Sample records for wyoming southern powder

  1. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  2. Hydrocarbon trapping mechanisms in the Miller Creek area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Jennifer Ann

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '' 1975 43'W'79 ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon Trapoing Mechanisms in the Miller Creek Area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. (May 1975) Jennifer Ann Armstrong, B. S. , University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: 17r. Robert. R. Berg...

  3. FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...................................................................................PS-18 Coal-Bed Methane ResourceChapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U

  4. Powder River, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River Energy Corporation Place:

  5. Challenges in assessment, management and development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGarry, D.E.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin has accelerated rapidly since the mid-1990's. forecasts of coalbed methane (CBM) production and development made during the late 1980's and early 1990's have proven to be distinctly unreliable. Estimates of gas in place and recoverable reserves have also varied widely. This lack of reliable data creates challenges in resource assessment, management and development for public resource management agencies and the CBM operators. These challenges include a variety of complex technical, legal and resource management-related issues. The Bureau of Land Management's Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (WRMG) and US Geological Survey (USGS), with the cooperation and assistance of CBM operators and other interested parties have initiated cooperative studies to address some of these issues. This paper presents results of those studies to date and outlines the agencies' goals and accomplishments expected at the studies' conclusion.

  6. The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

  7. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline. The geochemistry of the thermal waters of three active hot springs, Big Spring, White Sulfur Spring, and Teepee Fountain, is similar in composition; the geochemistry is characteristic of carbonate or carbonate-bearing siliciclastic aquifers. Previous studies of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system postulate that the thermal waters are a mixture of waters from Paleozoic formations. Major element geochemical analyses available for waters from these formations is not of sufficient quality to determine whether the thermal waters are a mixture of the Paleozoic aquifers. In the time frame of this study (1 year), the geochemistry of all three springs was constant through all four seasons, spanning spring snowmelt and recharge as well as late summer and fall dryness. This relationship is consistent with a deep source not influenced by shallow, local hydrogeology. Anomalies are evident in the historic dataset for the geochemistry of Big Spring. We speculate that anomalies occurring between 1906 and 1926 suggest mixing of source waters of Big Spring with waters from a siliciclastic formation, and that anomalies occurring between 1926 and 1933 suggest mixing with waters from a formation containing gypsum or anhydrite. Decreased concentrations measured in our study, relative to concentrations measured between 1933 and 1976, may reflect mixing of thermal waters with more dilute waters. Current data is not sufficient to rigorously test these suggestions, and events of sufficient scale taking place in these timeframes have not been identified.

  8. Reservoir Characterization of Coals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, to Test the Feasibility of CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    sequestration capacity, and whether enhanced coalbed methane recovery (ECBM) will offset the cost is to investigate the feasibility of sequestering CO2 in unmineable coalbeds of the Powder River Basin (PRB recovery through enhanced methane production. Summary Reservoir Characterization Preliminary Results for CO

  9. Sulfur and ash in Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short toms of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plans region. This is more than 30% of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more F or Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5% sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6% ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short toms of >26% of the total US coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill future energy needs.

  10. Sulfur and ash in paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short tons of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region. This is more than 30 percent of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more Fort Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5 percent sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6 percent ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short tons or >26 percent of the total U.S. coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill our future energy needs.

  11. Determining erodibility, critical shear stress, and allowable discharge estimates for cohesive channels: case study in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoman, R.W.; Niezgoda, S.L. [Lowham Engineering LLC, Lander, WY (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous discharge of coalbed natural gas-produced (CBNG-produced) water within ephemeral, cohesive channels in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming can result in significant erosion. A study was completed to investigate channel stability in an attempt to correlate cohesive soil properties to critical shear stress. An in situ jet device was used to determine critical shear stress (tau{sub c}) and erodibility (k{sub d}); cohesive soil properties were determined following ASTM procedures for 25 reaches. The study sites were comprised of erodible to moderately resistant clays with tau{sub c} ranging from 0.11 to 15.35 Pa and k{sub d} ranging from 0.27 to 2.38 cm{sup 3}/N s. A relationship between five cohesive soil characteristics and tau{sub c} was developed and presented for use in deriving tau{sub c} for similar sites. Allowable discharges for CBNG-produced water were also derived using tau{sub c} and the tractive force method. An increase in the allowable discharge was found for channels in which vegetation was maintained. The information from this case study is critical to the development of a conservative methodology to establish allowable discharges while minimizing flow-induced instability.

  12. Laramie, Wyoming December, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    ://www.wsgsweb.uwyo.edu Front cover: Coalbed methane drilling rig on location, southeastern edge of the Washakie Basin, southern Wyoming. This rig is exploring for coalbed methane in coals of the Almond Formation, Mesaverde Group ........................................................... 28 Coalbed methane developments...................................................... 28 Regulatory

  13. Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

  14. The relationship between coal quality and coal resource parameters of Powder River and Williston Basin coal, Wyoming, Montana, and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.M.; Flores, R.M.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean, compliant coal from mines in the Northern Rocky Mountain and Great Plains region is utilized as fuel for coal-fired power plants in 26 states. More than 30 percent of the nation`s 1997 production was from Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming. Production of clean, compliant coal from the region is estimated to increase to 415 million short tons by the year 2015. Studies in this region indicate a relationship between percent sulfur and ash and pounds of SO{sub 2} per million Btu and the resource parameters of coal thickness and overburden. The trends that the authors have observed indicate that both coal quality and the thickness of the coal and associated rocks are controlled by paleoenvironment and depositional setting.

  15. Wyoming’s “Rosy” Financial Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuhmann, Robert A.; Skopek, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Wyoming economy as coal, natural gas, oil, and trona (aeconomy in the months ahead (Mast 2009). Natural gas makes

  16. Wyoming’s “Rosy” Financial Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuhmann, Robert A.; Skopek, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. (2011b) “Wyoming Clean Coal Efforts Advance,” Casperadministra- tion pushes for clean-coal and carbon capture

  17. Evaluation of Phytoremediation of Coal Bed Methane Product Water and Waters of Quality Similar to that Associated with Coal Bed Methane Reserves of the Powder River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Bauder

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. emphasis on domestic energy independence, along with advances in knowledge of vast biogenically sourced coalbed methane reserves at relatively shallow sub-surface depths with the Powder River Basin, has resulted in rapid expansion of the coalbed methane industry in Wyoming and Montana. Techniques have recently been developed which constitute relatively efficient drilling and methane gas recovery and extraction techniques. However, this relatively efficient recovery requires aggressive reduction of hydrostatic pressure within water-saturated coal formations where the methane is trapped. Water removed from the coal formation during pumping is typically moderately saline and sodium-bicarbonate rich, and managed as an industrial waste product. Current approaches to coalbed methane product water management include: surface spreading on rangeland landscapes, managed irrigation of agricultural crop lands, direct discharge to ephermeral channels, permitted discharge of treated and untreated water to perennial streams, evaporation, subsurface injection at either shallow or deep depths. A Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory funded research award involved the investigation and assessment of: (1) phytoremediation as a water management technique for waste water produced in association with coalbed methane gas extraction; (2) feasibility of commercial-scale, low-impact industrial water treatment technologies for the reduction of salinity and sodicity in coalbed methane gas extraction by-product water; and (3) interactions of coalbed methane extraction by-product water with landscapes, vegetation, and water resources of the Powder River Basin. Prospective, greenhouse studies of salt tolerance and water use potential of indigenous, riparian vegetation species in saline-sodic environments confirmed the hypothesis that species such as Prairie cordgrass, Baltic rush, American bulrush, and Nuttall's alkaligrass will thrive in saline-sodic environments when water supplies sourced from coalbed methane extraction are plentiful. Constructed wetlands, planted to native, salt tolerant species demonstrated potential to utilize substantial volumes of coalbed methane product water, although plant community transitions to mono-culture and limited diversity communities is a likely consequence over time. Additionally, selected, cultured forage quality barley varieties and native plant species such as Quail bush, 4-wing saltbush, and seaside barley are capable of sustainable, high quality livestock forage production, when irrigated with coalbed methane product water sourced from the Powder River Basin. A consequence of long-term plant water use which was enumerated is elevated salinity and sodicity concentrations within soil and shallow alluvial groundwater into which coalbed methane product water might drain. The most significant conclusion of these investigations was the understanding that phytoremediation is not a viable, effective technique for management of coalbed methane product water under the present circumstances of produced water within the Powder River Basin. Phytoremediation is likely an effective approach to sodium and salt removal from salt-impaired sites after product water discharges are discontinued and site reclamation is desired. Coalbed methane product water of the Powder River Basin is most frequently impaired with respect to beneficial use quality by elevated sodicity, a water quality constituent which can cause swelling, slaking, and dispersion of smectite-dominated clay soils, such as commonly occurring within the Powder River Basin. To address this issue, a commercial-scale fluid-bed, cationic resin exchange treatment process and prototype operating treatment plant was developed and beta-tested by Drake Water Technologies under subcontract to this award. Drake Water Technologies secured U.S. Patent No. 7,368,059-B2, 'Method for removal of benevolent cations from contaminated water', a beta Drake Process Unit (DPU) was developed and deployed for operation in the Powder River Basin. First year operatio

  18. Using ground based geophysics to evaluate hydrogeologic effects of subsurface drip irrigation systems used to manage produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Veloski, G.A.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory has been evaluating various geophysical methods for site characterization regarding environmental issues associated with fossil fuels including produced water management. A relatively new method of managing produced water from coal bed natural gas production is through subsurface drip irrigation. This system involves disposing the produced water near the bottom of the root zone in agricultural fields, which would provide a beneficial use of this resource. The focus of this paper is to present results from a pre-injection geophysical survey for site assessment and background data. A pre-construction survey of approximately 1.2 km2 was completed in June 2007 using a Geophex GEM-2 broadband sensor over six fields along the Powder River floodplain. Quality assurance measures included drift checks, duplicate line surveys, and repeat field surveys using the Geometrics OhmMapper instrument. Subsequent surveys will be completed once the system is installed and operational. Geophysical inversion models were completed to provide a detailed cross-section of the subsurface geoelectrical structure along each line. Preliminary interpretations reveal that the subsurface conductivity distribution correlates to geomorphologic features.

  19. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  20. Wyoming Natural Gas Summary

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural3.40

  1. Wyoming's Budget: From Champagne to Soda Pop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuhmann, Robert A; Skopek, Tracy A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Skopek: Wyoming’s Budget: From Champagne to Soda Popconstruction money from budget cuts,” Casper Star-Tribune.proposes leaner state budget. ” Associated Press. Neary,

  2. Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulme, Diana; Hamerlinck, Jeffrey; Bergman, Harold; Oakleaf, Jim

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyomingâ??s diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyomingâ??s Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis functionality via the web. It is linked into various state and federal agency spatial data servers allowing users to visualize multiple themes, such as well locations and core sage grouse areas, in one domain. Additionally, this application gives users the ability to download any of the data being displayed within the web map. The Wyoming Energy Map is the newest mapping application developed directly from this effort. With over a 100 different layers accessible via this mapping application, it is the most comprehensive Wyoming energy mapping application available. This application also provides the public with the ability to create cultural and wildlife reports based on any location throughout Wyoming and at multiple scales. The WERIC website also allows users to access links to federal, state, and local natural resource agency websites and map servers; research documents about energy; and educational information, including information on upcoming energy-relate conferences. The WERIC website has seen significant use by energy industry consultants, land management agencies, state and local decision-makers, non-governmental organizations and the public. Continued service to these sectors is desirable but some challenges remain in keeping the WERIC site viable. The most pressing issue is finding the human and financial resources to keep the site continually updated. Initially, the concept included offering users the ability to maintain the site themselves; however, this has proven not to be a viable option since very few people contributed. Without user contributions, the web page relied on already committed university staff to publish and link to the appropriate documents and web-pages. An option that is currently being explored to address this issue is development of a partnership with the University of Wyoming, School of Energy Resources (SER). As part of their outreach program, SER may be able to contribute funding for a full-time position dedicated to maintenance of WERIC.

  3. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the United States Geological Survey, State Water Resources Research Institute Program allowed the Wyoming and Natural Resources, and at Wyoming State Water Plan meetings. We attended conferences hosted by the WyomingWyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program

  4. DERAILMENT IN WYOMING (2005) http://www.bigcountry.coop/coal.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Administration said. With tight supplies and high demand, spot market prices for Powder River Basin coal jumped 41 DERAILMENT IN WYOMING (2005) http://www.bigcountry.coop/coal.html [Johnson, 2005] Steven Johnson bottleneck in shipments from the nation's most important vein of low-sulfur coal has cut into coal supplies

  5. Wyoming Natural Gas Processed in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas

  6. National uranium resource evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damp, J N; Jennings, M D

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment sampling; studying well logs; and reviewing the literature. Five favorable environments were identified. These include portions of Eocene Wasatch and Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Powder River Basin and Lower Cretaceous Pryor sandstones of the Bighorn Basin. Unfavorable environments include all Precambrian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Middle Jurassic rocks; the Cretaceous Thermopolis, Mowry, Cody, Meeteetse, and Bearpaw Formations; the Upper Jurassic Sundance and Morrison, the Cretaceous Frontier, Meseverde, Lance, and the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Willwood Formations of the Bighorn Basin; the Wasatch Formation of the Powder River Basin, excluding two favorable areas and all Oligocene and Miocene rocks. Remaining rocks are unevaluated.

  7. Wyoming DOE EPSCoR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gern, W.A.

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

  8. LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood What does this project...

  9. Wyoming's Budget: From Champagne to Soda Pop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuhmann, Robert A; Skopek, Tracy A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Wyoming economy as coal, natural gas, oil, and trona (aeconomy in the months ahead (Mast, 7/4/09). Natural gas

  10. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release...

  11. ,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

  12. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  13. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  14. wyoming

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve Class3a.86,77,1996 N| Updated0

  15. Energy Incentive Programs, Wyoming | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessin Jamaica,IdahoWyoming Energy Incentive Programs, Wyoming

  16. Two methods for characterizing the compaction and ejection behavior of metal powders in a die

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sajdak, Richard James

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TWO METHODS FOR CHARACTERIZING THE COMPACTION AND EJECTION BEHAVIOR OF METAL POWDERS IN A DIE A Thesis by RICHARD JAMES SAJDAK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of Committee) (Head of Departme t) &ci- (51embor) (Flember) May 1969 ABSTRACT Two Methods for Characterizing the Compaction and Ejection Behavior of Metal Powders In a Die. (May 1969) Richard James Sajdak, B. S. , University of Wyoming M. S. , Texas A...

  17. Powder dispersion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorenz, Heather M. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder dispersion method and apparatus comprising an air eductor and a powder dispensing syringe inserted into a suction connection of the air eductor.

  18. Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

  19. Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of America, Boulder, CO. #12;Problem and Research Objectives: Coal bed methane (CBM) development, 2001). CBM extraction involves pumping methane and ground water out of coal seams. The gas and water://wwweng.uwyo.edu/civil/research/water/epmodeler.html. University of Wyoming, Laramie. 4. Wilkerson, G. V., 2002. A GIS model for evaluating the impacts of coal bed

  20. National Park Service- Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are currently being used by the Yellowstone Association Institute for ecology classes.

  1. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  2. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

  3. SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

  4. EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, was preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action had been implemented, Western would have interconnected the proposed facility to an existing transmission line. This project has been canceled.

  5. Jackson, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen Energy2005) |JMalucelliIowaWyoming: Energy Resources Jump

  6. Cody, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan,Information Feed Jump to:Electric Coop, IncWyoming:

  7. Precision powder feeder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM); Oliver, Michael S. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of precision powder feeders is disclosed. These feeders provide a precision flow of a wide range of powdered materials, while remaining robust against jamming or damage. These feeders can be precisely controlled by feedback mechanisms.

  8. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  9. Chemical analyses of selected thermal springs and wells in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic chemical data for 27 selected thermal well and springs in Wyoming are presented. The samples were gathered from 1979 through 1982 in an effort to define geothermal resources in Wyoming. The basic data for the 27 analyzed samples generally include location, temperature, flow, date analyzed, and a description of what the sample is from. The chemical analyses for the sample are listed.

  10. Wyoming Shale Production (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)CubicProduction

  11. Wyoming Shale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)CubicProductionProved

  12. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Wyoming

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof Energy AMDCoal_Budget_Fact_Sheet.pdfConnecticutUtahWyoming

  14. Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin: EnergyEdison,Wind EnergyWindWyoming:

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuelsPropane TankWashington Information toWyoming

  16. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  17. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  18. Multiple feed powder splitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for providing uniform powder flow to the nozzles when creating solid structures using a solid fabrication system such as the directed light fabrication (DLF) process. In the DLF process, gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power laser light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention is a device providing uniform flow of gas entrained powders to the nozzles of the DLF system. The device comprises a series of modular splitters which are slidably interconnected and contain an integral flow control mechanism. The device can take the gas entrained powder from between one to four hoppers and split the flow into eight tubular lines which feed the powder delivery nozzles of the DLF system.

  19. Gravity interpretation of the northern Overthrust Belt, Idaho and Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Wendy Ilene

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequence thickness westward from about 15 miles (2a. l km) east of the Idaho-Wyoming State line, to a site of maximum deposition somewhere in the west (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). In western Wyoming, Drdovic-ian rocks are represented by the Upper... 1n southeastern Idaho by the Laketown Dolomite. The lim1ted geoqraph1c extent of the Silurian is considered to be the result of subsequent erosion rather than non-deposition (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). In western Wyoming, the Devonian age rocks...

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. EA-1610: Windy Hollow Wind Project, Laramie County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proponent request to interconnect their proposed Windy Hollow Wind Project in Laramie County, Wyoming, to DOE’s Western Area Power Administration’s transmission system.

  2. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  3. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  4. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  5. Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

  6. Microsoft Word - Nuclear_hybrid_systems_for_Wyoming_-__final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming's coal and gas resources are exported from the state in unprocessed...

  7. Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

  8. Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Approved as to style and content by: o n . pan (Chairman of Committee) Ear R. os sn (Member...

  9. Hydrodynamic effect on oil accumulation in a stratigraphic trap, Kitty Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larberg, Gregory Martin

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DeFrte& and Mr. Ambrose Lyth. Log data wer e ?v ' 1 sl&1e fcn inspc stion from Getty O' I in I:c. uston. lgpc ct a1 t. hank, !. o Mr. inar Peder:vn, Mr. Alan Cr aw&ford ;&nd lctr . Jim Acldington for Lheir he tp. The helpful suggestions and c... extend thanks to my undergraduate professors in the Geology Department at Trinity University. Their instruction and friendship were instrumental in my de- cision to continue my education. Finally, I would like to thank my friends and parents...

  10. Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Campbell County, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Donna Lynn

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complexes (Fryberger, 1984). Eagle Rock field most likely consists of a preserved eolian sand dune, cemented and capped by a thin layer of marine carbonates, and trapped by the Opeche Shale which unconformably overlies the Minnelusa Formation... producing sandstone of Eagle Rock field can be detected seismically. The producing zone is only 10-12 feet thick, but the sharp contact of high-velocity marine carbonates over the low- velocity producing sandstones creates a high impedance contrast...

  11. Hydrodynamic flow in lower cretaceous muddy sandstone, Gas Draw field, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J.T.C.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lower Cretaceous Muddy sandstones form a simple stratigraphic trap at Gas Draw field, northeast Power River Basin. The Muddy at Gas Draw can be subdivided into six zones. The lowest, sixth Muddy sandstone is fluvial in origin, and the overlying fifth sandstone is a transgressive marine deposit. The fourth zone represents a fluvial origin below to shallow marine above. The third zone is interpreted to be of fluvial-overbank origin with possibly a bay-lagoonal association. The second sandstone is suggested to be a deposit of a fluvial or deltaic environment. The first zone was deposited in a lagoonal and poorly-drained marsh environment. At Gas Draw, the second Muddy sandstone is the major producing zone and has the highest average porosity and permeability of 22.6% and 209 md. It had high initial production rates of up to 1200 BOPD (191 m/sup 3//day). From correlation of well logs, the Muddy reservoirs appear to be separated by thin shales, but analysis of drill stem tests show that these reservoirs are connected at some points within the area. Analysis of drill-stem test pressures provides the basis for interpreting fluid potential relationships. The average potentiometric gradient of 32 ft/mi across the field results in a hydrodynamic oil column of 210 feet, whereas capillary-pressure differences due to permeability changes can account for only 38 feet of oil column. The observed oil column over most of the field has a height somewhat greater than 250 feet which agrees well with total calculated oil column of about 248 feet. Furthermore, local decrease in permeability to oil may be responsible for water production at any place within the field, even updip from the producing area.

  12. Hydrodynamic flow in Lower Cretaceous Muddy Sandstones, Rozet Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, David Arthur

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /km) across the field yields a hydrodynamic oil column of 420 ft (128 m). Capillary pressure differences due to permeability changes account for a oil column of 72 ft (42 m). The combined capillary and hydrodynamic oil columns of 492 ft (150 m) compares... and other Muddy Formation oil fields. Contour interval 1000 ft (305 m). . . Regional east-west cross section showing variable sandstone development in the Muddy interval from Kitty to Rozet Fields. . . . . . . . . Diagrammatic environments the northern...

  13. Hydrodynamic flow in lower Cretaceous Muddy sandstone, Gas Draw Field, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Joseph Tien-Chin

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control readily available for analysis of rock properties and fluid pressures. The nine-township area surrounding the Gas Draw field is well-suited for study of hydrodynamic effects on oil accumulation. Regional Geology Structure The citations... of southeastern Montana. It is bounded by the Miles City arch and Black Hills uplift on the east, the Hartville uplift on the southeast, and Bighorn Mountains and Casper arch on the west. Muddy stratigraphic oil fields are located on the east flank...

  14. Petrography and prediction of reservoir rock properties in the Sussex Sandstone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Richard Hoyt

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine rock composition and texture. Composition was established by point count of 100 grains. Framework grains were identified and counted as monocrystalline quartz, polycrystalline quartz, volcanic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, plagioclase... and quiet water deposition of shale was resumed. The sandstone is classified as a volcanic aronite based on a det: ital composition averaging 59 percent quartz, including both monccrystalline and polycrystalline varieties, 18 percent rock frag- ments...

