. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jin, Gye-Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb

    2014-09-15

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  3. CHANDRA AND HST IMAGING OF THE QUASARS PKS B0106+013 AND 3C 345: INVERSE COMPTON X-RAYS AND MAGNETIZED JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Lister, M. L.; Hogan, B. S.; Marshall, H. L.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from deep ({approx}70 ks) Chandra/ACIS observations and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys F475W observations of two highly optically polarized quasars belonging to the MOJAVE blazar sample, viz., PKS B0106+013 and 1641+399 (3C 345). These observations reveal X-ray and optical emissions from the jets in both sources. X-ray emission is detected from the entire length of the 0106+013 radio jet, which shows clear bends or wiggles-the X-ray emission is brightest at the first prominent kiloparsec jet bend. A picture of a helical kiloparsec jet with the first kiloparsec-scale bend representing a jet segment moving close(r) to our line of sight, and getting Doppler boosted at both radio and X-ray frequencies, is consistent with these observations. The X-ray emission from the jet end, however, peaks at about 0.''4 ({approx}3.4 kpc) upstream of the radio hot spot. Optical emission is detected both at the X-ray jet termination peak and at the radio hot spot. The X-ray jet termination peak is found upstream of the radio hot spot by around 0.''2 ({approx}1.3 kpc) in the short projected jet of 3C 345. HST optical emission is seen in an arc-like structure coincident with the bright radio hot spot, which we propose is a sharp (apparent) jet bend instead of a terminal point, that crosses our line of sight and consequently has a higher Doppler beaming factor. A weak radio hot spot is indeed observed less than 1'' downstream of the bright radio hot spot, but has no optical or X-ray counterpart. By making use of the parsec-scale radio and the kiloparsec-scale radio/X-ray data, we derive constraints on the jet Lorentz factors ({Gamma}{sub jet}) and inclination angles ({theta}): for a constant jet speed from parsec to kiloparsec scales, we obtain a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}70 for 0106+013 and {approx}40 for 3C 345. On relaxing this assumption, we derive a {Gamma}{sub jet} of {approx}2.5 for both the sources. Upper limits on {theta} of {approx}13 Degree-Sign are obtained for the two quasars. Broadband (radio-optical-X-ray) spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling of individual jet components in both quasars suggests that the optical emission is from the synchrotron mechanism, while the X-rays are produced via the inverse Compton mechanism from relativistically boosted cosmic microwave background seed photons. The locations of the upstream X-ray termination peaks strongly suggest that the sites of bulk jet deceleration lie upstream (by a few kiloparsecs) of the radio hot spots in these quasars. These regions are also the sites of shocks or magnetic field dissipation, which reaccelerate charged particles and produce high-energy optical and X-ray photons. This is consistent with the best-fit SED modeling parameters of magnetic field strength and electron power-law indices being higher in the jet termination regions compared to the cores. The shocked jet regions upstream of the radio hot spots, the kiloparsec-scale jet wiggles and a 'nose cone'-like jet structure in 0106+013, and the V-shaped radio structure in 3C 345, are all broadly consistent with instabilities associated with Poynting-flux-dominated jets. A greater theoretical understanding and more sensitive numerical simulations of jets spanning parsec to kiloparsec scales are needed, however, to make direct quantitative comparisons.

  4. NSLS-II X-Ray Diagnostics Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ILINSKI, P.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II x-ray diagnostics will provide continuous online data of electron beam dimensions, which will be used to derive electron beam emittance and energy spread. It will also provide information of electron beam tilt for coupling evaluation. X-ray diagnostics will be based on imaging of bending magnet and three-pole wiggler synchrotron radiation sources. Diagnostics from three-pole wiggler source will be used to derive particles energy spread. Beta and dispersion functions will have to be evaluated for emittance and particles energy spread calculations. Due to small vertical source sizes imaging need to be performed in x-ray energy range. X-ray optics with high numerical aperture, such as compound refractive lens, will be used to achieve required spatial resolution. Optical setups with different magnifications in horizontal and vertical directions fill be employed to deal with large aspect ratio of the source. X-ray diagnostics setup will include x-ray imaging optics, monochromatization, x-ray imaging and recording components.

