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1

SciTech Connect: Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State's Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct...

2

Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State’s Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly relevant to practice. During the Phase I, catalytic direct liquefaction of sub-bituminous Wyoming coals was investigated. The process conditions and catalysts were identified that lead to a significant increase of desirable oil fraction in the products. The Phase II work focused on systematic study of solvothermal depolymerization (STD) and direct liquefaction (DCL) of carbonaceous feedstocks. The effect of the reaction conditions (the nature of solvent, solvent/lignin ratio, temperature, pressure, heating rate, and residence time) on STD was investigated. The effect of a number of various additives (including lignin, model lignin compounds, lignin-derivable chemicals, and inorganic radical initiators), solvents, and catalysts on DCL has been studied. Although a significant progress has been achieved in developing solvothermal depolymerization, the side reactions – formation of considerable amounts of char and gaseous products – as well as other drawbacks do not render aqueous media as the most appropriate choice for commercial implementation of STD for processing coals and lignins. The trends and effects discovered in DCL point at the specific features of liquefaction mechanism that are currently underutilized yet could be exploited to intensify the process. A judicious choice of catalysts, solvents, and additives might enable practical and economically efficient direct conversion of Wyoming coals into liquid fuels.

Polyakov, Oleg

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Low-rank coal research  

SciTech Connect

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Low Rank Coal Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Rank Coal Optimization Low Rank Coal Optimization NETL Office of Research and Development Project Number: FWP-2012.03.03 Task 4 Project Description NETL's in-house research team is using an integrated approach to combine theory, computational modeling, experiment, and industrial input to develop physics-based methods, models, and tools to support the development and deployment of advanced gasification based devices and systems. The activities in this effort include developing and applying computational and modeling tools to simulate complex flows in applications such as transport or entrained flow gasifiers. TRIG Model Development - The primary objective of this work is to develop a hierarchy of models for numerical simulations of TRIG co-feed conditions that span fast running reduced order models (ROM's) to high fidelity multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Each model will have uncertainty quantification associated with its predictions to allow a user to choose a model based on the trade-offs between computational speed and uncertainty in the predictions.

5

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

6

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and usually coal derived.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

8

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

9

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low-rank coal oil agglomeration process is described. High mineral content, a high ash content subbituminous coals are effectively agglomerated with a bridging oil which is partially water soluble and capable of entering the pore structure, and is usually coal-derived.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

10

Upgrading low-rank coals using the liquids from coal (LFC) process  

SciTech Connect

Three unmistakable trends characterize national and international coal markets today that help to explain coal`s continuing and, in some cases, increasing share of the world`s energy mix: the downward trend in coal prices is primarily influenced by an excess of increasing supply relative to increasing demand. Associated with this trend are the availability of capital to expand coal supplies when prices become firm and the role of coal exports in international trade, especially for developing nations; the global trend toward reducing the transportation cost component relative to the market, preserves or enhances the producer`s profit margins in the face of lower prices. The strong influence of transportation costs is due to the geographic relationships between coal producers and coal users. The trend toward upgrading low grade coals, including subbituminous and lignite coals, that have favorable environmental characteristics, such as low sulfur, compensates in some measure for decreasing coal prices and helps to reduce transportation costs. The upgrading of low grade coal includes a variety of precombustion clean coal technologies, such as deep coal cleaning. Also included in this grouping are the coal drying and mild pyrolysis (or mild gasification) technologies that remove most of the moisture and a substantial portion of the volatile matter, including organic sulfur, while producing two or more saleable coproducts with considerable added value. SGI International`s Liquids From Coal (LFC) process falls into this category. In the following sections, the LFC process is described and the coproducts of the mild pyrolysis are characterized. Since the process can be applied widely to low rank coals all around the world, the characteristics of coproducts from three different regions around the Pacific Rim-the Powder River Basin of Wyoming, the Beluga Field in Alaska near the Cook Inlet, and the Bukit Asam region in south Sumatra, Indonesia - are compared.

Nickell, R.E.; Hoften, S.A. van

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fluidized bed combustion of low-rank coals: (Task 4. 1)  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained in the second year of a second three-year program are described. Two 1000-hour tests were completed to evaluate corrosion/erosion effects on boiler materials. The coals tested were Kentucky {number sign}9 from the Pyro mine and Gibbons Creek, Texas, lignite. Of the variety of stainless and carbon steels tested, several meet commercial requirements despite a wide range in ash compositions of the test coals. In Fluidized Bed Combustion characterization, the River King Illinois {number sign}6 and Jacobs Ranch, Wyoming, subbituminous coals were extensively tested under a wide range of operating conditions and with and without limestone addition. The Jacobs Ranch coal was also successfully and satisfactorily fired as a coal/water fuel slurry. The low-rank coal slurry provided excellent ignition and combustion efficiency, and without ash agglomeration or accumulation. Continued progress was made in expanding the data base on FBC of low- rank coals. 11 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Zobeck, B.J.; Kalmanovitch, D.P.; Potas, T.A.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chemical comminution and deashing of low-rank coals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of chemically comminuting a low-rank coal while at the same time increasing the heating value of the coal. A strong alkali solution is added to a low-rank coal to solubilize the carbonaceous portion of the coal, leaving behind the noncarbonaceous mineral matter portion. The solubilized coal is precipitated from solution by a multivalent cation, preferably calcium.

Quigley, David R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................PS-18 Coal-Bed Methane ResourceChapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U

14

EA-1219: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming.

15

Wyoming’s “Rosy” Financial Picture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. (2011b) “Wyoming Clean Coal Efforts Advance,” Casperadministra- tion pushes for clean-coal and carbon capture

Schuhmann, Robert A.; Skopek, Tracy A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Co Co 2 SequeStration Potential of texaS low-rank CoalS Background Fossil fuel combustion is the primary source of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a major greenhouse gas. Sequestration of CO 2 by injecting it into geologic formations, such as coal seams, may offer a viable method for reducing atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Injection into coal seams has the potential added benefit of enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The potential for CO 2 sequestration in low-rank coals, while as yet undetermined, is believed to differ significantly from that for bituminous coals. To evaluate the feasibility and the environmental, technical, and economic impacts of CO 2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coal beds, the Texas Engineering Experimental Station is conducting a four-year study

17

Hydrogen from Coal in a Single Step  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CO2 generated, a greenhouse gas with a potential to contribute to global warming, is generally released to the atmosphere. ... The H2/CH4 ratio in the product gases from three different rank coals Datong coal (bituminous), Taiheiyo coal (sub-bituminous), Wyoming coal (lignite) followed the order Datong>Taiheiyo>Wyoming. ...

Kanchan Mondal; Krzystof Piotrowski; Debalina Dasgupta; Edwin Hippo; Tomasz Wiltowski

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

18

Relative permeabilities of gas and water for different rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of gas–water two-phase flow through coal seams play crucial roles in water depletion and gas production associated with coalbed methane (CBM) recovery. One of the most important characteristic is the relative permeability of gas and water which is largely dependent on gas/water saturations in coal, varying with coal ranks. For better understanding of the seepage mechanism of the gas–water flow in coal, the relative permeabilities of gas and water in different rank coals selected from south Qinshui Basin have been investigated under various gas/water saturations through water replacement with methane using an unsteady-state method. The results have shown that the ratio of effective methane permeability and absolute permeability is obviously increasing with rank, implying that the gas slippage of high rank coal has more significant effect than the low rank coal. A series of relative permeability curves for selected coals have been obtained. All of these curves show that the selected coals are featured by smaller methane permeabilities and narrow spans of two-phase flow regions and lower relative permeability, and have low methane permeabilities under irreducible water condition as well. The experiments also revealed that the selected coals exhibit high residual water saturation with low relative permeabilities of gas and water. With increasing of the maximal vitrinite reflectance, the irreducible water saturation exhibits a U-shaped tendency whereas the methane permeability under the irreducible water condition generally increases. The irreducible water saturation slightly increases with increasing of vitrinite and weakly decreases as inertinite increases, while the methane permeability under irreducible water condition is negatively related with vitrinite and positively related to inertinite to some extent. The experimental data were further parameterized to correlate the relative permeabilities of methane and water to gas saturation, showing that a correlation of power function can fit the experiments well. As a result, a permeability model incorporated with coal rank and maceral compositions with gas saturation was developed to predict the relative permeabilities of gas (methane) and water in coals.

Jian Shen; Yong Qin; Geoff X. Wang; Xuehai Fu; Chongtao Wei; Bo Lei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production High Hydrogen, Low Methane Syngas from Low-Rank Coals for Coal-to-Liquids Production Southern Research Institute (SRI) Project Number: FE0012054 Project Description The focus of the project will be to develop, test, and optimize steam-reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, NH3, and CH4 in high-temperature and sulfur environments, increasing the ratio of hydrogen in syngas, as part of a modified, advanced gasification platform for the conversion of low-rank coals to syngas for coal-to-liquid and integrated gasification combined cycle applications. Project Details Program Background and Project Benefits Project Scope and Technology Readiness Level Accomplishments Contacts, Duration, and Cost Project Images Abstract Performer website: Southern Research Institute

20

Particulate control for low rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The power generating system in Victoria currently comprises a total capacity of 6650 MW. Eighty percent of this capacity consists of base load stations in the Latrobe Valley using brown coal. The Latrobe Valley brown coals have unique characteristics with high moisture content ranging from 58 percent to 70 percent and an ash content which is relatively low but very variable in nature. These and other factors associated with the coal have caused special problems in handling and combustion of the coal and the de-dusting of the boiler flue gases. In recent years, this has been the basis for the design parameters adopted for all the plants in the system. With respect to flue gas de-dusting, the SECV has carried out extensive laboratory studies to characterize the different ashes obtained from the Latrobe Valley brown coals, including precipitability and aerodynamic tests. It also carried out full-scale tests on operating plants and pilot tests have been conducted on inertial collectors, precipitators and bag filters. The Environmental Protection Authority of Victoria has established a particulate emission level of 0.150 grams/m{sup 3} n.t.p. dry for recent Latrobe Valley boilers. However, the mandated emission level takes into account wide variations in operating conditions, and the plants normally achieve much lower emission levels. The Latrobe Valley plants presently in operation include Yallourn W (2x350 MW + 2x375 MW), Morwell (170 MW total and briquette factory), Hazelwood (8x200 MW) and Loy Yang (4x500 MW). The Yalloum W boilers are supplied with coal from the Yalloum Open Cut, the Morwell and Hazelwood boilers from the Morwell Open Cut and Loy Yang boilers from the Loy Yang Open Cut. All boilers are pulverized coal fired (PCF) and incorporate special firing equipment to enable the as-mined wet coal to be fired directly into the furnaces. All boilers are fitted with electrostatic precipitators. The locations of the stations and open cuts are shown.

Touzel, R.McD.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Composition of liquids from coals of different rank  

SciTech Connect

Eight coal liquids prepared from six coals of widely differing rank were compared with respect to their suitability as potential feedstocks for production of refined fuels. The compositions of the liquids were determined by methods adapted from those developed for characterization of petroleum crudes. The coal liquids were prepared and upgraded by hydrogenation in a batch autoclave. The reaction conditions employed were selected to minimize hydrocarbon ring-opening reactions and, at the same time, to produce most of the hydrocarbon liquids potentially available from the coals. The degree of hydrogenation of the raw coal liquids was varied as required to decrease the nitrogen content to about the same level and to provide a predominantly hydrocarbon liquid for analysis. Distilled fractions of the upgraded coal liquids boiling up to 540/sup 0/C were characterized by a combination of separation and analytical techniques including adsorption chromatography; gel permeation chromatography; separations of acids, bases, and asphaltenes; and high- and low-resolution mass spectrometry. In general, the results show that liquids of comparable suitability as feedstocks for production of refined fuels can be produced from coals of different rank.

Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Thomson, J.S.; Woodward, P.W.; Vogh, J.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Low-Rank Coal Grinding Performance Versus Power Plant Performance  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this project was to demonstrate that Alaskan low-rank coal, which is high in volatile content, need not be ground as fine as bituminous coal (typically low in volatile content) for optimum combustion in power plants. The grind or particle size distribution (PSD), which is quantified by percentage of pulverized coal passing 74 microns (200 mesh), affects the pulverizer throughput in power plants. The finer the grind, the lower the throughput. For a power plant to maintain combustion levels, throughput needs to be high. The problem of particle size is compounded for Alaskan coal since it has a low Hardgrove grindability index (HGI); that is, it is difficult to grind. If the thesis of this project is demonstrated, then Alaskan coal need not be ground to the industry standard, thereby alleviating somewhat the low HGI issue (and, hopefully, furthering the salability of Alaskan coal). This project studied the relationship between PSD and power plant efficiency, emissions, and mill power consumption for low-rank high-volatile-content Alaskan coal. The emissions studied were CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, and Hg (only two tests). The tested PSD range was 42 to 81 percent passing 76 microns. Within the tested range, there was very little correlation between PSD and power plant efficiency, CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2}. Hg emissions were very low and, therefore, did not allow comparison between grind sizes. Mill power consumption was lower for coarser grinds.

Rajive Ganguli; Sukumar Bandopadhyay

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process.

Viall, Arthur J. (Colstrip, MT); Richards, Jeff M. (Colstrip, MT)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Stabilized thermally beneficiated low rank coal and method of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for reducing the spontaneous combustion tendencies of thermally beneficiated low rank coals employing heat, air or an oxygen containing gas followed by an optional moisture addition. Specific reaction conditions are supplied along with knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. 3 figs.

Viall, A.J.; Richards, J.M.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue acquisition of data pertinent to coal characterization that would help in determining the feasibility of carbon dioxide sequestration. Structural analysis and detailed correlation of coal zones are important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Evaluation of existing well logs indicates local structural complexity that complicates interpretations of continuity of the Wilcox Group coal zones. Therefore, we have begun searching for published structural maps for the areas of potential injection CO{sub 2}, near the coal-fired power plants. Preliminary evaluations of data received from Anadarko Petroleum Corporation suggest that coal properties and gas content and chemical composition vary greatly among coal seams. We are assessing the stratigraphic and geographic distributions and the weight of coal samples that Anadarko has provided to select samples for further laboratory analysis. Our goal is to perform additional isotherm analyses with various pure and/or mixed gases to enhance our characterization model. Additionally, we are evaluating opportunities for field determination of permeability with Anadarko, utilizing one of their wells.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to further characterize the three areas selected as potential test sites, to begin assessing regional attributes of natural coal fractures (cleats), which control coalbed permeability, and to interview laboratories for coal sample testing. An additional objective was to initiate discussions with an operating company that has interests in Texas coalbed gas production and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential, to determine their interest in participation and cost sharing in this project. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Therefore, we purchased 15 well logs from a commercial source to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Log suites included gamma ray (GR), self potential (SP), resistivity, sonic, and density curves. Other properties of the coals in the selected areas were collected from published literature. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to a Jackson coal outcrop and visited Wilcox coal exposures at the Sandow surface mine. Coal samples at the Sandow mine were collected for CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses. We contacted several laboratories that specialize in analyzing coals and selected a laboratory, submitting the Sandow Wilcox coals for analysis. To address the issue of cost sharing, we had fruitful initial discussions with a petroleum corporation in Houston. We reviewed the objectives and status of this project, discussed data that they have already collected, and explored the potential for cooperative data acquisition and exchange in the future. We are pursuing a cooperative agreement with them.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main tasks for this reporting period were to correlate well logs and refine coal property maps, evaluate methane content and gas composition of Wilcox Group coals, and initiate discussions concerning collection of additional, essential data with Anadarko. To assess the volume of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered and volume of methane that can be produced in the vicinity of the proposed Sam Seymour sequestration site, we used approximately 200 additional wells logs from Anadarko Petroleum Corp. to correlate and map coal properties of the 3 coal-bearing intervals of Wilcox group. Among the maps we are making are maps of the number of coal beds, number of coal beds greater than 5 ft thick, and cumulative coal thickness for each coal interval. This stratigraphic analysis validates the presence of abundant coal for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of Sam Seymour power plant. A typical wellbore in this region may penetrate 20 to 40 coal beds with cumulative coal thickness between 80 and 110 ft. Gas desorption analyses of approximately 75 coal samples from the 3 Wilcox coal intervals indicate that average methane content of Wilcox coals in this area ranges between 216 and 276 scf/t, basinward of the freshwater boundary indicated on a regional hydrologic map. Vitrinite reflectance data indicate that Wilcox coals are thermally immature for gas generation in this area. Minor amounts of biogenic gas may be present, basinward of the freshwater line, but we infer that most of the Wilcox coalbed gas in the deep coal beds is migrated thermogenic gas. Analysis based on limited data suggest that sites for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed gas recovery should be located basinward of the Wilcox freshwater contour, where methane content is high and the freshwater aquifer can be avoided.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Low-rank coal research. Quarterly report, January--March 1990  

SciTech Connect

This document contains several quarterly progress reports for low-rank coal research that was performed from January-March 1990. Reports in Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research are in Flue Gas Cleanup, Waste Management, and Regional Energy Policy Program for the Northern Great Plains. Reports in Advanced Research and Technology Development are presented in Turbine Combustion Phenomena, Combustion Inorganic Transformation (two sections), Liquefaction Reactivity of Low-Rank Coals, Gasification Ash and Slag Characterization, and Coal Science. Reports in Combustion Research cover Fluidized-Bed Combustion, Beneficiation of Low-Rank Coals, Combustion Characterization of Low-Rank Coal Fuels, Diesel Utilization of Low-Rank Coals, and Produce and Characterize HWD (hot-water drying) Fuels for Heat Engine Applications. Liquefaction Research is reported in Low-Rank Coal Direct Liquefaction. Gasification Research progress is discussed for Production of Hydrogen and By-Products from Coal and for Chemistry of Sulfur Removal in Mild Gas.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-degradable, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, C.L.; Timpe, R.C.; Potas, T.A.; DeWall, R.A.; Musich, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Low-rank coal oil agglomeration product and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A selectively-sized, raw, low-rank coal is processed to produce a low ash and relative water-free agglomerate with an enhanced heating value and a hardness sufficient to produce a non-decrepitating, shippable fuel. The low-rank coal is treated, under high shear conditions, in the first stage to cause ash reduction and subsequent surface modification which is necessary to facilitate agglomerate formation. In the second stage the treated low-rank coal is contacted with bridging and binding oils under low shear conditions to produce agglomerates of selected size. The bridging and binding oils may be coal or petroleum derived. The process incorporates a thermal deoiling step whereby the bridging oil may be completely or partially recovered from the agglomerate; whereas, partial recovery of the bridging oil functions to leave as an agglomerate binder, the heavy constituents of the bridging oil. The recovered oil is suitable for recycling to the agglomeration step or can serve as a value-added product.

Knudson, Curtis L. (Grand Forks, ND); Timpe, Ronald C. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The relationship between coal quality and coal resource parameters of Powder River and Williston Basin coal, Wyoming, Montana, and North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Clean, compliant coal from mines in the Northern Rocky Mountain and Great Plains region is utilized as fuel for coal-fired power plants in 26 states. More than 30 percent of the nation`s 1997 production was from Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming. Production of clean, compliant coal from the region is estimated to increase to 415 million short tons by the year 2015. Studies in this region indicate a relationship between percent sulfur and ash and pounds of SO{sub 2} per million Btu and the resource parameters of coal thickness and overburden. The trends that the authors have observed indicate that both coal quality and the thickness of the coal and associated rocks are controlled by paleoenvironment and depositional setting.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.M.; Flores, R.M.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Injection of CO{sub 2} in coalbeds is a plausible method of reducing atmospheric emissions of CO{sub 2}, and it can have the additional benefit of enhancing methane recovery from coal. Most previous studies have evaluated the merits of CO{sub 2} disposal in high-rank coals. The objective of this research was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery from, low-rank coals in the Texas Gulf Coast area. Our research included an extensive coal characterization program, including acquisition and analysis of coal core samples and well transient test data. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic reservoir simulation and economic studies to evaluate the effects of injectant fluid composition (pure CO{sub 2} and flue gas), well spacing, injection rate, and dewatering on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery in low-rank coals of the Calvert Bluff formation of the Texas Wilcox Group. Shallow and deep Calvert Bluff coals occur in two, distinct, coalbed gas petroleum systems that are separated by a transition zone. Calvert Bluff coals < 3,500 ft deep are part of a biogenic coalbed gas system. They have low gas content and are part of a freshwater aquifer. In contrast, Wilcox coals deeper than 3,500 ft are part of a thermogenic coalbed gas system. They have high gas content and are part of a saline aquifer. CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Calvert Bluff low-rank coals of East-Central Texas must be located in the deeper, unmineable coals, because shallow Wilcox coals are part of a protected freshwater aquifer. Probabilistic simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection into 20 feet of Calvert Bluff coal in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicates that these coals can store 1.27 to 2.25 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with an ECBM recovery of 0.48 to 0.85 Bcf. Simulation results of flue gas injection (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) indicate that these same coals can store 0.34 to 0.59 Bcf of CO{sub 2} with an ECBM recovery of 0.68 to 1.20 Bcf. Economic modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM recovery indicates predominantly negative economic indicators for the reservoir depths (4,000 to 6,200 ft) and well spacings investigated, using natural gas prices ranging from $2 to $12 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits based on carbon market prices ranging from $0.05 to $1.58 per Mscf CO{sub 2} ($1.00 to $30.00 per ton CO{sub 2}). Injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2} - 13% CO{sub 2}) results in better economic performance than injection of 100% CO{sub 2}. CO{sub 2} sequestration potential and methane resources in low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff formation in East-Central Texas are significant. The potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor. Moderate increases in gas prices and/or carbon credits could generate attractive economic conditions that, combined with the close proximity of many CO{sub 2} point sources near unmineable coalbeds, could enable commercial CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects in Texas low-rank coals. Additional studies are needed to characterize Wilcox regional methane coalbed gas systems and their boundaries, and to assess potential of other low-rank coal beds. Results from this study may be transferable to other low-rank coal formations and regions.