  15. Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  2. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  3. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  4. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  5. Without proper controls, consolidation could influence performance in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, S.; Nelson, P.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American coal industry is in a period of consolidation. Fewer firms with larger production are replacing a more dispersed industry. Because of the southern Powder River Basin's great importance as source of coal, there is a need to monitor the performance of southern PRB coal producers.

  6. Powell, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River Energy CorporationCounty,Powell,

  7. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  8. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The same atomization effect seen in a fuel injector is being applied to titanium metal resulting in fine titanium powders that are less than half the width of a human hair. Titanium melts above 3,000°F and is highly corrosive therefore requiring specialized containers. The liquid titanium is poured through an Ames Laboratory - USDOE patented tube which is intended to increase the energy efficiency of the atomization process, which has the ability to dramatically decrease the cost of fine titanium powders. This novel process could open markets for green manufacturing of titanium components from jet engines to biomedical implants.

  9. Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural

  10. Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming

  11. Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Net Withdrawals (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) WyomingFeet) Year

  12. Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) WyomingFeet)

  13. NO-TILL GRAIN PRODUCTION IN WYOMING: STATUS AND POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Resources University of Wyoming ABSTRACT In dryland cropping systems, optimal yields require that nutrient in the soil compared to crop-fallow systems. This enables producers to plant two, three, or four consecutive crops, or continuously, without fallow, but water and nutrient needs are much more closely balanced

  14. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  15. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  16. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  17. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  18. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, Stephen D. (Midland, MI); Weimer, Alan W. (Midland, MI); Carroll, Daniel F. (Midland, MI); Eisman, Glenn A. (Midland, MI); Cochran, Gene A. (Midland, MI); Susnitzky, David W. (Midland, MI); Beaman, Donald R. (Midland, MI); Nilsen, Kevin J. (Midland, MI)

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  19. Radiological Powder XRD | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115,PerformanceUsingFIB/SEM (Quanta)Powder

  20. Powder XRD | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home Design PassivePostdoctoral Opportunities Are you Your CartPowder

  1. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  2. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  3. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

  4. Red Butte, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRausWyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  5. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Wyoming | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: EnergyPotentialUrbanUtilityScalePVCapacityPulaskiRAPID/BulkTransmission/TexasRAPID/BulkTransmission/Wyoming <

  6. City of Deaver, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy InformationLakeWyoming (Utility

  7. [DOE/EPSCoR traineeship program for Wyoming: Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of the traineeship program supported by the Department of Energy EPSCoR funding, the University of Wyoming has made outstanding progress toward the objective of increasing the supply of highly trained engineers and scientists with interests in energy related disciplines. The scope of the traineeship program has already broadened to encompass both more departments than originally expected and nearly twice as many graduate students as expected. Further, since the primary emphasis was on new students, most of those recruited have developed ties to the DOE labs that would not have otherwise existed. This portion of this Progress Report gives an overall summary of the University of Wyoming`s approach to the DOE Traineeship Program implementation. It also provides an overview of the results so far and vision of how this program fits with the broader objectives for development of the University and its academic programs. Subsequent sections describe very briefly the impact of the traineeship students in each department that was successful in obtaining funds through the competitive process that was adopted. Finally, the report ends with a summary of both the academic status of the participants and the budget expenditures to date.

  8. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal resolution. Published studies indicate higher emission rates from soils and animal wastes at higher temperatures, and temporal variation in fertilizer application. A recent inverse modeling study indicates temporal variation in regional NH{sub 3} emissions. Monthly allocation factors were derived to estimate monthly emissions from soils, livestock and wild animal waste based on annual emission estimates. Monthly resolution of NH{sub 3} emissions from fertilizers is based on fertilizer sales to farmers. Statewide NH{sub 3} emissions are highest in the late spring and early summer months.

  9. Economic Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Powder River Basin Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unminable coalbeds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this paper is to study the economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 tonne) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

  10. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  11. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO); Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  12. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.; Kollie, T.G.; Weaver, F.J.

    1996-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm{sup 3} and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m{sup 2}/g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraalkyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders. 2 figs.

  13. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Fred J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  14. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Fred J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2 /g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  15. Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Fred J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

  16. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.

    1990-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, where after the product may be sintered.

  17. Method for molding ceramic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant for the metal-containing powder, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one multifunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and an organic solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  18. Southeast Electric Coop, Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar PowerstoriesNrelPartnerTypePonsa,HomeIndiana:Rhode IslandPlainfield, NewWyoming)

  19. Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)

  20. Wyoming Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet) Gas,

  1. Wyoming Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet)

  2. Wyoming Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)Cubic Feet)per

  3. Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende NewSowitec doWinvest Financing Service GmbH CoWorldWyoming

  4. Bar Nunn, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine: EnergyAustin EnergyBacliff,BallengerEnergyNIES07. ItBanyanWyoming: Energy

  5. Bessemer Bend, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud, Colorado: EnergyBessemer Bend, Wyoming:

  6. Big Horn County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud,Biodiesel Place:Forge07.DaddyWyoming:

  7. Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus Area EnergyMohawk Municipal CommMonongahela PowerWyoming

  8. Teton County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark Jump to: navigation,TelluricTODO:TennesseeTesseraOpenWyoming:

  9. Montana Natural Gas Processed in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30 2013 Macroeconomic team: Kay6 KentuckyYearDecadeBarrels)MontanaWyoming

  10. Town of Guernsey, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmont Rural ElecTown ofFrederick, ColoradoGuernsey, Wyoming

  11. Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadoreConnecticutPhotos of AECSign UpWashington DCWisconsinofWyoming

  12. Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of Dept.|SindhuDepartmentEnvironmental Management UnitedMarkWyoming

  13. City of Cody, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy InformationLakeWyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search

  14. City of Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy InformationLakeWyomingDurant,FrankfortGilbert, Minnesota

  15. Sublette County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen, Minnesota: EnergySublette County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to:

  16. Town of Lingle, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd JumpOperations JumpTooeleInformationTownLadoga,Lingle, Wyoming

  17. Wyoming - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World9, 2014 International Petroleum FigureElectricity NoteWyoming -

  18. Rotary powder feed through apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Less, Richard M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for increasing the uniformity of solids within a solids fabrication system, such as a direct light fabrication (DLF) system in which gas entrained powders are passed through the focal point of a moving high-power light which fuses the particles in the powder to a surface being built up in layers. The invention provides a feed through interface wherein gas entrained powders input from stationary input lines are coupled to a rotating head of the fabrication system. The invention eliminates the need to provide additional slack in the feed lines to accommodate head rotation, and therefore reduces feed line bending movements which induce non-uniform feeding of gas entrained powder to a rotating head.

  19. Neutron detectors comprising boron powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher; Bacon, Jeffrey Darnell; Makela, Mark F; Spaulding, Randy Jay

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  20. Powder collection apparatus/method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Terpstra, R.L.; Moore, J.A.

    1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Device for separating and collecting ultrafine atomized powder from the gas stream of a gas atomizing apparatus comprises a housing having an interior wall oriented at an angle relative to horizontal so as to form a downwardly converging, conical expansion chamber, an inlet conduit communicated to the expansion chamber proximate an upper region thereof for receiving the gas stream, and an outlet proximate a lower region of the expansion chamber. The inlet conduit is oriented at a compound inclined angle (with respect to horizontal) selected to promote separation and collection of powder from the gas stream in the expansion chamber. The compound angle comprises a first entrance angle that is greater than the angle of repose of the powder on the housing interior wall such that any powder accumulation in the inlet conduit tends to flow down the wall toward the outlet. The second angle is selected generally equal to the angle of the housing interior wall measured from the same horizontal plane so as to direct the gas stream into the expansion chamber generally tangent to the housing interior wall to establish a downward swirling gas stream flow in the expansion chamber. A powder collection container is communicated to the outlet of the expansion chamber to collect the powder for further processing. 4 figures.

  1. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface remediation was completed at the former uranium mill site in Riverton, Wyoming, in 1990. Residual radioactive materials (contaminated soil and debris) were removed and disposed of at Union Carbide Corporation`s (Umetco) nearby Gas Hills Title 2 facility. Ground water in the surficial and semiconfined aquifers (known collectively as the `uppermost aquifer`) below the former mill and tailings site has been contaminated. No contamination has been detected in the deeper, confined sandstone aquifer. The contaminant plume extends off site to the south and east. The plume is constrained by surface wetlands and small streams to the east and west of the site and by the Little Wind River to the south. Fifteen monitor wells installed in 1993 were sampled to better define the contaminant plume and to provide additional water quality data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples also were collected from domestic wells in response to a request by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality in January 1994. No contamination attributable to the former uranium milling operations have ever been detected in any of the domestic wells used for potable supplies.

  2. Structural geology of the northern termination of the Crawford Thrust, western Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, James Paul

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison with Previous Work CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES CITED. VITA, 106 107 116 177 136 139 144 1X LIST OF FIGUPES F IGUPE PAGE Generalized map of the Utah-Wyoming-Idaho Th!ust Belt, showing study area location.... . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . Strati graphi c column for the Utah-Wyom; ng- Idaho !hrust Belt Examples of Listric Normal faults From Wyoming. . 14 Cross sections A-A' through C-C' tron Brown and Spang ('l9/8) 21 Cross sections D-D' through ! -F' from Brown and Spang (1978) 22...

  3. EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill...

  4. Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

  5. EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

  6. Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

  7. EA-1008: Continued Development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (Sitewide), Natrona County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to continue development of the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 located in Natrona County, Wyoming over the next...

  8. Weatherization: Wyoming's Hidden Resource; Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D& R International

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Wyoming demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  9. California-Wyoming Grid Integration Study: Phase 1 -- Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Schwabe, P.; Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.; Brinkman, G.; Paduru, A.; Diakov, V.; Hand, M.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a comparative analysis of two different renewable energy options for the California energy market between 2017 and 2020: 12,000 GWh per year from new California in-state renewable energy resources; and 12,000 GWh per year from Wyoming wind delivered to the California marketplace. Either option would add to the California resources already existing or under construction, theoretically providing the last measure of power needed to meet (or to slightly exceed) the state's 33% renewable portfolio standard. Both options have discretely measurable differences in transmission costs, capital costs (due to the enabling of different generation portfolios), capacity values, and production costs. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the two different options to provide additional insight for future planning.

  10. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  13. Intradermal needle-free powdered drug injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, John (John Hsiao-Yung)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new method for needle-free powdered drug injection. The design, construction, and testing of a bench-top helium-powered device capable of delivering powder to controllable depths within the dermis ...

  14. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore CA 94551 (United States)

    2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  15. North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling of a 5000-foot exploratory gas and oil well by Marathon Oil Company is proposed for Section 34, T52N, R106W, near Pagoda Creek in the Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming. An area 75 feet by 80 feet would be cleared of all vegetation and graded nearly flat for the drill pad and reserve pit. The drilling rig, pipe rack, generator, tool house, living facilities, drilling mud pump, pit, and supply platform all would be built on the drill pad. A blooie hole would contain cuttings and dust from the air drilling. Support facilities would include a helicopter staging area along Clocktower Creek approximately one mile south of the Yellowstone Highway and a 2550-foot temporary water pipeline from Pagoda Creek to the well site. Personnel, equipment, and supplies would be trucked to the helicopter staging area and shuttled to the proposed location by helicopters. Lease stipulations prohibit drilling before September 8; therefore, the starting date would be the late fall of the respective year and would have to be completed by the following January 1. Approval of the exploratory well would not include approval of production facilities.

  16. Detrital Zircon Geochronology of Middle Ordovician Siliciclastic Sediment on the Southern Laurentian Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickell, Michael

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Archean craton of eastern Canada. The Trans-Hudson Orogen represents the suturing of the Superior Province to the Hearne and Wyoming cratons to the north and west between 1.78 Ga and 1.92 Ga (Whitmeyer and Karlstrom, 2007). 1.8-2.0 Ga grains... 1 DETRITAL ZIRCON GEOCHRONOLOGY OF MIDDLE ORDOVICIAN SILICICLASTIC SEDIMENT ON THE SOUTHERN LAURENTIAN SHELF A Thesis by MICHAEL JOHN PICKELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  17. Evidence of Southern Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    POS Evidence of Coverage Southern Health Services, Inc. SH.POS.11-09 #12;Table of Contents SH................................................................................................10 Facts about Southern Health .....................................................................12 Members' Responsibilities to Know How and When to Seek Care ............................13 Section

  18. Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

  19. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  20. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1982-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  1. EIS-0267: BPA/Lower Valley Transmission System Reinforcement Project, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA and LVPL proposal to construct a new 115-kV line from BPA’s Swan Valley Substation near Swan Valley in Bonneville County, Idaho about 58 km (36 miles) east to BPA’s Teton Substation near Jackson in Teton County, Wyoming.

  2. DOE-Sponsored Technology Enhances Recovery of Natural Gas in Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Oil and Natural Gas Program has found a way to distinguish between groundwater and the water co-produced with coalbed natural gas, thereby boosting opportunities to tap into the vast supply of natural gas in Wyoming as well as Montana.

  3. Glacial geology of the West Tensleep Drainage Basin, Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burggraf, G.B.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The glacial deposits of the West Tensleep Basin in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming are mapped and a relative chromology established. The deposits are correlated with the regional model as defined in the Wind River Mountains. A statistical analysis is performed on the density and weathering characteristics of the surficial boulders to determine their validity as indicators of relative age. (ACR)

  4. Thermal plasma chemical synthesis of powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, G.J.; Newkirk, L.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal plasma processing has been increasingly used to synthesize submicron powders of high-purity ceramics and metals. The high temperatures generated with the plasma provide a vapor phase reaction zone for elements with high boiling points and refractory materials. An overview is presented on the general plasma technology used in synthesis and on the properties of plasma powders.

  5. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  6. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Volume 1. Summary of the geology and uranium potential of Precambrian conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Flurkey, A.J.; Coolidge, C.M.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Sever, C.K.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of uranium-, thorium-, and gold-bearing conglomerates in Late Archean and Early Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks have been discovered in southern Wyoming. The mineral deposits were found by applying the time and strata bound model for the origin of uranium-bearing quartz-pebble conglomerates to favorable rock types within a geologic terrane known from prior regional mapping. No mineral deposits have been discovered that are of current (1981) economic interest, but preliminary resource estimates indicate that over 3418 tons of uranium and over 1996 tons of thorium are present in the Medicine Bow Mountains and that over 440 tons of uranium and 6350 tons of thorium are present in Sierra Madre. Sampling has been inadequate to determine gold resources. High grade uranium deposits have not been detected by work to date but local beds of uranium-bearing conglomerate contain as much as 1380 ppM uranium over a thickness of 0.65 meters. This project has involved geologic mapping at scales from 1/6000 to 1/50,000 detailed sampling, and the evaluation of 48 diamond drill holes, but the area is too large to fully establish the economic potential with the present information. This first volume summarizes the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of the uranium-bearing conglomerates. Volume 2 contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates.

  7. LIQUID PHASE SINTERING OF IRON WITH COPPER BASE ALLOY POWDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, M.-H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symposium on Powder Metallurgy - The Iron and Steel Inst.a Liquid Phase", Powder Metallurgy, 17 (33), 227 (1974). H.Other made by powder metallurgy techniques. ses to produce

  8. Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common...

  9. Structure of the eastern Red Rocks and Wind Ridge thrust faults, Wyoming: how a thrust fault gains displacement along strike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huntsman, Brent Stanley

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRUCTURE OF THE EASTERN RED ROCKS AND WIND RIDGE THRUST FAULTS, WYOMING: HOW A THRUST FAULT GAINS DISPLACEMENT ALONG STRIKE A Thesis by BRENT STANLEY HUNTSMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURE OF THE EASTERN RED ROCKS AND WIND RIDGE THRUST FAULTS, WYOMING: HOW A THRUST FAULT GAINS DISPLACEMENT ALONG STRIKE A Thesis by BRENT STANLEY HUNTSMAN...

  10. Conservation Assessment for Southern Maidenhair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region Black Hills National Forest in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota and Wyoming J. Hope Hornbeck, Deanna J. Reyher, Carolyn Hull Sieg and Reed W. Crook J. Hope Hornbeck is a Botanist with the Black Hills National Forest in Custer

  11. Continuous blending of dry pharmaceutical powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pernenkil, Lakshman

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional batch blending of pharmaceutical powders coupled with long quality analysis times increases the production cycle time leading to strained cash flows. Also, scale-up issues faced in process development causes ...

  12. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Williams, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biaxially textured alloy article comprises Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacted and heat treated, then rapidly recrystallized to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  13. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barringer, Eric A. (Waltham, MA); Fegley, Jr., M. Bruce (Waban, MA); Bowen, H. Kent (Belmont, MA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 micron can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed.

  14. Tantalum powder consolidation, modeling and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingert, S.R.; Vargas, V.D.; Sheinberg, H.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic approach was taken to investigate the consolidation of tantalum powders. The effects of sinter time, temperature and ramp rate; hot isostatic pressing (HIP) temperature and time; and powder oxygen content on consolidation density, kinetics, microstructure, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties have been evaluated. In general, higher temperatures and longer hold times resulted in higher density compacts with larger grain sizes for both sintering and HIP`ing. HIP`ed compacts were consistently higher in density than sintered products. The higher oxygen content powders resulted in finer grained, higher density HIP`ed products than the low oxygen powders. Texture analysis showed that the isostatically processed powder products demonstrated a near random texture. This resulted in isotropic properties in the final product. Mechanical testing results showed that the HIP`ed powder products had consistently higher flow stresses than conventionally produced plates, and the sintered compacts were comparable to the plate material. A micromechanics model (Ashby HIP model) has been employed to predict the mechanisms active in the consolidation processes of cold isostatic pressing (CIP), HIP and sintering. This model also predicts the density of the end product and whether grain growth should be expected under the applied processing conditions.

  15. A loesspaleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacialinterglacial cycles (~150 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Licciardi, Joseph M.

    ), although its origins are not well understood. In and near southeastern Washington, loess of the Palouse

  16. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  17. Laramide deformation of the Rocky Mountain Foreland, southeastern corner of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derr, Douglas Neanion

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    opening of a spreading center near the North Pole, oriented nearly parallel to the northern border of the United States, forced the North American plate to be pushed southwestward, resulting in the apparent rotation of the stress field and formation... Mountain Foreland includes a large area extending from northern New Mexico to southwestern Montana, and fmm the eastern limits of the Black Hills of South Dakota to the thrust belt of western Wyoming (Gries, 1983). In contrast to the consistent northerly...

  18. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D. (Livermore, CA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA); Landingham, Richard Lee (Livermore, CA); Hollingsworth, Joel P. (Oakland, CA)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  19. Die-target for dynamic powder consolidation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flinn, J.E.; Korth, G.E.

    1985-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A die/target is disclosed for consolidation of a powder, especially an atomized rapidly solidified metal powder, to produce monoliths by the dynamic action of a shock wave, especially a shock wave produced by the detonation of an explosive charge. The die/target comprises a rectangular metal block having a square primary surface with four rectangular mold cavities formed therein to receive the powder. The cavities are located away from the geometrical center of the primary surface and are distributed around such center while also being located away from the geometrical diagonals of the primary surface to reduce the action of reflected waves so as to avoid tensile cracking of the monoliths. The primary surface is covered by a powder retention plate which is engaged by a flyer plate to transmit the shock wave to the primary surface and the powder. Spawl plates are adhesively mounted on other surfaces of the block to act as momentum traps so as to reduce reflected waves in the block. 4 figs.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  2. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  3. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  4. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  5. Remedial Action Plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, M.L. (USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office); Sullivan, M. (Wyoming State Government, Cheyenne, WY (United States))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at an inactive uranium processing site northeast of Casper, Wyoming, and referred to as the Spook site. It provides a characterization of the present conditions at the site and also serves to document the concurrence of the State of Wyoming and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the State of Wyoming, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  6. The Technical and Economic Feasibility of Siting Synfuels Plants in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood; David Bell; William Schaffers; Thomas Foulke; Richard D Boardman

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study has been completed to determine the feasibility of constructing and operating gasification and reforming plants which convert Wyoming fossil resources (coal and natural gas) into the higher value products of power, transportation fuels, and chemical feedstocks, such as ammonia and methanol. Detailed plant designs, simulation models, economic models and well-to-wheel greenhouse gas models were developed, validated by national-level engineering firms, which were used to address the following issues that heretofore have prevented these types of projects from going forward in Wyoming, as much as elsewhere in the United States: 1. Quantification of plant capital and operating expenditures 2. Optimization of plant heat integration 3. Quantification of coal, natural gas, electricity, and water requirements 4. Access to raw materials and markets 5. Requirements for new infrastructure, such as electrical power lines and product pipelines 6. The possible cost-benefit tradeoffs of using natural gas reforming versus coal gasification 7. The extent of labor resources required for plant construction and for permanent operations 8. Options for managing associated CO2 emissions, including capture and uses in enhanced oil recovery and sequestration 9. Options for reducing water requirements such as recovery of the high moisture content in Wyoming coal and use of air coolers rather than cooling towers 10. Permitting requirements 11. Construction, and economic impacts on the local communities This paper will summarize the analysis completed for two major synfuels production pathways, methanol to gasoline and Fischer-Trosph diesel production, using either coal or natural gas as a feedstock.

  7. EIS-0450: TransWest Express 600 kV Direct Current Transmission Project in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (Wyoming State Office), evaluates the environmental impacts of granting a right-of-way for the TransWest Express 600-kilovolt Direct Current Transmission Project and amending a land use plan. The project consists of an overhead transmission line that would extend approximately 725 miles from south-central Wyoming, through Colorado and Utah. Western proposes to be a joint owner of the project.

  8. Environmental Assessment of Remedial Action at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0254) on the proposed remedial action at the inactive uranium milling site near Riverton, Wyoming. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required.

  9. Political mobilization, venue change, and the coal bed methane conflict in Montana and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, R.J. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The emerging conflict over coal bed methane (CBM) exploration and development in the mountain west offers a classic example of what Baumgartner and Jones call a 'wave of criticism.' The cozy subgovernments that have dominated energy exploration and development in the mountain states are now under attack and are struggling to maintain their autonomy. Energy exploration, which was once perceived to have only positive consequences, is now the focus of an intense debate that has managed to unite previously warring factions. This article utilizes a comparative assessment of CBM politics in Montana and Wyoming to explain the connection between changing popular and elite perceptions of the issue, institutional change, and policy change.