  5. Performance enhancement approaches for a dual energy x-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Evans, J.P.O. , “Stereoscopic dual energy imaging for targetCrawford, C.R. , “Dual Energy Volumetric X-ray Tomographicimages in 4–10 MeV Dual- energy customs system for material

  6. Structural characterization of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature using neutron powder diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, A. N.; Wong-Ng, W.; Huang, Q.; Tang, W.; Thompson, A.; Sharp, J.

    2014-08-28

    The structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (Seebeck coefficient Standard Reference Material (SRM™ 3451)) and the related phase Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} have been characterized as a function of temperature using the neutron powder diffraction (NPD) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques. The neutron structural studies were carried out from 20?K to 300?K for Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and from 10?K to 298?K for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The EXAFS technique for studying the local structure of the two compounds was conducted from 19?K to 298?K. Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are isostructural, with a space group of R3{sup ¯}m. The structure consists of repeated quintuple layers of atoms, Te2-M-Te1-M-Te2 (where M?=?Bi or Sb) stacking along the c-axis of the unit cell. EXAFS was used to examine the bond distances and static and thermal disorders for the first three shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} as a function of temperature. The temperature dependencies of thermal disorders were analyzed using the Debye and Einstein models for lattice vibrations. The Debye and Einstein temperatures for the first two shells of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are similar to those of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} within the uncertainty in the data. However, the Debye and Einstein temperatures for the third shell of Bi-Bi are significantly lower than those of the third shell of Sb-Sb. The Einstein temperature for the third shell is consistent with a soft phonon mode in both Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The lower Einstein temperature of Bi-Bi relative to Sb-Sb is consistent with the lower value of thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} relative to Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}.

  7. In-situ x-ray diffraction and resistivity analysis of CoSi{sub 2} phase formation with and without a Ti interlayer at rapid thermal annealing rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, C. Jr.; Clevenger, L.A.; Stephenson, G.B.; Brauer, S.; Morales, G.; Ludwig, K.F. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    It has been demonstrated, using synchrotron radiation, that at rapid thermal annealing rates (3 C/s) the 2formation of CoSi{sub 2} shifts to higher temperatures when a thin Ti interlayer is placed between Co and polycrystalline Si. It has also been shown that the Ti interlayer reduces the temperature range between the start of CoSi formation and CoSi{sub 2} formation (i.e. the range over which CoSi is present). 13 nm of Co deposited by physical vapor deposition on polycrystalline Si with and without either a 2 nm or 3.4 nm interlayer of Ti was analyzed in-situ by monitoring x-ray diffraction (XRD) peak intensity as a function of temperature using monochromatic radiation from a synchrotron beam line and by monitoring resistivity as a function of temperature i a rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system. The XRD analysis indicates that the phase formation proceeds from CoSi to CoSi{sub 2} in a temperature range that decreases from about 200 C to 140 C to 115 C with pure Co, Co/2 nm Ti and Co/3.4 nm Ti films respectively. The onset of the CoSi formation increases by about 135 C and 160 C for Co/2 nm Ti and Co/3.4 nm Ti compared to pure Co. The CoSi temperature range decreases from about 75 C in pure Co to less than 50 C in Co/Ti. In-situ RTA resistance along with in-situ XRD analysis indicates that the onset formation temperatures for CoSi are about 440 C, 575 C and 600 C and the temperatures for the completion of CoSi{sub 2} formation are about 640 C, 715 C and 715 C for Co, Co/2 nm Ti and Co/3.4 nm Ti films respectively. The results are consistent with he Ti interlayer acting as a diffusion barrier during the initial stages of the Co-Si reaction.

  8. X-ray radiography for container inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan I. (Clayton, MO); Morris, Christopher L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-07

    Arrangements of X-ray inspection systems are described for inspecting high-z materials in voluminous objects such as containers. Inspection methods may involve generating a radiographic image based on detected attenuation corresponding to a pulsed beams of radiation transmitted through a voluminous object. The pulsed beams of radiation are generated by a high-energy source and transmitted substantially downward along an incident angle, of approximately 1.degree. to 30.degree., to a vertical axis extending through the voluminous object. The generated radiographic image may be analyzed to detect on localized high attenuation representative of high-z materials and to discriminate high-z materials from lower and intermediate-z materials on the basis of the high density and greater attenuation of high-z material for higher energy (3-10 MeV) X-rays, and the compact nature of threatening masses of fissionable materials.