Duane McVay; Walter Ayers, Jr.; Jerry Jensen; Jorge Garduno; Gonzola Hernandez; Rasheed Bello; Rahila Ramazanova

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The primary objectives for this reporting period were to construct a coal geological model for reservoir analysis and to continue modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration performance in coalbed methane reservoirs under various operational conditions. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Therefore, we interpreted and created isopleth maps of coal occurrences, and correlated individual coal seams within the coal bearing subdivisions of the Wilcox Group--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations. Preliminary modeling studies were run to determine if gravity effects would affect the performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coalbed methane reservoirs. Results indicated that gravity could adversely affect sweep efficiency and, thus, volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced in thick, vertically continuous coals. Preliminary modeling studies were also run to determine the effect of injection gas composition on sequestration in low-rank coalbeds. Injected gas composition was varied from pure CO{sub 2} to pure N{sub 2}, and results show that increasing N{sub 2} content degrades CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production performance. We have reached a Data Exchange Agreement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation. We are currently incorporating the Anadarko data into our work, and expect these data to greatly enhance the accuracy and value of our studies.

Duane A. Mcvay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Liquefaction of calcium-containing subbituminous coals and coals of lower rank  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of a calcium-containing subbituminous coal and coals of lower rank to form insoluble, thermally stable calcium salts which remain within the solids portions of the residue on liquefaction of the coal, thereby suppressing the formation scale, made up largely of calcium carbonate deposits, e.g., vaterite, which normally forms within the coal liquefaction reactor (i.e., coal liquefaction zone), e.g., on reactor surfaces, lines, auxiliary equipment and the like. A solution of a compound or salt characterized by the formula MX, where M is a Group IA metal of the Periodic Table of the Elements, and X is an anion which is capable of forming water-insoluble, thermally stable calcium compounds, is maintained in contact with a particulate coal feed sufficient to impregnate said salt or compound into the pores of the coal. On separation of the impregnated particulate coal from the solution, the coal can be liquefied in a coal liquefaction reactor (reaction zone) at coal liquefaction conditions without significant formation of vaterite or other forms of calcium carbonate on reactor surfaces, auxiliary equipment and the like; and the Group IA metal which remains within the liquefaction bottoms catalyzes the reaction when the liquefaction bottoms are subjected to a gasification reaction.

Gorbaty, Martin L. (Sanwood, NJ); Taunton, John W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. In this reporting period we revised all of the economic calculations, participated in technology transfer of project results, and began working on project closeout tasks in anticipation of the project ending December 31, 2005. In this research, we conducted five separate simulation investigations, or cases. These cases are (1) CO{sub 2} sequestration base case scenarios for 4,000-ft and 6,200-ft depth coal beds in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of east-central Texas, (2) sensitivity study of the effects of well spacing on sequestration, (3) sensitivity study of the effects of injection gas composition, (4) sensitivity study of the effects of injection rate, and (5) sensitivity study of the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection/sequestration. Results show that, in most cases, revenue from coalbed methane production does not completely offset the costs of CO{sub 2} sequestration in Texas low-rank coals, indicating that CO{sub 2} injection is not economically feasible for the ranges of gas prices and carbon credits investigated. The best economic performance is obtained with flue gas (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) injection, as compared to injection of 100% CO{sub 2} and a mixture of 50% CO{sub 2} and 50% N{sub 2}. As part of technology transfer for this project, we presented results at the West Texas Geological Society Fall Symposium in October 2005 and at the COAL-SEQ Forum in November 2005.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) determine the effects of permeability anisotropy on performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas, and (2) begin reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells. To evaluate the effects of permeability anisotropy on CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds, we conducted deterministic reservoir modeling studies of 100% CO{sub 2} gas injection for the 6,200-ft depth base case (Case 1b) using the most likely values of the reservoir parameters. Simulation results show significant differences in the cumulative volumes of CH{sub 4} produced and CO{sub 2} injected due to permeability anisotropy, depending on the orientation of injection patterns relative to the orientation of permeability anisotropy. This indicates that knowledge of the magnitude and orientation of permeability anisotropy will be an important consideration in the design of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM projects. We continued discussions with Anadarko Petroleum regarding plans for additional coal core acquisition and laboratory work to further characterize Wilcox low-rank coals. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we submitted the paper SPE 100584 for presentation at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium to be held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on May 15-18, 2006.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to further characterize the three areas selected as potential CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Well-log data are critical for defining depth, thickness, number, and grouping of coal seams at the proposed sequestration sites. Thus, we purchased 12 hardcopy well logs (in addition to 15 well logs obtained during previous quarter) from a commercial source and digitized them to make coal-occurrence maps and cross sections. Detailed correlation of coal zones is important for reservoir analysis and modeling. Thus, we correlated and mapped Wilcox Group subdivisions--the Hooper, Simsboro and Calvert Bluff formations, as well as the coal-bearing intervals of the Yegua and Jackson formations in well logs. To assess cleat properties and describe coal characteristics, we made field trips to Big Brown and Martin Lake coal mines. This quarter we also received CO{sub 2} and methane sorption analyses of the Sandow Mine samples, and we are assessing the results. GEM, a compositional simulator developed by the Computer Modeling Group (CMG), was selected for performing the CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced CBM modeling tasks for this project. This software was used to conduct preliminary CO{sub 2} sequestration and methane production simulations in a 5-spot injection pattern. We are continuing to pursue a cooperative agreement with Anadarko Petroleum, which has already acquired significant relevant data near one of our potential sequestration sites.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objective for this reporting period was to perform pressure transient testing to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal to use as additional, necessary data for modeling performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. To perform permeability testing of the Wilcox coal, we worked with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in selecting the well and intervals to test and in designing the pressure transient test. Anadarko agreed to allow us to perform permeability tests in coal beds in an existing shut-in well (Well APCT2). This well is located in the region of the Sam K. Seymour power station, a site that we earlier identified as a major point source of CO{sub 2} emissions. A service company, Pinnacle Technologies Inc. (Pinnacle) was contracted to conduct the tests in the field. Intervals tested were 2 coal beds with thicknesses of 3 and 7 feet, respectively, at approximately 4,100 ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. Analyses of pressure transient test data indicate that average values for coalbed methane reservoir permeability in the tested coals are between 1.9 and 4.2 mD. These values are in the lower end of the range of permeability used in the preliminary simulation modeling. These new coal fracture permeability data from the APCT2 well, along with the acquired gas compositional analyses and sorption capacities of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}, complete the reservoir description phase of the project. During this quarter we also continued work on reservoir and economic modeling to evaluate performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to (1) estimate the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration in, and methane production from, low-rank coals of the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in the east-central Texas region, (2) quantify uncertainty associated with these estimates, (3) conduct reservoir and economic analyses of CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM production using horizontal wells, and (4) compare the results with those obtained from previous studies of vertical wells. To estimate the total volumes of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered in, and total volumes of methane that can be produced from, the Wilcox Group low-rank coals in east-central Texas, we used data provided by Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, data obtained during this research, and results of probabilistic simulation modeling studies we conducted. For the analysis, we applied our base-case coal seam characteristics to a 2,930-mi{sup 2} (1,875,200-ac) area where Calvert Bluff coal seams range between 4,000 and 6,200 ft deep. Results of the probabilistic analysis indicate that potential CO{sub 2} sequestration capacity of the coals ranges between 27.2 and 49.2 Tcf (1.57 and 2.69 billion tons), with a mean value of 38 Tcf (2.2 billion tons), assuming a 72.4% injection efficiency. Estimates of recoverable methane resources, assuming a 71.3% recovery factor, range between 6.3 and 13.6 Tcf, with a mean of 9.8 Tcf. As part of the technology transfer for this project, we presented the paper SPE 100584 at the 2006 SPE Gas Technology Symposium held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, on May 15-18, 2006. Also, we submitted an abstract to be considered for inclusion in a special volume dedicated to CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic media, which is planned for publication by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Process to improve boiler operation by supplemental firing with thermally beneficiated low rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention described is a process for improving the performance of a commercial coal or lignite fired boiler system by supplementing its normal coal supply with a controlled quantity of thermally beneficiated low rank coal, (TBLRC). This supplemental TBLRC can be delivered either to the solid fuel mill (pulverizer) or directly to the coal burner feed pipe. Specific benefits are supplied based on knowledge of equipment types that may be employed on a commercial scale to complete the process. The thermally beneficiated low rank coal can be delivered along with regular coal or intermittently with regular coal as the needs require.

Sheldon, Ray W. (Huntley, MT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Coal rank trends in western Kentucky coal field and relationship to hydrocarbon occurrence  

SciTech Connect

Extensive oil and gas development has occurred in the high volatile C bituminous region north of the Rough Creek fault zone, but few pools are known within the Webster syncline south of the fault zone. The rank of the Middle Pennsylvanian coals can be used to estimate the level of maturation of the Devonian New Albany Shale, a likely source rock for much of the oil and gas in the coal field. Based on relatively few data points, previous studies on the maturation of the New Albany Shale, which lies about 1 km below the Springfield coal, indicate an equivalent medium volatile bituminous (1.0-1.2% R{sub max}) rank in the Fluorspar district. New Albany rank decreases to an equivalent high volatile B/C (0.6% R{sub max}) north of the Rough Creek fault zone. Whereas the shale in the latter region is situated within the oil generation window, the higher rank region is past the peak of the level of maturation of the New Albany Shale. The significance of the New Albany reflectancy is dependent on the suppression of vitrinite reflectance in organic-rich shales. The possibility of reflectance suppression would imply that the shales could be more mature than studies have indicated.

Hower, J.C.; Rimmer, S.M.; Williams, D.A.; Beard, J.G. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to work on Tasks 1 and 2, which consisted of the following subtasks: review literature on CO{sub 2} sequestration and the effect of CO{sub 2} injection on methane production from coalbeds; acquire information on power plant flue gas emissions; acquire data on Texas coal occurrences and properties and formation water quality; construct a digital base map; and select geographic areas and geologic formations for study. Flue gas information, including volumes and compositions, were obtained for major Texas power plants and other industrial sources, such as cement plants. We evaluated and obtained computer mapping software and began building a digital base map that will be used to depict industrial emissions, coal occurrence, and water quality information. Digital data sets allow us to superpose data for visualization and for assessment of CO{sub 2}sequestration issues.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers, Jr.; Jerry L. Jensen

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Soil attenuation of leachates from low-rank coal combustion wastes: a literature survey. [116 references  

SciTech Connect

In parallel with pursuing the goal of increased utilization of low-rank solid fuels, the US Department of Energy is investigating various aspects associated with the disposal of coal-combustion solid wastes. Concern has been expressed relative to the potential hazards presented by leachates from fly ash, bottom ash and scrubber wastes. This is of particular interest in some regions where disposal areas overlap aquifer recharge regions. The western regions of the United States are characterized by relatively dry alkaline soils which may effect substantial attenuation of contaminants in the leachates thereby reducing the pollution potential. A project has been initiated to study the contaminant uptake of western soils. This effort consists of two phases: (1) preparation of a state-of-the-art document on soil attenuation; and (2) laboratory experimental studies to characterize attenuation of a western soil. The state-of-the-art document, represented herein, presents the results of studies on the characteristics of selected wastes, reviews the suggested models which account for the uptake, discusses the specialized columnar laboratory studies on the interaction of leachates and soils, and gives an overview of characteristics of Texas and Wyoming soils. 116 references, 10 figures, 29 tables.

Gauntt, R. O.; DeOtte, R. E.; Slowey, J. F.; McFarland, A. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to perform reservoir simulation and economic sensitivity studies to (1) determine the effects of injection gas composition, (2) determine the effects of injection rate, and (3) determine the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection on CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas. To predict CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds for these three sensitivity studies, we constructed a 5-spot pattern reservoir simulation model and selected reservoir parameters representative of a typical depth, approximately 6,200-ft, of potential LCB coalbed reservoirs in the focus area of East-Central Texas. Simulation results of flue gas injection (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern (40-ac well spacing) indicate that LCB coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 0.46 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with a median ECBM recovery of 0.94 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 4,270 days (11.7 years). Simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicated that these same coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 1.75 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft with a median ECBM recovery of 0.67 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 1,650 days (4.5 years). Breakthrough was defined as the point when CO{sub 2} comprised 5% of the production stream for all cases. The injection rate sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to injection rate. The main difference is in timing, with longer breakthrough times resulting as injection rate decreases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 670 days (1.8 years) to 7,240 days (19.8 years) for the reservoir parameters and well operating conditions investigated. The dewatering sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection. As time to start CO{sub 2} injection increases, the time to reach breakthrough also increases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 850 days (2.3 years) to 5,380 days (14.7 years) for the reservoir parameters and well injection/production schedules investigated. Preliminary economic modeling results using a gas price of $7-$8 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits of $1.33 per ton CO{sub 2} indicate that injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) and 50% N{sub 2}-50% CO{sub 2} are more economically viable than injecting 100% CO{sub 2}. Results also indicate that injection rate and duration and timing of dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection have no significant effect on the economic viability of the project(s).

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Catalytic steam gasification reactivity of HyperCoals produced from different rank of coals at 600-775{degree}C  

SciTech Connect

HyperCoal is a clean coal with ash content <0.05 wt %. HyperCoals were prepared from a brown coal, a sub-bituminous coal, and a bituminous raw coal by solvent extraction method. Catalytic steam gasification of these HyperCoals was carried out with K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} at 775, 700, 650, and 600 {degree}C, and their rates were compared. HyperCoals produced from low-rank coals were more reactive than those produced from the high-rank coals. XRD measurements were carried out to understand the difference in gasification reactivity of HyperCoals. Arrhenius plot of ln (k) vs 1/T in the temperature range 600-825{degree}C was a curve rather than a straight line. The point of change was observed at 700{degree}C for HyperCoals from low-rank coals and at 775{degree}C for HyperCoals from high-rank coals. Using HyperCoal produced from low-rank coals as feedstock, steam gasification of coal may be possible at temperatures less than 650{degree}C. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group, Energy Technology Research Institute

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Low-rank coal research. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1984  

SciTech Connect

Papers in the quarterly technical progress report for the period April-June, 1984, of the Low-Rank Coal Research project have been entered individually into EDB and ERA (17 items). (LTN)

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Upgrading of low-rank coals for conventional and advanced combustion systems  

SciTech Connect

Low-rank coals, subbituminous, lignitic, and brown coals, have a ubiquitous presence in the world, being found in all continents. Close to half of the world`s estimated coal resources are low- rank coals. Many countries have no alternative economic source of energy. In the lower 48 states of the United States, there are 220 billion tons of economically recoverable reserves of lignite and subbituminous coal. Add to this quantity 5 trillion tons of predominantly subbituminous coal in Alaska, and the combined amount represents the largest supply of the lowest-cost fuels available for generating electric power in the United States. However, to use these coals cost-effectively and in an environmentally acceptable way, it is imperative that their properties and combustion/gasification behavior be well understood. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) takes a cradle-to-grave approach (i.e., mining, precleaning, combustion/gasification, postcleaning, and reuse and disposal of residues) for all aspects of coal processing and utilization. The environmental impact of these activities must be matched with the appropriate technologies. Experience over many years has shown that variations in coal and ash properties have a critical impact on design, reliability and efficiency of operation, and environmental compliance when low-rank coals are burned in conventional systems. This chapter reviews the significant technical issues of beneficiation, which includes reduction in moisture as well as ash (including sulfur), in relation to low-rank coal properties and their impact on conventional and advanced power systems. Finally, the development and utilization of low-rank coal resources are briefly discussed in view of policy, economic, and strategic issues.

Young, B.C.; Musich, M.A.; Jones, M.L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Experimental Study on Microwave Pyrolysis of an Indonesian Low-Rank Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Microwave pyrolysis of an Indonesian lignite is investigated in this study. ... About half of the world’s coal reserves are low-rank coals. ... Considerable amts. of 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-naphthalenone (alpha-tetralone) were found in the oil fractions of lignites treated by microwave energy. ...

Nan Wang; Jianglong Yu; Arash Tahmasebi; Yanna Han; John Lucas; Terry Wall; Yu Jiang

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Low-rank coal research under the UND/DOE cooperative agreement. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1983-June 1983  

SciTech Connect

Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: (1) gasification wastewater treatment and reuse; (2) fine coal cleaning; (3) coal-water slurry preparation; (4) low-rank coal liquefaction; (5) combined flue gas cleanup/simultaneous SO/sub x/-NO/sub x/ control; (6) particulate control and hydrocarbons and trace element emissions from low-rank coals; (7) waste characterization; (8) combustion research and ash fowling; (9) fluidized-bed combustion of low-rank coals; (10) ash and slag characterization; (11) organic structure of coal; (12) distribution of inorganics in low-rank coals; (13) physical properties and moisture of low-rank coals; (14) supercritical solvent extraction; and (15) pyrolysis and devolatilization.

Wiltsee, Jr., G. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Technology for Low Rank Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Systems Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (wood waste, petroleum coke, etc.) is a clean way to produce electricity and produce or co-produce a variety of commercial products. The major challenge is cost reduction; current integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology is estimated to produce power at a cost higher than that of pulverized coal combustion. However, the Gasification

58

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

SciTech Connect

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Low rank coal upgrading in a flow of hot water  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous hydrothermal degradation and extraction at around 350{sup o}C using flowing solvent as a reaction/extraction medium were proposed for upgrading brown coal, more specifically, for converting brown coal into several fractions having different molecular weight and chemical structure under mild conditions. When an Australian brown coal, Loy Yang coal, was treated by water at 350{sup o}C under 18 MPa, the coal was separated into four fractions: gaseous product by 8% yield, water-soluble extract at room temperature (soluble) by 23% yield, extract precipitates as solid at room temperature (deposit) by 23% yield, and residual coal (upgraded coal) by 46% yield on daf basis. The separation was found to be realized by in situ extraction of low-molecular-weight substances released from coal macromolecular structure and/or those generated by hydrothermal decomposition reactions at 350{sup o}C. The solid products obtained, deposit and upgraded coal, were characterized in detail to examine the possibility of their effective utilization as solid fuel and chemical feed stock. The upgraded coal showed higher heating value and higher gasification reactivity than the parent coal, indicating that the upgraded coal can be a better solid fuel than the parent coal. The solid extract, deposit, was found to show thermoplasticity at less than 200{sup o}C, suggesting the possibility of utilizing the deposit as a raw material of high performance carbon materials. Several variables affecting the performance of the proposed method are also examined in detail in this paper. 12 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Masato Morimoto; Hiroyuki Nakagawa; Kouichi Miura [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan). Department of Chemical Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Liquid CO{sub 2}/Coal Slurry for Feeding Low Rank Coal to Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates the practicality of using a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and feed system for the E-Gas™ gasifier in an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation plant configuration. Liquid CO{sub 2} has several property differences from water that make it attractive for the coal slurries used in coal gasification-based power plants. First, the viscosity of liquid CO{sub 2} is much lower than water. This means it should take less energy to pump liquid CO{sub 2} through a pipe compared to water. This also means that a higher solids concentration can be fed to the gasifier, which should decrease the heat requirement needed to vaporize the slurry. Second, the heat of vaporization of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 80% lower than water. This means that less heat from the gasification reactions is needed to vaporize the slurry. This should result in less oxygen needed to achieve a given gasifier temperature. And third, the surface tension of liquid CO{sub 2} is about 2 orders of magnitude lower than water, which should result in finer atomization of the liquid CO{sub 2} slurry, faster reaction times between the oxygen and coal particles, and better carbon conversion at the same gasifier temperature. EPRI and others have recognized the potential that liquid CO{sub 2} has in improving the performance of an IGCC plant and have previously conducted systemslevel analyses to evaluate this concept. These past studies have shown that a significant increase in IGCC performance can be achieved with liquid CO{sub 2} over water with certain gasifiers. Although these previous analyses had produced some positive results, they were still based on various assumptions for liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry properties. This low-rank coal study extends the existing knowledge base to evaluate the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry concept on an E-Gas™-based IGCC plant with full 90% CO{sub 2} capture. The overall objective is to determine if this technology could be used to reduce the cost and improve the efficiency of IGCC plants. The study goes beyond the systems-level analyses and initial lab work that formed the bases of previous studies and includes the following tasks: performing laboratory tests to quantify slurry properties; developing an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2} slurry preparation and feed system; conducting a full IGCC plant techno-economic analysis for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and North Dakota lignite in both water and liquid CO{sub 2} slurries; and identifying a technology development plan to continue the due diligence to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of this technology. The initial task included rheology tests and slurry data analyses that would increase the knowledge and understanding of maximum solids loading capability for both PRB and lignite. Higher coal concentrations have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} over water slurries, and a coal concentration of 75% by weight in liquid CO{sub 2} has been estimated to be achievable in a commercial application. In addition, lower slurry viscosities have been verified in liquid CO{sub 2} at the same solids loading, where the liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry viscosity has been measured to be about a factor of 10 lower than the comparable water slurry and estimated to be less than 100 centipoise in a commercial application. In the following task, an engineering design of a liquid CO{sub 2}/coal slurry preparation and mixing system has been developed for both a batch and continuous system. The capital cost of the design has also been estimated so that it could be used in the economic analysis. An industry search and survey has been conducted to determine if essential components required to construct the feed system are available from commercial sources or if targeted R&D efforts are required. The search and survey concluded that commercial sources are available for selected components that comprise both the batch and continuous type systems. During normal operation, the fuel exits the bottom of the coal silo and is fed to a rod mill fo

Marasigan, Jose; Goldstein, Harvey; Dooher, John

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Anaerobic biprocessing of low rank coals. Final technical report, September 12, 1990--August 10, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal solubilization under aerobic conditions results in oxygenated coal product which, in turn, makes the coal poorer fuel than the starting material. A novel approach has been made in this project is to remove oxygen from coal by reductive decarboxylation. In Wyodak subbituminous coal the major oxygen functionality is carboxylic groups which exist predominantly as carboxylate anions strongly chelating metal cations like Ca{sup 2+} and forming strong macromolecular crosslinks which contribute in large measure to network polymer structure. Removal of the carboxylic groups at ambient temperature by anaerobic organisms would unravel the macromoleculer network, resulting in smaller coal macromolecules with increased H/C ratio which has better fuel value and better processing prospects. These studies described here sought to find biological methods to remove carboxylic functionalities from low rank coals under ambient conditions and to assess the properties of these modified coals towards coal liquefaction. Efforts were made to establish anaerobic microbial consortia having decarboxylating ability, decarboxylate coal with the adapted microbial consortia, isolate the organisms, and characterize the biotreated coal products. Production of CO{sup 2} was used as the primary indicator for possible coal decarboxylation.