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Spook uranium mill tailings site, Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document assesses a joint remedial action proposed by the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project and the State of Wyoming Abandoned Mine Lands Program. The proposed action would consist of stabilizing uranium mill tailings and other associated contaminated materials within an inactive open pit mine on the site; backfilling the open pit with overburden materials that would act as a radon barrier and cover; and recontouring and seeding all disturbed areas to premining conditions. The impacts of no action at this site are addressed as the alternative to the proposed action. 74 refs., 12 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. Wyoming Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet)Cubic

  12. Emplacement of the Moxa Arch and interaction with the Western Overthrust Belt, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraig, David Harry

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Geology EMPLACEMENT OF THE MOXA ARCH AND INTERACTION WITH THE WESTERN OVERTHRUST BELT, WYOMING A Thesis by DAVID HARRY KRAIG Approved as to style and content by: David V. Wiltschko (Chairman of Committee... College B. S. The University of New Mexico Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. David V. Wiltschko The northern segment of the Moxa Arch is modeled as uplifted along a low-angle thrust (Moxa thrust, MT). The west-verging MT cuts up section from...

  13. AN INVESTIGATION OF A THERMOPLASTIC-POWDER METALLURGY PROCESS FOR THE FABRICATION OF POROUS NIOBIUM RODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordin, Dennis R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions, Powder Metallurgy, Vol. 8, No. 16, 1965. W.THERMOPLASTIC- POWDER METALLURGY PROCESS FOR THE FABRICATIONTHERMOPLASTIC- POWDER METALLURGY PROCESS FOR THE FABRICATION

  14. Development and Testing of a BI-2212 Textured Powder Conductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damborsky, Kyle

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    for Praxair powder in a 500 cP epoxy. .................................................................................................................. 23 Fig. 8: Texture vs. time for various epoxy and powder combinations. All data from an 8.9 T applied...

  15. Southern Region Watershed Management Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coordinators and the organization, management and activities of the Southern Region Water Quality Planning1 Southern Region Watershed Management Project September 15, 2000 to September 14, 2005 Terminal responding to water quality and conservation issues with educational assistance, technology development

  16. SIS a new SFF method based on powder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asiabanpour, Bahram - Department of Engineering and Technology, Texas State University

    . This approach, used by SLS and 3D printing, is able to create thin and uniformly dense powder layers. Other

  17. Modelling the mechanical behaviour of pharmaceutical powders during compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    are made of dry powder through a powder compaction process. In the pharmaceutical industry, billionsModelling the mechanical behaviour of pharmaceutical powders during compaction C.-Y. Wua,T, O.M. Ruddyb , A.C. Benthamb , B.C. Hancockc , S.M. Besta , J.A. Elliotta a Pfizer Institute for Pharmaceutical

  18. Thermite powder ignition by localized microwaves Yehuda Meir, Eli Jerby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    - propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) for sintering of ceramic composites [14]. The magnetic (H, the microwave energy is supplied locally to the powder. It creates a confined hotspot, and initiates a self-propagating the powder prior to its ignition is simulated theoretically, taking into account the powder's temperature

  19. Environmental evaluation and restoration plan of the Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site, Wyoming: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barteaux, W.L.; Berdan, G.L.; Lawrence, J.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments were conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Hoe Creek Site, Wyoming; the Hoe Creek I experiment was conducted in 1976, the Hoe Creek II experiment in 1977, and the Hoe Creek III experiment in 1979. These experiments have had an impact on the land and groundwater quality at the site, and the Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that Western Research Institute (WRI) develop and implement a site restoration plan. The purpose of the plan is to restore the site to conditions being negotiated with the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ). To prepare for developing a plan, WRI compiled background information on the site. The geologic and hydrologic characteristics of the site were determined, and the water quality data were analyzed. Modelling the site was considered and possible restoration methods were examined. Samples were collected and laboratory tests were conducted. WRI then developed and began implementing a field-scale restoration test. 41 refs, 46 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Hoe Creek experiments: LLNL's underground coal-gasification project in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, D.R.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy and predecessor organizations, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory carried out a laboratory program and three field, underground coal gasification tests near Gillette, Wyoming. This report summarizes that work. Three methods of linking or connecting injection and production wells were used for the UCG field tests: Hoe Creek No. 1 employed explosive fracturing, Hoe Creek No. 2 featured use of reverse combustion, and directional drilling was used for the Hoe Creek No. 3. The Gas Research Institute cosponsored the latter test. Laboratory experiments and modeling, together with a laboratory and field environment program, are necessary adjuncts to the field program. Explosive fracturing in coal was simulated using computer models and laboratory tests. We developed a relationship of total inelastic strains to permeability, which we used to design and interpret a coal outcrop, explosive fracturing experiment at Kemmerer, Wyoming. Coal gasification was also simulated in laboratory experiments and with computer models. The primary aim has been to predict and correlate reaction, thermal-front propagation rates, and product gas composition as a function of bed properties and process operating conditions. Energy recovery in the form of produced gas and liquids amounted to 73% of the energy in the consumed coal. There were essentially no losses to the subsurface formation. The greatest energy loss was in steam production.

  1. Geology of the Hanna Formation, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, R.L.; Youngberg, A.D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanna Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) study area consists of the SW1/4 of Section 29 and the E1/2SE1/4 of Section 30 in Township 22 North, Range 81 West, Wyoming. Regionally, this is located in the coal-bearing Hanna Syncline of the Hanna Basin in southeast Wyoming. The structure of the site is characterized by beds dipping gently to the northeast. An east-west fault graben complex interrupts this basic trend in the center of the area. The target coal bed of the UCG experiments was the Hanna No. 1 coal in the Hanna Formation. Sedimentary rocks comprising the Hanna Formation consist of a sequence of nonmarine shales, sandstones, coals and conglomerates. The overburden of the Hanna No. 1 coal bed at the Hanna UCG site was divided into four broad local stratigraphic units. Analytical studies were made on overburden and coal samples taken from cores to determine their mineralogical composition. Textural and mineralogical characteristics of sandstones from local stratigraphic units A, B, and C were analyzed and compared. Petrographic analyses were done on the coal including oxides, forms of sulfur, pyrite types, maceral composition, and coal rank. Semi-quantitative spectrographic and analytic geochemical analyses were done on the overburden and coal and relative element concentrations were compared. Trends within each stratigraphic unit were also presented and related to depositional environments. The spectrographic analysis was also done by lithotype. 34 references, 60 figures, 18 tables.

  2. Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

  3. Tiger Team Assessment of the Navel Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the Tiger Team Assessment of the Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW). NPOSR-CUW consists of Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 located near Casper, Wyoming; Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number I and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 3 located near Rifle, Colorado; and Naval Oil Shale Reserve Number 2 located near Vernal, Utah, which was not examined as part of this assessment. The assessment was comprehensive, encompassing environment, safety, and health (ES H) and quality assurance (QA) disciplines; site remediation; facilities management; and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, state, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; best management practices; and internal NPOSR-CUW requirements was assessed. The NPOSR-CUW Tiger Team Assessment is part of a larger, comprehensive DOE Tiger Team Independent Assessment Program planned for DOE facilities. The objective of the initiative is to provide the Secretary with information on the compliance status of DOE facilities with regard to ES H requirements, root causes for noncompliance, adequacy of DOE and contractor ES H management programs, response actions to address the identified problem areas, and DOE-wide ES H compliance trends and root causes.

  4. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  5. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  6. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1992-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

  7. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

  8. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

  9. EPR Investigation of Irradiated Curry Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duliu, O. G.; Ali, S. I. [University of Bucharest, Department of Atomic and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box MG-11, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Georgescu, R. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei, P.O. Box MG-6, 077125 Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray irradiated curry powder, a well priced oriental spice was investigated in order to establish the ability of EPR to detect the presence and time stability of free irradiation free-radicals. Accordingly, curry powder aliquots were irradiated with gradually increasing absorbed doses up to 11.3 kGy. The EPR spectra of all irradiated samples show the presence of al last two different species of free radicals, whose concentration increased monotonously with the absorbed doses. A 100 deg. C isothermal annealing of irradiated samples has shown a differential reduction of amplitude of various components of the initial spectra, but even after 3.6 h of thermal treatment, the remaining amplitude represents no less then 30% of the initial ones. The same peculiarities have been noticed after more than one year storage at room temperature, all of them being very useful in establishing the existence of any previous irradiation treatment.

  10. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  11. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  12. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garmets, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  13. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  14. Powder River Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug Power IncPowder River Energy Corporation Place: Sundance,

  15. NAME M/YEAR MASTERS THESES TITLES COMMENTS SCOPEL, ROBERT B Jun-49 The Volcanic History of Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    The Coldwater Formation in the Area of the Allegan Area of Southwestern Michigan ROWE, DEAN E Aug-51 Hole, Wyoming SIMONS, MERTON E Aug-49 Insoluble Residues of the Traverse Group in the Petoskey Area. Jun-50 Geology of an Area North of Gardener, Montana MORDEN, AUDLEY D., JR Jun-50 Stratigraphy

  16. NAME M/YEAR MASTERS THESES TITLES SCOPEL, ROBERT B Jun49 The Volcanic History of Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskaran, Mark

    , Park County, Wyoming GOSSER, CHARLES F. Jun60 Petrography and Metamorphism of the Star Lake Area of the Keewatin Province, Ontario RUBEL, DANIEL N Apr59 Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Cooke city - pilot peak, Montana BRUEHL, DONALD H. Jun61 The Petrography and Structure of an area North of Cooke City, Montana #12

  17. HumanWildlife Interactions 8(2):284290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Interactions 8(2):284­290, Fall 2014 Oil and gas impacts on Wyoming's sage- grouse: Historical impacts from oil and gas development to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat been extrapolated to estimate future oil and gas impacts in the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (2010

  18. The reflection of very cold neutrons from diamond powder nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Nesvizhevsky; E. V. Lychagin; A. Yu. Muzychka; A. V. Strelkov; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov

    2008-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study possibility of efficient reflection of very cold neutrons (VCN) from powders of nanoparticles. In particular, we measured the scattering of VCN at a powder of diamond nanoparticles as a function of powder sample thickness, neutron velocity and scattering angle. We observed extremely intense scattering of VCN even off thin powder samples. This agrees qualitatively with the model of independent nanoparticles at rest. We show that this intense scattering would allow us to use nanoparticle powders very efficiently as the very first reflectors for neutrons with energies within a complete VCN range up to $10^{-4}$ eV.

  19. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunmead, S.D.; Weimer, A.W.; Carroll, D.F.; Eisman, G.A.; Cochran, G.A.; Susnitzky, D.W.; Beaman, D.R.; Nilsen, K.J.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  20. Overburden characterization and post-burn study of the Hoe Creek, Wyoming underground coal gasification site and comparison with the Hanna, Wyoming site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ethridge, F.C.; Burns, L.K.; Alexander, W.G.; Craig, G.N. II; Youngberg, A.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978 the third test (Hoe Creek III) in a series of underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments was completed at a site south of Gillette, Wyoming. The post-burn study of the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock of the two coal seams affected by the experiment is based on the study of fifteen cores. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the geology of the overburden and interlayered rock and to determine and evaluate the mineralogical and textural changes that were imposed by the experiment. Within the burn cavity the various sedimentary units have been brecciated and thermally altered to form several pyrometamorphic rock types of paralava rock, paralava breccia, buchite, buchite breccia and hornfels. High temperature minerals of mullite, cordierite, oligo-clase-andesine, tridymite, cristobalite, clinopyroxenes, and magnetite are common in the pyrometamorphic rocks. The habit of these minerals indicates that they crystallized from a melt. These minerals and textures suggest that the rocks were formed at temperatures between 1200/sup 0/ and 1400/sup 0/C. A comparison of geologic and geological-technological factors between the Hoe Creek III site, which experienced substantial roof collapse, and the Hanna II site, which had only moderate roof collapse, indicates that overburden thickness relative to coal seam thickness, degree of induration of overburden rock, injection-production well spacing, and ultimate cavity size are important controls of roof collapse in the structural setting of the two sites.

  1. Large Bore Powder Gun Qualification (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabern, Donald A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdiviez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Large Bore Powder Gun (LBPG) is being designed to enable experimentalists to characterize material behavior outside the capabilities of the NNSS JASPER and LANL TA-55 PF-4 guns. The combination of these three guns will create a capability to conduct impact experiments over a wide range of pressures and shock profiles. The Large Bore Powder Gun will be fielded at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) U1a Complex. The Complex is nearly 1000 ft below ground with dedicated drifts for testing, instrumentation, and post-shot entombment. To ensure the reliability, safety, and performance of the LBPG, a qualification plan has been established and documented here. Requirements for the LBPG have been established and documented in WE-14-TR-0065 U A, Large Bore Powder Gun Customer Requirements. The document includes the requirements for the physics experiments, the gun and confinement systems, and operations at NNSS. A detailed description of the requirements is established in that document and is referred to and quoted throughout this document. Two Gun and Confinement Systems will be fielded. The Prototype Gun will be used primarily to characterize the gun and confinement performance and be the primary platform for qualification actions. This gun will also be used to investigate and qualify target and diagnostic modifications through the life of the program (U1a.104 Drift). An identical gun, the Physics Gun, will be fielded for confirmatory and Pu experiments (U1a.102D Drift). Both guns will be qualified for operation. The Gun and Confinement System design will be qualified through analysis, inspection, and testing using the Prototype Gun for the majority of process. The Physics Gun will be qualified through inspection and a limited number of qualification tests to ensure performance and behavior equivalent to the Prototype gun. Figure 1.1 shows the partial configuration of U1a and the locations of the Prototype and Physics Gun/Confinement Systems.

  2. Laser production of articles from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, G.K.; Milewski, J.O.; Cremers, D.A.; Nemec, R.B.; Barbe, M.R.

    1998-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. Preferably the tool path and other parameters of the deposition process are established using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of a deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which a deposition head which delivers the laser beam and powder to the deposition zone moves along the tool path. 20 figs.

  3. Laser production of articles from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Gary K. (Los Alamos, NM); Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Cremers, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Nemec, Ronald B. (White Rock, NM); Barbe, Michael R. (White Rock, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. Preferably the tool path and other parameters of the deposition process are established using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of a deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which a deposition head which delivers the laser beam and powder to the deposition zone moves along the tool path.

  4. Powder Dropper | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22, 2014SocietyJ.Potential(GFA)Powder Dropper

  5. Seminoe-Kortes transmission line/substation consolidation project, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing switchyards at Western Area Power Administration's (WESTERN) Seminoe and Kortes facilities, located approximately 40 miles northeast of Rawlines, Carbon County, Wyoming, were constructed in 1939 and 1951, respectively. The circuit breakers at these facilities are beyond or approaching their service life and need to be replaced. In addition, the switchyards have poor access for maintenance and replacement of equipment, and their locations create potential for oil spills into the North Platte River. WESTERN is proposing to consolidate the switchyard facilities into one new substation to provide easier access, restore proper levels of system reliability, and decrease the potential for oil contamination of the river. This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the proposed Seminoe-Kortes Consolidation Project. 57 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Ground-water effects of the UCG experiments at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water changes and subsidence effects associated with three underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments have been monitored at the Hoe Creek site in northeastern Wyoming. Ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. It was found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. These contaminants may be of environmental significance if they find their way, in sufficient concentrations, into surface waters, or into aquifers from which water is extracted for drinking or agricultural purposes. Fortunately, the concentrations of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, recent field measurements indicate that there may be significant limitations on this natural cleansing process. The contaminants of potential concern, and the mechanisms that affect their deposition and persistence have been identified.

  7. Oil springs and flat top anticlines, Carbon County Wyoming: An unusual fold pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackstone, D.L. Jr. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil Springs Anticline, northwest of Medicine Bow, Wyoming, and located at the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin, lies near the junction of the Freezeout Hills Anticline, the Shirley thrust fault and the Flat Top Anticline. The surface fold as defined by the outcrop of the Wall Creek Sandstone Member of the Frontier Formation is disharmonic to deeper structure at the level of the Jurassic Sundance Formation. The fold is wedged between two major folds and is the result of a space problem between larger structural elements. The controlling Flat Top Anticline is an excellent example of a fold controlled by a well constrained fault in the Precambrian crystalline basement. The basement is bowed upward and outward to the northwest in the hanging wall of the Flat Top Anticline. The purpose of this paper is to describe the geologic structure of the Oil Springs and Flat Top anticlines and their relationship to the Freezeout Hills and the Hanna Basin. Commercial production of petroleum and natural gas occurs on the west flank of the Laramie-Cooper Lake Basin as far north as the northeast corner of the Hanna Basin. Stone reviewed the producing formations in the Laramie and eastern Hanna basins and noted that 11 commercial accumulations of petroleum and natural gas are directly related to anticlinal structures. Production derived from the Permian-Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone in this region has a special geologic framework. Fields that produce from the Tensleep Sandstone are well defined anticlines bounded by faults or fault systems, a situation also reported by Biggs and Espach, Blackstone and in the Wyoming Geological Association Symposium. The Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in these faulted anticlines are in juxtaposition to potential source rocks of either Jurassic or Cretaceous age in the footwalls of the faults. 17 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

  9. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

  10. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  11. Method for preparing metal powder, device for preparing metal powder, method for processing spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing metal powder is provided the comprising supplying a molten bath containing a reducing agent, contacting a metal oxide with the molten bath for a time and at a temperature sufficient to reduce the metal in the metal oxide to elemental metal and produce free oxygen; and isolating the elemental metal from the molten bath.

  12. Amorphous powders of Al-Hf prepared by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, R.B.; Hannigan, J.W.; Sheinberg, H.; Tiainen, T.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We synthesized amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ alloy powder by mechanically alloying an equimolar mixture of crystalline powders of Al and Hf using hexane as a dispersant. We characterized the powder as a function of mechanical-alloying time by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ powder heated at 10 K s/sup /minus/1/ crystallizes polymorphously at 1003 K into orthorhombic AlHf (CrB-type structure). During mechanical alloying, some hexane decomposes and hydrogen and carbon are incorporated into the amorphous alloy powder. The hydrogen can be removed by annealing the powder by hot pressing at a temperature approximately 30 K below the crystallization temperature. The amorphous compacts have a diamond pyramidal hardness of 1025 DPH. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. NanoComposite Stainless Steel Powder Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHoff, R.; Glasgow, C. (MesoCoat, Inc.)

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been investigating a new class of Fe-based amorphous material stemming from a DARPA, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency initiative in structural amorphous metals. Further engineering of the original SAM materials such as chemistry modifications and manufacturing processes, has led to the development of a class of Fe based amorphous materials that upon processing, devitrify into a nearly homogeneous distribution of nano sized complex metal carbides and borides. The powder material is produced through the gas atomization process and subsequently utilized by several methods; laser fusing as a coating to existing components or bulk consolidated into new components through various powder metallurgy techniques (vacuum hot pressing, Dynaforge, and hot isostatic pressing). The unique fine scale distribution of microstructural features yields a material with high hardness and wear resistance compared to material produced through conventional processing techniques such as casting while maintaining adequate fracture toughness. Several compositions have been examined including those specifically designed for high hardness and wear resistance and a composition specifically tailored to devitrify into an austenitic matrix (similar to a stainless steel) which poses improved corrosion behavior.

  14. Southern Sky Redshift Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Costa, L.N.; Pellegrini, P.S.; Sargent, W.L.W.; Tonry, J.; Davis, M.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general characteristics of the space distribution of galaxies in the SSRS sample, covering the southern Galactic cap, are examined, and maps of the space distribution are presented. The sample consists of 2028 galaxies in an area of 1.75 sr with declination south of -17.5 deg and galactic latitude below -30 deg. The survey provides useful information on large-scale structure to a depth of 120/h Mpc. The galaxy distribution exhibits prominent filaments, sheets, and voids. Some large-scale structures are highly subclustered; others are much more diffuse. 21 references.

  15. Synthesis of nanophase W and WC powders from ammonium metatungstate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, L.; Kear, B.H. [Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Ceramic Engineering

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanophase {alpha}-W powder has been synthesized by reductive decomposition of ammonium metatungstate (AMT) at low temperatures (< 600 C). The formation of {beta}-W, which is the usual product of low temperature reduction of tungsten oxides, is avoided. Thus, it has been possible to lower the carburization temperature of W to WC to about 575 C. Nanophase WC powder (< 10 nm grain size) is produced by the low temperature carburization of nanophase {alpha}-W powder.

  16. Controlled powder morphology experiments in megabar 304 stainless steel compaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Johnson, K.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments with controlled morphology including shape, size, and size distribution were made on 304L stainless steel powders. These experiments involved not only the powder variables but pressure variables of 0.08 to 1.0 Mbar. Also included are measured container strain on the material ranging from 1.5% to 26%. Using a new strain controllable design it was possible to seperate and control, independently, strain and pressure. Results indicate that powder morphology, size distribution, packing density are among the pertinent parameters in predicting compaction of these powders.

  17. Iowa Powder Atomization Technologies, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    complex parts very efficiently. Metal powders are mixed with a low melting plastic and injected into reusable molds, the plastic is then removed and the remaining...

  18. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  19. Neutron Powder Diffraction and Molecular Simulation Study of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulation Study of the Structural Evolution of Ammonia Borane from 15 to 340 K. Neutron Powder Diffraction and Molecular Simulation Study of the Structural Evolution of...

  20. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  1. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabin, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

  2. Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennings, Peter Hill

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana. (August 1986) Peter Hill Hennings, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. John H. Spang Field mapping on scales of 1:6, 000 and 1: 12, 000 indicate that the basement involved... in the Field Area Methodology DATA. PAGE I 3 7 10 12 17 25 25 28 Field Map. Interpretive Data: Cross Sections Dry Fork Ridge Anticline. Faole Point Anticline and the Mountain Flank. . Basement Geometry. Fracture Analysis...

  3. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future oil shale and tar sands resource development.