  9. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigues, Mario S; LE Denmat, Simon; Chevrier, Joel; Felici, Roberto; Comin, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    We show how the in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies (SPM) with X-ray microbeams enables many new experiments in the synchrotron radiation domain. Our instrument is based on an optics free AFM/STM that can be directly installed on most of the SR X-ray end stations. The instrument can be simply used for AFM imaging of the investigated sample or it can be used for detection of photoemitted electrons with a sharp STM like tungsten tip, thus leading to locally measure the EXAFS signal. Alternatively one can measure the photons absorbed by the tip, thus locally detecting diffraction. In this paper, we show examples of both measurements. We also describe the experimental setup and the tip-beam interaction that is a key point for alignment procedures. We finally show how these features can be exploited in an extended variety of domains, nanosciences and nanomechanics, just to name a few.

  10. X-ray fluorescence mapping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-RayX-Ray ScienceX-Ray

  11. Miniature x-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  12. Dislocation engineering in SiGe on periodic and aperiodic Si(001) templates studied by fast scanning X-ray nanodiffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondiali, Valeria; Cecchi, Stefano; Chrastina, Daniel [L-NESS, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, Polo di Como, via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Bollani, Monica, E-mail: monica.bollani@ifn.cnr.it [IFN-CNR, L-NESS, via Anzani 42, 22100 Como (Italy); Richard, Marie-Ingrid [ID01/ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, IM2NP UMR 7334, Campus de St Jérôme, F-13397 Marseille Cedex (France); Schülli, Tobias; Chahine, Gilbert [ID01/ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2014-01-13

    Fast-scanning X-ray nanodiffraction microscopy is used to directly visualize the misfit dislocation network in a SiGe film deposited on a pit-patterned Si substrate at the beginning of plastic relaxation. X-ray real-space diffracted intensity maps are compared to topographic atomic force microscopy images, in which crosshatch lines can be seen. The change in intensity distribution as a function of the incidence angle shows localized variations in strain within the SiGe film. These variations, which reflect the order imposed by the substrate pattern, are attributed to the presence of both bunches of misfit dislocations and defect-free regions.

  13. Generation of continuous and pulsed diagnostic imaging x-ray radiation using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -nanotube-based field-emission cathode G. Z. Yue Department of Physics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North-ray radiation can be generated using a carbon nanotube CNT -based field-emission cathode. The device can readily emission current of 28 mA was obtained from a 0.2 cm2 area CNT cathode. The x-ray intensity is sufficient

  14. Nanoscale femtosecond imaging of transient hot solid density plasmas with elemental and charge state sensitivity using resonant coherent diffraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluge, Thomas; Chung, H -K; Gutt, C; Huang, L G; Zacharias, M; Schramm, U; Cowan, T E

    2015-01-01

    Here we propose to exploit the low energy bandwidth, small wavelength and penetration power of ultrashort pulses from XFELs for resonant Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) on plasma structures in laser excited plasmas. Small angle scattering allows to detect nanoscale density fluctuations in forward scattering direction. Typically, the SAXS signal from laser excited plasmas is expected to be dominated by the free electron distribution. We propose that the ionic scattering signal becomes visible when the X-ray energy is in resonance with an electron transition between two bound states (Resonant coherent X-ray diffraction, RCXD). In this case the scattering cross-section dramatically increases so that the signal of X-ray scattering from ions silhouettes against the free electron scattering background which allows to measure the opacity and derived quantities with high spatial and temporal resolution, being fundamentally limited only by the X-ray wavelength and timing. Deriving quantities such as ion spatial distribu...

  15. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G. [Institute of Crystallography, CNR, via Salaria Km 29.300, I-00015, Monterotondo Roma (Italy)] [Institute of Crystallography, CNR, via Salaria Km 29.300, I-00015, Monterotondo Roma (Italy); Fratini, M. [Centro Fermi -Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche 'Enrico Fermi', Roma (Italy)] [Centro Fermi -Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche 'Enrico Fermi', Roma (Italy); Ricci, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Burghammer, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B. P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)] [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B. P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, and Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale dell'Università di Genova and AUO San Martino Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy)] [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, and Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale dell'Università di Genova and AUO San Martino Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy); Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A. [Institute for Chemical and Physical Process, CNR, c/o Physics Dep. at Sapienza University, P-le A. Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy)] [Institute for Chemical and Physical Process, CNR, c/o Physics Dep. at Sapienza University, P-le A. Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  16. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources (NGLSs). Although NGLSs will not displace synchrotrons from their role they do offer exciting new capabilities which can be understood from the physics of the light production in each device.