Jain, M.K.; Narayan, R.

1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

Task 27 -- Alaskan low-rank coal-water fuel demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

Development of coal-water-fuel (CWF) technology has to-date been predicated on the use of high-rank bituminous coal only, and until now the high inherent moisture content of low-rank coal has precluded its use for CWF production. The unique feature of the Alaskan project is the integration of hot-water-drying (HWD) into CWF technology as a beneficiation process. Hot-water-drying is an EERC developed technology unavailable to the competition that allows the range of CWF feedstock to be extended to low-rank coals. The primary objective of the Alaskan Project, is to promote interest in the CWF marketplace by demonstrating the commercial viability of low-rank coal-water-fuel (LRCWF). While commercialization plans cannot be finalized until the implementation and results of the Alaskan LRCWF Project are known and evaluated, this report has been prepared to specifically address issues concerning business objectives for the project, and outline a market development plan for meeting those objectives.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Co-pyrolysis of low rank coals and biomass: Product distributions  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis and gasification of combined low rank coal and biomass feeds are the subject of much study in an effort to mitigate the production of green house gases from integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While co-feeding has the potential to reduce the net carbon footprint of commercial gasification operations, the effects of co-feeding on kinetics and product distributions requires study to ensure the success of this strategy. Southern yellow pine was pyrolyzed in a semi-batch type drop tube reactor with either Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal or Mississippi lignite at several temperatures and feed ratios. Product gas composition of expected primary constituents (CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) was determined by in-situ mass spectrometry while minor gaseous constituents were determined using a GC-MS. Product distributions are fit to linear functions of temperature, and quadratic functions of biomass fraction, for use in computational co-pyrolysis simulations. The results are shown to yield significant nonlinearities, particularly at higher temperatures and for lower ranked coals. The co-pyrolysis product distributions evolve more tar, and less char, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, than an additive pyrolysis process would suggest. For lignite co-pyrolysis, CO and H{sub 2} production are also reduced. The data suggests that evolution of hydrogen from rapid pyrolysis of biomass prevents the crosslinking of fragmented aromatic structures during coal pyrolysis to produce tar, rather than secondary char and light gases. Finally, it is shown that, for the two coal types tested, co-pyrolysis synergies are more significant as coal rank decreases, likely because the initial structure in these coals contains larger pores and smaller clusters of aromatic structures which are more readily retained as tar in rapid co-pyrolysis.

Soncini, Ryan M.; Means, Nicholas C.; Weiland, Nathan T.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Low-rank coal research. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--June 30, 1989, including quarterly report, April--June 1989  

SciTech Connect

This work is a compilation of reports on ongoing research at the University of North Dakota. Topics include: Control Technology and Coal Preparation Research (SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control, waste management), Advanced Research and Technology Development (turbine combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation, coal/char reactivity, liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, fine particulate emissions), Combustion Research (fluidized bed combustion, beneficiation of low-rank coals, combustion characterization of low-rank coal fuels, diesel utilization of low-rank coals), Liquefaction Research (low-rank coal direct liquefaction), and Gasification Research (hydrogen production from low-rank coals, advanced wastewater treatment, mild gasification, color and residual COD removal from Synfuel wastewaters, Great Plains Gasification Plant, gasifier optimization).

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

CO{sub 2} SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF TEXAS LOW-RANK COALS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. There were three main objectives for this reporting period, which related to obtaining accurate parameters for reservoir model description and modeling reservoir performance of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The first objective was to collect and desorb gas from 10 sidewall core coal samples from an Anadarko Petroleum Corporation well (APCL2 well) at approximately 6,200-ft depth in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of the Wilcox Group in east-central Texas. The second objective was to measure sorptive capacities of these Wilcox coal samples for CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}. The final objective was to contract a service company to perform pressure transient testing in Wilcox coal beds in a shut-in well, to determine permeability of deep Wilcox coal. Bulk density of the APCL2 well sidewall core samples averaged 1.332 g/cc. The 10 sidewall core samples were placed in 4 sidewall core canisters and desorbed. Total gas content of the coal (including lost gas and projected residual gas) averaged 395 scf/ton on an as-received basis. The average lost gas estimations were approximately 45% of the bulk sample total gas. Projected residual gas was 5% of in-situ gas content. Six gas samples desorbed from the sidewall cores were analyzed to determine gas composition. Average gas composition was approximately 94.3% methane, 3.0% ethane, and 0.7% propane, with traces of heavier hydrocarbon gases. Carbon dioxide averaged 1.7%. Coal from the 4 canisters was mixed to form one composite sample that was used for pure CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2} isotherm analyses. The composite sample was 4.53% moisture, 37.48% volatile matter, 9.86% ash, and 48.12% fixed carbon. Mean vitrinite reflectance was 0.54%. Coal rank was high-volatile C to B bituminous. Comparison of the desorbed gas content (395 scf/ton, as received) at reservoir pressure (2,697 psi) with the sorption isotherm indicates that Lower Calvert Bluff coal at this well site is oversaturated, but lost gas may have been overestimated. This high gas content suggests that little or no depressurization would be required to initiate methane production. Sorption isotherms results indicate that the sorptive capacity of CO{sub 2} is about 2.5 times that of CH{sub 4} at 1,000 psia. This ratio is similar to that of higher rank bituminous coals from other basins (e.g., Carroll, and Pashin, 2003), and it is very low in comparison to results of other low-rank coals and to the values that we used in our preliminary reservoir modeling. If this value from the APCL2 well is representative, Wilcox coals in this area will sequester less CO{sub 2} on a per ton basis than we had earlier inferred. However, because measured methane contents are higher, enhanced coalbed methane production potential is greater than we earlier inferred. Pressure transient testing for determining coal fracture permeability will be conducted soon by Pinnacle Technologies. The data from these analyses will be used to finalize our coal model for the reservoir simulation phase of the project.

Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Assessing the cumulative impacts of surface mining and coal bed methane development on shallow aquifers in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Large scale surface coal mining taken place along the cropline of the Wyodak-Anderson coal seam since approximately 1977. Groundwater impacts due to surface mining of coal and other energy-related development is a primary regulatory concern and an identified Office of Surface Mining deficiency in the Wyoming coal program. The modeled aquifers are the upper unit (coal) of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation and the overlying Eocene Wasatch Formation. A regional groundwater model covering 790 square miles was constructed using MODFLOW, to simulate the impacts from three surface coal mines and coal bed methane development occurring downdip. Assessing anisotropy of the coal aquifer, quality checking of in situ aquifer tests and database quality control were precursors to modelling. Geologic data was kriged to develop the structural model of the aquifers. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was utilized to facilitate storage, analysis, display, development of input modelling arrays and assessment of hydrologic boundaries. Model output presents the predicted impacts of likely development scenarios, including impacts from coal bed methane development and surface coal mining through anticipated life of mining, and surface mining impacts independent of gas development.

Peacock, K. [Dept. of Interior, Casper, WY (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Sulfur and ash in Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000  

SciTech Connect

When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short toms of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plans region. This is more than 30% of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more F or Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5% sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6% ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short toms of >26% of the total US coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill future energy needs.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Sulfur and ash in paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000  

SciTech Connect

When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short tons of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region. This is more than 30 percent of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more Fort Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5 percent sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6 percent ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short tons or >26 percent of the total U.S. coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill our future energy needs.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation of mechanisms of ash deposit formation from low-rank coal combustion: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This project was undertaken to determine the chemical behavior of alkali metal and other species implicated in the ash fouling which can occur during the combustion of low rank coals. The coal combustion was studied in unaugmented premixed pulverized coal flames. Vapor species were measured by molecular beam mass spectrometry. Temperatures were also measured, and time-resolved coal/ash particulate samples were collected and analyzed. A major part of the research on this project was devoted to: (1) the development and refinement of techniques for the MBMS analysis of trace quantities of unstable and reactive high temperature vapor species from the pulverized coal flames; and (2) the time-resolved sampling and collection of particulates. The equipment is now operating very satisfactorily. Inorganic species, some of which were present at parts-per-million levels, were quantitatively sampled and measured in the pulverized coal flames. Time-resolved particulate samples which were free of vapor deposited contaminants were collected without the use of an interfering substrate. Profiles of the alkali metal species in Beulah lignite and Decker subbituminous coal flames were obtained. It was found in both flames that sodium is volatilized as the atomic species early (milliseconds) in the combustion process. The gaseous Na reacts, also in milliseconds, to form an unknown species which is probably an oxide fume, but which is not NaOH or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. This is probably the mechanism for the formation of the alkali ''fumes'' observed in other systems. Measurements were also made of a number of other gaseous species, and time-resolved coal/ash samples were obtained and analyzed. 27 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

Greene, F.T.; O'Donnell, J.E.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wyoming Information to Wyoming Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Information on AddThis.com... Wyoming Information This state page compiles information related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles in Wyoming and includes new incentives and laws, alternative fueling station locations, truck stop electrification sites, fuel prices, and local points of contact. Select a new state Select a State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas

72

Advanced Acid Gas Separation Technology for the Utilization of Low Rank Coals  

SciTech Connect

Air Products has developed a potentially ground-breaking technology – Sour Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) – to replace the solvent-based acid gas removal (AGR) systems currently employed to separate sulfur containing species, along with CO{sub 2} and other impurities, from gasifier syngas streams. The Sour PSA technology is based on adsorption processes that utilize pressure swing or temperature swing regeneration methods. Sour PSA technology has already been shown with higher rank coals to provide a significant reduction in the cost of CO{sub 2} capture for power generation, which should translate to a reduction in cost of electricity (COE), compared to baseline CO{sub 2} capture plant design. The objective of this project is to test the performance and capability of the adsorbents in handling tar and other impurities using a gaseous mixture generated from the gasification of lower rank, lignite coal. The results of this testing are used to generate a high-level pilot process design, and to prepare a techno-economic assessment evaluating the applicability of the technology to plants utilizing these coals.

Kloosterman, Jeff

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microsoft Word - wyoming.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Wyoming NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... WECC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 7,986 37 Electric Utilities ...................................................................................................... 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) ........................................................................... 48,119,254 31

74

Microsoft Word - wyoming.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Wyoming NERC Region(s) ....................................................................................................... WECC Primary Energy Source........................................................................................... Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) ....................................................................... 7,986 37 Electric Utilities ...................................................................................................... 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power ................................ 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) ........................................................................... 48,119,254 31

75

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to evaluate the ability of advanced low rank coal gasification technology to cause a significant reduction in the COE for IGCC power plants with 90% carbon capture and sequestration compared with the COE for similarly configured IGCC plants using conventional low rank coal gasification technology. GE’s advanced low rank coal gasification technology uses the Posimetric Feed System, a new dry coal feed system based on GE’s proprietary Posimetric Feeder. In order to demonstrate the performance and economic benefits of the Posimetric Feeder in lowering the cost of low rank coal-fired IGCC power with carbon capture, two case studies were completed. In the Base Case, the gasifier was fed a dilute slurry of Montana Rosebud PRB coal using GE’s conventional slurry feed system. In the Advanced Technology Case, the slurry feed system was replaced with the Posimetric Feed system. The process configurations of both cases were kept the same, to the extent possible, in order to highlight the benefit of substituting the Posimetric Feed System for the slurry feed system.

Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri, John; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Liber, Pawel; Lopez-Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Direct liquefaction of low-rank coal. Final technical report, July 13, 1994--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

A multistep direct liquefaction process specifically aimed at low- rank coals has been developed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center. The process consists of a preconversion treatment to prepare the coal for solubilization, solubilization of the coal in the solvent, and polishing using a phenolic solvent or solvent blend to complete solubilization of the remaining material. The product of these three steps can then be upgraded during a traditional hydrogenation step. This project addresses two research questions necessary for the further development and scaleup of this process: 1) determination of the recyclability of the solvent used during solubilization and 2) determination of the minimum severity required for effective hydrotreatment of the liquid product. The project was performed during two tasks: the first consisting of ten recycle tests and the second consisting of twelve hydrotreatment tests performed at various conditions. This project showed that the solvent could be recycled during the preconversion, solubilization and polishing steps of the multistep process and that lower-severity conditions can be used to successfully hydrotreat the product of the multistep process. The success of this project indicates that additional studies should be performed to evaluate the liquid-phase reactions taking place during batch tests in which the gas flow is continuous (i.e., the gas effects would be negligible). In addition, the entire multistep process (including hydrotreatment) should be evaluated during continuous unit operations. 2 refs., 11 figs., 27 tabs.

Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

An initial study on feasible treatment of Serbian lignite through utilization of low-rank coal upgrading technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Despite benefiting from vast fuel reserves, combustion of low-rank coals is commonly characterized by low thermal efficiency and high pollutant emissions, partly due to high moisture content of the coals in question. Thus, removal of moisture from low-rank coals is deemed an important quality upgrading method. The paper provides an overview of the current status of low-rank coal upgrading technologies, particularly with respect to utilization of drying and dewatering procedures. In order to examine the influence of relevant parameters on the moisture removal process, a model of convective coal drying in a packed, as well as in a fluid bed combustion arrangement, is developed and presented. Product-specific data (intraparticle mass transfer, gas–solid moisture equilibrium) related to the coal variety addressed herein (lignite) are obtained through preliminary investigations. Effective thermal conductivity of the packed bed as defined by Zehner/Bauer/Schlünder is used to define heat transfer mechanisms occurring in the packed bed. Similar two-phase fluidization model has been validated for different types of biomaterials.

Milan Staki?; Dejan Cvetinovi?; Predrag Škobalj; Vuk Spasojevi?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Laramie, Wyoming December, 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.wsgsweb.uwyo.edu Front cover: Coalbed methane drilling rig on location, southeastern edge of the Washakie Basin, southern Wyoming. This rig is exploring for coalbed methane in coals of the Almond Formation, Mesaverde Group ........................................................... 28 Coalbed methane developments...................................................... 28 Regulatory

Laughlin, Robert B.

79

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

80

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a review of the available data on mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts from small, laboratory-scale experiments, pilot-scale slipstream reactors and full-scale power plants was carried out. Data from small-scale reactors obtained with both simulated flue gas and actual coal combustion flue gas demonstrated the importance of temperature, ammonia, space velocity and chlorine on mercury oxidation across SCR catalyst. SCR catalysts are, under certain circumstances, capable of driving mercury speciation toward the gas-phase equilibrium values at SCR temperatures. Evidence suggests that mercury does not always reach equilibrium at the outlet. There may be other factors that become apparent as more data become available.

Constance Senior

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wyoming Points of Wyoming Points of Contact to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Points of Contact on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Points of Contact The following people or agencies can help you find more information about Wyoming's clean transportation laws, incentives, and funding opportunities.

83

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Wyoming Laws and Wyoming Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives Listed below are incentives, laws, and regulations related to alternative fuels and advanced vehicles for Wyoming. Your Clean Cities coordinator at

84

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

EIS-0432: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Medicine Bow Gasification and Liquefaction Coal-to-Liquids, Carbon County, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is assessing the potential environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to Medicine Bow Fuel & Power LLC (MBFP), a wholly-owned subsidiary of DKRW Advanced Fuels LLC. MBFP submitted an application to DOE under the Federal loan guarantee program pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to support the construction and startup of the MBFP coal-to-liquids facility, a coal mine and associated coal handling facilities.

86

A BLOCH DECAY AND ULTRA HIGH SPEED CP/MAS 13C NMR STUDY OF THE ARGONNE PREMIUM COALS AND SELECTED OXIDISED LOW-RANK COALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the results of a Bloch decay and ultrahigh speed cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study of the Argonne premium coals and selected oxidized low-rank coals. A Varian Associates VXR-300 NMR spectrometer operating at 75.4 \\{MHz\\} (13C) equipped with a Doty, Scientific, Inc. high-speed cross-polarization/magic angle probe was employed. Solid-state Bloch decay 13C NMR spectra were determined using 90° carbon pulse, 74 kHz dipolar proton decoupling during acquisition, and a 200-s recycle delay with 13 kHz magic angle spinning. The probe and sample rotor exhibited a background signal amounting to ca. 20% of the total intensity of the coal spectrum, and required careful FID scaling and subtraction of the signal obtained from the empty rotor and caps. CP/MAS spectra were determined at variable contact times from 25 ?S to 25 ms, with 5 s recycle times. The chapter presents a comparison of CP/MAS and Bloch decay results for the Argonne premium coals, a standard humic acid, and for a selection of oxidized coals.

J.C. Linehan; J.A. Franz

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of America, Boulder, CO. #12;Problem and Research Objectives: Coal bed methane (CBM) development, 2001). CBM extraction involves pumping methane and ground water out of coal seams. The gas and water://wwweng.uwyo.edu/civil/research/water/epmodeler.html. University of Wyoming, Laramie. 4. Wilkerson, G. V., 2002. A GIS model for evaluating the impacts of coal bed

88

Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming has substantial natural resources including coal, natural gas, oil, and wind power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) is making a meaningful down payment on the nation's energy and environmental future. The Recovery Act investments in Wyoming are supporting a broad range of clean energy projects from energy efficiency and the smart grid to carbon capture and storage. Through these investments, Wyoming's businesses, the University of Wyoming, non-profits, and local governments are creating quality jobs today and positioning Wyoming to play an important role in the new energy economy of the future. Recovery_Act_Memo_Wyoming.pdf More Documents & Publications Slide 1

89

Microsoft Word - Nuclear_hybrid_systems_for_Wyoming_-__final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming's coal and gas resources are exported from the state in unprocessed...

90

Performance of an IGCC Plant with Carbon Capture and Coal-CO2-Slurry Feed: Impact of Coal Rank, Slurry Loading, and Syngas Cooling Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The significant performance improvement reported by Dooher et al. for a plant with CO2 slurry feed reveals its potential and the need to develop a more fundamental understanding of the differences between water and liquid carbon dioxide as slurrying media and how these may affect individual process units for coals of different rank. ... It corresponds to the arrangement proposed by Dooher et al.,(19) in which the slurry transport medium is directly injected into the gasifier with the solid feedstock and O2. ...

Cristina Botero; Randall P. Field; Robert D. Brasington; Howard J. Herzog; Ahmed F. Ghoniem

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low-rank coal research semiannual report, January 1992--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

This semiannual report is a compilation of seventeen reports on ongoing coal research at the University of North Dakota. The following research areas are covered: control technology and coal preparation; advanced research and technology development; combustion; liquefaction and gasification. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other The list below contains summaries of all Wyoming laws and incentives

93

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

to someone by E-mail to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives Listed below are the summaries of all current Wyoming laws, incentives, regulations, funding opportunities, and other initiatives related to

94

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Other to someone by E-mail Other to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Other The list below contains summaries of all Wyoming laws and incentives

95

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Wyoming laws and incentives

96

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low-Rank Coal  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of the design of an advanced dry feed system that was carried out under Task 4.0 of Cooperative Agreement DE-FE0007902 with the US DOE, “Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the use of Low- Rank Coal.” The resulting design will be used for the advanced technology IGCC case with 90% carbon capture for sequestration to be developed under Task 5.0 of the same agreement. The scope of work covered coal preparation and feeding up through the gasifier injector. Subcomponents have been broken down into feed preparation (including grinding and drying), low pressure conveyance, pressurization, high pressure conveyance, and injection. Pressurization of the coal feed is done using Posimetric1 Feeders sized for the application. In addition, a secondary feed system is described for preparing and feeding slag additive and recycle fines to the gasifier injector. This report includes information on the basis for the design, requirements for down selection of the key technologies used, the down selection methodology and the final, down selected design for the Posimetric Feed System, or PFS.

Rader, Jeff; Aguilar, Kelly; Aldred, Derek; Chadwick, Ronald; Conchieri,; Dara, Satyadileep; Henson, Victor; Leininger, Tom; Liber, Pawel; Nakazono, Benito; Pan, Edward; Ramirez, Jennifer; Stevenson, John; Venkatraman, Vignesh

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

Lili Huang; Schobert, H.H.; Chunshan Song

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Coal Ranks and Geothermal Gradients in High-volatile Bituminous Coalfields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 380; Sw. No., 6. If it is assumed that no great changes in geothermal gradient have occurred since the early Pleistocene, this coal was metamorphosed at a temperature ... Silesia5. The most obvious explanation is that of a nearly two to one difference in geothermal gradient. Comparison of data from the Carboniferous coalfields of the Netherlands with analyses of ...