  4. Process for preparing titanium nitride powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1988-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making titanium nitride powder by reaction of titanium phosphates with sodium cyanide. The process of this invention may comprise mixing one or more phosphates of Ti with a cyanide salt in the absence of oxygen and heating to a temperature sufficient to cause reaction to occur. In the preferred embodiment the ratio of cyanide salt to Ti should be at least 2 which results in the major Ti-containing product being TiN rather than sodium titanium phosphate byproducts. The process is an improvement over prior processes since the byproducts are water soluble salts of sodium which can easily be removed from the preferred TiN product by washing. 2 tabs.

  5. Gaseous Decomposition Products of Safety Powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cubbison, C.E.

    1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    19.6 Volume o f a i r added 70.8 T o t a l vo lume 90 .4 Volume a f t e r e x p l o s i o n — 74.4 C o n t r a c t i o n 16.0 R e s i d u e a f t e r a b s o r p t i o n o f c a r b o n d i o x i d e 68.8 74.4 6 8 . 8 = 5 .6 . Oxygen p r e s e... DECOMPOSITION PRODUCTS OF SAFETY POWDERS. THESIS SUBMITTED FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE I I THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL BHGUEBRING AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS. BY C.E.CUBBISOH 1912. RD01D7 MaDSfl COHTEHTS. * * * * Pago * P r e f a c e 6...

  6. Sinterable powders from laser driven reactions : final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggerty, John Scarseth

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely fine, uniform ceramic powders have been synthesized from Sil4 NH3 and C2H4 gas phase reactants that are heated by absorbing optical energy emitted from a C02 laser. Resulting Si, Si3N4 and SiC powders have been ...

  7. Synthesis of high purity sinterable silicon carbide powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boecker, W.D.; Mehosky, B.L.; Rogers, R.S.C.; Storm, R.S.; Venkateswaran, V. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (USA). Structural Ceramics Div.)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High purity, submicron silicon carbide powders were produced via gas phase synthesis using a hydrogen/argon plasma. Two test facilities were constructed, a bench-scale unit and a larger pilot scale reactor. Three candidate silicon sources were evaluated:silicon tetrachloride (SiCl{sub 4}). dimethyldichlorosilane (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}(SiCl{sub 2}) and methyltrichlorosilane (CH{sub 3}SiCl{sub 3}). Product powders were evaluated on the basis of pressureless sinterability, surface area, agglomeration, particle size distribution, phase distribution and chemistry. Three commercial powders, Starck A10, Starck B10, and Carborundum submicron alpha silicon carbide, were also evaluated for comparison to the product powders. Powders were reproducibly synthesized at a rate of one pound per hour for standard run times of five hours. Product powders exhibited chemical and physical properties equal to or exceeding the commercial powders evaluated. In limited attempts to pressureless sinter the product powders, densities of 91% of theoretical were obtained with as-produced powder. Post-processing permitted densities in excess of 97% of theoretical. X-ray diffraction of the product indicates that the product powders are primarily beta poly-types, with traces of alpha present. Increased production rates to a target level of seven pounds per hour were not possible due to current transients produced by the pilot scale power supply. Extensive unsuccessful efforts to reduce or eliminate the transients are described. Low recovered product yields resulted from a failure of a product collection filter that was not discovered until the completion of the project.

  8. Multi-scale current activated tip-based sintering of powder-based materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Desouky, Ahmed Mohamed

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Japan Society for powder Metallurgy 9 B. Srinivasaro, K. Oh-PM sintering method. Powder Metallurgy 45(4):322-328 47 Z.A.Japan Society of Powder Metallurgy 57(10): 654-659 106 M.

  9. Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bora Mavis

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of kinetic components of a reaction which was set to stoichiometric constant with which the species appear in the reaction in KINSIM by default. For instance, in the case of LDH precipitation, the new program allows to change the order of species in the reactions associated with Al{sup 3+} and let the Ni{sup 2+} reactions take over. This could be carried on iteratively until a good fit between the experimental data and the predictions were observed. However for such studies availability of accurate equilibrium constants (especially for the solubility products for the solid phase) is a prerequisite.

  10. Final environmental statement related to the Western Nuclear, Inc. , Split Rock Uranium Mill (Fremont County, Wyoming)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed action is the renewal of Source Material License SUA-56 (with amendments) issued to Western Nuclear, Inc. (WNI), for the operation of the Split Rock Uranium Mill near Jeffrey City and the Green Mountain Ion-Exchange Facility, both in Fremont County, Wyoming. The license also permits possession of material from past operations at four ancillary facilities in the Gas Hills mining area - the Bullrush, Day-Loma, Frazier-Lamac, and Rox sites (Docket No. 40-1162). However, although heap leaching operations were previously authorized at Frazier-Lamac, there has never been any processing of material at this site. The Split Rock mill is an acid-leach, ion-exchange and solvent-extraction uranium-ore processing mill with a design capacity of 1540 MT (1700 tons) of ore per day. WNI has proposed by license amendment request to increase the storage capacity of the tailings ponds in order to permit the continuation of present production rates of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ through 1996 using lower-grade ores.

  11. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spook, Wyoming, site observational work plan proposes site-specific activities to achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) of the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards 60 FR 2854 (1995) at this Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This draft SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of existing site characterization data, a conceptual site model of the nature and extent of ground water contamination, exposure pathways, and potential impact to human health and the environment. Section 2.0 describes the requirements for meeting ground water standards at UMTRA Project sites. Section 3.0 defines past and current conditions, describes potential environmental and human health risks, and provides site-specific data that supports the selection of a proposed ground water compliance strategy. Section 4.0 provides the justification for selecting the proposed ground water compliance strategy based on the framework defined in the ground water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS).

  12. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project`s present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b).

  13. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

  14. Postburn evaluation for Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3, underground coal gasification experiments, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngberg, A.D.; Sinks, D.J.; Craig, G.N. II; Ethridge, F.G.; Burns, L.K.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1980 and 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) conducted a post-burn study at the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) site, Hanna, Wyoming. This report contains a summary of the field and laboratory results from the study. Lithologic and geophysical well log data from twenty-two (22) drill holes, combined with high resolution seismic data delineate a reactor cavity 42.7m (140 ft.) long, 35.1 m (115 ft.) and 21.3 m (70 ft.) high that is partially filled with rubble, char and pyrometamorphic rock. Sedimentographic studies were completed on the overburden. Reflectance data on coal samples within the reactor cavity and cavity wall reveal that the coal was altered by temperatures ranging from 245/sup 0/C to 670/sup 0/C (472/sup 0/-1238/sup 0/F). Overburden rocks found within the cavity contain various pyrometamorphic minerals, indicating that temperatures of at least 1200/sup 0/C (2192/sup 0/F) were reached during the tests. The calcite cemented fine-grained sandstone and siltstone directly above the Hanna No. 1 coal bed formed a strong roof above the cavity, unlike other UCG sites such as Hoe Creek which is not calcite cemented. 30 references, 27 figures, 8 tables.

  15. Implications of ground-water measurements at the Hoe Creek UCG site in northeastern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, S.W.; Wang, F.T.; Stuermer, D.H.; Raber, E.; Ganow, H.C.; Stone, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) promises to become an important source of synthetic fuels. In an effort to provide timely information concerning the environmental implications of the UCG process, we are conducting investigations in conjunction with the UCG experiments carried out in northeastern Wyoming by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Our ground-water quality measurements have extended over a period of four years and have been supplemented by laboratory studies of contaminant sorption by coal. Cavity roof collapse and aquifer interconnection were also investigated, using surface and subsurface geotechnical instruments, post-burn coring, and hydraulic head measurements. We have found that a broad range of residual gasification products are introduced into the ground-water system. Fortunately, the concentrations of many of these contaminants are substantially reduced by sorption on the surrounding coal. However, some of these materials seem likely to remain in the local groundwater, at low concentrations, for several years. We have attempted to interpret our results in terms of concepts that will assist in the development of effective and practicable control technologies.

  16. Morphology and composition of Ni-Co electrodeposited powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maksimovic, V.M., E-mail: vesnam@vinca.rs [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 'Vinca', University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade, P. O. Box 522 (Serbia); Lacnjevac, U.C. [Institute for Multidisciplinary research, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 33, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Stoiljkovic, M.M. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 'Vinca', University of Belgrade, 11001 Belgrade, P. O. Box 522 (Serbia); Pavlovic, M.G. [Institute of Electrochemistry, ICTM, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Njegoseva 12 (Serbia); Jovic, V.D. [Institute for Multidisciplinary research, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 33, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The morphology, phase and chemical composition of Ni-Co alloy powders electrodeposited from an ammonium sulfate-boric acid containing electrolyte with different ratio of Ni/Co ions were investigated. The ratios of Ni/Co ions were 1/1, 1/2 and 1/3. The morphology, chemical composition and phase composition of the electrodeposited alloy powders were investigated using AES, SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. Composition of the electrolyte, i.e. the ratio of Ni/Co concentrations was found to influence both, the alloy phase composition and the morphology of Ni-Co alloy powders. At the highest ratio of Ni/Co = 1/1 concentrations typical 2D fern-like dendritic particles were obtained. With a decrease of Ni/Co ions ratio among 2D fern-like dendrites, 3D dendrites and different agglomerates were obtained. X-ray diffraction studies showed that the alloy powders mainly consisted of the face-centered cubic {alpha}-nickel phase and hexagonal close-packed {epsilon}-cobalt phase and minor proportions of face-centered cubic {alpha}-cobalt phase. The occurrence of the latter phase was observed only in the alloy powder with the higher cobalt concentration in electrolyte. The electrodeposition of Ni-Co powders occurred in an anomalous manner. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-Co alloys powders were successfully electrodeposited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of the electrolyte (Ni/Co ions ratio) was found to influence on morphology of powders. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrodeposition of Ni-Co powders occurred in an anomalous manner.

  17. amorphous ball-milled powders: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , and thermal properties of Nafion powders prepared by high-energy ball milling of pellets is given. Nafion powders prepared in this manner exhibit thermal behavior similar...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum powder mixtures Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Summary: .S. Colton GIT 2009 17 12;Compacting Pressures for Various Metal Powders P Metal Pressure (MPa) Aluminum... Metal Powder...

  19. Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

  20. Characterization of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic powders produced by water atomization and powder heat treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tongsri, Ruangdaj, E-mail: ruangdt@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Yotkaew, Thanyaporn, E-mail: thanyy@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Krataitong, Rungtip, E-mail: rungtipk@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Wila, Pongsak, E-mail: pongsakw@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Sir-on, Autcharaporn, E-mail: autchars@mtec.or.th [Materials Characterization Research Unit (MCRU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Muthitamongkol, Pennapa, E-mail: pennapm@mtec.or.th [Materials Characterization Research Unit (MCRU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Tosangthum, Nattaya, E-mail: nattayt@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic shows its importance in industrial applications, the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic-containing powders, produced by a powder processing route with a high production rate, were characterized. The route consisted of water atomization of an alloy melt (Cu–61 wt.% Sn) and subsequent heat treatment of the water-atomized powders. Characterization of the water-atomized powders and their heated forms was conducted by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Fine water-atomized powder microstructures consisted of primary hexagonal ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} dendrites coexisting with interdendritic ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic. Solidification of fine melt droplets was governed by surface nucleation and growth of the primary hexagonal ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} dendrites followed by ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic solidification of the remnant liquid. In coarse melt droplets, nucleation and growth of primary ?-Cu{sub 3}Sn dendrites were followed by peritectic reaction (?-Cu{sub 3}Sn + liquid ? ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5}) or direct crystallization of ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} phase from the undercooled melt. Finally, the ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic solidification of the remnant liquid occurred. Heating of the water-atomized powders at different temperatures resulted in microstructural homogenization. The water-atomized powders with mixed phases were transformed to powders with single monoclinic ?-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} phase. - Highlights: • The Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic powder production route was proposed. • Single phase Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} powders could be by water atomization and heating. • Water-atomized Cu–Sn powders contained mixed Cu–Sn phases. • Solidification and heat treatment of water-atomized Cu–Sn powders are explained.

  1. Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. es011yakovleva2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary Technology for High Energy Li-ion...

  2. Apparatus for making environmentally stable reactive alloy powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloyants needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

  3. aluminum powder part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear applications. Two specific uses for which this powder is intended are Al2O3 pellets and Al2O 3 ? B4C composite pellets for use as thermal insulator or burnable neutron...

  4. aluminum germanium powders: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear applications. Two specific uses for which this powder is intended are Al2O3 pellets and Al2O 3 ? B4C composite pellets for use as thermal insulator or burnable neutron...

  5. Environmentally stable reactive alloy powders and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, I.E.; Lograsso, B.K.; Terpstra, R.L.

    1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for making powder from a metallic melt by atomizing the melt to form droplets and reacting the droplets downstream of the atomizing location with a reactive gas. The droplets are reacted with the gas at a temperature where a solidified exterior surface is formed thereon and where a protective refractory barrier layer (reaction layer) is formed whose penetration into the droplets is limited by the presence of the solidified surface so as to avoid selective reduction of key reactive alloys needed to achieve desired powder end use properties. The barrier layer protects the reactive powder particles from environmental constituents such as air and water in the liquid or vapor form during subsequent fabrication of the powder to end-use shapes and during use in the intended service environment. 7 figs.

  6. Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders is described. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe[sub 3] Al and FeAl. 25 figures.

  7. alloyed powders kermetnye: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  8. alloy powder fabricated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  9. alloy powders produced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  10. alloy powders obtained: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  11. alloyed powders hyperfine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  12. alloy powder prepared: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  13. Neutron detectors comprising ultra-thin layers of boron powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhehul; Morris, Christopher

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-efficiency neutron detector substrate assemblies comprising a first conductive substrate, wherein a first side of the substrate is in direct contact with a first layer of a powder material having a thickness of from about 50 nm to about 250 nm and comprising .sup.10boron, .sup.10boron carbide or combinations thereof, and wherein a conductive material is in proximity to the first layer of powder material; and processes of making said neutron detector substrate assemblies.

  14. Consolidation of aluminum 6061 powder by equal channel angular extrusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, John Montgomery

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the powder is placed in a deformable mold ? often rubber, glass, or stainless steel. The container is evacuated and welded shut and then placed inside the HIP unit. A high- pressure gas or liquid surrounds the powder mold and applies pressure equally on all... oxide films and provide new surface area for welding. Next, the particles are resistance heated and pressure is applied for about 15 minutes. Applied temperatures are lower than HIP temperatures, and PAS uses much shorter consolidation times ? minutes...

  15. Quality experimental and calculated powder x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullenger, D.B.; Cantrell, J.S.; Beiter, T.A.; Tomlin, D.W.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, we have submitted quality powder XRD patterns to the International Centre for Diffraction Data for inclusion as reference standards in their Powder Diffraction File. The procedure followed is described; examples used are {beta}-UH{sub 3}, {alpha}- BaT{sub 2}, alpha-lithium disilicate ({alpha}-Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}), and 2,2`,4,4`,6,6`hexanitroazobenzene-III (HNAB-III).

  16. Powder segregation during the filling of a simple die

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Larry Raymond

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . During vibratory die f il ling, f iltration of f ines through the moving powder mass is still a major cause of segregation. The vibration tends to flatten out the inner mound of fines, thereby decreasing radial segregation and increasing vertical... SEGREGATION DURING DIE FILLING 23 l. Introduction 23 2. Experimental 2. 1. Materials 2. 2. Equipment and Procedure 23 23 24 3. Results 4. Discussion 5. Conclusions 24 24 31 III. SOME EFFECTS OF VIBRATION UPON POWDER SEGREGATION DURING DIE...

  17. Annotated bibliography of selected references on shoreline barrier island deposits with emphasis on Patrick Draw Field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Schatzinger, R.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains 290 annotated references on barrier island and associated depositional environments and reservoirs. It is not an exhaustive compilation of all references on the subject, but rather selected papers on barrier islands, and the depositional processes of formation. Papers that examine the morphology and internal architecture of barrier island deposits, exploration and development technologies are emphasized. Papers were selected that aid in understanding reservoir architecture and engineering technologies to help maximize recovery efficiency from barrier island oil reservoirs. Barrier islands from Wyoming, Montana and the Rocky Mountains basins are extensively covered.

  18. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  19. Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the first document for the UMTRA Ground Water Project to address site-specific activities to meet compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)). In support of the activities the regulatory framework and drivers are presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. A combination of the two compliance strategies that will be recommended for this site are no remediation with the application of alternate concentration levels (ACL) and natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. ACLs are to be applied to constituents that occur at concentrations above background levels but which are essential nutrients and occur within nutritional ranges and/or have very low toxicity and high dietary intake rates compared to the levels detected in the ground water. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels within 1 00 years. These two recommended compliance strategies were evaluated by applying Riverton site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement. There are three aquifers beneath the site: a surficial unconfined aquifer, a middle semiconfined aquifer, and a deeper confined aquifer. The milling-related contamination at the site has affected both the surficial and semiconfined aquifers, although the leaky shale aquifers separating these units limits the downward migration of contamination into the semiconfined aquifer. A shale aquitard separates the semiconfined aquifer from the underlying confined aquifer which has not been contaminated by milling-related constituents.

  20. Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern...

  1. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company:...

  2. In vitro degradation and cytotoxicity of Mg/Ca composites produced by powder metallurgy q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    In vitro degradation and cytotoxicity of Mg/Ca composites produced by powder metallurgy q Y Biodegradation Cytotoxicity Powder metallurgy a b s t r a c t Mg/Ca (1 wt.%, 5 wt.%, 10 wt.% Ca) composites were prepared from pure magnesium and calcium powders using the powder metallurgy method, aiming to enlarge

  3. Powder Diffraction with Proteins Jon Wright, Irene Margiolaki, Andy Fitch and Yves Watier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    Powder Diffraction with Proteins Jon Wright, Irene Margiolaki, Andy Fitch and Yves Watier #12 C 3Wright, Protein Powders #12;Wright, Protein Powders 4 Structure representations #12;Wright method to "solve" phase problem · What do we see in electron density maps? 6Wright, Protein Powders #12

  4. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL AND GAS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five sub-contractors that have taken place during the first six months (January 1, 2003--June 30, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Gnomon, Inc. and all five (5) subcontractors have agreed on a process for the framework of this two-year project. They have also started gathering geomorphological information and entering cultural resource data into databases that will be used to create models later in the project. This data is being gathered in both the Power River Basin of Wyoming, and the Southeastern region of New Mexico. Several meetings were held with key players in this project to explain the purpose of the research, to obtain feedback and to gain support. All activities have been accomplished on time and within budget with no major setbacks.

  5. BIOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT SOURCEBOOK GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    1 BIOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT SOURCEBOOK GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY GENERAL TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1: Introduction to the Biology Department.............................................5 Chapter 2 #12;2 BIOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT SOURCEBOOK GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY DETAILED TABLE OF CONTENTS

  6. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amber Lynn Genau

    2004-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  7. Method for producing microcomposite powders using a soap solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maginnis, Michael A. (Coker, AL); Robinson, David A. (Mobile, AL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing microcomposite powders for use in superconducting and non-superconducting applications. A particular method to produce microcomposite powders for use in superconducting applications includes the steps of: (a) preparing a solution including ammonium soap; (b) dissolving a preselected amount of a soluble metallic such as silver nitrate in the solution including ammonium soap to form a first solution; (c) adding a primary phase material such as a single phase YBC superconducting material in particle form to the first solution; (d) preparing a second solution formed from a mixture of a weak acid and an alkyl-mono-ether; (e) adding the second solution to the first solution to form a resultant mixture; (f) allowing the resultant mixture to set until the resultant mixture begins to cloud and thicken into a gel precipitating around individual particles of the primary phase material; (g) thereafter drying the resultant mixture to form a YBC superconducting material/silver nitrate precursor powder; and (h) calcining the YBC superconducting material/silver nitrate precursor powder to convert the silver nitrate to silver and thereby form a YBC/silver microcomposite powder wherein the silver is substantially uniformly dispersed in the matrix of the YBC material.

  8. Effects of Natural Gas Well Development and Reclamation Activities on Topsoil Properties Proposal Submitted to the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    , as is typically done during energy development activities, drastically disrupts the soil system and stimulates Submitted to the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources 2007-08 Matching Grant Fund April 15, 2008 Summary: Maintaining and restoring productivity of topsoil disturbed by energy development is crucial

  9. Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Appraiser under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study.

  10. 3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, and River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Pointe, Paul; Parney, Robert; Eiben, Thorsten; Dunleavy, Mike; Whitney, John; Eubanks, Darrel

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models.

  11. Annual variation in primary moult parameters in Cape Weavers, Southern Masked Weavers and Southern Red

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    and Southern Red Bishops in the Western Cape, South Africa #12;160 #12;161 Annual variation in primary moult parameters in Cape Weavers, Southern Masked Weavers and Southern Red Bishops in the Western Cape, South Africa Abstract Duration of primary moult was similar in Cape Weavers and Southern Red Bishops (96 days

  12. Georgia Southern University Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Georgia Southern University Information Technology Organization Chart 2013-2014 FINAL: September 18, 2013 R\\Work\\Common:\\OrgCharts\\Rev2014\\ Information Technology \\CIO Produced: Strategic Research of the groups of units reporting there. President Vice President for Information Technology and Chief

  13. Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulation of Recent Southern Hemisphere Climate Change Nathan P. Gillett1 * and David W. J. Thompson2 Recent observations indicate that climate change over the high latitudes of the Southern's surface as well. Recent climate change in the Southern Hemi- sphere (SH) is marked by a strengthening

  14. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Byers, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed.

  15. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Byers, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed.

  16. Method and apparatus for the production of metal oxide powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Byers, C.H.

    1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method for preparing metal oxide powder. A first solution, which is substantially organic, is prepared. A second solution, which is an aqueous solution substantially immiscible in the first solution, is prepared and delivered as drops to the first solution. The drops of the second solution are atomized by a pulsed electric field forming micro-drops of the second solution. Reagents in the first solution diffuse into and react with reactants in the micro-drops of the second solution forming metal hydroxide or oxalate particles. The metal hydroxide or metal oxalate particles are then recovered and dried to produce the metal oxide powder. An apparatus for preparing a metal oxide powder is also disclosed. 2 figs.