  17. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  18. Phase Tomography Using X-ray Talbot Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momose, A.; Yashiro, W.; Moritake, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Uesugi, K.; Suzuki, Y. [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hattori, T. [Laboratory of Advanced Science and Technology for Industry, University of Hyogo, 3-1-2 Kouto, Kamigori, Hyogo 678-1205 (Japan)

    2007-01-19

    A biological tomography result obtained with an X-ray Talbot interferometer is reported. An X-ray Talbot interferometer was constructed using an amplitude grating fabricated by X-ray lithography at the LIGA beamline of NewSUBARU and gold electroplating. The pitch and pattern thickness of the grating were 8 {mu}m and 30 {mu}m, respectively. The effective area was 20 x 20 mm2, which was entirely illuminated with a wide beam available at the medium-length beamline 20B2 of SPring-8, allowing the acquisition of a three-dimensional tomogram of almost the whole body of a fish. The resulting image obtained with 17.7 keV X-rays revealed organs with bones in the same view.

  19. High performance x-ray anti-scatter grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Logan, C.M.

    1995-05-23

    Disclosed are an x-ray anti-scatter grid for x-ray imaging, particularly for screening mammography, and method for fabricating same, x-rays incident along a direct path pass through a grid composed of a plurality of parallel or crossed openings, microchannels, grooves, or slots etched in a substrate, such as silicon, having the walls of the microchannels or slots coated with a high opacity material, such as gold, while x-rays incident at angels with respect to the slots of the grid, arising from scatter, are blocked. The thickness of the substrate is dependent on the specific application of the grid, whereby a substrate of the grid for mammography would be thinner than one for chest radiology. Instead of coating the walls of the slots, such could be filed with an appropriate liquid, such as mercury. 4 Figs.

  20. The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit o...

  1. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary I. (Sunnyvale, CA); Maccagno, Pierre (Stanford, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  2. Soft X-ray microflares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzoeva, I K

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray solar bursts are studied. Weak bursts with powers up to 10-8 W/m2 were detected. All the events were confirmed by GOES observations. Parameters of these microflares are determined. A physical mechanism for the low-intensity solar events is discussed.

  3. Focused X-ray source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  4. X-Ray Microscopy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray ImagingIn the

  5. Some new schemes for producing high-accuracy elliptical X-ray mirrors by elastic bending

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmore, H.A.; Howells, M.R.; Irick, S.; Renner, T.; Sandler, R.; Koo, Y.-M.

    1996-08-01

    Although x-ray micro-foci can be produced by a variety of diffractive methods, grazing incidence mirrors are the only route to an achromatic focus. In this paper we describe our efforts to produce elliptically shaped mirrors with the very high figure accuracy necessary for producing a micro-focus. The motivation for this work is provided by the need to produce achromatic foci for a range of applications ranging from tunable micro-focus x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ({mu}-XPS) at soft x-ray energies to micro-focus white beam x-ray diffraction ({mu}-XRD) at hard x-ray energies. We describe the methodology of beam bending, a practical example of a system we have produced for {mu}-XRD, and results demonstrating the production of a surface with micro-radian figure accuracy.

  6. Data fusion in neutron and X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrapp, Michael J.; Goldammer, Matthias; Schulz, Michael; Issani, Siraj; Bhamidipati, Suryanarayana; Böni, Peter

    2014-10-28

    We present a fusion methodology between neutron and X-ray computed tomography (CT). On the one hand, the inspection by X-ray CT of a wide class of multimaterials in non-destructive testing applications suffers from limited information of object features. On the other hand, neutron imaging can provide complementary data in such a way that the combination of both data sets fully characterizes the object. In this contribution, a novel data fusion procedure, called Fusion Regularized Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique, is developed where the X-ray reconstruction is modified to fulfill the available data from the imaging with neutrons. The experiments, which were obtained from an aluminum profile containing a steel screw, and attached carbon fiber plates demonstrate that the image quality in CT can be significantly improved when the proposed fusion method is used.