R. P. SUGGATE; J. O. ELPHICK

1964-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Idle Reduction

100

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Driving / Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Driving / Idling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

DOE-Sponsored Project Shows Huge Potential for Carbon Storage in Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wyoming Rock Springs Uplift could potentially store 14 to 17 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, according to results from a Department of Energy-sponsored study. This is equal to 250 to 300 years’ worth of CO2 emissions produced by the Wyoming’s coal-fired power plants and other large regional anthropogenic CO2 sources at current emission levels.

102

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 3.9 catalytic tar cracking  

SciTech Connect

Tar produced in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment, including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas stream cleanup filters, and pressure-swing absorption systems. Catalytic cracking of tars to smaller hydrocarbons can be an effective means of removing these tars from gas streams and, in the process, generating useful products, such as methane gas, which is crucial to operation of molten carbonate fuel cells. Aerosol tars are not readily removed from gas streams by conventional means and, as a consequence, often end up plugging filters or fouling fuel cells, turbines, or sorbents. Catalytic cracking of these tars to molecular moieties of C{sub 10} or smaller would prevent the problems commonly attributed to the tars. As an example, the moving Bourdon fixed-bed gasifier, by virtue of its efficient countercurrent heat exchange and widespread commercial use, may offer the lowest-cost integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system if tar generation and wastewater contamination can be minimized. We evaluate the potential of selected catalysts to minimize tar accumulation and maximize char conversion to useful liquid and/or gaseous products. Owing to the potential for production of extremely toxic nickel carbonyl gas, care must be exercised in the use of a NISMM catalyst for cracking tars at high temperatures in reducing atmospheres such as those produced by coal gasification. We observed a fifty percent or more of tar produced during steam gasification of Beulah lignite at temperatures of 400{degrees}-800+{degrees}C when cracked by either dolomite or zeolite maintained at a temperature of 50{degrees}C-100{degrees}C below that of the reactor.

Timpe, R.C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Aftermarket Conversions to someone by E-mail Aftermarket Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Aftermarket Conversions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

104

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Dealer to someone by E-mail Alternative Fuel Dealer to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Alternative Fuel Dealer on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

105

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Acquisition / Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Acquisition / Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Acquisition / Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

106

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling /  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner to someone by E-mail Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fueling / TSE Infrastructure Owner on

107

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fleet Purchaser/Manager to someone by E-mail Fleet Purchaser/Manager to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Fleet Purchaser/Manager on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

108

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Owner/Driver to someone by E-mail Vehicle Owner/Driver to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Vehicle Owner/Driver on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

109

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 8, 2010 December 8, 2010 CX-004682: Categorical Exclusion Determination Novel Sorbents for Emission Control from Coal Combustion CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 8, 2010 CX-004680: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot Scale Demonstration of Cowboy Coal Upgrading Process CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory December 8, 2010 CX-004667: Categorical Exclusion Determination Alternate Environmental Processes/Sorbents to Reduce Emissions and Recover Water for Power Plant Use CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/08/2010 Location(s): Laramie, Wyoming Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

110

Wyoming DOE EPSCoR  

SciTech Connect

All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

Gern, W.A.

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas The list below contains summaries of all Wyoming laws and incentives

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - alberta mountain coal Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United States of America. Summary: 1 Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study...

113

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal. Semi-annual report, January--June 1994  

SciTech Connect

Summaries of progress on the following tasks are presented: Mixed waste treatment; Hot water extraction of nonpolar organic pollutant from soils; Aqueous phase thermal oxidation wastewater treatment; Review of results from comprehensive characterization of air toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants; Air toxic fine particulate control; Effectiveness of sorbents for trace elements; Catalyst for utilization of methane in selective catalytic reduction of NOx; Fuel utilization properties; Hot gas cleaning; PFBC; catalytic tar cracking; sulfur forms in coal; resid and bitumen desulfurization; biodesulfurization; diesel fuel desulfurization; stability issues; Sorbent carbon development; Evaluation of carbon products; Stable and supercritical chars; Briquette binders; Carbon molecular sieves; Coal char fuel evaporation canister sorbent; Development of a coal by-product classification protocol for utilization; Use of coal ash in recycled plastics and composite materials; Corrosion of advanced structural materials; Joining of advanced structural materials; Resource data evaluation; and the Usti and Labem (Czech Republic) coal-upgrading program.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Rank enhancement of Permian Barakar and Raniganj coal measures in the western part of the Sohagpur coalfield, Madhya Pradesh, India  

SciTech Connect

The Geological Survey of India (GSI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are engaged in a study of the coking coal deposits in the Sohagpur coalfield, near Shahdol, Madhya Pradesh. The major occurrences of coking coal in the Sohagpur coalfield are on the northern, down-thrown side of the regional Bamhani-Chilpa fault, where depths to the coking coal range generally from 100 to 500 m. These coal deposits are within the Permian Barakar Formation, which comprises the lower coal measures of the Gondwana Supergroup. Equivalent coal beds on the south side of the fault are generally non-coking, and are currently being mined in open-cast and underground mines, for use as fuel for electric power generation. In this paper, new data are presented which expands on data and ideas originally presented in Mukhopadyay and others. The purpose of this paper is to integrate thermal signatures (vitrinite reflectance and volatile matter) of the principal coal beds of the Sohagpur coalfield with stratigraphic and structural data. In order to characterize the coking coal deposits, the authors have collected more than 100 coal samples from both the Barakar and Raniganj Formations for analyses. The occurrence of coking coal in the Sohagpur coalfield is related primarily to the thermal alteration of the coal beds in the different geologic settings within the coalfield. In addition, differences in the maceral content of the various coal beds and in the chemical and physical composition within each bed depending upon location, play an important role in determining the existence of coking properties for a particular coal deposit. Potential heat sources for thermal alteration include the abundant dolerite intrusives in the region, and greater depth of burial of the coking coal beds on the down-thrown side of the Bamhani-Chilpa fault. Offset along the Bamhani-Chilpa system has been suggested to greater than 400 m. Hot water, similar to that found in other Permian coalfields in India, may have been the agent that metamorphosed the coal in some places but not in others.

Warwick, P.D.; Milici, R.C.; Mukhopadyay, A.; Adhikari, S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Synthesis Gas Production with an Adjustable H2/CO Ratio through the Coal Gasification Process: Effects of Coal Ranks And Methane Addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the decline of oil reserves and production, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) part of Fischer–Tropsch (F-T) synthesis technology has become increasing important. ... The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates that over 50% of the coal reserve base in the United States (U.S.) is bituminous coal, about 30% is sub-bituminous, and 9% is lignite. ...

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jing Jin; Hongchang Zhou; Marten Cohron; Houying Zhao; Hongying Liu; Weiping Pan

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Wyoming State Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming State Regulations: Wyoming State of Wyoming The Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC) is the state agency authorized to regulate oil and gas exploration and production waste. The Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers general environmental protection regulations. Contact Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission 2211 King Blvd. Casper, WY 82602 (street address) P.O. Box 2640 Casper, WY 82602 (mailing address) (307) 234-7147 (phone) (307) 234-5306 (fax) Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality 122 West 25th Street, Herscheler Building Cheyenne, WY 82002 (307) 777-7937 (phone) (307) 777-7682 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Document # 4855, Agency (Oil and Gas Conservation Commission), General Agency, Board or Commission Rules, Chapter 4 (Environmental Rules, Including Underground Injection Control Program Rules for Enhanced Recovery and Disposal Projects), Section 1. Pollution and Surface Damage (Forms 14A and 14B) of the Wyoming Rules and Regulations contains the environmental rules administered by the WOGCC with respect to management options for exploration and production waste.

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Loans and Leases to someone by E-mail Loans and Leases to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wyoming Laws and Incentives for Loans and Leases

118

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050WY3","N3010WY3","N3020WY3","N3035WY3","NA1570SWY3","N3045WY3" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Natural Gas...

119

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cost and Performance Comparison Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants, Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baseline Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants Volume 3 Executive Summary: Low Rank Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity September 2011 DOE/NETL-2010/1399 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wyoming/Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Incentives Wyoming/Incentives < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Financial Incentive Programs for Wyoming 2 Rules, Regulations and Policies for Wyoming Download All Financial Incentives and Policies for Wyoming CSV (rows 1 - 42) Financial Incentive Programs for Wyoming Download Financial Incentives for Wyoming CSV (rows 1 - 34) Incentive Incentive Type Active Black Hills Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs (Wyoming) Utility Rebate Program Yes Black Hills Power - Residential Customer Rebate Program (Wyoming) Utility Rebate Program Yes Black Hills Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Utility Rebate Program No Carbon Power & Light - Energy Conservation Home Improvement Loan (Wyoming) Utility Loan Program No

122

Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

Larry Demick

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Investigation of feasibility of injecting power plant waste gases for enhanced coalbed methane recovery from low rank coals in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as power plants. CO2 emissions can be offset by sequestration of produced CO2 in natural reservoirs such as coal seams, which may initially contain methane. Production of coalbed methane can be enhanced through CO2 injection, providing an opportunity...

Saugier, Luke Duncan

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming Introduction Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state. Modeling Inputs New infrastructure projects considered in this analysis would be developed for the purpose of exporting Wyoming wind and natural gas

125

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 3, 2010 March 3, 2010 CX-006667: Categorical Exclusion Determination Restoration of 73-SX-10H CX(s) Applied: B6.1 Date: 03/07/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC February 24, 2010 CX-006661: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Flowline at 83-AX-4 CX(s) Applied: B5.2, B5.4 Date: 02/24/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC February 24, 2010 CX-006655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Coal Bed Methane Gas Separator CX(s) Applied: B3.7, B3.11 Date: 02/24/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC February 24, 2010 CX-006651: Categorical Exclusion Determination Water Haul Permit Location CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.6 Date: 02/11/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC February 13, 2010 CX-006734: Categorical Exclusion Determination

126

Section 5 - Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal has the longest history of use among the fossil fuels, with use as a fuel dating to 3000 BC in China and Wales. Marco Polo’s “Description of the World” (1298) comments on many novel customs and practices of China, including the use of “stones that burn like logs” (coal). By the thirteenth century the mining of coal was widespread in England in regions such as Durham, Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Staffordshire, and North and South Wales. By the early seventeenth century nearly half of England’s maritime trade consisted of coal exports. Coal was the fuel that launched the Industrial Revolution in Europe and then the United States. By the late 1890s, the U.S. assumed the lead in world coal production. Britain now ranked second, after having been the world leader since the beginnings of the formal industry in the 1500s. Germany was third, an indication of its growing industrial power relative to continental rival France. Coal’s leading role in energy use peaked in the early twentieth century, after which it was supplanted by oil and natural gas. By the late twentieth century China’s rapid economic expansion, surging demand for electricity, and prodigious coal resources combined to propel it to become the world leader in production. Continuous improvements in coal mining technology have produced lower costs, improved safety, and greater labor productivity. John Buddle introduced the first air pump to ventilate coal mines (1803), followed shortly by the miner’s safety lamps that were developed independently by Sir Humphry Davy, William Clanny, and George Stephenson (1813-1816). Coal mining underwent a rapid transition in the 1880s to mechanical coal cutting in mines in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Russia. The St. Joseph Lead Company of Missouri (1900) invented the first underground mine roof bolts that became a key safety feature in underground coal mines. The first commercially successful bucket wheel excavator was used at the Luise Mine in Braunkohlemwerke, Germany (1925), followed by the first successful continuous miners in U.S. underground coal mining (1948). The first mechanized U.S. longwall mining system appeared in 1951, and was followed by the self-advancing hydraulic longwall support system that provided greater support for the roof of the mine. LeTourneau Technologies, Inc. of Texas manufactured the largest rubber tired front-end wheel loader in the world, the L-2350, which would play an important role in loading coal in Wyoming’s large surface mines (2005). Coal mining has always been a very hazardous occupation, and has produced some of history’s worst industrial disasters. The Courrières mine disaster, Europe's worst mining accident, caused the death of 1,099 miners in Northern France (1906). An explosion in a coal mine in Liaoning province in northeastern China killed more than 1,500 Chinese miners (1942), as did other major accidents in Ky?sh?, Japan (1914), Wankie, Rhodesia (1972), Wales (1913), Bihar, India (1965), and West Virginia, U.S. (1907), to name just a few. Legislation such as the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act in the U.S. (1969) improved working conditions in many nations. The Great Smog of London (1952) occurred after an exceptionally cold winter forced homes and factories to burn large quantities of coal. A temperature inversion formed, trapping pollutants above the ground. More than 4,000 people died from respiratory ailments within the following week. The use of coal has been impacted by legislation to control the environmental impacts associated with its mining and combustion. The first known environmental regulation of coal dates to 1306 when King Edward II of England prohibited burning sea coal while Parliament was in session because of its offensive smoke. Sulfur dioxide from coal combustion was tied to acid rain in the 1960s, and carbon dioxide emissions became a concern beginning in the 1980s when climate change emerged as a critical environmental issue.

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Integrating flotation to improve the performance of an HMC circuit treating a low-rank fine coal  

SciTech Connect

One reason that heavy media cyclone (HMC) circuits suffer from the inadvertent loss of magnetite and fine coal is the presence of nonmagnetic material in the magnetic separator feed. In this study, flotation was applied to the undersize fractions of the HMC drain-and-rinse screens to minimize these problems. These fractions, which contain 17.9% nonmagnetic material, are currently sent to magnetic separators and the nonmagnetic portion from the separators contains 39.1% ash. Applying flotation resulted in a clean coal product with an ash content of 8.7% and a calorific value of 6,300 kcal/kg. The refuse from flotation, which will be sent to the magnetic separators, contains 7.7% nonmagnetics.

Celik, H.; Polat, M. [Celar Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

129

Wyoming.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

130

Wyoming.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming www.effi cientwindows.org March 2013 1. Meet the Energy Code and Look for the ENERGY STAR ® Windows must comply with your local energy code. Windows that are ENERGY STAR qualifi ed typically meet or exceed energy code requirements. To verify if specific window energy properties comply with the local code requirements, go to Step 2. 2. Look for Effi cient Properties on the NFRC Label The National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) label is needed for verifi cation of energy code compliance (www.nfrc. org). The NFRC label displays whole- window energy properties and appears on all fenestration products which are part of the ENERGY STAR program.

131

BLM biological assessment for T and E species for the WyCoalGas project. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project; Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume considers the water requirements of the proposed plant and possible sources of water supply. The water requirements are 7900 acre-feet per year at full production (1720 acre-feet would be supplied by the moisture in the coal). Surface and ground water sources are described and a private reservoir would be built to store water. The priority of use from each source is considered. Also, in some cases other present water rights come first. In almost every year little or no water would be available during August and September. Endangered species in the area are considered, in particular, the effect of the increased water usage on them. (LTN)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coal preparation: The essential clean coal technology  

SciTech Connect

This chapter is a brief introduction to a broad topic which has many highly specialized areas. The aim is to summarize the essential elements of coal preparation and illustrate its important role in facilitating the clean use of coal. Conventional coal preparation is the essential first step in ensuring the economic and environmentally acceptable use of coal. The aim of coal preparation is to produce saleable products of consistent, specified quality which satisfy customer requirements while optimizing the utilization of the coal resource. Coal preparation covers all aspects of preparing coal for the market. It includes size reduction, blending and homogenization and, most importantly, the process of physical beneficiation or washing, which involves separation of undesirable mineral matter from the coal substance itself. Coal preparation can be performed at different levels of sophistication and cost. The degree of coal preparation required is decided by considering the quality of the raw coal, transport costs and, in particular, the coal quality specified by the consumer. However, the cost of coal beneficiation rises rapidly with the complexity of the process and some coal is lost with the waste matter because of process inefficiencies, therefore each situation requires individual study to determine the optimum coal preparation strategy. The necessary expertise is available within APEC countries such as Australia. Coals destined for iron making are almost always highly beneficiated. Physical beneficiation is mostly confined to the higher rank, hard coals, but all other aspects of coal preparation can be applied to subbituminous and lignitic coals to improve their utilization. Also, there are some interesting developments aimed specifically at reducing the water content of lower rank coals.

Cain, D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends, 2001 - 2010 Trends, 2001 - 2010 Transportation infrastructure overview In 2010, railroads transported over 70 percent of coal delivered to electric power plants which are generally concentrated east of the Mississippi River and in Texas. The U.S. railroad market is dominated by four major rail companies that account for 99 percent of U.S. coal rail shipments by volume. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by mode Rail Barge Truck Figure 2. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by rail, 2010 figure data Figure 3. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by barge, 2010 figure data Figure 4. Deliveries from major coal basins to power plants by truck, 2010 figure data The Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, where coal is extracted in

134

Evaluating coking resources. 2. State standard GOST 25543-88 as a coding system for coal and coal mixtures in evaluating their technological properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The codification of coal in State Standard 25543-88 is compared with the international codification of coal of medium and high rank. The ranking of coking coal on the basis of State Standard GOST...

Yu. A. Zolotukhin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Wyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the United States Geological Survey, State Water Resources Research Institute Program allowed the Wyoming and Natural Resources, and at Wyoming State Water Plan meetings. We attended conferences hosted by the WyomingWyoming Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report FY 1999 Introduction Research Program

136

Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September-November 1983  

SciTech Connect

Wyoming subbituminous coal was liquefied using three different two-stage process configurations in bench-scale tests. These process configurations differed in the type of fractionated deashing resid being recycled to the individual stages. The objective of these runs was to determine whether, by recycle of specific resid streams to the thermal stage, the second stage catalyst life could be improved without detrimentally affecting distillate yield or hydrogen consumption. The results indicate that the two-stage process configuration consisting of hydrotreating the Light Deashed Resid and direct recycle of heavy Deashed Resid to the thermal stage produced the best results. This process configuration resulted in a distillate yield of 54 wt % (MAF coal basis) and overall coal conversion in the 93 to 95% range, as measured by pyridine-soluble analytical test while operating in a total distillate mode. These results are very encouraging from the lower rank Wyoming subbituminous coal. Among the three two-stage process configurations tested, the particular process configuration of hydrotreating Light Deashed Resid resulted in the least amount of catalyst deactivation. As a part of this research effort, a test procedure for quick evaluation of various resids and catalysts in terms of coke precursors was also developed. This procedure utilizing as-produced oxide-form extrudates of catalyst is able to simulate closely in a batch reactor test the performance of a presulfided and extrudate form of catalyst in a continuous reactor. The CSD unit, being able to not only deash but also fractionate the resid, greatly increased the flexibility of options for coal liquefaction. New process concepts evolved incorporating reside fractionation and selective resid recycle in coal liquefaction. 17 figures, 28 tables.

Paranjape, A.S.

1984-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Wyoming | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming Last updated on 2013-06-03 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information The International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) Uniform Building Code, which is based on the 1989 Model Energy Code (MEC), may be adopted and enforced by local jurisdictions. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Wyoming (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Less energy efficient than 2003 IECC Effective Date 08/13/2008 Code Enforcement Voluntary DOE Determination ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: No Wyoming DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Current Code None Statewide

138

Recovery Act State Memos Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Wyoming For questions about DOE's Recovery Act activities, please contact the DOE Recovery Act Clearinghouse: 1-888-DOE-RCVY (888-363-7289), Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time https://recoveryclearinghouse.energy.gov/contactUs.htm. All numbers and projects listed as of June 1, 2010 TABLE OF CONTENTS RECOVERY ACT SNAPSHOT................................................................................... 1 FUNDING ALLOCATION TABLE.............................................................................. 2 ENERGY EFFICIENCY ............................................................................................... 3 ELECTRIC GRID ........................................................................................................ 4

139

Tensor Rank.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This master's thesis addresses numerical methods of computing the typical ranks of tensors over the real numbers and explores some properties of tensors over… (more)

Erdtman, Elias

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Teapot Dome: Characterization of a CO2-enhanced oil recovery and storage site in Eastern Wyoming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...storage, and underground coal gasification. Vicki Stamp has more than...unparalleled opportunity for industry and others to use the site...projects are intimately linked to industry-driven enhanced oil recovery...three-dimensional models United States waste disposal Wyoming GeoRef...

S. Julio Friedmann; Vicki W. Stamp

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Production of low ash coal by thermal extraction with N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Present study was conducted for the purpose of producing low ash coal from LRC (low rank coals) such as lignite and sub-bituminous coal through thermal extraction using polar solvent. Extraction from bituminous coal

Sang Do Kim; Kwang Jae Woo; Soon Kwan Jeong…

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

FRAGMENTATION OF COAL AND IMPROVED DISPERSION OF LIQUEFACTION CATALYSTS USING IONIC LIQUIDS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal has been utilized for coal-to-liquid fuels and coal-to-chemical industries both historically in South Africa and recently in China. Abundant bituminous and low-rank coal reserves… (more)

Cetiner, Ruveyda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Probabilistic rank aggregation for multiple SVM ranking.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Learning to rank is a fast growing research problem in Machine Learning and Information Retrieval. Ranking Support Vector Machine (RSVM) is a widely adopted ranking… (more)

Cheung, Chi Wai

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Adsorption Behavior of CO2 in Coal and Coal Char  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coals of diverse characteristics have been chosen to provide a better understanding on the influence of various coal properties, such as maceral, volatile matter, and ash contents. ... In addition, char samples from two of these coals (a non-coking coal A and a coking coal B) were prepared by pyrolysis at 800 and 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere and were tested for CO2 adsorption capacity. ... As stated earlier, virgin coal samples considered for the adsorption measurements include coals A, C, and D, which are of low-, high-, and medium-volatile sub-bituminous rank, respectively. ...

Shanmuganathan Ramasamy; Pavan Pramod Sripada; Md Moniruzzaman Khan; Su Tian; Japan Trivedi; Rajender Gupta

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Enhanced CO2 Gas Storage in Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (GHG) such as carbon dioxide (CO2) is largely believed to be a primary contributor to global warming. ... Four coals of various rank exploited from four main coal seams in China were tested. ...