  17. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Ning Guiling [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)], E-mail: ninggl@dlut.edu.cn; Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  18. Aerosol flow reactor production of superconducting ceramic powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodas, T. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Engler, E.; Lee, V.; Parkin, L.S. (Research Div., Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential applications and basic studies of superconducting ceramics require the reproducible production of chemically homogeneous, ultrapure powders with controlled particle size distributions. Previous work has mainly examined the use of liquid and solid phase methods for superconducting powder production. In this work, it is shown that carbon-free, submicron powders based on the Y-Ba-Cu-O, La-Sr-Cu-O, Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O and Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O systems can be produced in a gaseous flow system by reacting aerosol particles containing the nitrate salts of the appropriate metals in flowing oxygen at temperatures of 900 - 1100C. It is also demonstrated that composite Cu/YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7/ wires can be fabricated by thermophoretic deposition of the particles onto the inner surface of a Cu tube hby sintering/annealing.

  19. Method for forming biaxially textured articles by powder metallurgy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Williams, Robert K. (Knoxville, TN); Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing a biaxially textured alloy article comprises the steps of preparing a mixture comprising Ni powder and at least one powder selected from the group consisting of Cr, W, V, Mo, Cu, Al, Ce, YSZ, Y, Rare Earths, (RE), MgO, CeO.sub.2, and Y.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; compacting the mixture, followed by heat treating and rapidly recrystallizing to produce a biaxial texture on the article. In some embodiments the alloy article further comprises electromagnetic or electro-optical devices and possesses superconducting properties.

  20. Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janey, Mark A. (Concord, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular-level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

  1. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Brownsboro, AL); Antony, Leo V. M. (Huntsville, AL); O'Dell, Scott (Arab, AL); Power, Chris (Guntersville, AL); Tabor, Terry (Huntsville, AL)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  2. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balachandran, U.; Krishnaraj, P.; Eror, N.G.; Lelovic, M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an improved process of preparing Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BSCCO) powders, and more particularly, to a process for preparing BSCCO powders that utilize freeze-drying. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution; grinding the flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the powder to form dry green precursor powders; denitrating the powders; and heating the powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders.

  3. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the first six months of 2004 (January 1, 2004-June 30, 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Azotea Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Azote Mesa area of southeastern New Mexico.

  4. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggy Robinson

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a summary of activities of Gnomon, Inc. and five subcontractors that have taken place during the second six months (July 1, 2003-December 31, 2003) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement: ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil & Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming'', DE-FC26-02NT15445. Although Gnomon and all five subcontractors completed tasks during these six months, most of the technical experimental work was conducted by the subcontractor, SRI Foundation (SRIF). SRIF created a sensitivity model for the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico that rates areas as having a very good chance, a good chance, or a very poor chance of containing cultural resource sites. SRIF suggested that the results of the sensitivity model might influence possible changes in cultural resource management (CRM) practices in the Loco Hills area of southeastern New Mexico.

  5. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  6. Explosively driven low-density foams and powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viecelli, James A. (Orinda, CA); Wood, Lowell L. (Simi Valley, CA); Ishikawa, Muriel Y. (Livermore, CA); Nuckolls, John H. (Danville, CA); Pagoria, Phillip F. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow RX-08HD cylindrical charges were loaded with boron and PTFE, in the form of low-bulk density powders or powders dispersed in a rigid foam matrix. Each charge was initiated by a Comp B booster at one end, producing a detonation wave propagating down the length of the cylinder, crushing the foam or bulk powder and collapsing the void spaces. The PdV work done in crushing the material heated it to high temperatures, expelling it in a high velocity fluid jet. In the case of boron particles supported in foam, framing camera photos, temperature measurements, and aluminum witness plates suggest that the boron was completely vaporized by the crush wave and that the boron vapor turbulently mixed with and burned in the surrounding air. In the case of PTFE powder, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of residues recovered from fragments of a granite target slab suggest that heating was sufficient to dissociate the PTFE to carbon vapor and molecular fluorine which reacted with the quartz and aluminum silicates in the granite to form aluminum oxide and mineral fluoride compounds.

  7. Mechanical Properties of a Metal Powder-Loaded Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Neuschwanger; L. L. Whinnery; S. H. Goods

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-static compression tests have been performed on polyurethane foam specimens. The modulus of the foam exhibited a power-law dependence with respect to density of the form: E* {proportional_to} {rho}*{sup n}, where n = 1.7. The modulus data is well described by a simple geometric model (attributed to the work of Gibson and Ashby) for closed-cell foam in which the stiffness of the foam is governed by the flexure of the cell struts and cell walls. The compressive strength of the foam is also found to follow a power-law behavior with respect to foam density. In this instance, Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence. The modulus of the polyurethane foam was modified by addition of a gas atomized, spherical aluminum powder. Additions of 30 and 50 weight percent of the powder significantly increased the foam modulus. However, there were only slight increases in modulus with 5 and 10 weight percent additions of the metal powder. Strength was also slightly increased at high loading fractions of powder. This increase in modulus and strength could be predicted by combining the above geometric model with a well-known model describing the effect on modulus of a rigid dispersoid in a compliant matrix.

  8. Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    , Rapid City, SD 57702, email: jbednar@usgs.gov Groundwater availability in the Lower Tertiary and Upper in parts of Montana and Wyoming. Both structural basins are in the forefront of energy development associated with measuring streamflow, only fall estimates of base flow were used in the study. A net balance

  9. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  10. Geohydrology of bedrock aquifers in the Northern Great Plains in parts of Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, J.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of energy-related resources in the northern Great Plains of the US will require large quantities of ground water. Because Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming are semiarid, the primary local sources of nonappropriated water are the deep bedrock aquifers of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age. The US Geological Survey undertook a 4-year interdisciplinary study that has culminated in a digital-simulation model of the regional flow system and incorporates the results of geochemical, hydrologic, and geologic studies. Rocks of Paleozoic and Mesozoic age form at least five artesian aquifers that are recharged in the mountainous areas of Montana, South Dakota, and Wyoming. The aquifers extend for more than 600 mi to discharge areas in the northeastern part of North Dakota and in Manitoba. In general, the direction of flow in each aquifer is east to northeast, but flow is deflected to the north and south around the Williston basin. Flow through the Williston basin is restricted because of brine (200,000-350,000 mg/l), halite beds, geologic structures, and decreased permeability of rocks in the deeper parts of the basin. Fracture systems and lineaments transverse the entire area and act either as conduits or as barriers to ground-water flow, depending on their hydrogeologic and geochemical history. Vertical leakage from the aquifers is restricted by shale with low permeability, by halite beds, and by stratigraphic traps or low-permeability zones associated with petroleum accumulations. However, interaquifer leakage appears to occur through and along some of the major lineaments and fractures. Interaquifer leakage may be a major consideration in determining the quality of water produced from wells.

  11. AN INVESTIGATION OF HYDROSTATIC EXTRUSION AND OTHER DEFORMATION MODES FOR THE FABRICATION OF MULTI-FILAMENTARY NIOBIUM-TIN SUPERCONDUCTORS BY A POWDER METALLURGY APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLeod, G.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUPERCONDUCTORS BY A POWDER METALLURGY ApPROACH By GLEN EARLTin Superconductors by a Powder Metallurgy Approach TABLE OFSUPERCONDUCTORS BY A POWDER METALLURGY APPROACH Glen Earl

  12. Fabrication of NiTi shape memory alloy from elemental powders by hot isostatic pressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeese, Matthew Doyle

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research involved in this thesis was conducted to develop a procedure for producing cylindrical specimens of NiTi shape memory alloy for mechanical testing from elemental powders by hot isostatic pressing. Powders were mixed to ratios of 50...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid whey powder Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    r a c t This paper describes controlled synthesis of Fe3O4 powder via... carbothermal reduction method using pure Fe2O3 powder and glucose mixture as starting materials. Pure Fe3O4...

  14. STUDIES OF DESIGN PARAMETERS IN THE FABRICATION OF Nb-Al-Ge SUPERCONDUCTORS BY THE POWDER METALLURGY INFILTRATION METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granda, J.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TicltcJ by a Powder Metallurgy Approach, (D. Eng. Thesis)SUPERCONDUCTORS BY THE POWDER METALLURGY INFILTRATION METHODBY TrIE POWDER METALLURGY INFILTRATION METHOD Jose J. Granda

  15. Nonaqueous solution synthesis process for preparing oxide powders of lead zirconate titanate and related materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voigt, J.A.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for producing powders of perovskite-type compounds which comprises mixing a metal alkoxide solution with a lead acetate solution to form a homogeneous, clear metal solution, adding an oxalic acid/n-propanol solution to this metal solution to form an easily filterable, free-flowing precursor powder and then calcining this powder. This process provides fine perovskite-phase powders with ferroelectric properties which are particularly useful in a variety of electronic applications. 4 figs.

  16. "Ceramics and high-temperature composites, silicides" Oxidation of Stainless Steel Powder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : Powder, stainless steel, oxidation INTRODUCTION Ceramic matrix composites dispersed with metal particles"Ceramics and high-temperature composites, silicides" CHTC9 Oxidation of Stainless Steel Powder. To understand the corrosion behavior of a model 304L(p)-ZrO2(s) composite, a 304L stainless steel powder has

  17. Waveform Relocated Earthquake Catalog for Southern California...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the southern California crust. Hypocenters in the new relocated catalogexhibit tighter spatial clustering of seismicity than does the routinely generated catalog,and the depth...

  18. The rhetorical structure of the southern lady: an analysis of the myth of southern womanhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Givens, Vonda Ka

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rhetorical Structure of the Southern Lady: An Analysis of the Myth of Southern Womanhood. (December 1994) Vonda Ka Givens, B. A. , David Lipscomb University; Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Martin J. Medhurst Analysis of the rhetorical structure... These failures prompted southerners to start retreating from debate. As pressure from the North increased in the 1830s, 40s and 50s, southerners began to guard fiercely their position. Protecting their position meant putting a tight rein on education...

  19. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  20. Gulf of Mexico",,"Louisiana",,"New Mexico",,"Oklahoma",,"Texas",,"Wyoming",,"Other States

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs U.S.WyomingExpansionReserves

  1. Report on Characterization and Processing of MDD Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium oxide powers most civilian nuclear reactors worldwide. A large infrastructure based on a well-established technology is in place to support this strategic component of the energy industry. Because uranium oxide fuels are used so ubiquitously, it is expected that ceramic fuel pellets will continue to be used. A better understanding of the properties of the starting materials, the processing methods used to fabricate fuel pellets and how the properties of pellets change in service, are important aspects being studied via experiments, models and simulations. A close integration of these approaches is essential if we are to find new ways to optimize both the fuel composition and structure for the purpose of improving performance, e.g., designed microstructures, reducing process losses, e.g. by net shape sintering, and enabling reprocessing of used fuel; e.g., incorporation of transuranics. Ceramic oxide fuel pellets are typically cold pressed and sintered from a powder feedstock. Consequently, a complete understanding of pellet fabrication requires a thorough knowledge of the process from powder synthesis through quality control and acceptance. In this study, uranium oxide powder synthesized by Modified Direct Denitration (MDD) is evaluated. Use of powders synthesized by novel, simplified approaches such as MDD are both a challenge and an opportunity. The MDD synthesis process offers an opportunity to simplify the fabrication process potentially reducing process losses. MDD also provides a simple path to incorporate transuranics from used fuel reprocessing with minimal handling. The challenge is to demonstrate and ultimately prove the reliability and reproducibility of simplified processing with the performance of fuel pellets experiencing in-pile service. This report summarizes a processing study of uranium oxide pellets made from MDD uranium oxide.

  2. Low temperature fabrication from nano-size ceramic powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.J.; Hockey, B. [and others

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the compaction process is to produce a dense green-state compact from a nanosize powder that subsequently can be sintered at high temperatures to form a dense ceramic piece. High density in the green-state after pressing is of primary importance for achieving high densities after sintering. Investigation of the compaction behavior of ceramic powders, therefore, is an important part of characterization of raw ceramic powders and evaluation of their compaction behavior, analysis of interaction between particles, and the study of microstructure of green body (unsintered) during pressure-forming processes. The compaction of nanosize ceramic particles into high density green bodies is very difficult. For the nanosize materials used in this study (amorphous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and {gamma} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), there is no evidence by TEM of partial sintering after synthesis. Nevertheless, strong aggregation forces, such as the van der Waals surface forces of attraction, exist and result in moderate precursor particle agglomeration. More importantly, these attractive surface forces, which increase in magnitude with decreasing particle size, inhibit interparticle sliding necessary for particle rearrangement to denser bodies during subsequent compaction. Attempts to produce high density green body compacts of nanosize particles, therefore, generally have been focused on overcoming these surface forces of attraction by using either dispersive fluids or high pressures with or without lubricating liquids. In the present work, the use of high pressure has been employed as a means of compacting nanosize powders to relatively high green densities.

  3. Powder River Energy Corporation Smart Grid Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips ColorLoading map...ClimatePowder River

  4. ASSOCIATE DEAN Southern Saskatchewan Campus and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    1 ASSOCIATE DEAN Southern Saskatchewan Campus and Advancement of Global Health Strategies POSITION of Nursing, the Associate Dean Southern Saskatchewan Campus and Advancement of Global Health Strategies geographical region of Saskatchewan, the Associate Dean will act as the Dean's designate in operational

  5. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This...

  6. DOE's Studies of Weekday/Weekend Ozone Pollution in Southern...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California DOE's Studies of WeekdayWeekend Ozone Pollution in Southern California 2002 DEER Conference Presentation:...

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Homes, Russellville...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Southern Homes, Russellville, AL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Homes, Russellville, AL Case study of the first manufactured home built to the DOE Zero Energy...

  8. Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes at the University of Southern Mississipp...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes at the University of Southern Mississippi Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes at the University of Southern Mississippi April 16, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis...

  9. Southern hemisphere tropospheric aerosol microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gras, J.L. (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Aspendale (Australia))

    1991-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol particle size distribution data have been obtained in the southern hemisphere from approximately 4{degree}S to 44{degree}S and between ground level and 6 km, in the vicinity of eastern Australia. The relative shape of the free-tropospheric size distribution for particles with radii larger than approximately 0.04 {mu}m was found to be remarkably stable with time, altitude, and location for the autumn-winter periods considered. This was despite some large concentration changes which were found to be typical of the southeastern Australian coastal region. The majority of free-troposphere large particles were found to have sulfuric acid or lightly ammoniated sulfate morphology. Large particles in the boundary layer almost exclusively had a sea-salt morphology.

  10. Southern Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, Robin; Sonne, Jeffrey; Withers, Charles; Cummings, James; Verdict, Malcolm; Roberts, Sydney

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC) builds collaborative partnerships with: state and local governments and their program support offices, the building delivery industry (designers, contractors, realtors and commissioning agents), product manufacturers and their supply chains, utilities and their program implementers, consumers and other stakeholders in order to forge a strong regional network of building energy efficiency allies. Through a project Steering Committee composed of the state energy offices and building industry stakeholders, the SEEC works to establish consensus-based goals, priorities and strategies at the regional, state and local levels that will materially advance the deployment of high-performance “beyond code” buildings. In its first Phase, SEEC will provide limited technical and policy support assistance, training, certification and education to a wide spectrum of the building construction, codes and standards, and the consumer marketplace.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Riverton, Wyoming. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of two phases: the Surface Project and the Ground Water Project. At the UMTRA Project site near Riverton, Wyoming, Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1988 to 1990. Tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials were taken from the Riverton site to a disposal cell in the Gas Hills area, about 60 road miles (100 kilometers) to the east. The surface cleanup reduces radon and other radiation emissions and minimizes further ground water contamination. The UMTRA Project`s second phase, the Ground Water Project, will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination at the Riverton site that has resulted from the uranium ore processing activities. Such evaluations are used at each site to determine a strategy for complying with UMTRA ground water standards established by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and if human health risks could result from exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium ore processing. Exposure could hypothetically occur if drinking water were pumped from a well drilled in an area where ground water contamination might have occurred. Human health and environmental risks may also result if people, plants, or animals are exposed to surface water that has mixed with contaminated ground water.

  12. Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

  13. Effects of in-situ oil-shale retorting on water quality near Rock Springs, Wyoming, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindner-Lunsford, J.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Plafcan, M.; Lowham, H.W.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental in-situ retorting techniques (methods of extracting shale oil without mining) were used from 1969 to 1979 by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) at a test area near Rock Springs in southwestern Wyoming. The retorting experiments at site 9 have produced elevated concentrations of some contaminants in the ground water. During 1988 and 1989, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, conducted a site characterization study to evaluate the chemical contamination of ground water at the site. Water samples from 34 wells were analyzed; more than 70 identifiable organic compounds were detected using a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analytical methods. This report provides information that can be used to evaluate possible remedial action for the site. Remediation techniques that may be applicable include those techniques based on removing the contaminants from the aquifer and those based on immobilizing the contaminants. Before a technique is selected, the risks associated with the remedial action (including the no-action alternative) need to be assessed, and the criteria to be used for decisions regarding aquifer restoration need to be defined. 31 refs., 23 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, Michael A. [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Hughes, Robert W. [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Smith, Ronald I. [ISIS Pulsed Neutron and Muon Source, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H., E-mail: Duncan.Gregory@glasgow.ac.uk [WestCHEM, School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  15. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, David B; Fares, Stephen J; Tran, Kim L; Langham, Mary E

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  16. Powder River Energy Corporation (Montana) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips ColorLoading map...ClimatePowder River Energy

  17. QER - Comment of Powder River Energy Corporation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans | Department of Energy20 1 196Powder

  18. Bulk synthesis of nanoporous palladium and platinum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, David B. (Fremont, CA); Fares, Stephen J. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Kim L. (Livermore, CA); Langham, Mary E. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for providing nanoporous palladium and platinum powders. These materials were synthesized on milligram to gram scales by chemical reduction of tetrahalo-complexes with ascorbate in a concentrated aqueous surfactant at temperatures between -20.degree. C. and 30.degree. C. The prepared particles have diameters of approximately 50 nm, wherein each particle is perforated by pores having diameters of approximately 3 nm, as determined by electron tomography. These materials are of potential value for hydrogen and electrical charge storage applications.

  19. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator Aug 2013 Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator Aug 2013 © Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  20. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2013 Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), Calif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2013 © Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  1. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2010 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2010 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  2. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Califo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  3. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  4. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Califo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2011 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  5. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator November 2011 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  6. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2014 Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator May 2014 © Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  7. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2012 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Cal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2012 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  8. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2011 Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), Cal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2011 © Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies (IEES), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  9. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator February 2014 Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), Calif

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator February 2014 © Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  10. Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2014 Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), Califor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Southern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading EconomicSouthern California Leading Economic IndicatorIndicatorIndicatorIndicator August 2014 © Center for Economic Analysis and Forecasting (CEAF), California State University Fullerton Adrian R. Fleissig, Ph

  11. Densification of nanosized alumina powders by hot isostatic pressing (HIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimar, P.; Knitter, R.; Szabo, D.V. [Forschungszentrum, Karlsruhe (Germany); Krauss, W.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The densification of nanosized alumina powders to compacts of nearly theoretical density by Hot Isostatic Pressing was the aim of this work. Three types of powders produced by the so called exploding wire technique in the mesh size between 20 to 80 nm were used. Because of the big internal friction during dry pressing the densities achieved were only in the range of about 30% TD. Therefore it was necessary to use a second post densification step by cold isostatic pressing (CIP). With pressures as high as 750 MPa the authors received a density of 58% TD. The pellets were sealed in capsules of stainless steel which were densified at different temperatures between 900 C and 1,350 C with pressures between 120 and 300 MPa. The resulting compacts were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The resulting phases were determined by X-ray diffraction. Grain size measurement at the as fabricated compacts was a decisive criterion for the success of the experiments.

  12. Helium/solid powder O-ring leakage correlation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leisher, W.B.; Weissman, S.H.; Tallant, D.R.; Kubo, M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a method to test powder leakage that has passed O-ring seals. To validate this method we have spiked a test fixture with 98 ng of U and recovered 130 +- 25 ng of U. We did not detect U at a detection limit of 26 ng in a fixture which was treated as a blank. This method has been applied to the leakage of UO/sub 2/ powder passing the type of EPDM O-ring seals used in a SNM shipping cask belonging to PNC. Considering the three experimental tests in which no or very small quantities of U were detected as effective blank test, it appears that the level of external contamination is negligible. Therefore, we believe that the U quantities greater than 26 ng (6 tests) passed the primary O-ring seal. From this limited quantity of data, we observe no apparent correlation between the amount of U measured and either helium leak rate or equivalent tube diameter. The data for the 130/sup 0/C tests indicate the possibility of a U/time relationship; however, more data are needed for verification.

  13. Remedial Action Plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Spook, Wyoming. Volume 1, Text, Appendices A, B, C, D, and E: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, M.L. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Sullivan, M. [Wyoming State Government, Cheyenne, WY (United States)

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at an inactive uranium processing site northeast of Casper, Wyoming, and referred to as the Spook site. It provides a characterization of the present conditions at the site and also serves to document the concurrence of the State of Wyoming and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the State of Wyoming, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  14. Wyoming-Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14ThousandFeet) Working

  15. Production and Characterization of Atomized U-Mo Powder by the Rotating Electrode Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.R. Clark; B.R. Muntifering; J.F. Jue

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to produce feedstock fuel powder for irradiation testing, the Idaho National Laboratory has produced a rotating electrode type atomizer to fabricate uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. Operating with the appropriate parameters, this laboratory-scale atomizer produces fuel in the desired size range for the RERTR dispersion experiments. Analysis of the powder shows a homogenous, rapidly solidified microstructure with fine equiaxed grains. This powder has been used to produce irradiation experiments to further test adjusted matrix U-Mo dispersion fuel.

  16. Fall 2012 FUPWG Meeting Welcome: Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Southern Company's retail service territory, financials, customers and sales, power generation, U.S. military projects, and more.

  17. The genetic prehistory of southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickrell, Joseph K.

    Southern and eastern African populations that speak non-Bantu languages with click consonants are known to harbour some of the most ancient genetic lineages in humans, but their relationships are poorly understood. Here, ...

  18. Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Death, R.

    Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

  19. The Southern Pacific, 1901-1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hofsommer, Don L.

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    and Hawley in Iowa 3 8 San Diego & Arizona Railway 59 Portland, Eugene & Eastern Railway 63 Southern Pacific Company, Pacific System, ca. 1922 85 Inside Gateway 9 Modoc Line 6 El Paso & Southwestern's South western Route 101 Southern Pacific's Arizona... representative date, Espee's steam and electric lines, truck and bus operations, plus its maritime system sprawled across a wide domain from Portland, San Francisco, and Los Angeles on the west, to New Orleans on the south, to Saint Louis in the Heartlands...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - au powder surfaces Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mathematics 86 UNCORRECTEDPROOF MSA 21109 19 Summary: size distribution analyzer3 at Praxair 152 Surface Technologies Inc. Both of the powder types had... -xxx Effect of initial...

  1. Multi-scale analysis and simulation of powder blending in pharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngai, Samuel S. H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Multi-Scale Analysis methodology was developed and carried out for gaining fundamental understanding of the pharmaceutical powder blending process. Through experiment, analysis and computer simulations, microscopic ...

  2. High-performance Ni[sub 3]Al synthesized from composite powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiou, W.C.; Hu, C.T. (National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specimens of Ni[sub 3]Al + B of high density (>99.3 pct RD) and relatively large dimension have been synthesized from composite powders through processes of replacing plating and electroless Ni-B plating on Al powder, sintering, and thermal-mechanical treatment. The uniformly coated Ni layer over fine Al or Ni core particles constituting these coating/core composite powders has advantages such as better resistance to oxidation relative to pure Al powder, a greater green density as a compacted powder than prealloyed powder, the possibility of atomically added B to the material by careful choice of a suitable plating solution, and avoidance of the expensive powder metallurgy (PM) equipment such as a hot isostatic press (HIP), hot press (HP), etc. The final Ni[sub 3]Al + B product is made from Ni-B-Al and Ni-B-Ni mixed composite powders by means of traditional PM processes such as compacting, sintering, rolling, and annealing, and therefore, the dimensions of the product are not constrained by the capacity of an HIP or HP. The properties of Ni[sub 3]Al composite powder metallurgy (CPM) specimens tested at room temperature have been obtained, and comparison with previous reports is conducted. A tensile elongation of about 16 pct at room temperature was attained.

  3. Investigation of a novel passivation technique for gas atomized magnesium powders.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinmetz, Andrew Douglas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Gas atomized magnesium powders are critical for the production of a wide variety of flares, tracer projectiles, and other munitions for the United States military,… (more)

  4. Energy efficiency opportunities within the powder coating industry - Energy audit and pinch analysis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergek, Charlotte

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The powder coating industries in Sweden use about 525 GWh of energy every year. The need to reduce the energy use is increasing due to… (more)

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous aluminum powder Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    slag... by limestone powder and BFS can lower the cost and enhance the greenness of concrete, since the production Source: Li, Victor C. - Departments of Civil and Environmental...

  6. Rrecord of Decision (EPA Region 5): Chem-Central Site, Wyoming, MI. (First remedial action), September 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2-acre Chem-Central site is a bulk chemical storage facility in Wyoming, Kent County, Michigan. Land use in the area is a mixture of residential and commercial. An estimated 10,000 people live within 1 mile of the site and receive their water supply via the municipal distribution system. Two creeks, Cole Drain and Plaster Creek, lie in proximity to the site. Between 1957 and 1962, hazardous substances entered the ground as a result of faulty construction of a .T-arm pipe used to transfer liquid products from bulk storage tanks to small delivery trucks. Additional hazardous substances may have entered the ground through accidental spills. In 1977, a routine State biological survey of Plaster Creek identified a contaminated ditch containing oils with organic compounds including PCBs and metals that was discharging into Cole Drain. Between 1978 and 1986, the State and EPA focused their efforts on finding and eliminating the source of the ditch contamination through extensive investigations of area soil, ground water, and surface water. Results indicated that ground water and soil surrounding and north of the Chem-Central plant were contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds. The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses a remedy for contaminated onsite soil, contaminated offsite soil surrounding and north of the plant, and then addresses a remedy for contaminated onsite soil, contaminated offsite soil surrounding and north of the plant, and the ground water contamination plume emanating from the plant and spreading 1,800 feet northward. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including PCE, TCE, and toluene; and other organics including PAHs and PCBs. The selected remedial action for this site is included.

  7. Simulation of CO2 Sequestration at Rock Spring Uplift, Wyoming: Heterogeneity and Uncertainties in Storage Capacity, Injectivity and Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hailin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jiao, Zunsheng [Wyoming State Geological Survey; Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Surdam, Ronald C. [Wyoming State Geological Survey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many geological, geochemical, geomechanical and hydrogeological factors control CO{sub 2} storage in subsurface. Among them heterogeneity in saline aquifer can seriously influence design of injection wells, CO{sub 2} injection rate, CO{sub 2} plume migration, storage capacity, and potential leakage and risk assessment. This study applies indicator geostatistics, transition probability and Markov chain model at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming generating facies-based heterogeneous fields for porosity and permeability in target saline aquifer (Pennsylvanian Weber sandstone) and surrounding rocks (Phosphoria, Madison and cap-rock Chugwater). A multiphase flow simulator FEHM is then used to model injection of CO{sub 2} into the target saline aquifer involving field-scale heterogeneity. The results reveal that (1) CO{sub 2} injection rates in different injection wells significantly change with local permeability distributions; (2) brine production rates in different pumping wells are also significantly impacted by the spatial heterogeneity in permeability; (3) liquid pressure evolution during and after CO{sub 2} injection in saline aquifer varies greatly for different realizations of random permeability fields, and this has potential important effects on hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock, reactivation of pre-existing faults and the integrity of the cap-rock; (4) CO{sub 2} storage capacity estimate for Rock Springs Uplift is 6614 {+-} 256 Mt at 95% confidence interval, which is about 36% of previous estimate based on homogeneous and isotropic storage formation; (5) density profiles show that the density of injected CO{sub 2} below 3 km is close to that of the ambient brine with given geothermal gradient and brine concentration, which indicates CO{sub 2} plume can sink to the deep before reaching thermal equilibrium with brine. Finally, we present uncertainty analysis of CO{sub 2} leakage into overlying formations due to heterogeneity in both the target saline aquifer and surrounding formations. This uncertainty in leakage will be used to feed into risk assessment modeling.

  8. Multiscale heterogeneity characterization of tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies, Almond Formation outcrops, Rock Springs uplift, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatzinger, R.A.; Tomutsa, L. [BDM Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to accurately predict fluid flow within a reservoir, variability in the rock properties at all scales relevant to the specific depositional environment needs to be taken into account. The present work describes rock variability at scales from hundreds of meters (facies level) to millimeters (laminae) based on outcrop studies of the Almond Formation. Tidal channel, tidal delta and foreshore facies were sampled on the eastern flank of the Rock Springs uplift, southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The Almond Fm. was deposited as part of a mesotidal Upper Cretaceous transgressive systems tract within the greater Green River Basin. Bedding style, lithology, lateral extent of beds of bedsets, bed thickness, amount and distribution of depositional clay matrix, bioturbation and grain sorting provide controls on sandstone properties that may vary more than an order of magnitude within and between depositional facies in outcrops of the Almond Formation. These features can be mapped on the scale of an outcrop. The products of diagenesis such as the relative timing of carbonate cement, scale of cemented zones, continuity of cemented zones, selectively leached framework grains, lateral variability of compaction of sedimentary rock fragments, and the resultant pore structure play an equally important, although less predictable role in determining rock property heterogeneity. A knowledge of the spatial distribution of the products of diagenesis such as calcite cement or compaction is critical to modeling variation even within a single facies in the Almond Fin. because diagenesis can enhance or reduce primary (depositional) rock property heterogeneity. Application of outcrop heterogeneity models to the subsurface is greatly hindered by differences in diagenesis between the two settings. The measurements upon which this study is based were performed both on drilled outcrop plugs and on blocks.

  9. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  10. High Pressure Neutron Powder Diffraction Study of Superhydrated Natrolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colligan,M.; Lee, Y.; Vogt, T.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.; Marshall, W.; Hriljac, J.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron powder diffraction data were collected on a sample of natrolite and a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of perdeuterated methanol and water at a pressure of 1.87(11) GPa. The natrolite sample was superhydrated, with a water content double that observed at ambient pressure. All of the water deuterium atoms were located and the nature and extent of the hydrogen bonding elucidated for the first time. This has allowed the calculation of bond valence sums for the water oxygen atoms, and from this, it can be deduced that the key energetic factor leading to loss of the additional water molecule upon pressure release is the poor coordination to sodium cations within the pores.

  11. The iron powder test for naphthenic acid corrosion studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau, J.L.; Yepez, O.; Specht, M.I.; Lorenzo, R. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the course of an ongoing investigation into the phenomenon of naphthenic acid corrosion, a new test method has evolved and is currently being further developed to substitute the total acid number (TAN or neutralization number) as an indicator for naphthenic acid corrosion potential. It can also be used to complement conventional autoclave corrosion tests in high temperature environments, which are based on weight loss of steel coupons. In this new method an oil sample reacts with pure iron powder within an autoclave heated to the testing temperature. The result is based on the amount of dissolved iron found in the oil sample. The oil sample can dissolve an amount of iron for a given time at a given temperature, depending on the naphthenic acid corrosion, since these acids react with iron to produce oil soluble iron naphthenates. This paper describes the method, compares it with conventional crude corrosiveness testing, and proposes it as a new way of measuring naphthenic acid corrosion potential.

  12. Shutdown mechanisms for a hypothetical criticality accident involving HEU powder: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentley, C.; Basoglu, B.; Dunn, M.; Plaster, M.; Ruggles, A.; Wilkinson, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Dodds, H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the physical processes that would cause an accidental criticality involving higly enriched uranium(HEU) powder to shut down naturally. The study analyses an excursion resulting from the continous poring of slightly damp HEU powder (either UO{sub 3} or UF{sub 4} containing 1.5% water) onto a concrete floor.

  13. Characterization of prealloyed copper powders treated in high energy ball mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajkovic, Viseslava [Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: visnja@vin.bg.ac.yu; Bozic, Dusan [Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Jovanovic, Milan T. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences 'Vinca', P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The inert gas atomised prealloyed copper powders containing 3.5 wt.% Al were milled up to 20 h in the planetary ball mill in order to oxidize aluminium in situ with oxygen from the air. In the next procedure compacts from milled powder were synthesized by hot-pressing in argon atmosphere. Compacts from as-received Cu-3.5 wt.% Al powder and electrolytic copper powder were also prepared under the same conditions. Microstructural and morphological changes of high energy milled powder as well as changes of thermal stability and electrical conductivity of compacts were studied as a function of milling time and high temperature exposure at 800 deg. C. Optical, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis were performed for microstructural characterization, whereas thermal stability and electrical conductivity were evaluated by microhardness measurements and conductometer Sigmatest, respectively. The prealloyed 5 h-milled and compacted powder showed a significant increase in microhardness reaching the value of 2600 MPa, about 4 times greater than that of compacts synthesized from as-received electrolytic copper powder (670 MPa). The electrical conductivity of compacts from 5 h-milled powder was 52% IACS. The results were discussed in terms of the effect of small grain size and finely distributed alumina dispersoids on hardening and thermal stability of compacts.

  14. Preparation of lead-zirconium-titanium film and powder by electrodeposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, R.N.; Ginley, D.S.

    1995-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of lead-zirconium-titanium (PZT) film and powder compositions. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath, providing soluble salts of lead, zirconium and titanium metals to this bath, electrically energizing the bath to thereby direct ions of each respective metal to a substrate electrode and cause formation of metallic particles as a recoverable film of PZT powder on the electrode, and also recovering the resultant film as a powder. Recovery of the PZT powder can be accomplished by continually energizing the bath to thereby cause powder initially deposited on the substrate-electrode to drop therefrom into the bath from which it is subsequently removed. A second recovery alternative comprises energizing the bath for a period of time sufficient to cause PZT powder deposition on the substrate-electrode only, from which it is subsequently recovered. PZT film and powder so produced can be employed directly in electronic applications, or the film and powder can be subsequently oxidized as by an annealing process to thereby produce lead-zirconium-titanium oxide for use in electronic applications. 4 figs.

  15. Sinterable ceramic powders from laser heated gas phase reactions and rapidly solidified ceramic materials : annual report.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haggerty, John Scarseth

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO[subscript 2] lasers have been employed to heat reactant gases to synthesize Si, Si[subscript 3] N[subscript 4] and SiC powders. The powders are small, uniform in size, nonagglomerated, highly pure and of controlled ...

  16. Cold compaction study of Armstrong Process Ti-6Al-4V powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL; Clark, Michael B [ORNL; Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Fuller, Brian [International Titanium Powder; Akhtar, Kamal [International Titanium Powder

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the cold compaction behavior of Ti-6Al-4V powders produced by Armstrong Process . As-received as well as milled powders were characterized and these powders were uniaxially die-pressed at designated pressures up to 690 MPa to form disk samples with different aspect ratios. Samples with high aspect ratio exhibited non-uniform density along the pressing axis and the density distribution is in consistent with the result predicted by finite element analysis. The linear regression analysis on the experimental density data can be used to predict density of compacts with different aspect ratios. In the studied pressure range, an empirical powder compaction equation represents the green density pressure relationship very well for both the as-received and 1-hr milled Armstrong Ti-6Al-4V powders.

  17. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  18. Recovery of yttrium from cathode ray tubes and lamps’ fluorescent powders: experimental results and economic simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innocenzi, V., E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it; De Michelis, I.; Ferella, F.; Vegliň, F.

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Fluorescent powder of lamps. • Fluorescent powder of cathode ray rubes. • Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powders. • Economic simulation for the processes to recover yttrium from WEEE. - Abstract: In this paper, yttrium recovery from fluorescent powder of lamps and cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is described. The process for treating these materials includes the following: (a) acid leaching, (b) purification of the leach liquors using sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide, (c) precipitation of yttrium using oxalic acid, and (d) calcinations of oxalates for production of yttrium oxides. Experimental results have shown that process conditions necessary to purify the solutions and recover yttrium strongly depend on composition of the leach liquor, in other words, whether the powder comes from treatment of CRTs or lamp. In the optimal experimental conditions, the recoveries of yttrium oxide are about 95%, 55%, and 65% for CRT, lamps, and CRT/lamp mixture (called MIX) powders, respectively. The lower yields obtained during treatments of MIX and lamp powders are probably due to the co-precipitation of yttrium together with other metals contained in the lamps powder only. Yttrium loss can be reduced to minimum changing the experimental conditions with respect to the case of the CRT process. In any case, the purity of final products from CRT, lamps, and MIX is greater than 95%. Moreover, the possibility to treat simultaneously both CRT and lamp powders is very important and interesting from an industrial point of view since it could be possible to run a single plant treating fluorescent powder coming from two different electronic wastes.

  19. Continuous Process for Low-Cost, High-Quality YSZ Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott L. Swartz; Michael Beachy; Matthew M. Seabaugh

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes results obtained by NexTech Materials, Ltd. in a project funded by DOE under the auspices of the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). The project focused on development of YSZ electrolyte powder synthesis technology that could be ''tailored'' to the process-specific needs of different solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) designs being developed by SECA's industry teams. The work in the project involved bench-scale processing work aimed at establishing a homogeneous precipitation process for producing YSZ electrolyte powder, scaleup of the process to 20-kilogram batch sizes, and evaluation of the YSZ powder products produced by the process. The developed process involved the steps of: (a) preparation of an aqueous hydrous oxide slurry via coprecipitation; (b) washing of residual salts from the precipitated hydroxide slurry followed by drying; (c) calcination of the dried powder to crystallize the YSZ powder and achieve desired surface area; and (d) milling of the calcined powder to targeted particle size. YSZ powders thus prepared were subjected to a comprehensive set of characterization and performance tests, including particle size distribution and surface area analyses, sintering performance studies, and ionic conductivity measurements. A number of different YSZ powder formulations were established, all of which had desirable performance attributes relative to commercially available YSZ powders. Powder characterization and performance metrics that were established at the onset of the project were met or exceeded. A manufacturing cost analysis was performed, and a manufactured cost of $27/kg was estimated based on this analysis. The analysis also allowed an identification of process refinements that would lead to even lower cost.

  20. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam (Hinsdale, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi.sub.2 Sr.sub.2 Ca.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains.

  1. Novel synthesis of high phase-purity Mg2SnO4 from metallic precursors via powder metallurgy route

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    Novel synthesis of high phase-purity Mg2SnO4 from metallic precursors via powder metallurgy route of composition Mg2Sn was prepared by the conventional powder metallurgy route. This up on heating in air under

  2. Rapid formation of phase-clean 110 K (Bi-2223) powders derived via freeze-drying process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balachandran, U.

    1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the preparation of amorphous precursor powders for Pb-doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2} Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (2223) includes a freeze-drying process incorporating a splat-freezing step. The process generally includes splat freezing a nitrate solution of Bi, Pb, Sr, Ca, and Cu to form flakes of the solution without any phase separation; grinding the frozen flakes to form a powder; freeze-drying the frozen powder; heating the dried powder to form a dry green precursor powders; denitrating the green-powders; heating the denitrated powders to form phase-clean Bi-2223 powders. The grain boundaries of the 2223 grains appear to be clean, leading to good intergrain contact between 2223 grains. 11 figs.

  3. Application and modeling of near-infrared frequency domain photon migration for monitoring pharmaceutical powder blending operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Tianshu

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of blending. A simulation method was developed which consisted of (i) dynamic simulation for generating the powder structure; (ii) the completely-randommixture model for predicting the spatial distribution of API particles within the powder bed; and (iii...

  4. A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River-water-balance (SWB) model to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins

  5. Standard test method for carbon (total) in uranium oxide powders and pellets by direct combustion-infrared detection method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard test method for carbon (total) in uranium oxide powders and pellets by direct combustion-infrared detection method

  6. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992

  7. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section

  8. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant to Section 340 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992

  9. SECTION 340 WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 340 ­ WRDA 1992, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN WEST VIRGINIA MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN to be developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern West Virginia pursuant

  10. SECTION 531 WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 531 ­ WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY MODEL AGREEMENT FOR DESIGN in southern and eastern Kentucky pursuant to Section 531 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996

  11. SECTION 531 WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    SECTION 531 ­ WRDA 1996, AS AMENDED SOUTHERN AND EASTERN KENTUCKY MODEL AGREEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION to be developed for providing environmental assistance to non-Federal interests in southern and eastern Kentucky

  12. Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R. Aurand and Andrew J. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins. The study area covers about 75 production in the Powder River structural basin and oil production in the Williston structural basin

  13. Paleotopography and hydrocarbon accumulation: Williston, Powder River, and Denver basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, G.E. (Thomas and Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent geomorphic analyses of 1:24,000 scale topographic maps in the three major basins of the northern Great Plains have disclosed a persistent system of basement paleotopographic features that trend north-northeast throughout the region. Superimposed across this system and subtly influenced by it, are the northwesterly trending Laramide structural features. Paleozoic depositional patterns have been strongly influenced by the paleoridge and trough system formed by the north-northeast features. Mesozoic deposition has also been affected by the ancient subsurface system but in a more subtle manner. Many of the Paleozoic and Mezoxoic hydrocarbon locations in the three basins appear to be the results of paleotopographic control on hydrocarbon accumulation sites. This affect ranges from Paleozoic reef sites in the Williston basin through paleotrough localization of Pennsylvanian Minnelusa production in the Powder River basin to fractured Cretaceous Niobrara production at the Silo field in the Denver basin. Basement paleotopography is the underlying factor in all deposition and subsequent hydrocarbon migration in any basin. As such, it should be considered a major factor in the exploration for oil and gas.

  14. Juvenile Largemouth Bass Photo by E. Oberdrster, Southern Methodist University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PhytoplanP Juvenile Largemouth Bass Photo by E. Oberdörster, Southern Methodist University...................................................................................................... 20 Small-fish Sampling

  15. EXPERIMENTS WITH POWDERED CMN THERMOMETERS BETWEEN 10 mK AND 4K, AND A COMPARISON WITH AN NBS SRM 768 FIXED POINT DEVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fogle, W.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPERIMENTS WITH POWDERED CMN THERMOMETERS BETWEEN 10 mK ANDof a powdered CHN thermometer with an NBS fixed point devicesuperficially similar CMN thermometers is also presented. c

  16. Southern California Trial Plantings of Eucalyptus1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Southern California Trial Plantings of Eucalyptus1 Paul W. Moore2 Following the Arab oil embargo to the Oregon border on the north. E. camaldulensis and its closely allied species E. teretecornis dominated times with 9 trees planted 3 X 3. Spacing was 10' X 10'. Soil San Emigdio Loam. One percent slope

  17. Georgia Southern University Business and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Georgia Southern University Business and Finance Organization Chart 2013-2014 FINAL: September 18, 2013 R:\\Work\\Common\\Org Charts\\Rev2014\\ Business & Finance Produced: Strategic Research & Analysis/KBM President Vice President for Business and Finance Associate Vice President for Finance Associate Vice

  18. Temperature Change in the Southern Sarah Gille

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    on Impact #12;Southern Ocean data (900 m depth) #12;Autonomous Floats: ALACE and PALACE in the 1990s #12 in the coordinates of the flow #12;Profiling Autonomous Floats: PALACE, and ARGO #12;Stratification changes (from of ACC. Temperature change at 900 m in 50 years: > 2 C. Gille, JPO, 2003 #12;Mechanisms: Changes in wind

  19. Southern Region Water Quality Coordination Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an existing collaborative process through which new and existing technologies and management systems Committee (SRWQPC) promotes the development and delivery of effective management systems that can be adaptedSouthern Region Water Quality Coordination Project September 14, 2004 to June 1, 2005 Progress

  20. Ornithological surveys in Serrania de 10s Churumbelos, southern Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuervo, Andrés

    Ornithological surveys in Serrania de 10s Churumbelos, southern Colombia Paul G. W. Salaman, Thomas resultadosindicanfuertementequela Serrania de10sChurumbelosdebeser una prioridadpara la conservaci6n en Colombia, en tanto que. Figure I: Map of Serrania de 10s Churumbelos, southern Colombia. ~ h " eChurumbelos massif of southern

  1. Three new species of shallow water, yellow zoanthids (Hexacorallia: Zoanthidea: Epizoanthidae) from southern California, USA, and southern Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillipp, Nicholas A.; Fautin, Daphne G.