  7. Inner-Shell Multiple Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules With an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Studied By Coincident Ion Momentum Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erk, B. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Rolles, D. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Foucar, L. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Rudek, B. [Max Planck Advanced Study Group and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Epp, S. W. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Cryle, M. [Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Bostedt, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Schorb, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Technical Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. for Optic and Atomic Physics; Bozek, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Rouzee, A. [Max Born Inst., Berlin (Germany); Hundertmark, A. [Max Born Inst., Berlin (Germany); Marchenko, T. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Paris (France); Simon, M. [Laboratory of Chemical Physics, Paris (France); Filsinger, F. [Fritz Haber Inst. for Max Planck Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany); Christensen, L. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; De, S. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India); Trippel, S. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Hamburg (Germany); Küpper, J. [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) and Univ. of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Physics, Center for Ultrafast Imaging; Stapelfeldt, H. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry; Wada, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan), Dept. of Physical Science; Ueda, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). IMRAM; Swiggers, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Messerschmidt, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Linac Coherent Light Source; Schröter, C. D. [Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Moshammer, R. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Schlichting, I. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany); Max Planck Inst. for Medical Rearch, Heidelburg (Germany); Ullrich, J. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); National Institute for Physics and Technology, Braunschweig (Germany); Rudenko, A. [Max Planck Society, Hamburg (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics; Max Planck Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2013-08-28

    The ionization and fragmentation of two selenium containing hydrocarbon molecules, methylselenol (CH3SeH) and ethylselenol (C2H5SeH), by intense (>1017 W cm-2 ) 5 fs x-ray pulses with photon energies of 1.7 and 2 keV has been studied by means of coincident ion momentum spectroscopy. Measuring charge states and ion kinetic energies, we find signatures of charge redistribution within the molecular environment. Furthermore, by analyzing fragment ion angular correlations, we can determine the laboratory-frame orientation of individual molecules and thus investigate the fragmentation dynamics in the molecular frame. This allows distinguishing protons originating from different molecular sites along with identifying the reaction channels that lead to their emission.

  8. Inner-Shell Multiple Ionization of Polyatomic Molecules With an Intense X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Studied By Coincident Ion Momentum Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Erk, B.; Rolles, D.; Foucar, L.; Rudek, B.; Epp, S. W.; Cryle, M.; Bostedt, C.; Schorb, S.; Bozek, J.; Rouzee, A.; et al

    2013-08-28

    The ionization and fragmentation of two selenium containing hydrocarbon molecules, methylselenol (CH3SeH) and ethylselenol (C2H5SeH), by intense (>1017 W cm-2 ) 5 fs x-ray pulses with photon energies of 1.7 and 2 keV has been studied by means of coincident ion momentum spectroscopy. Measuring charge states and ion kinetic energies, we find signatures of charge redistribution within the molecular environment. Furthermore, by analyzing fragment ion angular correlations, we can determine the laboratory-frame orientation of individual molecules and thus investigate the fragmentation dynamics in the molecular frame. This allows distinguishing protons originating from different molecular sites along with identifying the reactionmore »channels that lead to their emission.« less

  9. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  10. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; N. Kobayashi; Y. Tsuboi

    2005-06-27

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is found from a mid-infrared protostar L1448 IRS 3(A). The lack of detection of this source in our deep NIR images indicates that this source has a very steep spectral slope of > 3.2 in 2--10 micron.

  11. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  12. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  13. X-ray radiography with highly charged ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marrs, Roscoe E. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    An extremely small (1-250 micron FWHM) beam of slow highly charged ions deexciting on an x-ray production target generates x-ray monochromatic radiation that is passed through a specimen and detected for imaging. The resolution of the x-ray radiograms is improved and such detection is achieved with relatively low dosages of radiation passing through the specimen. An apparatus containing an electron beam ion trap (and modifications thereof) equipped with a focusing column serves as a source of ions that generate radiation projected onto an image detector. Electronic and other detectors are able to detect an increased amount of radiation per pixel than achieved by previous methods and apparati.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a galactose-specific lectin from Dolichos lablab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavanya Latha, V.; Kulkarni, Kiran A. [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Nagender Rao, R.; Siva Kumar, N. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Suguna, K., E-mail: suguna@mbu.iisc.ernet.in [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2006-02-01