Shu-Qing Hao; Sungho Kim; Yong Qin; Xue-Hai Fu

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Wyoming/Geothermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Wyoming Geothermal General Regulatory Roadmap Geothermal Power Projects Under Development in Wyoming No geothermal projects listed. Add a geothermal project. Operational Geothermal Power Plants in Wyoming No geothermal power plants listed. Add a geothermal energy generation facility. Geothermal Areas in Wyoming Mean Capacity (MW) Number of Plants Owners Geothermal Region Huckleberry Hot Springs Geothermal Area 38.744 MW38,744.243 kW 38,744,243.17 W 38,744,243,170 mW 0.0387 GW 3.874424e-5 TW Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GRR-logo.png Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap for Wyoming Overview Flowchart The flowcharts listed below were developed as part of the Geothermal

147

Wyoming/Transmission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wyoming/Transmission < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search WyomingTransmissionHeader.png Roadmap Agency Links Local Regulations State Regulations Summary General Transmission Dashboard Permitting Atlas Compare States Arizona California Colorado Idaho Montana Nevada New Mexico Oregon Utah Washington Wyoming Resource Library NEPA Database The electrical grid in Wyoming is part of the WestConnect Transmission Planning area, and covers the southwest of the United States. Within the WestConnect system, Wyoming is part of the Colorado Coordinated Planning Group (CCPG) power grid that covers Colorado and portions of Wyoming.

148

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming Wyoming Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming Location Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued for actions in Wyoming. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 26, 2013 CX-010688: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization Project #3 CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.2, B5.4, B5.5 Date: 07/26/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC July 26, 2013 CX-010687: Categorical Exclusion Determination Optimization Project Area #1 CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.2, B5.4, B5.5 Date: 07/26/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): RMOTC July 2, 2013 CX-010686: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cheyenne Substation KV2A 115-kilovolt Tie Line Installation CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/02/2013 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region June 28, 2013

149

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 7.2, Resource data evaluation. Topical report, July 1994--May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Resource Data Evaluation subtask of the US Department of Energy (DOE) base program represents an Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) initiative to promote the integration of geographic information system (GIS) technologies with other ongoing and planned EERC research in the areas of resource utilization, remediation, land use planning, and regulatory and policy assessment. Significant demand for GIS-based information already exists for energy resource evaluation, interpretation of remote sensing data, environmental assessment at the state and local levels, and use in strategic planning. The objective of this task was to determine the appropriate platform and approach upon which to develop GIS applications for optimizing resource evaluation and integrating this information with related areas of interest. Activities associated with Task 7.2, Resource Data Evaluation, were conducted primarily during the first half of the project year. These activities included tasks associated with the development and implementation of GIS databases and construction of digitized files for research pertaining to energy studies. As previously noted, database design was undertaken for two EERC projects: 1) coal occurrence in Bowman and adjacent counties in the Fort Union Coal Region of southwestern North Dakota and 2) energy resource utilization concerns for selected sites in Alaska.

Hartman, J.H.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

PacifiCorp (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming) Wyoming) (Redirected from Rocky Mountain Power (Wyoming)) Jump to: navigation, search Name PacifiCorp Place Wyoming Service Territory Wyoming Website www.rockymountainpower.ne Green Button Reference Page www.rockymountainpower.ne Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 14354 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. PacifiCorp consists of three business units. Rocky Mountain Power is a subsidiary of PacifiCorp which delivers electricity to customers in Utah, Wyoming and Idaho, it is headquartered in Salt Lake City, UT. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2 Residential 25 (Small General Service - Three Phase Secondary) Commercial

152

Wyoming's Economic Future: Planning for Sustained Prosperity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Highest-Priority the Highest-Priority Geological CO 2 Storage Sites and Formations in Wyoming Ronald C. Surdam Director, Carbon Management Institute Modified from Surdam, R.C., Jiao, Z., Stauffer, P., & Miller, T., 2009, An integrated strategy for carbon management combining geological CO 2 sequestration, displaced fluid production, and water treatment: Wyoming State Geological Survey Challenges in Geologic Resource Development No. 8, 25 p. WSGS, UW, State, and DOE- funded research identified two high-capacity sites in southwest Wyoming: Rock Springs Uplift & Moxa Arch Carbon Capture Potential In Southwest Wyoming Surdam, R.C. & Jiao, Z., 2007, The Rock Springs Uplift: An outstanding geological CO 2 sequestration site in southwest Wyoming: Wyoming State Geological Survey Challenges in Geologic Resource

153

Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Amy:56:27.6 Deborah Mc Eligot Deborah Storrings Male Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Macon Fessenden 20 1 5:42.2 2 0:26.9 1 34:29.7 3:23 1 0:12.8 1 17:41.1 3

Suzuki, Masatsugu

154

BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SEISMIC ENERGY of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL and David Gross Thunder Basin Coal Company Post Office Box 406 Wright, Wyoming 82732 D. Craig Pearson

155

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","92014","1151989" ,"Release...

156

,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

157

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MDU Resources Group Inc (Wyoming)) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Montana-Dakota Utilities Co Place: Wyoming References: Energy Information Administration.1 EIA Form 861 Data...

158

Continuing consolidation in the coal industry  

SciTech Connect

Extensive consolidation has occurred in the coal industry over the past decade. The greatest degree of consolidation has occurred in Northern Appalachia, the Illinois Basin, and the Wyoming portion of the Powder River Basin (PRB), which are the coal supply regions where most observers expect the greatest growth in coal production over the next decade. In addition to reducing the number of alternative suppliers, high level of concentration also tend to result in higher prices, more volatile spot markets, and lower levels of reliability. Therefore, coal-fired generators purchasing in these regions need to respond proactively and strategically to these market trends. 2 figs.

Gaalaas, T. [Pace Global Energy Services LLC (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Investigations into coal coprocessing and coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of coal to liquid suitable as feedstock to a petroleum refinery is dependent upon several process variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, coal rank, catalyst type, nature of the feed to the reactor, type of process, etc. Western Research Institute (WRI) has initiated a research program in the area of coal liquefaction to address the impact of some of these variables upon the yield and quality of the coal-derived liquid. The principal goal of this research is to improve the efficiency of the coal liquefaction process. Two different approaches are currently being investigated. These include the coprocessing of a heavy liquid, such as crude oil, and coal using a dispersed catalyst and the direct liquefaction of coal using a supported catalyst. Another important consideration in coal liquefaction is the utilization of hydrogen, including both externally- and internally-supplied hydrogen. Because the incorporation of externally-supplied hydrogen during conversion of this very aromatic fossil fuel to, for example, transportation fuels is very expensive, improved utilization of internally-supplied hydrogen can lead to reducing processing costs. The objectives of this investigation, which is Task 3.3.4, Coal Coprocessing, of the 1991--1992 Annual Research Plan, are: (1) to evaluate coal/oil pretreatment conditions that are expected to improve the liquid yield through more efficient dispersion of an oil-soluble, iron-based catalyst, (2) to characterize the coke deposits on novel, supported catalysts after coal liquefaction experiments and to correlate the carbon skeletal structure parameters of the coke deposit with catalyst performance as measured by coal liquefaction product yield, and (3) to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction and coprocessing. Experimental results are discussed in this report.

Guffey, F.D.; Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Thomas, K.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Zhang, Tiejun; Haynes, H.W. Jr. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Introduction Positive finite rank . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Positive finite rank . . . Positive finite rank . . . Positive finite rank . . . ¯� I qixf1981@sxu.edu.cn #12;Introduction Positive finite rank . . . Positive finite rank . . . Positive finite rank . . . ¯� I K 12 19 £ ¶w« ' 4 ò � 1 Introduction · In quantum mechanics, a quantum system

Li, Chi-Kwong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 7, 2012 March 7, 2012 CX-008379: Categorical Exclusion Determination Archer Communications Building CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 03/07/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region January 24, 2012 CX-008675: Categorical Exclusion Determination Sustainable Energy Solutions LLC - Cryogenic Carbon Capture (Phase 2) CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.9 Date: 01/24/2012 Location(s): Utah, Wyoming Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy January 12, 2012 CX-007755: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine and Proposed Actions at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.1 Date: 01/12/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Legacy Management December 15, 2011 CX-007515: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bucknam Temporary Tap, Natrona County, Wyoming

162

Quarterly review of methane from coal-seams technology. Volume 7, Number 3, July-September 1989  

SciTech Connect

The report contains: sources of coal well information; Powder River Basin, Wyoming; greater Green River coal region, Wyoming and Colorado; Piceance Basin, Colorado; San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Raton Basin, Colorado and New Mexico; Black Warrior Basin, Alabama; the United States coalbed methane resource; western cretaceous coal seams project; multiple coal seams project; spalling and the development of a hydraulic fracturing strategy for coal; geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources; coalbed methane opportunities in Alberta; the coalbed methane forum; eastern coalbed methane forum.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Coal-CO[subscript 2] Slurry Feed for Pressurized Gasifiers: Slurry Preparation System Characterization and Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification-based plants with coal-CO[subscript 2] slurry feed are predicted to be more efficient than those with coal-water slurry feed. This is particularly true for high moisture, low rank coal such as lignite. ...

Botero, Cristina

164

Drying Kinetics Characteristic of Indonesia Lignite Coal (IBC) Using Lab Scale Fixed Bed Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent instability of energy market arouse a lot of interest about coal which has a tremendous amount of proven coal reserves worldwide. South Korea hold the second rank by importing 80 million tons of coal in...

TaeJin Kang; DoMan Jeon; Hueon Namkung…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Index (click to jump links) Coal Production and Prices Coal Mining Labor Productivity Coal Consumption Coal Production and Prices Emissions Caps Lead to More Use of Low-Sulfur Coal From Western Mines Continued improvements in mine productivity (which have averaged 5.9 percent per year since 1980) are projected to cause falling real minemouth prices throughout the forecast relative to historical levels. Higher electricity demand and lower prices, in turn, are projected to yield increasing coal demand, but the demand is subject to the overall sulfur emissions cap in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which encourages progressively greater reliance on the lowest sulfur coals (from Wyoming, Montana, Colorado, and Utah). Figure 106. Coal production by region, 1970-2025 (million short tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

166

United States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

167

Kuznetsk Basin coking coal: Reserves and technological value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reserves of Kuznetsk Basin coking coal are analyzed, in terms of rank composition and scope for coke production. The technological value of the coal is evaluated by the OOO VNITs Ugol...

V. P. Ivanov; V. Yu. Sushkov; A. A. Torgunakov; S. A. Pantykin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effect of weathering on coal characteristics and coke qualities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The effect of weathering on the modification of chemical, petrological and rheological properties of four metallurgical coals in different rank and geology was investigated. And… (more)

Lee, Seung Jae

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Formation and retention of methane in coal  

SciTech Connect

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Technical and Economic Feasibility of Siting Synfuels Plants in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive study has been completed to determine the feasibility of constructing and operating gasification and reforming plants which convert Wyoming fossil resources (coal and natural gas) into the higher value products of power, transportation fuels, and chemical feedstocks, such as ammonia and methanol. Detailed plant designs, simulation models, economic models and well-to-wheel greenhouse gas models were developed, validated by national-level engineering firms, which were used to address the following issues that heretofore have prevented these types of projects from going forward in Wyoming, as much as elsewhere in the United States: 1. Quantification of plant capital and operating expenditures 2. Optimization of plant heat integration 3. Quantification of coal, natural gas, electricity, and water requirements 4. Access to raw materials and markets 5. Requirements for new infrastructure, such as electrical power lines and product pipelines 6. The possible cost-benefit tradeoffs of using natural gas reforming versus coal gasification 7. The extent of labor resources required for plant construction and for permanent operations 8. Options for managing associated CO2 emissions, including capture and uses in enhanced oil recovery and sequestration 9. Options for reducing water requirements such as recovery of the high moisture content in Wyoming coal and use of air coolers rather than cooling towers 10. Permitting requirements 11. Construction, and economic impacts on the local communities This paper will summarize the analysis completed for two major synfuels production pathways, methanol to gasoline and Fischer-Trosph diesel production, using either coal or natural gas as a feedstock.

Anastasia M Gandrik; Rick A Wood; David Bell; William Schaffers; Thomas Foulke; Richard D Boardman

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Influence of coal thermoplastic properties on coking pressure generation: Part 2 – A study of binary coal blends and specific additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of coal blends and pitch/coal blends were evaluated using rheometry, thermogravimetric analysis and microscopy to confirm and further elucidate the coking pressure mechanism previously proposed by Duffy et al. (2007) [1]. We confirm that blending a low rank, high fluidity, low coking pressure coal, with a high rank, low fluidity, high coking pressure coal can significantly reduce the coking pressure associated with the latter. Interestingly, blending does not necessarily result in a fluidity that is midway between that of the two coals; sometimes the fluidity of the blend is less than that of the low fluidity coal, especially when the coals are significantly different in rank. This occurs because the increase in complex viscosity (?*) through resolidification of the low rank, high fluidity coal counteracts the reduction in ?* resulting from softening of the high rank, low fluidity coal. It has also been confirmed that the ?* of the resultant blend can be estimated from the ?* of each component coal using a logarithmic additivity rule commonly employed for polymer blends. Polarised light microscopy has indicated that the degree of mixing between coals of different rank is minimal, with fusion restricted to the particle surface. It is therefore inappropriate to think of such a coal blend in the same way as a single coal, since each component coal behaves relatively independently. This limited fusion is important for understanding the coking pressure mechanism for blends. It is proposed here that the lower rank coal, which softens at lower temperature, is able to expand into the interparticle voids between the high rank coal that is yet to soften, and these voids can create channels for volatiles to traverse. Then, and importantly, when the high rank coal begins to expand, the pore structure developed in the resolidified structures of the low rank coal can facilitate removal of volatiles, while the resolidified material may also act as a suitable sorbent for volatile matter. This is considered to be the primary mechanism by which coal blending is able to alleviate coking pressure, and applies to addition of inert material also. Addition of a coal tar pitch was found to increase fluidity but also to extend the thermoplastic range to lower temperatures. This caused an increase in the swelling range, which was accompanied by a long plateau in ?*, a feature which has previously been observed for certain high fluidity, high pressure coals. Elasticity and ?* at the onset of expansion were also higher for both the pitch impregnated coals and the high pressure blends, which supports previous findings for singly charged high pressure coals, and confirms the potential use of such criteria for identifying potentially dangerous coals/blends.

John J. Duffy; Merrick R. Mahoney; Karen M. Steel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0759678,"lon":-107.2902839,"alt":0,"address":"Wyoming","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

173

PacifiCorp (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Wyoming Service Territory Wyoming Website www.rockymountainpower.ne Green Button Reference Page www.rockymountainpower.ne Green Button Implemented Yes Utility Id 14354 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. PacifiCorp consists of three business units. Rocky Mountain Power is a subsidiary of PacifiCorp which delivers electricity to customers in Utah, Wyoming and Idaho, it is headquartered in Salt Lake City, UT. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 2 Residential 25 (Small General Service - Three Phase Secondary) Commercial 28 (General Service - Three Phase Secondary) Commercial 46 (Time Of Use Three Phase Secondary) Commercial

174

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 30, 2012 July 30, 2012 CX-009090: Categorical Exclusion Determination Line Switch Replacements at Guernsey Rural, Worland, Refinery, Box Butte, and Morrill Taps CX(s) Applied: B4.6, B4.11 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Wyoming, Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008784: Categorical Exclusion Determination License Outgrant to Owl Creek Water District Town of Thermopolis, Hot Springs County, Wyoming CX(s) Applied: B4.9 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region July 23, 2012 CX-008496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Interstate Electrification Improvement CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/23/2012 Location(s): Wyoming Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

175

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 11, 2010 August 11, 2010 CX-006735: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hyperspectral Survey CX(s) Applied: B3.8, B3.11 Date: 08/11/2010 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC August 4, 2010 CX-003231: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wyoming American Recovery and Reinvestment Act State Energy Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B5.1 Date: 08/04/2010 Location(s): Wyoming Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 13, 2010 CX-003032: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.7, B3.6, B4.4, B5.1 Date: 07/13/2010 Location(s): Jackson Hole, Wyoming Office(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory July 9, 2010 CX-006699: Categorical Exclusion Determination

176

Wyoming/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources Wyoming/Wind Resources < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wyoming Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

177

Wyoming Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Municipal Power Agency Wyoming Municipal Power Agency Place Wyoming Utility Id 40603 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wyoming_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=412214

178

Wyoming Wind Power Project (generation/wind)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Wyoming Wind Power Project (Foote Creek Rim I and II) Thumbnail image of wind...

179

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 133 278...

180

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

182

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" "Rank","Mine Name / Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining Ll","Surface","Wyoming",107639188 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company Llc","Surface","Wyoming",93082919 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining Llc","Surface","Wyoming",39204736 4,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal Llc","Surface","Wyoming",34316314 5,"Belle Ayr Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",24227846 6,"Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",22466733

183

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant Utility to Purchase Low-Carbon Power from Innovative Clean Coal Plant January 19, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon dioxide produced are among the technologies being used in the Texas Clean Energy Project. | Photo courtesy of llnlphotos. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory demonstrated coal gasification in large-scale field experiments at the Rocky Mountain Test Facility (above) near Hanna, Wyoming. Coal gasification and sequestration of the carbon

184

Coal Gasification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Office of Fossil Energy supports activities to advance coal-to-hydrogen technologies, specifically via the process of coal gasification with sequestration. DOE anticipates that coal...

185

Sorption Behaviors of Various Organic Vapors to Argonne Premium Coal Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sorption Behaviors of Various Organic Vapors to Argonne Premium Coal Samples ... Sorption of various organic vapors by Argonne Premium coals (APCS-1, 3, 5, and 8) was investigated to clarify the coal?organic interaction, sorption mechanism, and micropore and cross-linking structure of coals. ... Otake and Suuberg4 showed the behaviors of solvent swelling of Argonne premium sample coals by diffusion of various organic solvents are quite different among the coals used, which did not correlate well with coal rank. ...

Kazuhiko Shimizu; Toshimasa Takanohashi; Masashi Iino

1998-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

186

Coal ash composition of Australian low rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The iron-containing phases in nine precipitator ashes of widely differing composition have been analyzed by57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The importance of the relative proportion of calcium ferrite to magnesioferr...

L. J. Brown; J. D. Cashion; R. C. Ledger

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Proximate analysis of coal  

SciTech Connect

This lab experiment illustrates the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to perform proximate analysis on a series of coal samples of different rank. Peat and coke are also examined. A total of four exercises are described. These are dry exercises as students interpret previously recorded scans. The weight percent moisture, volatile matter, fixed carbon, and ash content are determined for each sample and comparisons are made. Proximate analysis is performed on a coal sample from a local electric utility. From the weight percent sulfur found in the coal (determined by a separate procedure the Eschka method) and the ash content, students calculate the quantity of sulfur dioxide emissions and ash produced annually by a large coal-fired electric power plant.

Donahue, C.J.; Rais, E.A. [University of Michigan, Dearborn, MI (USA)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

coking coal [A caking coal suitable for the production of coke for metallurgical use] ? Kokskohle f, verkokbare Kohle

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hoe Creek Underground Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hoe Creek Underground Coal Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site - 045 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Site (045) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Hoe Creek Underground Gasification site occupies 80 acres of land located in Campbell County, Wyoming. The site was used to investigate the process and environmental parameters of underground coal gasification technologies in the 1970s. The Department of Energy¿s (DOE) current mission is limited to completing environmental remediation activities at the site. This property is owned by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM),

190

Determining coal permeabilities through constant pressure production interference testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kurt Schubarth, B. S. , Texas A&M Un1versity Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Stephen A. Holditch The determination of format1on propert1es 1s important to the success of any underground coal gasification (UCG) project. There are many ways.... : "Hydrological Site Characterization for In-Situ Coal Gasification, " 6th Underground Coal Conversion Symposium, July 13-17, 1980. Schrider, L. A. and Jennings, J. W. : "An Underground Coal Gasification Experiment, Hanna, Wyoming, " 1974, SPE 4993. 3. van...

Schubarth, Stephen Kurt

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Competitive interstate taxation of western coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the potential market power of western states in setting coal severance taxes. An attempt to determine the emphasis placed by the western states on the development of their coal resources is also made. Three market structures are analyzed. One involves a western regional cartel, setting taxes collectively. The other cases are noncooperative tax equilibria with Montana and Wyoming competing against each other. We study the effects on these equilibria of changes in each region's relative emphasis on development of coal resources vs tax revenue. The welfare impacts of these tax setting policies are also addressed. The analysis is based on an activity analysis of US coal markets. The results show that the taxes associated with the noncooperative competitive tax equilibria are close to present tax levels. Additionally, we conclude that western states currently are quite efficient extractors of economic rent from coal produced within their boundaries, in terms of welfare loss per dollar of tax revenue collected. 2 figures.

Kolstad, C.D.; Wolak, F.A. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 30, 2009 December 30, 2009 CX-006683: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.2 Date: 12/30/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC December 29, 2009 CX-001292: Categorical Exclusion Determination Training Programs, Lighting Upgrades, Hire a Consultant, Energy Efficient Boiler Installation CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 12/29/2009 Location(s): Cheyenne, Wyoming Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 23, 2009 CX-006679: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B5.2 Date: 12/23/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC December 23, 2009 CX-006681: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Drilling Location in Section 29 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 12/23/2009

193

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 26, 2011 May 26, 2011 CX-006716: Categorical Exclusion Determination New B-1-3 Pit and Box Construction CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B6.1 Date: 05/26/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC May 17, 2011 CX-006719: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casing Drilling Test CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.7, B5.12 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC May 5, 2011 CX-005852: Categorical Exclusion Determination Stegall-Wayside 230 Kilovolt Access Road Extension CX(s) Applied: B1.13 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): Dawes County, Wyoming Office(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region April 29, 2011 CX-005664: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development and Testing of Compact Heat Exchange Reactors (CHER) for Synthesis of Liquid Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6

194

Reordering MPI Ranks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

application. Methodology One way to change MPI task placement on cores is to change the rank ordering, the order in which MPI tasks (or ranks) are assigned to cores. When a...