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In southern California and southern Australia, several species of hexacorals that are common at diving depths have been referred to as “Yellow Zoanthids.” We describe three new species of them in the genus Epizoanthus because all have a macrocnemic...

  2. Anisotropy and Spatial Variation of Relative Permeability and Lithologic Character of Tensleep Sandstone Reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Thomas L.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This multidisciplinary study is designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal is to be accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, depositional, and diagenetic frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery; and (5) a geochemical investigation of the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2}-enhanced oil recovery processes.

  3. Effects of TiCl4 Purity on the Sinterability of Armstrong-Processed Ti Powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, K. Scott; Hovanski, Yuri; Lavender, Curt A.

    2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of high purity and low purity powders were synthesized from TiCl4 by the Armstrong process. While both powders displayed swelling when consolidated and sintered, the lower purity powder exhibited this phenomenon in significantly lower degree. The improvement is attributed to the increase in the onset of sintering temperature, which mitigates the entrapment of volatile impurities that would otherwise lead to pore formation and growth. The net effect is that the use of a lower purity TiCl4 may beneficial in two ways: (1) it is a potentially lower cost precursor to Ti powder production and (2) the trace impurities allow higher density components to be fabricated via a typical low-cost press and sinter approach.

  4. Combustion of Bulk 84% Fe/16% KCIO{sub 4} heat powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissen, M.; Guidotti, R.A.; Berry, B.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe/KClO{sub 4} pyrotechnic mixtures are used in thermal batteries to provide the heat necessary to bring the battery stack to operating temperatures of 550 to 600 C. This heat source is normally used as discs pressed from bulk powder. To evaluate the consequences associated with unexpected ignition of large amounts of heat powder, combustion of 84% Fe/16% KClO{sub 4} heat powders was conducted for various scenarios under controlled conditions and the response documented. Increasing amounts of heat powder--up to 8 lbs--were ignited in both unconfined and confined (sealed) containers in a remote area. The containers were thermocoupled and the resulting burning filmed with a standard video camera, high-speed (1,000 frames/s) film and video cameras, and an infrared video camera. A 20- minute video of the burning under the various conditions is presented.

  5. Electricity from wood powder report on a TPV generator in progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broman, L.; Jarefors, K. [Solar Energy Research Center (SERC), University College of Falun Borlange (UCFB), Box 10044, S-781 10 Borlange (Sweden); Marks, J. [Department of Operational Efficiency, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Herrgardsv 122, S-776 98 Garpenberg (Sweden); Wanlass, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401-3393, United States of America

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint project between NREL, SLU, and UCFB aims at building a wood powder fueled TPV generator. The progress of the project is presented. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum powder alloy Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aluminum powder alloy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 JOURNALDEPHYSIQUE1V ColloqueC7,supplement au...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum alloy powder Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aluminum alloy powder Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 JOURNALDEPHYSIQUE1V ColloqueC7,supplement au...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminum nitride powder Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the original powder. An FTIR study was done using the KBr technique and a high... , a reduction in the content of adsorbed water was observed, compared to the original ... Source:...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - al-mo powder processing Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the critical transition temperature and the critical current density of the processed powder by magnetic... h and Jc of the order of 106 A cm-2 at 4 K. The superconducting...

  10. Transient liquid-phase infiltration of a powder-metal skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Adam Michael, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient Liquid-Phase Infiltration (TLI) is a new method for densifying a powder-metal skeleton that produces a final part of homogeneous composition without significant dimensional change, unlike traditional infiltration ...

  11. alloyed fe-mo powder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  12. alloyed al-ti powders: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: The research in this thesis covers the design and implementation of a depleted uranium (DU) powder production system and the initial results of a DU-Zr-Mg alloy...

  13. Wyoming Natural Gas Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14 Oct-14Year (Million20082009 2010

  14. Wyoming Natural Gas Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14 Oct-14Year (Million20082009

  15. Wyoming Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14Thousand Cubic Feet)

  16. An evaluation of known remaining oil resources in the state of New Mexico and Wyoming. Volume 4, Project on Advanced Oil Recovery and the States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) has conducted a series of studies to evaluate the known, remaining oil resource in twenty-three (23) states. The primary objective of the IOGCC`s effort is to examine the potential impact of an aggressive and focused program of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) and technology transfer on future oil recovery in the United States. As part of a larger effort by the IOGCC, this report focuses on the potential economic benefits of improved oil recovery in the states of New Mexico and Wyoming. Individual reports for six other oil producing states and a national report have been separately published by the IOGCC. The analysis presented in this report is based on the databases and models available in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). Overall, well abandonments and more stringent environmental regulations could limit economic access to New Mexico`s known, remaining oil resource. The high risk of near-term abandonment and the significant benefits of future application of improved oil recovery technology, clearly point to a need for more aggressive transfer of currently available technologies to domestic oil producers. Development and application of advanced oil recovery technologies could have even greater benefits to the state and the nation. A collaborative, focused RD&D effort, integrating the resources and expertise of industry, state and local governments, and the Federal government, is clearly warranted. With effective RD&D and a program of aggressive technology transfer to widely disseminate its results, oil production could be maximized. The resulting increase in production rates, employment, operator profits, state and Federal tax revenues, and energy security will benefit both the states of New Mexico and Wyoming and the nation as a whole.

  17. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  18. Combustion characteristics of dry coal-powder-fueled adiabatic diesel engine: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakwani, R.M.; Kamo, R.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at investigating the combustion characteristics of dry coal powder fueled diesel engine. During this program, significant achievements were made in overcoming many problems facing the coal-powder-fueled engine. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept was used to enhance the combustion of coal powder fuel. The major coal-fueled engine test results and accomplishments are as follows: design, fabrication and engine testing of improved coal feed system for fumigation of coal powder to the intake air; design, fabrication and engine testing of the TICS chamber made from a superalloy material (Hastelloy X); design, fabrication and engine testing of wear resistant chrome oxide ceramic coated piston rings and cylinder liner; lubrication system was improved to separate coal particles from the contaminated lubricating oil; control of the ignition timing of fumigated coal powder by utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and variable TICS chamber temperature; coal-fueled engine testing was conducted in two configurations: dual fuel (with diesel pilot) and 100% coal-fueled engine without diesel pilot or heated intake air; cold starting of the 100% coal-powder-fueled engine with a glow plug; and coal-fueled-engine was operated from 800 to 1800 rpm speed and idle to full load engine conditions.

  19. New southern galaxies with active nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maia, M.A.G.; Da costa, L.N.; Willmer, C.; Pellegrini, P.S.; Rite, C.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A list of AGN candidates, identified from optical spectra taken as part of an ongoing redshift survey of southern galaxies, is presented. The identification, coordinates, morphological type, measured heliocentric radial velocity, and proposed emission type are given for the galaxies showing evidence of nonstellar nuclear activity. Using standard diagnostics, several new Seyferts and low-ionization nuclear-emission regions (LINERs) are identified among the emission-line galaxies observed. 14 references.

  20. Southern Pine Based on Biorefinery Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragauskas, Arthur J; Singh, Preet

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This program seeks to develop an integrated southern pine wood to biofuels/biomaterials processing facility on the Recipient’s campus, that will test advanced integrated wood processing technologies at the laboratory scale, including: • The generation of the bioethanol from pines residues and hemicelluloses extracted from pine woodchips; • The conversion of extracted woodchips to linerboard and bleach grade pulps; and • The efficient conversion of pine residues, bark and kraft cooking liquor into a useful pyrolysis oil.

  1. Inhalation carcinogenicity study with nickel metal powder in Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oller, Adriana R. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)], E-mail: aoller@nipera.org; Kirkpatrick, Daniel T.; Radovsky, Ann [WIL Research Laboratories, LLC, 1407 George Road, Ashland, OH 44805 8946 (United States); Bates, Hudson K. [NiPERA, 2605 Meridian Parkway, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27713 (United States)

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epidemiological studies of nickel refinery workers have demonstrated an association between increased respiratory cancer risk and exposure to certain nickel compounds (later confirmed in animal studies). However, the lack of an association found in epidemiological analyses for nickel metal remained unconfirmed for lack of robust animal inhalation studies. In the present study, Wistar rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation to 0, 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal powder (MMAD = 1.8 {mu}m, GSD = 2.4 {mu}m) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for up to 24 months. A subsequent six-month period without exposures preceded the final euthanasia. High mortality among rats exposed to 1.0 mg Ni/m{sup 3} nickel metal resulted in the earlier termination of exposures in this group. The exposure level of 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} was established as the MTD for the study. Lung alterations associated with nickel metal exposure included alveolar proteinosis, alveolar histiocytosis, chronic inflammation, and bronchiolar-alveolar hyperplasia. No increased incidence of neoplasm of the respiratory tract was observed. Adrenal gland pheochromocytomas (benign and malignant) in males and combined cortical adenomas/carcinomas in females were induced in a dose-dependent manner by the nickel metal exposure. The incidence of pheochromocytomas was statistically increased in the 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} male group. Pheochromocytomas appear to be secondary to the lung toxicity associated with the exposure rather than being related to a direct nickel effect on the adrenal glands. The incidence of cortical tumors among 0.4 mg Ni/m{sup 3} females, although statistically higher compared to the concurrent controls, falls within the historical control range; therefore, in the present study, this tumor is of uncertain relationship to nickel metal exposure. The lack of respiratory tumors in the present animal study is consistent with the findings of the epidemiological studies.

  2. Thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates in FGH96 superalloy powder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lin, E-mail: zhanglincsu@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Liu Hengsan, E-mail: lhsj63@sohu.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); He Xinbo, E-mail: xb_he@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Rafi-ud-din, E-mail: rafiuddi@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qu Xuanhui, E-mail: quxh@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Qin Mingli, E-mail: mlqin75@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, Beijing Key Laboratory for Powder Metallurgy and Particulate Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Li Zhou, E-mail: zhouli621@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China); Zhang Guoqing, E-mail: g.zhang@126.com [National Key Lab of High Temperature Structural Materials, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing, 100095 (China)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of rapidly solidified FGH96 superalloy powder and the thermal evolution behavior of carbides and {gamma} Prime precipitates within powder particles were investigated. It was observed that the reduction of powder size and the increase of cooling rate had transformed the solidification morphologies of atomized powder from dendrite in major to cellular structure. The secondary dendritic spacing was measured to be 1.02-2.55 {mu}m and the corresponding cooling rates were estimated to be in the range of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4}-4.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K{center_dot}s{sup -1}. An increase in the annealing temperature had rendered the phase transformation of carbides evolving from non-equilibrium MC Prime carbides to intermediate transition stage of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides, and finally to thermodynamically stable MC carbides. The superfine {gamma} Prime precipitates were formed at the dendritic boundaries of rapidly solidified superalloy powder. The coalescence, growth, and homogenization of {gamma}' precipitates occurred with increasing annealing temperature. With decreasing cooling rate from 650 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1} to 5 Degree-Sign C{center_dot}K{sup -1}, the morphological development of {gamma} Prime precipitates had been shown to proceed from spheroidal to cuboidal and finally to solid state dendrites. Meanwhile, a shift had been observed from dendritic morphology to recrystallized structure between 900 Degree-Sign C and 1050 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, accelerated evolution of carbides and {gamma}' precipitates had been facilitated by the formation of new grain boundaries which provide fast diffusion path for atomic elements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characteristic of FGH96 superalloy powder was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation between microstructure, particle size, and cooling rate was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal evolution behavior of {gamma} Prime and carbides in loose FGH96 powder was studied.

  3. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  4. Enery Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Zwitter; Phillip Nash; Xiaoyan Xu; Chadwick Johnson

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Department of Energy NETL project NT01931 Energy Efficient Press and Sinter of Titanium Powder for Low-Cost Components in Vehicle Applications. Titanium has been identified as one of the key materials with the required strength that can reduce the weight of automotive components and thereby reduce fuel consumption. Working with newly developed sources of titanium powder, Webster-Hoff will develop the processing technology to manufacture low cost vehicle components using the single press/single sinter techniques developed for iron based powder metallurgy today. Working with an automotive or truck manufacturer, Webster-Hoff will demonstrate the feasibility of manufacturing a press and sinter titanium component for a vehicle application. The project objective is two-fold, to develop the technology for manufacturing press and sinter titanium components, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle application. The lowest cost method for converting metal powder into a net shape part is the Powder Metallurgy Press and Sinter Process. The method involves compaction of the metal powder in a tool (usually a die and punches, upper and lower) at a high pressure (up to 60 TSI or 827 MPa) to form a green compact with the net shape of the final component. The powder in the green compact is held together by the compression bonds between the powder particles. The sinter process then converts the green compact to a metallurgically bonded net shape part through the process of solid state diffusion. The goal of this project is to expand the understanding and application of press and sinter technology to Titanium Powder applications, developing techniques to manufacture net shape Titanium components via the press and sinter process. In addition, working with a vehicle manufacturer, demonstrate the feasibility of producing a titanium component for a vehicle. This is not a research program, but rather a project to develop a process for press and sinter of net shape Titanium components. All of these project objectives have been successfully completed.

  5. Aerosols Generated by Free Fall Spills of Powders and Solutions in Static Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutter, S. L.; Johnston, J. W.; Mishima, J.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimation of potential airborne releases. Aerosols generated by accidents are being investigated to develop the source terms for these releases. The lower boundary accidental release event would be a free fall spill of powders or liquids in static air. Experiments measured the mass airborne and particle size distribution of these aerosols for various source sizes and spill heights. Two powder and liquid sources were used: Ti02 and uo2; and aqueous uranine (sodium fluorescein) and uranyl nitrate solutions. Spill height and source size were significant in releases of both powders and liquids. For the source powders used (l "m uo2 and 1.7 "m Ti0 2, quantities from 25 g to 1000 g, and fall heights of 1 m and 3m), the maximum source airborne was 0.12%. The maximum source airborne was an order of magnitude less for the liquids (with source quantities ranging from 125 to 1000 cc at the same fall heights). The median aerodynamic equivalent diameters for collected airborne powder ranged from 6 to 26.5 "m; liquids ranged from 4.1 to 34 "m. All of the spills produced a significant fraction of respirable particles 10 ~m and less.

  6. Water conservation reserve program alternatives for the southern Ogallala aquifer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Erin Alexis

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The Ogallala Aquifer is a vast resource underlying parts of eight states. The southern portion of the Ogallala Aquifer is considered to be an exhaustible… (more)

  7. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest...

  8. Loess Hills and Southern Iowa Development and Conservation (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Loess Hills Development and Conservation Authority, the Loess Hills Alliance, and the Southern Iowa Development and Conservation Authority are regional organizations with representatives from...

  9. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Review and Peer Evaluation lm037horstemeyer2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Magnesium Projects Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) 2011...

  10. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Evaluation Meeting lm037horstemeyer2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Magnesium Projects Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) 2011...

  11. Comments of the Southern Environmental Law Center and the American...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Emergency Order and allow federal and state regulators the discretion to enforce binding air pollution control laws. Comments of the Southern Environmental Law Center and the...

  12. EA-1616: National Carbon Research Center Project at Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    616: National Carbon Research Center Project at Southern Company Services' Power Systems Development Facility near Wilsonville, Alabama EA-1616: National Carbon Research Center...

  13. Southern Oregon University Highlighted by U.S. Energy Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    by Southern Oregon University (SOU). The school's investments in renewable energy, sustainability, and purchasing Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) are benefiting residents and...

  14. Southern Coal finds value in the met market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Justice family launches a new coal company (Southern Coal Corp.) to serve metallurgical and steam coal markets. 1 tab., 3 photos.

  15. Columbus Southern Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy,(EC-LEDS)Columbus Electric Coop, Inc Place: NewSouthern

  16. ARM - Lesson Plans: Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAcid Rain OutreachMovingReason forSouthern

  17. Southern Company - Kemper County | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research |RegulationRenewable Energy (EERE)SmartRemarksonSunShotSouthAprilSouthern

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Southern California Edison Co.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking WorkTransformationSitingMoltenTowerResearch ChallengeSouthern

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Texas Southern University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCES Sandia Researchers WinTVATest FacilitiesSouthern

  20. OPTIMIZATION OF CUTTING CONDITIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE MACHINING OF SINTERED POWDER METAL STEELS USING PCBN AND CARBIDE TOOLS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Kunal J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Powder metals are becoming a popular choice in the automotive and other manufacturing industries because of their ability to meet wide ranging product functional requirements… (more)

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - al-al2o3 nanocomposite powder Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    449451 (2007) 4650 Hardness and wear resistance of carbon Summary: , calcination and reduction. The molecular level process produces CNTCu nanocomposite powders, in which... the...

  2. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T. [Department of Earth Sciences, Cambridge University, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EQ (United Kingdom); Tucker, Matthew G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Keen, David A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Oxford University, Clarendon Laboratory, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Conversion method of powder inelastic scattering data for one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke [Tohoku University, Japan; Fujita, Prof. Masaki [Tohoku University, Japan; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Bewley, Robert I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bull, Dr. Martyn J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bennington, Dr. Stephen M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extracting dispersive magnetic excitations from inelastic neutron scattering data usually requires large single crystals. We present a simple yet powerful method for extracting such information from polycrystalline or powder data for one-dimensional systems. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this data treatment by extracting dispersion curves from powder inelastic neutron scattering data on the one-dimensional spin-half systems: CuGeO3 and Rb2Cu2Mo3O12. For many such materials it is not possible to grow sufficiently large crystals and this method offers a quick and efficient way to study their magnetic excitations.

  4. A Semi-Empirical Model Relating Flow Properties to Particle Contacts in Fine Binary Powder Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kojima, Takehiro; Elliott, James A.

    2014-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    zone to 7 the onset of incipient flow is of wide benefit to a range of granular systems beyond EP 8 printing devices such as the processes of powder materials in pharmaceutical and food 9 industrials. 10 However, despite its importance, the number... additives have only a small effect on the internal friction [20]. In this study, 12 nm 17 hydrophobic silica nanoparticles, Aerosil® R805 (Evonik Industries, Germany), were chosen 18 as the surface additives for the PS-DVB powder particles. The BET surface...

  5. Plasma synthesis of lithium based intercalation powders for solid polymer electrolyte batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pink, Robert J. (Pocatello, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a process for preparing lithium intercalation compounds by plasma reaction comprising the steps of: forming a feed solution by mixing lithium nitrate or lithium hydroxide or lithium oxide and the required metal nitrate or metal hydroxide or metal oxide and between 10-50% alcohol by weight; mixing the feed solution with O.sub.2 gas wherein the O.sub.2 gas atomizes the feed solution into fine reactant droplets, inserting the atomized feed solution into a plasma reactor to form an intercalation powder; and if desired, heating the resulting powder to from a very pure single phase product.

  6. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Omatete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG)

    1991-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product any be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  7. Method for molding ceramic powders using a water-based gel casting process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jenny, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Omalete, Ogbemi O. (Lagos, NG)

    1992-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for molding ceramic powders comprises forming a slurry mixture including ceramic powder, a dispersant, and a monomer solution. The monomer solution includes at least one monofunctional monomer and at least one difunctional monomer, a free-radical initiator, and a aqueous solvent. The slurry mixture is transferred to a mold, and the mold containing the slurry mixture is heated to polymerize and crosslink the monomer and form a firm polymer-solvent gel matrix. The solid product may be removed from the mold and heated to first remove the solvent and subsequently remove the polymer, whereafter the product may be sintered.

  8. CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    1 CANADA-SOUTHERN AFRICA MIGRATION SURVEY INFORMATION What is SAMP? SAMP is the Southern African people in Canada and in Africa? SAMP recently launched a new migration project, The Diaspora Project come to Canada and do they ever think of going back? What kind of education individuals have obtained

  9. DDT AND ITS METABOLITES IN THE SEDIMENTS OFF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DDT AND ITS METABOLITES IN THE SEDIMENTS OFF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA JOHN S. MACGREGOR1 ABSTRACT To assess the degree of DDT contamination in the marine sediments off Los Angeles, 103 stations in the Pacific Ocean off southern California were sampled in July and August 1971 for DDT and its metabolites

  10. aamli southern norway: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aamli southern norway First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Seep mounds on the Southern Vring...

  11. Alfalfa Production Guide for the Southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Alfalfa Production Guide for the Southern Great Plains Foreward Table of Contents Acknowledgment This circular, Alfalfa Production Guide for the Southern Great Plains (E-826), is available online in PDF of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Stillwater, Oklahoma #12;Alfalfa

  12. University of Southern California 1 M. Pedram Nov 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    1 University of Southern California 1 © M. Pedram Nov 1997 M. PedramUSC Massoud Pedram University Nov 1997 M. PedramUSC Opportunities for Power Savings System Behavioral RT-Level Logic Physical 5 Minute Speed Error Jan 1998 #12;3 University of Southern California 3 © M. Pedram Nov 1997 M. Pedram

  13. Ordovician chitinozoans and acritarchs from southern and southeastern Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ordovician chitinozoans and acritarchs from southern and southeastern Turkey Chitinozoaires et'Orléans, 45067 Orléans cedex, France d TPAO, Exploration Group, M. Kemal Mah. 06520 Ankara, Turkey e EOST CNRS in southern and southeastern Turkey led to a re-evaluation of the age assignments of formations identified

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Chinook salmon invade southern South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Mart

    ORIGINAL PAPER Chinook salmon invade southern South America Cristia´n Correa � Mart R. Gross We document the invasion of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to southern South America. This is the first anadromous salmon species to have invaded such a large range in South America, and it raises many

  15. Preliminary results on the characterization of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas-bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouch, T.D.; Keefer, W.R.; Finn, T.M. [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind River Basin is a structural and sedimentary basin in central Wyoming (Figure 1) that was created during the Laramide orogeny from Late Cretaceous through Eocene time. The objectives of the Wind River Basin tight gas sandstone project are to define the limits of the tight gas accumulation in the basin and to estimate in-place and recoverable gas resources. The approximate limits of the tight gas accumulation are defined from available drillhole information. Geologic parameters, which controlled the development of the accumulation, are studied in order to better understand the origins of tight gas accumulations, and to predict the limits of the accumulation in areas where little drillhole information is available. The architecture of sandstone reservoirs are studied in outcrop to predict production characteristics of similar reservoirs within the tight gas accumulation. Core and cuttings are used to determine thermal maturities, quality of source rocks, and diagenetic histories. Our work thus far has concentrated in the Wind River Indian Reservation in the western part of the basin.