    The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of a leguminous plant, D. lablab, has been crystallized. Molecular-replacement solution using 3.0 Å X-ray diffraction data showed the lectin to be a tetramer. The galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 73.99, b = 84.13, c = 93.15 Å, ? = 89.92, ? = 76.01, ? = 76.99°. X-ray diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 Å have been collected under cryoconditions (100 K) using a MAR imaging-plate detector system mounted on a rotating-anode X-ray generator. Molecular-replacement calculations carried out using the available structures of legume lectins as search models revealed that the galactose-specific lectin from D. lablab forms a tetramer similar to soybean agglutinin; two such tetramers are present in the asymmetric unit.

  15. X-ray and Near-infrared Studies of a Star-forming Cloud; L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, M; Tsuboi, Y

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of X-ray and near-infrared (NIR) observations of L1448, a star-forming region in the Perseus cloud complex using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the 4 m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory. We detect 72 X-ray sources in a ~17 arcmin x 17 arcmin region with a ~68 ks ACIS exposure, for which we conduct follow-up NIR imaging observations in a concentric ~11 arcmin x 11 arcmin region with FLAMINGOS down to m_Ks ~ 17 mag. Twelve X-ray sources have NIR or optical counterparts. By plotting X-ray mean energy versus NIR to X-ray flux ratio, the X-ray sources are clearly separated into two groups. The X-ray spectral and temporal features as well as NIR magnitudes and colors indicate that one group mainly consists of young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud and the other of background extragalactic sources. Ten X-ray-emitting YSO candidates are thus newly identified, which are low-mass or brown dwarf mass sources from their NIR magnitudes. In addition, a possible X-ray signal is fou...

  16. X-ray emission from O stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Cohen

    2008-02-01

    Young O stars are strong, hard, and variable X-ray sources, properties which strongly affect their circumstellar and galactic environments. After ~1 Myr, these stars settle down to become steady sources of soft X-rays. I use high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy and MHD modeling to show that young O stars like theta-1 Ori C are well explained by the magnetically channeled wind shock scenario. After their magnetic fields dissipate, older O stars produce X-rays via shock heating in their unstable stellar winds. Here too I use X-ray spectroscopy and numerical modeling to confirm this scenario. In addition to elucidating the nature and cause of the O star X-ray emission, modeling of the high-resolution X-ray spectra of O supergiants provides strong evidence that mass-loss rates of these O stars have been overestimated.

  17. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Inubushi, Yuichi

    2010-10-15

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 {mu}m and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  18. Suzaku Reveals Helium-burning Products in the X-ray Emitting Planetary Nebula BD+303639

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Murashima; M. Kokubun; K. Makishima; J. Kotoku; H. Murakami; K. Matsushita; K. Hayashida; K. Arnaud; K. Hamaguchi; H. Matsumoto

    2006-07-07

    BD+303639, the brightest planetary nebula at X-ray energies, was observed with Suzaku, an X-ray observatory launched on 2005 July 10. Using the X-ray Imaging Spectrometer, the K-lines from C VI, O VII, and O VIII were resolved for the first time, and C/O, N/O, and Ne/O abundance ratios determined. The C/O and Ne/O abundance ratios exceed the solar value by a factor of at least 30 and 5, respectively. These results indicate that the X-rays are emitted mainly by helium shell-burning products.

  19. High resolution collimator system for X-ray detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eberhard, Jeffrey W. (Schenectady, NY); Cain, Dallas E. (Scotia, NY)

    1987-01-01

    High resolution in an X-ray computerized tomography (CT) inspection system is achieved by using a collimator/detector combination to limit the beam width of the X-ray beam incident on a detector element to the desired resolution width. In a detector such as a high pressure Xenon detector array, a narrow tapered collimator is provided above a wide detector element. The collimator slits have any desired width, as small as a few mils at the top, the slit width is easily controlled, and they are fabricated on standard machines. The slit length determines the slice thickness of the CT image.

  20. X-Ray Microscopy Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single goldWindX-Ray Imaging of theX-Ray