195

The Ranks of Liberty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE ranks of liberty have suddenly been thinned; physically they are weaker, but the blow has made them ...

1940-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead October 19, 2010 - 12:43pm Addthis Wyoming residents can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances such as clothes washers. | File photo Wyoming residents can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances such as clothes washers. | File photo Lindsay Gsell What does this mean for me? Wyoming received $511,000 in Recovery Act funding for its appliance rebate program. The program has already distributed 60% of rebate funding. Wyoming's appliance rebate program, which opened in April, continues through this fall. Residents of the Equality State can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR certified clothes washers, dishwashers, water heaters and gas furnaces ranging from $50 to $250.

197

Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead Wyoming's Appliance Rebate Program Surges Ahead October 19, 2010 - 12:43pm Addthis Wyoming residents can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances such as clothes washers. | File photo Wyoming residents can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR appliances such as clothes washers. | File photo Lindsay Gsell What does this mean for me? Wyoming received $511,000 in Recovery Act funding for its appliance rebate program. The program has already distributed 60% of rebate funding. Wyoming's appliance rebate program, which opened in April, continues through this fall. Residents of the Equality State can receive rebates on ENERGY STAR certified clothes washers, dishwashers, water heaters and gas furnaces ranging from $50 to $250.

198

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 22, 2009 October 22, 2009 CX-006666: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: Date: 01/00/1900 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC October 20, 2009 CX-006645: Categorical Exclusion Determination T-6-10 Abandonment and Storage Relocation CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.22, B5.3 Date: 10/20/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC October 20, 2009 CX-006653: Categorical Exclusion Determination B-1-3 Heat Trace CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 10/20/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC October 14, 2009 CX-006647: Categorical Exclusion Determination Move Contaminated Soil From North Water Flood to East Side Land Farm CX(s) Applied: B5.3, B5.6 Date: 10/14/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC October 14, 2009 CX-006649: Categorical Exclusion Determination

199

National Park Service- Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are currently being used by the Yellowstone Association Institute for ecology classes.

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian bituminous coal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applied Physics Institute Collection: Engineering 36 Impact of coal quality and gasifier technology on IGCC performance Summary: was captured and the two highest rank...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Formation and retention of methane in coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The formation and retention of methane in coalbeds was studied for ten Utah coal samples, one Colorado coal sample and eight coal samples from the Argonne Premium Coal Sample Bank.Methane gas content of the Utah and Colorado coals varied from zero to 9 cm{sup 3}/g. The Utah coals were all high volatile bituminous coals. The Colorado coal was a gassy medium volatile bituminous coal. The Argonne coals cover a range or rank from lignite to low volatile bituminous coal and were used to determine the effect of rank in laboratory studies. The methane content of six selected Utah coal seams and the Colorado coal seam was measured in situ using a special sample collection device and a bubble desorbometer. Coal samples were collected at each measurement site for laboratory analysis. The cleat and joint system was evaluated for the coal and surrounding rocks and geological conditions were noted. Permeability measurements were performed on selected samples and all samples were analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, petrographic analysis, {sup 13}C NMR dipolar-dephasing spectroscopy, and density analysis. The observed methane adsorption behavior was correlated with the chemical structure and physical properties of the coals.

Hucka, V.J.; Bodily, D.M.; Huang, H.

1992-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base Gregory D. Croft1 and Tad W the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production of this highest-rank coal. The pro- duction of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

203

NETL: Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use of our domestic energy resources and infrastructure. Gasification Systems | Advanced Combustion | Coal & Coal-Biomass to Liquids | Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Turbines CO2...

204

Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Porous Structure of Coal  

SciTech Connect

In this report, 129 Xe nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in coal is used to describe some poorly understood features of coal microporous structure, particularly in establishing that a connected network exists, the type of connectivity, and its changes with the rank of coal. Micropore size scale and distribution are also considered. Two methods are developed which are new and versatile tools for the investigation of porous structure. Both utilize xenon gas that is in motion, while undergoing diffusion or exchange in coal, to describe the connectivity of the micropore structure of coal. Time tracking of the adsorption process by NMR, selective saturation, and saturation transfer techniques were used to obtain new information on the coal rank dependence of porous structure. In addition, an existing 129 Xe chemical shift-pore diameter model was used to calculate micropore diameters for coals, as well as for a microporous carbon, before and after pore-size alteration. In the initial study performed, straightforward 129 Xe NMR spectra at equilibrium xenon adsorption at a series of pressures were acquired for a rank-varied set of six coals. Acquisition of the NMR signal as an echo was tested and found to improve spectral quality. The spectra were used to calculate micropore diameters for the six coals. These range from 5.6 to 7.5 ? and exhibit a minimum value for the intermediate coal rank. The smallest pores occur in coals of about 82-85% carbon; at both lower and higher coal ranks, the average micropore size tends to be larger. The changes in the spectra with coal rank and surface area were explored. Signal linewidths were found to decrease with increasing coal rank and were interpreted in terms of increasing chemical or physical homogeneity of the coal as rank increases. The packing density of powdered coal was found to alter the spectral appearance in a high volatile bituminous coal, which is preliminary evidence that exchange affects the chemical shift of xenon in this coal.

Ljubisa R. Radovic; Patrick G. Hatcher

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming 81: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming Location of the proposed Sand Hills Wind Project, near Laramie, Wyoming Location of the proposed Sand Hills Wind Project, near Laramie, Wyoming Summary The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE's Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action is implemented, Western would interconnect the proposed facility to an existing transmission line. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. List of Available Documents

206

Wyoming's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources Wyoming's At-large congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Wyoming. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Wyoming's At-large congressional district Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power Company Smart Grid Project Powder River Energy Corporation Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Wyoming's At-large congressional district Blue Sky Batteries Inc Blue Sky Group Inc HTH Wind Energy Inc LappinTech LLC Nacel Energy Nanomaterials Discovery Corporation NDC Pathfinder Renewable Wind Energy PowerSHIFT Energy Company Inc TMA Global Wind Energy Systems TriLateral Energy LLC Utility Companies in Wyoming's At-large congressional district

207

LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood October 16, 2012 - 10:50am Addthis LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A team representing two Federal agencies-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management and U.S. Geological Survey-is evaluating

208

U.S. States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

209

Haemers' Minimum Rank.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Haemers' minimum rank was first defined by Willem Haemers in 1979. He created this graph parameter as an upper bound for the Shannon capacity of… (more)

Tims, Geoff

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cheyenne, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1399814°, -104.8202462° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1399814,"lon":-104.8202462,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Midwest, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Midwest, Wyoming: Energy Resources Midwest, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.4113604°, -106.2800242° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4113604,"lon":-106.2800242,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

212

Hoback, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hoback, Wyoming: Energy Resources Hoback, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.2818713°, -110.7838117° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2818713,"lon":-110.7838117,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Sundance, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sundance, Wyoming: Energy Resources Sundance, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.4063746°, -104.3757816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4063746,"lon":-104.3757816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy Resources Meeteetse, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.1571766°, -108.8715193° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1571766,"lon":-108.8715193,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Volumes Delivered to Consumers

216

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas in Storage 90,464 90,588 89,999 89,825 91,028 93,007 1990-2013

217

Frannie, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Frannie, Wyoming: Energy Resources Frannie, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.9691175°, -108.6215163° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9691175,"lon":-108.6215163,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

218

Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Gulf of Mexico Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption

219

Hartrandt, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hartrandt, Wyoming: Energy Resources Hartrandt, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8874654°, -106.3475273° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8874654,"lon":-106.3475273,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Alcova, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alcova, Wyoming: Energy Resources Alcova, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.5521842°, -106.7164296° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5521842,"lon":-106.7164296,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Casper, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Casper, Wyoming: Energy Resources Casper, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.866632°, -106.313081° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.866632,"lon":-106.313081,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Delaware Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Connecticut Delaware Georgia Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes

223

Cheyenne, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cheyenne, Wyoming: Energy Resources Cheyenne, Wyoming: Energy Resources (Redirected from Cheyenne, WY) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1399814°, -104.8202462° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1399814,"lon":-104.8202462,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Wyoming Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Wyoming Wind Energy Center Facility Wyoming Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Orion Energy Energy Purchaser PPM Energy Inc Location Evanston WY Coordinates 41.304414°, -110.793904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.304414,"lon":-110.793904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Storage Capacity 114,067 111,167 111,120 111,120 106,764 124,937 1988-2012

226

Wyoming Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California Colorado Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Wyoming AGA Producing Region AGA Eastern Consuming Region AGA Western Consuming Region Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View

227

Evansville, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8599653°, -106.2683566° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8599653,"lon":-106.2683566,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Brookhurst, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhurst, Wyoming: Energy Resources Brookhurst, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8574654°, -106.2364105° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8574654,"lon":-106.2364105,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

CO2 adsorption capacity of argonne premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Adsorption and desorption isotherms of CO2 on dried Argonne Premium coal samples were investigated. A small hysteresis was detected between the adsorption and desorption isotherms. The hysteresis was small or negligible for high rank coals but discernable for low rank coals. The isotherms were found to be rectilinear and to fit the conventional adsorption equations poorly. The rectilinear shape of the adsorption isotherms was related to the solubility of the CO2 in the coal and to coal swelling. Using an adsorption model that accounted for volumetric effects provided good agreement between the surface areas calculated from the high-pressure isotherms and the literature values obtained under traditional low-pressure conditions. Ignoring the volumetric effects resulted in estimated surface areas that were 40% larger for the higher-ranked coals and 60–100% larger for the lower-ranked coals. The heat of adsorption, after correcting for volumetric effects, was fairly constant (26±1 kJ/mol) regardless of rank. The adsorption capacity, average pore size, and volume effect for each of the Argonne coals were also estimated employing the same model. The model equation explicitly accounts for volumetric effects, attributable to the solubility of CO2 in the organic matrix and the coal swelling, and estimates the actual adsorbed amount.

Ekrem Ozdemir; Badie I Morsi; Karl Schroeder

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

SHEEP MOUNTAIN URANIUM PROJECT CROOKS GAP, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;PROJECT OVERVIEW ·Site Location·Site Location ·Fremont , Wyoming ·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C·Existing Uranium Mine Permit 381C ·Historical Operation ·Western Nuclear Crooks Gap Project ·Mined 1956 ­ 1988 and Open Pit Mining ·Current Mine Permit (381C) ·Updating POO, Reclamation Plan & Bond ·Uranium Recovery

231

EA-1581: Sand Hills Wind Project, Wyoming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Bureau of Land Management, with DOE’s Western Area Power Administration as a cooperating agency, is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct, operate, and maintain the Sand Hills Wind Energy Facility on private and federal lands in Albany County, Wyoming. If the proposed action is implemented, Western would interconnect the proposed facility to an existing transmission line.

232

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

233

Chapter 2 of the Wyoming Public Service Commission Regulations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Wyoming Public Service Commission Regulations: General Regulations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation:...

234

Chapter 1 of the Wyoming Public Service Commission Regulations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Wyoming Public Service Commission Regulations: Rules of Practice and Procedure Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

235

Chapter 9 of the Wyoming Public Service Commission Regulations...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Public Service Commission Regulations: General Forms Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Chapter 9 of...

236

Wyoming Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Wyoming Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Estimated Production from Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

237

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

238

,"Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

239

Guide to Permitting Electric Transmission Lines in Wyoming |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Permitting Electric Transmission Lines in Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Guide to...

240

The structural alignment of coal and the analogous case of Argonne Upper Freeport coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that coal is somewhat aligned. Multiple techniques imply a structural alignment but its quantification has been challenging. Moreover, discrepancies exist among techniques as to whether low-rank coals are aligned. The extent of structural alignment for the rank range was quantified directly via image analysis of high-resolution transmission electron micrograph lattice fringes. Alignment was quantified, for each coal, by the contribution to the total fringe length within the prominent 45° of orientation over random orientation (1/4 of the possible orientations). It was evident that there is structural alignment across the rank range. Thus it is time for the community to desist from making the erroneous statement that: low-rank coals are randomly oriented. The slight orientation was similar for low-rank Beulah-Zap lignite and Illinois No. 6 bituminous coals (24% and 22%) with Pocahontas (lvb) coal showing slightly greater (39%) alignment with extensive alignment (65%) in the case of an anthracite coal. The degree of ordering is illustrated with the aid of false-color lattice fringe images and Rose diagrams. The fringe contribution 90° opposed to the maximum length contribution had the minimum or near minimum percentage length contribution for all coals except Upper Freeport and to a lesser degree Illinois No. 6. For the Upper Freeport coal the alignment is lower than expected given its mvb rank (14% over random) and is attributed to a variant of T-stacking for the small aromatic moieties sited perpendicular and between horizontal displaced fringes.

Jonathan P. Mathews; Atul Sharma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rank Estimation in ReducedRank Regression Efstathia Bura  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank Estimation in Reduced­Rank Regression Efstathia Bura Department of Statistics, The George, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 E­mail: dennis@stat.umn.edu Reduced rank regression assumes that the coe#cient matrix in a multi­ variate regression model is not of full rank. The unknown rank

Bura, Efstathia

242

Intermediate rank and property RD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce concepts of intermediate rank for countable groups that "interpolate" between consecutive values of the classical (integer-valued) rank. Various classes of groups are proved to have intermediate rank behaviors. We are especially interested in interpolation between rank 1 and rank 2. For instance, we construct groups "of rank 7/4". Our setting is essentially that of non positively curved spaces, where concepts of intermediate rank include polynomial rank, local rank, and mesoscopic rank. The resulting framework has interesting connections to operator algebras. We prove property RD in many cases where intermediate rank occurs. This gives a new family of groups satisfying the Baum-Connes conjecture. We prove that the reduced $C^*$-algebras of groups of rank 7/4 have stable rank 1.

Sylvain Barré; Mikael Pichot

243

Conventional coal preparation in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Processing of bituminous and anthracite coal is widely practiced in the United States and, as mentioned earlier, about 80 percent of the production of these coals is processed as clean coal in preparation plants. Subbituminous coal is not widely processed, primarily because these low rank raw coals are low in sulfur (0.5 to 1.0 percent) and relatively low in ash (8 to 15 percent). They are also relatively low in heat content due to their high inherent moisture. Lignite coals, to the best of the authors{close_quote} knowledge, are not presently being processed in Conventional Coal Preparation plants. This is due to their unstable nature and putting them in water in a coal preparation plant is likely to cause severe degradation in particle size and add to their already high inherent moisture content. The following are the benefits of clean coal processing: produces a uniform product which can be utilized more efficiently; produces a higher quality product which results in higher efficiency at the power station or the steel mill; reduces sulfur dioxide and other adverse stack emissions during coal firing which is a very important environmental consideration; reduces ash or slag handling costs by the user; reduces shipping costs; and reduces handling and storage costs. Processing any stable raw coal in a coal preparation plant will always produce a higher grade product which is a more efficient and a more environmentally acceptable fuel for use at power stations, steel mills, home heating or industrial boilers.

Beck, M.K.; Taylor, B.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Full Rank Rational Demand Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a nominal income full rank QES. R EFERENCES (A.84)S. G. Donald. “Inferring the Rank of a Matrix. ” Journal of97-102. . “A Demand System Rank Theorem. ” Econometrica 57 (

LaFrance, Jeffrey T; Pope, Rulon D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

STRUCTURAL ELUCIDATION, MOLECULAR REPRESENTATION AND SOLVENT INTERACTIONS OF VITRINITE-RICH AND INERTINITE-RICH SOUTH AFRICAN COALS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two Permian-aged South African coals, vitrinite-rich Waterberg and inertinite-rich Highveld coals (similar rank, carbon content and Permian age), were studied to determine the structural differences… (more)

Van Niekerk, Daniel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Jump to: navigation, search State Wyoming Name Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Address 2211 King Blvd City, State Casper, Wyoming Zip 82602 Website http://wogcc.state.wy.us/ Coordinates 42.8433001°, -106.3511243° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8433001,"lon":-106.3511243,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

247

Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) Local Option - Energy Improvement Loan Program (Wyoming) < Back Savings Category Energy Sources Buying & Making Electricity Other Program Info Start Date 7/1/2011 State Wyoming Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically repaid via a special assessment on the property over a period of years. Wyoming has authorized local governments to establish such

248

Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute  

SciTech Connect

This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

Nealon, Teresa

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Low rank matrix completion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of recovering a low rank matrix given a sampling of its entries. Such problems are of considerable interest in a diverse set of fields including control, system identification, statistics and signal ...

Nan, Feng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Rank Project Name Directorate,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank Project Name Directorate, Dept/Div and POC Cost Savings Payback (Years) Waste Reduction 1 NATIONAL LABORATORY FY02 Funded Pollution Prevention Projects 0.4 Years (~5 months) #12;

251

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

SUBTRACTING A BEST RANK-1 APPROXIMATION MAY INCREASE TENSOR RANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBTRACTING A BEST RANK-1 APPROXIMATION MAY INCREASE TENSOR RANK Alwin Stegeman Heymans Institute, fax: +33 4 92 94 28 98, pcomon@unice.fr ABSTRACT Is has been shown that a best rank-R approximation be solved by consecutively computing and substracting best rank-1 approximations. The reason

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

253

Rank and directional entropy Rank and directional entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank and directional entropy Rank and directional entropy E. Arthur (Robbie) Robinson (Joint work with Ayse Sahin) The George Washington University Talk at KIAS, Seoul, Korea. September 27, 2010 #12;Rank and directional entropy Outline 1 Introduction 2 Finite rank, Z case 3 The formal definition 4 The Z2 case 5

Robinson Jr., E. Arthur (Robbie)

254

SFP-Rank: Significant Frequent Pattern Analysis for Effective Ranking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SFP-Rank: Significant Frequent Pattern Analysis for Effective Ranking Yuanfeng Song, Wilfred Ng. Ranking documents in terms of their relevance to a given query is fundamental to many real domains has given rise to the development of many efficient ranking models. While most existing research

Ng, Wilfred Siu Hung

255

Kinetics of steam gasification of bituminous coals in terms of their use for underground coal gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The kinetics of steam gasification was examined for bituminous coals of a low coal rank. The examined coals can be the raw material for underground coal gasification. Measurements were carried out under isothermal conditions at a high pressure of 4 MPa and temperatures of 800, 900, 950, and 1000 °C. Yields of gasification products such as carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane were calculated based on the kinetic curves of formation reactions of these products. Also carbon conversion degrees are presented. Moreover, calculations were made of the kinetic parameters of carbon monoxide and hydrogen formation reaction in the coal gasification process. The parameters obtained during the examinations enable a preliminary assessment of coal for the process of underground coal gasification.

Stanis?aw Porada; Grzegorz Czerski; Tadeusz Dziok; Przemys?aw Grzywacz; Dorota Makowska

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.

Edward Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Wei Zhang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Real Waring Rank Greg Blekherman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real Waring Rank Greg Blekherman September 29, 2012 Tensors and their Geometry in High Dimensions such decomposition exists is the rank of f . Illustrative example: 2x3 - 6xy2 = (x + -1y)3 + (x - -1y)3. Over C a generic form has unique rank, given by the Alexander-Hirschowitz theorem. Call rank r typical for forms

California at Berkeley, University of

258

Utilizing geographic information systems technology in the Wyoming cumulative hydrologic impact assessment modeling process  

SciTech Connect

The coal-permitting process places heavy demands on both permit applicants and regulatory authorities with respect to the management and analysis of hydrologic data. Currently, this correlation is being addressed for the Powder River Basin, Wyoming by the ongoing Cumulative Hydrologic Impact Assessment (CHIA) efforts at the University of Wyoming. One critical component of the CHIA is the use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) for support, management, manipulation, pre-analysis, and display of data associated with the chosen groundwater and surface water models. This paper will discuss the methodology in using of GIS technology as an integrated tool with the MODFLOW and HEC-1 hydrologic models. Pre-existing GIS links associated with these two models served as a foundation for this effort. However, due to established standards and site specific factors, substantial modifications were performed on existing tools to obtain adequate results. The groundwater-modeling effort required the use of a refined grid in which cell sizes varied based on the relative locations of ongoing mining activities. Surface water modeling was performed in a semi-arid region with very limited topographic relief and predominantly ephemeral stream channels. These were substantial issues that presented challenges for effective GIS/model integration.

Hamerlinck, J.D.; Oakleaf, J.R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Research on the evolvement of morphology of coking coal during the coking process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The evolvement of morphology and structure of the coal with different metamorphic degrees during coking process in the vertical furnace was investigated by infrared Image detector. Moreover, the temperature distribution in the radial direction and the crack formation were also studied in heating process. The results show that the amount of crack and the shrinkage level of char decrease with the coal rank rising. In addition, the initial temperature of crack formation for char increases with the coal rank rising.

Xiangyun Zhong; Shiyong Wu; Yang Liu; Zhenning Zhao; Yaru Zhang; Jinfeng Bai; Jun Xu; Bai Xi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Gravity interpretation of the northern Overthrust Belt, Idaho and Wyoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sequence thickness westward from about 15 miles (2a. l km) east of the Idaho-Wyoming State line, to a site of maximum deposition somewhere in the west (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). In western Wyoming, Drdovic-ian rocks are represented by the Upper... 1n southeastern Idaho by the Laketown Dolomite. The lim1ted geoqraph1c extent of the Silurian is considered to be the result of subsequent erosion rather than non-deposition (Armstrong and Oriel, 1965). In western Wyoming, the Devonian age rocks...