  16. Geochemical provenance of anomalous metal concentrations in stream sediments in the Ashton 1:250,000 quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stream-sediment samples from 1500 sites in the Ashton, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming 1:250,000 quadrangle were analyzed for 45 elements. Almost all samples containing anomalous concentrations (exceeding one standard deviation above the mean value of any element) were derived from drainage basins underlain by Quaternary rhyolite, Tertiary andesite or Precambrian gneiss and schist. Aluminum, barium, calcium, cobalt, iron, nickel, magnesium, scandium, sodium, strontium, and vanadium have no andesite provenance. Most anomalous manganese, europium, hafnium, and zirconium values were derived from Precambrian rocks. All other anomalous elemental concentrations are related to Quaternary rhyolite. This study demonstrates that multielemental stream-sediment analyses can be used to infer the provenance of stream sediments. Such data are available for many parts of the country as a result of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. This study suggests that stream-sediment samples collected in the Rocky Mountains can be used either as pathfinders or as direct indicators to select targets for mineral exploration for a host of metals.

  17. Ground-water hydrologic effects resulting from underground coal gasification experiments at the Hoe Creek Site near Gillette, Wyoming. Interim report, October 1979-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raber, E.; Stone, R.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical note summarizes our activities, to date, on the research project: Ground-Water Hydrologic Effects Resulting from Underground Coal Gasification Experiments (EPA-IAG-79-D-X0795). The gasified coal seam (Felix No. 2 coal) and two overlying aquifers (Felix No. 1 coal and overlying sand) appear to have become interconnected as a result of roof collapse and subsidence at both Hoe Creek Sites II and III near Gillette, Wyoming. To evaluate changes in the ground-water flow regime at the two sites, completion of supplementary wells was necessary to define the distance versus head drawdown relationships in each of the three aquifers. Hydraulic head potentials have been measured at Site III since gasification ended on October 10, 1979. These data are presented in graphic format. Although hydraulic head measurements at Site II seemed to be approaching a steady-state condition 1.5 years after gasification, the subsequent gasification at Site III temporarily altered the ground-water flow patterns. These changes will have a definite effect on contaminant dispersal and will need to be taken into consideration.

  18. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Dy-Doped BaTiO3 Powders ERSIN E. OREN and A. CUNEYT TAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    . Hydrothermal processing sis method used and temperature, may exhibit four different of BaTiO3 powders has) are "ferroelectric." hydrothermal processing required a pH 12 in the aqueous BaTiO3 is of the tetragonal symmetryHydrothermal Synthesis of Dy-Doped BaTiO3 Powders ERSIN E. OREN and A. CUNEYT TAS Submicron

  19. Fractal Analysis of Flame-Synthesized Nanostructured Silica and Titania Powders Using Small-Angle X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaucage, Gregory

    Fractal Analysis of Flame-Synthesized Nanostructured Silica and Titania Powders Using Small-Angle X these powders display mass-fractal morphologies, which are composed of ramified aggregates of nanoscale primary particles. Primary particle size, aggregate size, fractal dimension, and specific surface area are obtained

  20. Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - altai southern siberia Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Altai Summary: in the southern part of the Altai Republic (south-west Siberia, Russia). The research area represents a complete... in the southern Altai grasslands and are...

  2. Indigenous climate knowledge in southern Uganda: the multiple components of a dynamic regional system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlove, Ben; Roncoli, Carla; Kabugo, Merit; Majugu, Abushen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    knowledge in southern Uganda: the multiple components of aAbstract Farmers in southern Uganda seek information toMakerere University, Kampala, Uganda A. Majugu Department of

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - activityin southern brazil Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine 32 Dr. David Kemp Australian Minister of Summary: - Southern StatesThailand - sustainable industry development - Southern StatesBrazil - clean coal power......

  4. Mitigating the Social and Environmental Impacts of Multimodal Freight Corridor Operations at Southern California Ports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recker, Will W

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at Southern California Ports. ” Presented at the 11 th WorldFreeway approaching the ports Figure 2. Overviews of Studyat Southern California Ports ABSTRACT The San Pedro Bay

  5. Frictional powders: Ratcheting under periodic strain in 3D , C. T. David2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Frictional powders: Ratcheting under periodic strain in 3D S. Luding1 , C. T. David2 , R. Garcia the (deviatoric) stress- strain relation a ratchet-like behavior is observed: Increasing the coefficient of friction leads to a transition from ratcheting to shake-down, i.e., the accumulation of strain stops

  6. Chemical Preparation of Pure and Strontium-and/or Magnesium-Doped Lanthanum Gallate Powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    Chemical Preparation of Pure and Strontium- and/or Magnesium-Doped Lanthanum Gallate Powders A. Cu) ceramics that have been doped with strontium and/or magnesium are known to have superior oxygen re- cently synthesized strontium- and magnesium-doped LaGaO3 ceramics, using the conventional "solid

  7. A modified Drucker-Prager Cap model for die compaction simulation of pharmaceutical powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    ;1. Introduction As the most widely used dosage form for drug delivery in the pharmaceutical industry, tablets haveA modified Drucker-Prager Cap model for die compaction simulation of pharmaceutical powders L Institute for Pharmaceutical Materials Science, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University

  8. 1 INTRODUCTION The plastic behavior of a certain powder or soil sam-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    1 INTRODUCTION The plastic behavior of a certain powder or soil sam- ple depends on the history in order to in- vestigate the elasto-plastic response of granular ma- terials. An alternative is obtained by the calculation of the interaction forces between parti- cles. This includes, e.g., plastic

  9. Development of lifetime test procedure for powder evacuated panel insulation. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkes, K E; Graves, R S; Childs, K W

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA is between Appliance Research Consortium (ARC) of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) and the Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. A Powder Evacuated Panel (PEP) is a "super" thermal insulation, having a thermal resistivity (R) substantially above that of existing insulation without the environmental problems of some insulations such as Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) blown foam.

  10. Powder Technology, 56 (1988) 259 -277 259 Studies in Magnetochemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    Powder Technology, 56 (1988) 259 - 277 259 Studies in Magnetochemical Engineering: Part IV. A Fluidized-Bed Superconducting Magnetic Separation Process for Dry Coal Desulfurization* Y. A. LIU separation process for desulfurization of dry pulverized coal for utility boiler applications (typically

  11. Gas-powder flow in blast furnace with different shapes of cohesive zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, X.F.; Pinson, D.; Zhang, S.J.; Yu, A.B.; Zulli, P. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With high PCI rate operations, a large quantity of unburned coal/char fines will flow together with the gas into the blast furnace. Under some operating conditions, the holdup of fines results in deterioration of furnace permeability and lower production efficiency. Therefore, it is important to understand the behaviour of powder (unburnt coal/char) inside the blast furnace when operating with different cohesive zone (CZ) shapes. This work is mainly concerned with the effect of cohesive zone shape on the powder flow and accumulation in a blast furnace. A model is presented which is capable of simulating a clear and stable accumulation region in the lower central region of the furnace. The results indicate that powder is likely to accumulate at the lower part of W-shaped CZs and the upper part of V- and inverse V-shaped CZs. For the same CZ shape, a thick cohesive layer can result in a large pressure drop while the resistance of narrow cohesive layers to gas-powder flow is found to be relatively small. Implications of the findings to blast furnace operation are also discussed.

  12. Catalytically Assisted Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of Tantalum Carbide Powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    Catalytically Assisted Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of Tantalum Carbide Powders Troy high-temperature combustion synthesis (SHS) of materials has gained recognition for its energy in the context of gas-phase and solid-phase transport models. I. Introduction IN RECENT years, self-propagating

  13. Chemical Synthesis of Pure and Gd-doped CaZrO3 Powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tas, A. Cuneyt

    chemical synthesis techniques: (i) self-propagating combustion synthesis, and (ii) precipitation potential use as a high-temperature thermistor material.8 The electrical response of calcium zirconate (preChemical Synthesis of Pure and Gd-doped CaZrO3 Powders I. Erkin Gonenli a and A. CuĂ? neyt Tas b

  14. Reuse of textile powder remainders for acoustic applications using the Wet-Laid technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are like a powder with difficult recycling, but it can be recycled by means of Wet-Laid Technology study about the acoustic behaviour of nonwoven materials combined with recycled polyester. The recycled polyester used in these combinations has been manufactured from remains of plastic bottles (PET

  15. MODELING THE MEAN INTERACTION FORCES BETWEEN POWDER APPLICATION TO SILICA GEL-MAGNESIUM STEARATE MIXTURES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 MODELING THE MEAN INTERACTION FORCES BETWEEN POWDER PARTICLES. APPLICATION TO SILICA GEL-MAGNESIUM) particles (d50 = 55 µm) were coated with fine invited particles of magnesium stearate (MS, d50 = 4.6 µm. Interaction forces between the material attached to the cantilever (Magnesium Stearate MS) and the surface

  16. Method of manufacturing iron aluminide by thermomechanical processing of elemental powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hajaligol, Mohammed R. (Richmond, VA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing iron aluminide useful as electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 20 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.05% Zr or ZrO.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1 % rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a mixture of aluminum powder and iron powder, shaping the mixture into an article such as by cold rolling the mixture into a sheet, and sintering the article at a temperature sufficient to react the iron and aluminum powders and form iron aluminide. The sintering can be followed by hot or cold rolling to reduce porosity created during the sintering step and optional annealing steps in a vacuum or inert atmosphere.

  17. Incident spectrum determination for time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, J. P.

    1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate characterization of the incident neutron spectrum is an important requirement for precise Rietveld analysis of time-of-flight powder neutron diffraction data. Without an accurate incident spectrum the calculated model for the measured relative intensities of individual Bragg reflections will possess systematic errors. We describe a method for obtaining an accurate numerical incident spectrum using data from a transmitted beam monitor.

  18. COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky resources in the Powder River Basin reported by 7.5-minute quadrangle map area 1999 Resource assessment

  19. Mechanical properties of WC10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion processed powders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    Mechanical properties of WC±10Co cemented carbides sintered from nanocrystalline spray conversion as the spray conversion process [2]. The WC particle sizes in powders fabricated by the spray conversion: microstructural parameters such as WC grain size, Co mean free path and WC/WC contiguity; chemical factors

  20. Characterizations of WC-10Co nanocomposite powders and subsequently sinterhip sintered cemented carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, X.L. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)]. E-mail: sxl071932@126.com; Shao, G.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Duan, X.L. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiong, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yang, H. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, 122Luoshi Road, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultrafine WC-Co cemented carbides, combining high hardness and high toughness, are expected to find broad applications. In this study, WC-10Co-0.4VC-0.4Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} (wt.%) nanocomposite powders, whose average grain size was about 30 nm, were fabricated by spray pyrolysis-continuous reduction and carbonization technology. The as-prepared nanocomposite powders were characterized and analyzed by chemical methods, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), BET analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Furthermore, 'sinterhip' was used in the sintering process, by which ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbides with an average grain size of 240 nm were prepared. The material exhibited high Rockwell A hardness of HRA 92.8, Vickers hardness HV{sub 1} 1918, and transverse rapture strength (TRS) of 3780 MPa. The homogeneously dispersed grain growth inhibitors such as VC, Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} in nanocomposite powder and the special nonmetal-metal nanocomposite structure of WC-10Co nanocomposite powder played very important roles in obtaining ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbide with the desired properties and microstructure. There was an abundance of triple junctions in the ultrafine WC-10Co cemented carbide; these triple junctions endowed the sintered specimen with high mechanical properties.

  1. Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

  2. Evaluation of Dried Plum Powder in Meat Products Destined for Convenience and Foodservice Outlets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merrill, Robert M.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Antioxidant activity of dried plum powder (DPP) at 3% was compared to rosemary extract (RE) at 0.05% in turkey breakfast sausages which were stored under three aerobic conditions: raw refrigerated (RR; 6 degrees C), raw and precooked frozen (RF...

  3. SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

  4. Fabrication of metal matrix composite by semi-solid powder processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yufeng [Ames Laboratory

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Various metal matrix composites (MMCs) are widely used in the automotive, aerospace and electrical industries due to their capability and flexibility in improving the mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of a component. However, current manufacturing technologies may suffer from insufficient process stability and reliability and inadequate economic efficiency and may not be able to satisfy the increasing demands placed on MMCs. Semi-solid powder processing (SPP), a technology that combines traditional powder metallurgy and semi-solid forming methods, has potential to produce MMCs with low cost and high efficiency. In this work, the analytical study and experimental investigation of SPP on the fabrication of MMCs were explored. An analytical model was developed to understand the deformation mechanism of the powder compact in the semi-solid state. The densification behavior of the Al6061 and SiC powder mixtures was investigated with different liquid fractions and SiC volume fractions. The limits of SPP were analyzed in terms of reinforcement phase loading and its impact on the composite microstructure. To explore adoption of new materials, carbon nanotube (CNT) was investigated as a reinforcing material in aluminum matrix using SPP. The process was successfully modeled for the mono-phase powder (Al6061) compaction and the density and density distribution were predicted. The deformation mechanism at low and high liquid fractions was discussed. In addition, the compaction behavior of the ceramic-metal powder mixture was understood, and the SiC loading limit was identified by parametric study. For the fabrication of CNT reinforced Al6061 composite, the mechanical alloying of Al6061-CNT powders was first investigated. A mathematical model was developed to predict the CNT length change during the mechanical alloying process. The effects of mechanical alloying time and processing temperature during SPP were studied on the mechanical, microstructural and compositional properties of the Al6061-CNT composites. A shear lag model was applied to predict the mechanical property (hardness) of the composite. This work demonstrated the promising potential of SPP in the fabrication of particle/fiber (nanotube) reinforced MMCs.

  5. A comprehensive review on the hydro metallurgical process for the production of nickel and copper powders by hydrogen reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)]. E-mail: archana@nmlindia.com; Kumar, V. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Pandey, B.D. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Sahu, K.K. [Non Ferrous Process Group, National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of nickel and copper powders from leach solutions and other aqueous streams by hydrogen reduction under pressure has been reviewed in the present paper. By optimising the optimum process condition, powders or composite materials of required specification could be produced from different types of acidic and alkaline solutions by coating nickel or copper powders on the secondary materials such as graphite, tungsten carbide and aluminium. The paper also highlights the kinetics of reduction and the use of various inorganic and organic additives to improve the quality of the powder on bench and commercial scale. Effect of various experimental factors such as pH of the solution, concentration of metals, particle size and nature of additives, operating condition of autoclave, etc. on the rate of reduction and quality of powder are also discussed.

  6. Appraisal Seattle, Renton and Southern Railway Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, John H.

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a i l as 30# , 3 5 # t 5 0 # , 55# , 56# , 6 0 # , 72# and 80# , w h i l e some s p e c i a l work i s 90# . T h e r e may be no 55# r a i l a t a l l and t h e r e may be some 40# r a i l . I f a l l o f t h e 55# were cha r g ed t o 5 6 # , o n... Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship. http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu A Civil Engineering thesis of the University of Kansas APPRAISAL BEUTLE REHTON M D SOUTHERN RAILWAY COMPANY i l O C ^ I I N D E X L e t t e r o f T r a n s m i t t a l , H i s t o...

  7. Method of manufacturing aluminide sheet by thermomechanical processing of aluminide powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr.ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  8. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  9. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. (Contains a minimum of 109 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 97 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 115 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Distribution of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrini, P.S.; Da Costa, L.N.; Willmer, C.N.A.; Huchra, J.P.; Latham, D.W. (Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations in the southern galactic hemisphere in the declination range between -17.5 and 2.5 degrees are combined with other available observation. The data set is used to study the spatial distribution of galaxies of a contiguous area of 3.13 sr of the Southern Galactic Cap. An approximately homogeneous magnitude-limited sample of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Cap is constructed from different catalogs. The resulting large scale structure is similar to that of previous surveys in which bright galaxies are distributed on surfaces which intersect at sharp corners and nearly surround voids that are almost empty of galaxies. 29 refs.

  14. Jets, mixing, and topography in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Emma Joan Douglas

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    .3 The Southern Ocean in models The Southern Ocean has been represented in models with a range of complexities, from full Earth system models to simple 2D quasi-geostrophic models to 1D flux models. Due to computational restrictions, modern global circulation... models and earth system models are eddy-permitting, rather than eddy-resolving. This requires some parametrisation of eddy activity, as previously mentioned. Lee and Coward (2003) studied the Southern Ocean in the OCCAM model at 1/4? (eddy permitting...

  15. 3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

    2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage logging suites to wells with a full suite of modern logs. The model for the fault block architecture was derived by 3D palinspastic reconstruction. This involved field work to construct three new cross-sections at key areas in the Field; creation of horizon and fault surface maps from well penetrations and tops; and numerical modeling to derive the geometry, chronology, fault movement and folding history of the Field through a 3D restoration of the reservoir units to their original undeformed state. The methodology for predicting fracture intensity and orientation variations throughout the Field was accomplished by gathering outcrop and subsurface image log fracture data, and comparing it to the strain field produced by the various folding and faulting events determined through the 3D palinspastic reconstruction. It was found that the strains produced during the initial folding of the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations corresponded well without both the orientations and relative fracture intensity measured in outcrop and in the subsurface. The results have led to a 15% to 20% increase in estimated matrix pore volume, and to the plan to drill two horizontal drain holes located and oriented based on the modeling results. Marathon Oil is also evaluating alternative tertiary recovery processes based on the quantitative 3D integrated reservoir model.

  16. Near-Net Shape Fabrication Using Low-Cost Titanium Alloy Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David M. Bowden; Dr. William H. Peter

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of titanium in commercial aircraft production has risen steadily over the last half century. The aerospace industry currently accounts for 58% of the domestic titanium market. The Kroll process, which has been used for over 50 years to produce titanium metal from its mineral form, consumes large quantities of energy. And, methods used to convert the titanium sponge output of the Kroll process into useful mill products also require significant energy resources. These traditional approaches result in product forms that are very expensive, have long lead times of up to a year or more, and require costly operations to fabricate finished parts. Given the increasing role of titanium in commercial aircraft, new titanium technologies are needed to create a more sustainable manufacturing strategy that consumes less energy, requires less material, and significantly reduces material and fabrication costs. A number of emerging processes are under development which could lead to a breakthrough in extraction technology. Several of these processes produce titanium alloy powder as a product. The availability of low-cost titanium powders may in turn enable a more efficient approach to the manufacture of titanium components using powder metallurgical processing. The objective of this project was to define energy-efficient strategies for manufacturing large-scale titanium structures using these low-cost powders as the starting material. Strategies include approaches to powder consolidation to achieve fully dense mill products, and joining technologies such as friction and laser welding to combine those mill products into near net shape (NNS) preforms for machining. The near net shape approach reduces material and machining requirements providing for improved affordability of titanium structures. Energy and cost modeling was used to define those approaches that offer the largest energy savings together with the economic benefits needed to drive implementation. Technical feasibility studies were performed to identify the most viable approaches to NNS preform fabrication using basic powder metallurgy mill product forms as the building blocks and advanced joining techniques including fusion and solid state joining to assemble these building blocks into efficient machining performs.

  17. A novel powder metallurgy-based method for the recycling of aluminum adapted to a small island developing state in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A novel powder metallurgy-based method for the recycling of aluminum adapted to a small island volume scrap aluminum, the application of the powder metallurgy process is proposed. Its methodology of the advantages of the powder metallurgy process. The properties of the recycled parts make them competitive

  18. Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural basins are necessary for future development in these regions. To help determine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    #12;i Abstract Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural of streams, and quantify reservoir interaction in the Williston and Powder River structural basins the loss to underlying aquifers was 7790 ft3 /s. Both the Powder River and Williston basins contain gaining

  19. Corrosion inhibitor storage and release property of TiO{sub 2} nanotube powder synthesized by rapid breakdown anodization method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arunchandran, C.; Ramya, S.; George, R.P. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)] [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Kamachi Mudali, U., E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders were synthesized by rapid breakdown anodization method. ? Benzotriazole was loaded into the TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders. ? Low pH induced release of benzotriazole from TiO{sub 2} nanotube powders was proved. -- Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) is one of the most studied substances in material science due to its versatile properties and diverse applications. In this study titanium dioxide nanotube powder were synthesized by rapid breakdown anodization (RBA) method. The synthesis involved potentiostatic anodization of titanium foil in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} electrolyte under an applied voltage of 20 V and rapid stirring. The morphology and the phase of titanium dioxide nanotube powder were studied using field emission scanning electron microscopy, laser Raman spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Benzotriazole was chosen as model inhibitor to evaluate TiO{sub 2} nanotube powder's corrosion inhibitor loading and releasing properties. The storage and release properties of TiO{sub 2} nanotube powder were studied using UV–visible spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis.

  20. Preliminary draft industrial siting administration permit application: Socioeconomic factors technical report. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project in Converse County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the with-project scenario, WyCoalGas is projected to make a difference in the long-range future of Converse County. Because of the size of the proposed construction and operations work forces, the projected changes in employment, income, labor force, and population will alter Converse County's economic role in the region. Specifically, as growth occurs, Converse County will begin to satisfy a larger portion of its own higher-ordered demands, those that are currently being satisfied by the economy of Casper. Business-serving and household-serving activities, currently absent, will find the larger income and population base forecast to occur with the WyCoalGas project desirable. Converse County's economy will begin to mature, moving away from strict dependence on extractive industries to a more sophisticated structure that could eventually appeal to national, and certainly, regional markets. The technical demand of the WyCoalGas plant will mean a significant influx of varying occupations and skills. The creation of basic manufacturing, advanced trade and service sectors, and concomitant finance and transportation firms will make Converse County more economically autonomous. The county will also begin to serve market center functions for the smaller counties of eastern Wyoming that currently rely on Casper, Cheyenne or other distant market centers. The projected conditions expected to exist in the absence of the WyCoalGas project, the socioeconomic conditions that would accompany the project, and the differences between the two scenarios are considered. The analysis is keyed to the linkages between Converse County and Natrona County.