Silver, Wendy Ilene

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Advanced direct coal liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 1983-February 1984  

SciTech Connect

Five Bench-Scale coal liquefaction runs were completed with Wyoming subbituminous coal in a two-stage process scheme. In this process scheme, LDAR, the lighter fraction of ash-free resid, was fed to the catalytic stage prior to its recycle to the thermal stage, whereas DAR, the heavy fraction of the deashed resid, was directly recycled to the thermal stage without any intermediate processing step. The results indicate that increasing coal space rate in the dissolver resulted in lower coal conversion and reduced distillate yield in this process configuration. The coal conversions decreased from 92 wt% to 89 wt% (MAF coal) and the distillate yield was reduced from 50 wt% to less than 40 wt% (MAF coal), as the coal space velocity increased. Attempts to duplicate the yields of Run 32, at comparable process conditions in Runs 37 and 38, were unsuccessful. Several process parameters were investigated but failed to show why the yields of Run 32 could not be duplicated. Valuable process related information was gained as a result of process parameter studies completed during these runs. At comparable process conditions, coal conversions were lower by about 3 to 4 relative percent and were only in the 87 wt% (MAF coal) range. Similarly, the distillate yield was about 40 wt% (MAF coal) which is about 10 wt% lower than observed in Run 32. Although no exact cause for these results could be determined, it appeared that the H/C atomic ratio of the solvent and possibly the flow pattern (plug-flow versus back-mixed) could have affected the coal conversion and quantity of distillate product produced. A significant decrease in coal conversion of 4 to 5 wt% was observed when the disposable catalyst (iron oxide) was removed from the reaction mixture and therefore substantiates the need for a disposable catalyst in the liquefaction of Wyoming subbituminous coal.

Paranjape, A.S.

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Exploratory Research on Novel Coal  

SciTech Connect

The report presents the findings of work performed under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22 -95PC95050, Task 3 - Flow Sheet Development. A novel direct coal liquefaction technology was investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates. The process concept explored consists of a first-stage coal dissolution step in which the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second stage, the products are catalytically upgraded to refinery feedstocks. Integrated first-stage and solids-separation steps were used to prepare feedstocks for second-stage catalytic upgrading. An engineering and economic evaluation was conducted concurrently with experimental work throughout the program. Parameters were established for a low-cost, low-severity first-stage reaction system. A hydride ion reagent system was used to effect high coal conversions of Black Thunder Mine Wyoming subbituminous coal. An integrated first-stage and filtration step was successfully demonstrated and used to produce product filtrates with extremely low solids contents. High filtration rates previously measured off-line in Task 2 studies were obtained in the integrated system. Resid conversions of first-stage products in the second stage were found to be consistently greater than for conventional two-stage liquefaction resids. In Task 5, elementally balanced material balance data were derived from experimental results and an integrated liquefaction system balance was completed. The economic analysis indicates that the production of refined product (gasoline) via this novel direct liquefaction technology is higher than the cost associated with conventional two-stage liquefaction technologies. However, several approaches to reduce costs for the conceptual commercial plant were recommended. These approaches will be investigated in the next task (Task 4) of the program.

Winschel, R.A.; Brandes, S.D.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Influence of coal on coke properties and blast-furnace operation  

SciTech Connect

With unstable coal supplies and properties and a fluctuating content of coking coal in the batch at OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (ZSMK) and of bituminous coal at Kuznetskaya enrichment facility, it is important to optimize the rank composition of the batch for coke production.

G.R. Gainieva; L.D. Nikitin [OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Coal Production | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

03 03 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279603 Varnish cache server Coal Production Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 140, and contains only the reference case. The unit of measurement in this dataset is million short tons. The data is broken down into northern Appalachia, central Appalachia, southern Appalachia, eastern interior, western interior, gulf, Dakota medium, western montana, Wyoming, Rocky Mountain, Arizona/New Mexico and Washington/Alaska. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

265

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES AT NPR-3, WYOMING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RESOURCES AT NPR-3 Mark Milliken March 2006 The Naval Petroleum Reserves NPR-3 Teapot Dome NPR-3 LOCATION Salt Creek Anticline Trend NPR-3 WHY CONSIDER GEOTHERMAL ASSETS IN A STRIPPER OIL FIELD? RMOTC will partner with industry and academia to provide a test site for technologies that to reduce energy-related operational costs. * Energy efficiency * Energy conservation * Alternative energy sources KEY CHALLENGES * Acceptance by Industry * Creation of a Joint Industry Partnership (JIP) * Consensus on best technologies * Funding for infrastructure support * Funding of Projects Teapot Dome Wyoming Depositional Basin Settings NPR-3 STRATIGRAPHY 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 DEPTH PRECAMBRIAN BASEMENT CAMBRIAN SS MISSISSIPPIAN MADSION LS PENNSYLVANIAN TENSLEEP PERMIAN GOOSE EGG TRIASSIC CHUGWATER

266

Wyoming's Economic Future: Planning for Sustained Prosperity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zunsheng Jiao Zunsheng Jiao Senior Geologist WSGS Future Work * Refine the geological framework required for 3-D rock fluid modeling of the Rock Springs Uplift (RSU). * Construct a 3-D numerical model of CO 2 injection into the RSU. * Build a Performance Assessment (PA) model that includes uncertainty and that can be utilized to construct a Probabilistic Risk Analysis (PRA) for CO 2 sequestration at the RSU. A SYSTEM MODEL FOR GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE CO2_PENS, Los Alamos/Goldsim Rock Springs Uplift: an outstanding geological CO 2 sequestration site in southwestern Wyoming * Thick saline aquifer sequence overlain by thick sealing lithologies. * Doubly-plunging anticline characterized by more than 10,000 ft of closed structural relief. * Huge area (50 x 35 mile).

267

Town of Lusk, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lusk, Wyoming (Utility Company) Lusk, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Lusk Place Wyoming Utility Id 11330 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial- Single-Phase Commercial Commercial- Three-Phase Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0838/kWh Commercial: $0.0481/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Town_of_Lusk,_Wyoming_(Utility_Company)&oldid=411770

268

Wyoming/Wind Resources/Full Version | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources/Full Version Wyoming/Wind Resources/Full Version < Wyoming‎ | Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Wyoming Wind Resources WyomingMap.jpg More information about these 30-m height wind resource maps is available on the Wind Powering America website. Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across the country as more people look for a hedge against increasing electricity rates and a way to harvest their local wind resources. Small wind electric systems can make a significant contribution to our nation's energy needs. Although wind turbines large enough to provide a significant portion of the electricity needed by the average U.S. home generally require 1 acre of property or more, approximately 21 million U.S. homes are built on 1-acre

269

Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Regionals Wyoming Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Wyoming Coaches can review the middle school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your

270

Wyoming Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regions National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Regionals Wyoming Regions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Wyoming Coaches can review the high school regional locations listed below. Please note: Registrations are based on the location of your school. Please be sure to select the regional that is designated for your school's state, county, city, or district.

271

City of Pine Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) Bluffs, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Pine Bluffs Place Wyoming Utility Id 15051 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electrical Household Residential General Electrical Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1250/kWh Commercial: $0.1050/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Pine_Bluffs,_Wyoming_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410

272

National Park Service - Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming National Park Service - Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming October 7, 2013 - 10:15am Addthis Photo of Photovoltaic System at Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, has many historical sites within its boundaries. One of these is the Lamar Buffalo Ranch, a ranch that was set up in the early 1900s to breed buffalo for replacement stock within the park during a time when their numbers were very low. The ranch buildings are currently being used by the Yellowstone Association Institute for ecology classes. Since the ranch is located in the northeast corner of the park it is quite isolated from the commercial power grid, and power has been traditionally supplied by propane generators. The generators are now only a backup system

273

NorthWestern Energy LLC (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming) Wyoming) Jump to: navigation, search Name NorthWestern Energy LLC Place Wyoming Utility Id 12825 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for NorthWestern Energy LLC (Wyoming). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-01 19.46 199.099 171 106.025 923.771 168 125.485 1,122.87 339

274

City of Cody, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cody, Wyoming (Utility Company) Cody, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Cody Place Wyoming Utility Id 3881 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Commercial Demand Commercial Optional Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1040/kWh Commercial: $0.0748/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Cody,_Wyoming_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409457

275

Wyoming Natural Gas Processed in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Processed in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's...

276

Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

277

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

278

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,780...

279

Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves (Million Barrels...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Wyoming Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's...

280

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

282

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's...

283

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

284

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

285

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

286

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

287

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,540 2,297...

288

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

289

Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's...

290

Wyoming Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

291

Black Hills Power Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming) Wyoming) Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Hills Power Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 19545 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0867/kWh Commercial: $0.0948/kWh Industrial: $0.0627/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Black Hills Power Inc (Wyoming). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

292

Low-Level Airflow in Southern Wyoming during Wintertime  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of low-level flights were conducted with an instrumented aircraft to investigate wind characteristics in the planetary boundary layer over the low regions of the continental divide in southern Wyoming. The airflow upwind of the ...

John D. Marwitz; Paul J. Dawson

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

One area for improvement in the economics of coal liquefaction is coal drying, particularly for the lower rank coals. However, there is considerable evidence to show that drying has a detrimental effect on the liquefaction behavior of coals. Regarding the liquefaction of coal, there does not appear to have been any systematic study of the methods of coal drying on coal structure and the role water plays in enhancing or lessening coal reactivity toward liquefaction. For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D{sub 2}O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D{sub 2}O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D{sub 2}O and by successive exchange of H{sub 2}O associated with the coals with D{sub 2}O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal.

Netzel, D.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Delineation of a coal burn edge with seismic refraction  

SciTech Connect

Coal seams in many areas of western United States have ignited and burned for considerable distances underground. The boundary between the coal and clinker needs to be defined for determination of reserves. Field tests of a seismic refraction method were conducted at Kerr-McGee Coal Corp's open pit Clovis Point mine near Gillette, Wyoming. Explosive sources were detonated in shot holes in the pit floor. Geophone lines, laid on the surface beyond the edge of the pit, crossed from an area of known coal to an area of clinker. Delays in arrival times correlated with the expected beginning of the clinker zone. Waves passing through the clinker also exhibit a significant attenuation. A magnetic survey concluded along the seismic lines showed anomalies in the regions where seismic data indicated the burn edge.

Sontag, K.D.; Wolfe, P.J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 31. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Anthracite Total Alabama 106.57 - - - 106.57 Alaska - w - - w Arizona w - - - w Arkansas w - - - w Colorado w w - - 37.54 Illinois 53.08 - - - 53.08 Indiana 52.01 - - - 52.01 Kentucky Total 63.12 - - - 63.12 Kentucky (East) 75.62 - - - 75.62 Kentucky (West) 48.67 - - - 48.67 Louisiana - - w - w Maryland 55.67 - - - 55.67 Mississippi - - w - w Missouri w - - - w Montana w 17.60 w - 18.11 New Mexico w w - - 36.74 North Dakota - - 17.40 - 17.40 Ohio 47.80 - - - 47.80 Oklahoma 59.63 - - - 59.63 Pennsylvania Total 72.57

296

Reduced Rank Models for Contingency Tables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solution problem 73-14, Rank factorization of nonnegativein Great Britain Reduced rank models for contingency tablesclass analysis; Reduced rank models. 1. INTRODUCTION In

Jan de Leeuw; Peter van der Heijden

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

X-ray Computed Tomography of coal: Final report  

SciTech Connect

X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a method of mapping with x-rays the internal structures of coal. The technique normally produces 2-D images of the internal structures of an object. These images can be recast to create pseudo 3-D representations. CT of coal has been explored for a variety of different applications to coal and coal processing technology. In a comparison of CT data with conventional coal analyses and petrography, CT was found to offer a good indication of the total ash content of the coal. The spatial distribution of the coal mineral matter as seen with CT has been suggested as an indicator of coal washability. Studies of gas flow through coal using xenon gas as a tracer have shown the extremely complicated nature of the modes of penetration of gas through coal, with significant differences in the rates at which the gas can pass along and across the bedding planes of coal. In a special furnace designed to allow CT images to be taken while the coal was being heated, the pyrolysis and gasification of coal have been studied. Gasification rates with steam and CO/sub 2/ for a range of coal ranks have been obtained, and the location of the gasification reactions within the piece of coal can be seen. Coal drying and the progress of the pyrolysis wave into coal have been examined when the coal was subjected to the kind of sudden temperature jump that it might experience in fixed bed gasifier applications. CT has also been used to examine stable flow structures within model fluidized beds and the accessibility of lump coal to microbial desulfurization. 53 refs., 242 figs., 26 tabs.

Maylotte, D.H.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.; Lamby, E.J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

Coal gasification power generation, and product market study. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Western Research Institute (WRI) project was part of a WRI Energy Resource Utilization Program to stimulate pilot-scale improved technologies projects to add value to coal resources in the Rocky Mountain region. The intent of this program is to assess the application potential of emerging technologies to western resources. The focus of this project is on a coal resource near the Wyoming/Colorado border, in Colorado. Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company operates a coal mine in Jackson County, Colorado. The coal produces 10,500 Btu/lb and has very low sulfur and ash contents. Kerr Coal Company is seeking advanced technology for alternate uses for this coal. This project was to have included a significant cost-share from the Kerr Coal Company ownership for a market survey of potential products and technical alternatives to be studied in the Rocky Mountain Region. The Energy Fuels Corporation/Kerr Coal Company and WRI originally proposed this work on a cost reimbursable basis. The total cost of the project was priced at $117,035. The Kerr Coal Company had scheduled at least $60,000.00 to be spent on market research for the project that never developed because of product market changes for the company. WRI and Kerr explored potential markets and new technologies for this resource. The first phase of this project as a preliminary study had studied fuel and nonfuel technical alternatives. Through related projects conducted at WRI, resource utilization was studied to find high-value materials that can be targeted for fuel and nonfuel use and eventually include other low-sulfur coals in the Rocky Mountain region. The six-month project work was spread over about a three-year period to observe, measure, and confirm over time-any trends in technology development that would lead to economic benefits in northern Colorado and southern Wyoming from coal gasification and power generation.

Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sodium-Copper Exchange on Wyoming Montmorillonite in Chloride, Perchlorate, Nitrate, and Sulfate. The copper exchange capacity (CuEC) and Na-Cu exchange reactions on Wyoming montmo- rillonite were studied

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends  

SciTech Connect

Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Inland-transport modes for coal and coal-derived energy: an evaluation method for comparing environmental impacts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a method for evaluating relative environmental impacts of coal transportation modes (e.g., unit trains, trucks). Impacts of each mode are evaluated (rated) for a number of categories of environmental effects (e.g., air pollution, water pollution). The overall environmental impact of each mode is determined for the coal origin (mine-mouth area), the coal or coal-energy product destination (demand point), and the line-haul route. These origin, destination, and en route impact rankings are then combined into a systemwide ranking. Thus the method accounts for the many combinations of transport modes, routes, and energy products that can satisfy a user's energy demand from a particular coal source. Impact ratings and system rankings are not highly detailed (narrowly defined). Instead, environmental impacts are given low, medium, and high ratings that are developed using environmental effects data compiled in a recent Argonne National Laboratory report entitled Data for Intermodal Comparison of Environmental Impacts of Inland Transportation Alternatives for Coal Energy (ANL/EES-TM-206). The ratings and rankings developed for this report are generic. Using the method presented, policy makers can apply these generic data and the analytical framework given to particular cases by adding their own site specific data and making some informed judgements. Separate tables of generic ratings and rankings are developed for transportation systems serving coal power plants, coal liquefaction plants, and coal gasification plants. The final chapter presents an hypothetical example of a site-specific application and adjustment of generic evaluations. 44 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

Bertram, K.M.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Wyoming Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 261,478 259,227 269,921 1970's 276,926 292,434 298,439 303,519 263,684 215,104 251,846 262,801 255,760 1980's 366,530 393,027 432,313 579,479 624,619 506,241 512,579 560,603 591,472 1990's 635,922 681,266 728,113 750,853 821,689 895,129 845,253 863,052 870,518 902,889 2000's 993,702 988,595 1,083,860 1,101,425 1,249,309 1,278,087 1,288,124 1,399,570 1,278,439 1,507,142 2010's 1,642,190 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014

304

Rank-Stability and Rank-Similarity of Link-Based Web Ranking Algorithms in Authority-Connected Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank-Stability and Rank-Similarity of Link-Based Web Ranking Algorithms in Authority@cs.technion.ac.il) Department of Computer Science, Technion, Haifa, Israel Abstract. Web search algorithms that rank Web pages's prevailing link-based ranking algorithms rank Web pages by using the dominant eigenvector of certain matrices

Moran, Shlomo

305

How to rank the top500 list?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOW TO RANK THE TOP500 LIST? Lin-Wang Wang Computationalone question emerged: how to rank the computers according tothe first 10 computers. Old rank (based on speed) New rank (

Wang, Lin-Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Coal - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, mining, and prices. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Coal overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly PDF XLS Annual Coke overview PDF XLS Coal-fired power plants Existing generating units in the U.S. by state, company and plant 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 Go Prices Additional formats Weekly spot prices (Coal News and Markets) Coal futures near-month contract final settlement price (weekly NYMEX) Average sales price: PDF XLSBy state and mine type PDF XLSBy state and disposition PDF XLSBy state and underground mining method PDF XLSBy state, county, and number of mines PDF XLSBy state and coal rank PDF XLSBy mine production range and mine type Average consumer prices by end use sector, Census division, and state,

307

Preparation and gasification of a Thailand coal-water fuel  

SciTech Connect

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a four-task program to assess the responsiveness of Wiang Haeng coal to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 37.4 wt% for the raw coal to about 20 wt% for the HWD coals. The energy density, determined at 500 cP, indicates an increase from 4450 to 6650 Btu/lb by hydrothermal treatment. Raw and HWD coal were then gasified at various mild gasification conditions of 700 C and 30 psig. The tests indicated that the coal is probably similar to other low-rank coals and will produce high levels of hydrogen and be fairly reactive.

Ness, R.O. Jr.; Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Richter, J.J.; Dewall, R.A.; Young, B.C. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center; Nakanart, A. [Ministry of Industry, Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Gasification of New Zealand Coals: A Comparative Simulation Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to conduct a preliminary feasibility assessment of gasification of New Zealand (NZ) lignite and sub-bituminous coals, using a commercial simulation tool. ... Coal is a nonrenewable resource; however, the world’s coal reserves amount to twice the combined oil and gas reserves. ... The reasons for the entrained flow gasifier selection include its high suitability to low rank coals (lignites) and the use of entrained flow gasifiers for an IGCC as the industrially preferred choice dictated through experience. ...

Smitha V. Nathen; Robert D. Kirkpatrick; Brent R. Young

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

310

J.Org. Chem. 1984,49, 3033-3035 3033 Proposed SequentialConversion of Coal's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.Org. Chem. 1984,49, 3033-3035 3033 SchemeI. @& Proposed SequentialConversion of Coal's Native moieties (func- tionalities determined to be important for lignins6and for low-rank coals'). In contrast "C, is one of condensation to make a dimeric furan! Sincein a coal systemthere will be some available

311

In Situ FTIR Study of Real-Time Changes of Active Groups during Oxygen-Free Reaction of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a common reason for mine fires and gas explosions, which usually result in personal injury, huge economic loss, and environmental pollution. ... For low-rank coals, the quantities of active groups usually decrease at the beginning of coal reaction and then increase with the rise of coal temperature. ...

Xuyao Qi; Deming Wang; Haihui Xin; Guansheng Qi

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Rank one and finite rank perturbations - survey and open problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We survey the relationships of rank one self-adjoint and unitary perturbations as well as finite rank unitary perturbations with various branches of analysis and mathematical physics. We include the case of non-inner characteristic operator functions. For rank one perturbations and non-inner characteristic functions, we prove a representation formula for the adjoint of the Clark operator. Throughout we mention many open problems at varying levels of difficulty.

Constanze Liaw

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Town of Basin, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming (Utility Company) Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Basin Place Wyoming Utility Id 1779 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial General Demand Service Industrial General Service Commercial Industrial Demand Service Industrial Noncommercial Service Commercial Nongeneral Demand Service Industrial Nongeneral Service Commercial Nonindustrial Demand Service Industrial Nonresidential Service Residential Residential Residential Security Lighting Service Lighting

314

City of Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) Gillette, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Gillette City of Place Wyoming Utility Id 7222 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial & Misc Service Commercial Demand Meter Industrial Residential Residential Residential All Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0894/kWh Commercial: $0.0692/kWh

315

Wyoming - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Wyoming - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: United States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming The page does not exist for . To view this page, please select a state: Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida

316

Town of Lingle, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lingle, Wyoming (Utility Company) Lingle, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Lingle Place Wyoming Utility Id 11099 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Athletic Field Commercial Commercial Single Phase Commercial Commercial Single Phase B Commercial Commercial Three Phase Commercial Residential B Residential Residential Single Phase Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1200/kWh Commercial: $0.1060/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

317

Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home March 17, 2010 - 4:41pm Addthis Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Terry Sandstrom never thought he would run his house entirely on renewable energy, but when faced with a $100,000 price tag to get connected to the grid, he had to look at alternative options. The man who spent his entire life in houses pulling energy from the grid now has 12 solar panels on his front lawn and a wind turbine in the backyard."I had no involvement in the renewable energy process until I got up here," says Terry, who moved from

318

Town of Guernsey, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guernsey, Wyoming (Utility Company) Guernsey, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Guernsey Place Wyoming Utility Id 7759 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - Billing Demand Equal to or Greater Than 25KW Commercial Commercial - Billing Demand Less Than 25KW Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0890/kWh Commercial: $0.1280/kWh Industrial: $0.0979/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

319

Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home Solar and Wind Powering Wyoming Home March 17, 2010 - 4:41pm Addthis Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Solar panels at Terry Sandstrom's home in Wheatland, Wyo. | Photo courtesy of Terry Sandstrom Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Terry Sandstrom never thought he would run his house entirely on renewable energy, but when faced with a $100,000 price tag to get connected to the grid, he had to look at alternative options. The man who spent his entire life in houses pulling energy from the grid now has 12 solar panels on his front lawn and a wind turbine in the backyard."I had no involvement in the renewable energy process until I got up here," says Terry, who moved from

320

Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Wyoming Utility Id 12199 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0890/kWh Commercial: $0.0630/kWh Industrial: $0.0711/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (Wyoming). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 1,001 12,569 12,440 728 11,267 2,349 17 257 19 1,746 24,093 14,808

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

High West Energy, Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming) Wyoming) Jump to: navigation, search Name High West Energy, Inc Place Wyoming Utility Id 27058 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png A F Industrial Commercial & Small Power Commercial Farm and Home Residential Irrigation Industrial Large Power Industrial Security Lighting-150 - 175 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Security Lighting-400 watt M V/ HPS Lighting Street Lighting-200 - 250 watt M V/ HPS Lighting

322

City of Torrington, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Torrington, Wyoming (Utility Company) Torrington, Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Torrington Place Wyoming Utility Id 19032 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial General Service Demand Commercial General Service Heat Commercial Irrigation and Non-Potable Pumps Commercial Large Power Industrial Resident Electric Heat Rate (ALL Electric) Residential Residential Residential Street Lights Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0857/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh

323

Town of Wheatland, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming (Utility Company) Wyoming (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Wheatland Place Wyoming Utility Id 20512 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 175W Mercury Vapor Lighting 400W Mercury Vapor Lighting 700W Mercury Vapor Lighting Electric Home Heating Residential Energy Development Commercial General Service Time-of-Day- Single-Phase Commercial General Service Time-of-Day- Three-Phase Commercial General Service- Single-Phase Commercial General Service- Three-Phase Commercial

324

SBOT WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WYOMING WYOMING ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD CENTER POC Jenny Krom Telephone (307) 233-4818 Email jenny.krom@rmotc.doe.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Office Administrative Services 561110 Facilities Support Services 561210 Security Guards and Patrol Services 561612 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Locksmiths 561622 Exterminating and Pest Control Services 561710 Janitorial Services 561720 Solid Waste Collection 562111 Hazardous Waste Collection 562112 Other Waste Collection 562119 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Solid Waste Landfill 562212 Solid Waste Combustors and Incinerators 562213 Other Nonhazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562219 Remediation Services 562910 Materials Recovery Facilities 562920 All Other Miscellaneous Waste Management Services 562998

325

The relationship between the thermoplastic behavior of blends and their component coals  

SciTech Connect

The thermoplastic behaviors of a number of coking coal blends were measured using proton magnetic resonance thermal analysis (PMRTA) to determine to what extent they were affected by interactions between the component coals. Most blends showed evidence that at temperatures near their temperatures of maximum fluidity the extent to which they fused was different to that expected if the coals did not interact. Only blends of coking coals of different rank fused to a greater extent than expected in the absence of interactions. Semi-anthracite, low rank coals and charcoal reduced the extent of fusion of coking coals to values below those expected if they were acting as inert diluents. These interactions are interpreted as being mediated by transfer of volatile material between the coals on heating.

Sakurovs, R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

REPRESENTATIONS OF RANK 3 ALGEBRAS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The class of rank 3 algebras includes the Jordan algebra of a symmetric bilinear form, the trace zero elements of a Jordan algebra of degree… (more)

Benkart, Georgia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Organic compounds in water extracts of coal: links to Balkan endemic nephropathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the world’s energy is provided by fossil fuels, and coal is the world’s most abundant fossil fuel with reserves substantially greater than those of oil and...2008). “Lignite” ranks in between peat and sub...

S. V. M. Maharaj; W. H. Orem; C. A. Tatu…

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

A study on carbon dioxide emissions from bituminous coal in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumption of primary energy in Korea increased 5.25 % per year over a 10 years span starting in 1990. Korea ranked 8th in primary energy consumption in 2011; coal consumption increased 35 % from 87,827 milli...

Jeongwoo Lee; Chang-Sang Cho; Ki-hyup Hong; Jae-Hak Jeong…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Coal and Coal-Biomass to Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Coal-Biomass to Liquids News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications...

330

California-Wyoming Grid Integration Study: Phase 1?Economic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Replaced by Wyoming Wind Power (Share of 12,000 GWhyear) Technology CA33% CA35% Biogas 0.4% 0.2% Biomass 0.1% 1.1% Geothermal 29.8% 28.6% Large-Scale Solar PV 43.5% 43.1%...

331

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Compilation of data on strippable Fort Union coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region: A CD-ROM presentation  

SciTech Connect

The Fort Union Formation and equivalent formations of Paleocene age in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region contain 14 strippable coals that yielded more than 30 percent of the 1.03 billion short tons produced in the United States in 1996. These thick, low contaminant, compliant coals, which are utilized by electric power plants in 28 States, are being assessed by the US Geological Survey. The minable coals occur in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana, Hanna, Carbon and Greater Green River Basins in Wyoming, and Williston Basin in North Dakota. Production during the past 25 years of thick, high quality Fort Union and equivalent coal beds and zones in the region increased from 40 to more than 340 million short tons. The Powder River Basin is projected to produce 416 million short tons of coal in 2015. Major production in the Powder River Basin is from the Wyodak-Anderson, Anderson-Dietz, and Rosebud coal deposits. Producing Fort Union coals in the Williston Basin include the Beulah-Zap, Hagel, and Harmon coal deposits. Producing Fort Union coals in the Greater Green River Basin are in five beds of the Deadman coal zone. Coal production in the Hanna Basin is from eight beds in the Ferris and Hanna Formations. Coals in the Powder River Basin and Williston Basin contain much less sulfur and ash than coals produced in other regions in the conterminous US. When sulfur values are compared as pounds of SO{sub 2} per million Btu (as received basis), Powder River Basin and Williston Basin coals have the lowest amounts of any coals in the conterminous US.

Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.; Cavaroc, V.V. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

FMI NewCoal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NewCoal NewCoal Jump to: navigation, search Name FMI NewCoal Place Denver, Colorado Sector Efficiency Product FMI NewCoal is a coal technology developer focused on upgrading low rank coals to improve combustion efficiency and reduce production of greenhouse emissions for coal fired utility and industrial power generation worldwide. Coordinates 39.74001°, -104.992259° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.74001,"lon":-104.992259,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

US coal reserves: A review and update  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in series of ``U.S. Coal Reserves`` reports. As part of the Administration of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) program to provide information on coal, it presents detailed estimates of domestic coal reserves, which are basic to the analysis and forecasting of future coal supply. It also describes the data, methods, and assumptions used to develop such estimates and explain terminology related to recent data programs. In addition, the report provides technical documentation for specific revisions and adjustments to the demonstrated reserve base (DRB) of coal in the United States and for coal quality and reserve allocations. It makes the resulting data available for general use by the public. This report includes data on recoverable coal reserves located at active mines and on the estimated distribution of rank and sulfur content in those reserves. An analysis of the projected demand and depletion in recoverable reserves at active mines is used to evaluate the areas and magnitude of anticipated investment in new mining capacity.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Preparation and coking properties of coal maceral concentrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The concentrates with different maceral contents were obtained from Kailuan coking coals with different coal ranks ( R o,ran ? varying from 0.88% to 1.73%) by float–sink separation in lab. Then these concentrates were characterized by proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, petrography analysis and coking index determination. The results show that the vitrinite is characterized as nature of lower carbon content, higher hydrogen content, higher volatile matter and stronger caking property compared to inertinite. The relationships between variation rate of volatile matter and maximum volatile matter and coal ranks are identified, and a linear model is developed for fast determination of the maceral contents. Compared to inertinite-rich concentrate, the blending ratio of vitrinite-rich concentrate is increased by 13%, which is considered to be a potential technique based on maceral separation for expanding the coking coal resources.

Lei Zhang; Wenli Liu; Dongpo Men

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Low rank fuels such as subbituminous coals and lignites contain significant amounts of moisture compared to higher rank coals. Typically, the moisture content of subbituminous coals ranges from 15 to 30 percent, while that for lignites is between 25 and 40 percent, where both are expressed on a wet coal basis. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit. High fuel moisture results in fuel handling problems, and it affects heat rate, mass rate (tonnage) of emissions, and the consumption of water needed for evaporative cooling. This project deals with lignite and subbituminous coal-fired pulverized coal power plants, which are cooled by evaporative cooling towers. In particular, the project involves use of power plant waste heat to partially dry the coal before it is fed to the pulverizers. Done in a proper way, coal drying will reduce cooling tower makeup water requirements and also provide heat rate and emissions benefits. The technology addressed in this project makes use of the hot circulating cooling water leaving the condenser to heat the air used for drying the coal (Figure 1). The temperature of the circulating water leaving the condenser is usually about 49 C (120 F), and this can be used to produce an air stream at approximately 43 C (110 F). Figure 2 shows a variation of this approach, in which coal drying would be accomplished by both warm air, passing through the dryer, and a flow of hot circulating cooling water, passing through a heat exchanger located in the dryer. Higher temperature drying can be accomplished if hot flue gas from the boiler or extracted steam from the turbine cycle is used to supplement the thermal energy obtained from the circulating cooling water. Various options such as these are being examined in this investigation. This is the eleventh Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report.

Edward Levy

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Low-Rank Approximation for Link-Based Ranking Anonymous Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

050 051 052 053 Low-Rank Approximation for Link-Based Ranking Anonymous Author(s) Affiliation Address email Abstract Given a graph G, ranking the importance of nodes by PageRank and the similar- ity of node pairs by SimRank are two fundamental problems in link-base ranking for many applications such as search

de Freitas, Nando

338

The Role of Semifusinite in Plasticity Development for a Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal rank is a factor of great importance in plasticity development during carbonization, since only some bituminous coals swell in a satisfactory manner and then resolidify to produce good commercial cokes. ... Diessel studied the carbonization behavior of the inertinite macerals in Australian coals by carrying out tests up to 1000 °C where the optical characteristics of the coked entities were correlated with their noncoked counterparts. ... For instance, large-scale coking experiments of some Australian coals containing more than 45% inertinite produced good quality coke, while a Carboniferous coal with that high of an inertinite content gave only a very poor coke. ...

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Darrell N. Taulbee; John M. Andrésen; James C. Hower; Colin E. Snape

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 2: Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Coal Coal is a mixture of organic mineral material produced by a natural process of growth and decay, or an accumulation of debris both vegetal and mineral with some sorting and stratification. The process is accomplished by chemical, biological, bacteriological and metamorphic action. 1 Forms of Coal Coal is a hydrocarbon that is classified according to the amount of heat it produces. Heat content depends upon the amount of fixed carbon it contains. Rank is the degree of progressive alteration in the transformation from lignite to anthracite. There are four primary ranks of coal: * Anthracite (semi-anthracite, anthracite, and meta-anthracite) * Bituminous (high-volatile, medium-volatile, and low-volatile) * Subbituminous * Lignite (brown coal and lignite)

340

Coal Ash and Clean Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IT is the normal view that the incombustible part of coal is not only a useless but even objectionable diluent. At times in the past, ... , familiar with the theory of contact catalysis of gas reactions, have speculated that the ash constituents might well play an active role in the processes of carbonisation and combustion. ...

H. J. HODSMAN

1926-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

POLYTOPES OF MINIMUM POSITIVE SEMIDEFINITE RANK 1 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The positive semidefinite (psd) rank of a polytope is the smallest k for which the cone ... characterize those polytopes whose psd rank equals this lower bound. 1.

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wyoming Regional Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions » Wyoming Regional Science Wyoming Regions » Wyoming Regional Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regional Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Anne Theriault Email: anne@wyrsb.org Regional Event Information Date: February 8, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 16 Maximum Number of Teams per School: 3

345

Wyoming Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Wyoming Regions » Wyoming Regional Middle Wyoming Regions » Wyoming Regional Middle School Science Bowl National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Wyoming Regions Wyoming Regional Middle School Science Bowl Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Regional Coordinator Information Name: Anne Theriault Email: anneo.t@gmail.com Regional Event Information Date: Saturday, March 1, 2014 Maximum Number of Teams: 16

346

Volcanic ash in feed coal and its influence on coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect

The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research are collaborating with an Indiana Utility to determine the physical and chemical properties of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a coal-fired power plant. The plant utilizes a low-sulfur (.23--.47 weight percent S) coal from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of feed coal samples identified two mineral suites. A primary suite (not authigenic) consisting of quartz (detrital and volcanic beta-form grains), biotite, and minor zircon and a secondary authigenic mineral suite containing calcite, alumino-phosphates (crandallite and gorceixite), kaolinite, quartz, anatase, barite, and pyrite. The authigenic minerals are attributed to air-fall and reworked volcanic ash that was deposited in peat-forming mires. The Powder River Basin feed coals contain higher amounts of Ba, Ca, Mg, Na, Sr, and P compared to other analyzed eastern coals. These elements are associated with alumino-phosphate, biotite, calcite, and clay minerals. The element associations are indicative of coal that incorporated volcanic ash during deposition. XRD analysis of CCPs revealed a predominance of glass, perovskite, lime, gehlenite, quartz, and phosphates with minor amounts of periclase, anhydrite, hematite, and spinel group minerals in the fly ash; and quartz, plagioclase (albite and anorthite), pyroxene (augite and fassaite), rhodonite, and akermanite in the bottom ash. Microprobe and SEM analysis of fly ash samples revealed quartz, zircon, monazite, euhedral laths of corundum with merrillite, hematite, dendritic spinels/ferrites, and rounded grains of wollastonite with periclase. The abundant Ca and Mg mineral phases in the fly ashes are related to the presence of carbonate, clay, and phosphate minerals in the feed coal. The Ca- and Mg-rich mineral phases in the CCPs can be attributed to volcanic minerals deposited in the peat-forming mire. Dissolution and alteration of these minerals occurred either in the peat-forming sate or during coalification/diagenesis contributing to the authigenic mineral suite. Additionally, detrital mineral input and epigenetic ground-water flow may have affected the geochemistry of the feed coal.

Brownfield, M.E.; Affolter, R.H.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.; Hower, J.C.; Stricker, G.D.; O'Connor, J.T.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The use of NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute has conducted a study of different methods of coal drying as pretreatment steps before liquefaction. The objectives of this study were to develop a combined chemical dehydration/nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the moisture content of coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during drying, and to determine the effects of different drying methods on liquefaction reactivity of coals. Different methods of drying were investigated to determine whether coal drying can be accomplished without reducing the reactivity of coals toward liquefaction. Drying methods included thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration. Coals of rank lignite to high volatile bituminous were studied. Coals that were dried or partially dried thermally and with microwaves had lower liquefaction conversions than coals containing equilibrium moisture contents. However, chemically dried coals had conversions equal to or greater than the premoisturized coals. The conversion behavior is consistent with changes in the physical structure and cross linking reactions because of drying. Thermal and microwave drying appear to cause a collapse in the pore structure, thus preventing donor solvents such as tetralin from contacting reactive sites inside the coals. Chemical dehydration does not appear to collapse the pore structure. These results are supported by the solvent swelling measurements in which the swelling ratios of thermally dried and microwave-dried coals were lower than those of premoisturized coals, indicating a greater degree of cross linking in the dried coals. The swelling ratios of the chemically dried coals were greater than those of the premoisturized coals because the pore structure remaining unchanged or increased when water was removed. These results are consistent with the NMR results, which did not show significant changes in coal chemical structure.

Netzel, D.A.; Miknis, F.P.; Wallace, J.C. Jr.; Butcher, C.H.; Mitzel, J.M.; Turner, T.F.; Hurtubise, R.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Direct determination of organic and inorganic sulfur in coal by controlled oxidation  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop an analytical method to directly measure the forms of organic sulfur in coal. The method will provide a route to monitor the effectiveness of coal preparation research directed toward removal of organic sulfur in coal. The approach involves subjecting diluted coal samples simultaneously to an oxygen flow and a linear increase in temperature. Distinctive sulfur dioxide evolution patterns are observed among coals of different rank and between raw and treated coals. Assignments have been made relating each specific sulfur dioxide evolution to the non-aromatic organic, aromatic organic, and inorganic sulfur present in coals and treated coals. Work is progressing on schedule to optimize experimental conditions and to improve the efficiency of the controlled-atmosphere programmed-temperature oxidation (CAPTO) method by developing a multiple sample instrumental system.

LaCount, R.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Direct determination of organic and inorganic sulfur in coal by controlled oxidation  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to develop an analytical method to directly measure the forms of organic sulfur in coal. The method will provide a route to monitor the effectiveness of coal preparation research directed toward removal of organic sulfur in coal. The approach involves subjecting diluted coal samples simultaneously to an oxygen flow and a linear increase in temperature. Distinctive sulfur dioxide evolution patterns are observed among coals of different rank and between raw and treated coals. Assignments have been made relating each specific sulfur dioxide evolution to the non-aromatic organic, aromatic organic, and inorganic sulfur present in coals and treated coals. Work is progressing on schedule to optimize experimental conditions and to improve the efficiency of the controlled-atmosphere programmed-temperature oxidation (CAPTO) method by developing a multiple sample instrumental system.

LaCount, R.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

Not Available

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Weston County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Weston County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Weston County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.9270224°, -104.4723301° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.9270224,"lon":-104.4723301,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

NorthWestern Corporation (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name NorthWestern Corporation Place Wyoming Utility Id 12825 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0975/kWh Commercial: $0.1380/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for NorthWestern Corporation (Wyoming). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 14.42 146.703 173 99.874 849.906 170 114.294 996.609 343

355

Antelope Hills, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0816341°, -106.3241933° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0816341,"lon":-106.3241933,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

356

Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources Rafter J Ranch, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.426248°, -110.79844° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.426248,"lon":-110.79844,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

Hot Springs County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Wyoming: Energy Resources County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.658734°, -108.326784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.658734,"lon":-108.326784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

358

Homa Hills, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Homa Hills, Wyoming: Energy Resources Homa Hills, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9799661°, -106.3608619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9799661,"lon":-106.3608619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

359

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Uinta County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2107397°, -110.6168921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2107397,"lon":-110.6168921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

360

City of Powell, Wyoming (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Powell City of Powell Place Wyoming Utility Id 15294 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Large Power Demand Service Industrial Residential Rate Residential Security Lighting (150W HPS) Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0986/kWh Commercial: $0.0956/kWh Industrial: $0.0692/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Powell,_Wyoming_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410131

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vista West, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8599962°, -106.4346979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8599962,"lon":-106.4346979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Red Butte, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Butte, Wyoming: Energy Resources Butte, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8060757°, -106.4341976° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8060757,"lon":-106.4341976,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

Sublette County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sublette County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Sublette County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8138723°, -109.7591675° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8138723,"lon":-109.7591675,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

364

Powder River, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0321863°, -106.9872785° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0321863,"lon":-106.9872785,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Laramie County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laramie County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Laramie County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4269559°, -104.8454619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4269559,"lon":-104.8454619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

366

Converse County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converse County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Converse County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0489425°, -105.4068079° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0489425,"lon":-105.4068079,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

367

Distributed Generation Study/Wyoming County Community Hospital | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming County Community Hospital Wyoming County Community Hospital < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Warsaw, New York Site Description Institutional-Hospital/Health Care Study Type Long-term Monitoring Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Waukesha VGF L36GSID Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Natural Gas System Installer Gerster Trane System Enclosure Indoor System Application Combined Heat and Power Number of Prime Movers 1 Stand-alone Capability Seamless Power Rating 560 kW0.56 MW 560,000 W 560,000,000 mW 5.6e-4 GW 5.6e-7 TW Nominal Voltage (V) 480 Heat Recovery Rating (BTU/hr) 1000000 Cooling Capacity (Refrig/Tons) Origin of Controller 3rd Party Off-the-Shelf Component Integration Customer Assembled Start Date 2001/09/26

368

Airport Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.9932901°, -107.9492606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.9932901,"lon":-107.9492606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Bar Nunn, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9135767°, -106.3433606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9135767,"lon":-106.3433606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Sweetwater County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Wyoming: Energy Resources County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8519395°, -109.1880047° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8519395,"lon":-109.1880047,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Washakie County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washakie County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Washakie County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.8347829°, -107.7037626° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8347829,"lon":-107.7037626,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Natrona County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natrona County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Natrona County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.8313837°, -106.912251° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8313837,"lon":-106.912251,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

Teton Village, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.587984°, -110.827989° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.587984,"lon":-110.827989,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

South Park, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.4221501°, -110.793261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.4221501,"lon":-110.793261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

Goshen County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goshen County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Goshen County, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0334428°, -104.3791912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0334428,"lon":-104.3791912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

376

Moose Wilson Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources Road, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.5252053°, -110.844655° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5252053,"lon":-110.844655,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

377

Lower Valley Energy Inc (Wyoming) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Wyoming Place Wyoming Utility Id 11273 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1]Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png C-1 Small Commercial Commercial C-2 Large Power Service Commercial I-1 Small Irrigation Service Commercial I-2 Large Irrigation Service Commercial

378

Casper Mountain, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain, Wyoming: Energy Resources Mountain, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7330199°, -106.3266921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7330199,"lon":-106.3266921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

379

Albany County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming: Energy Resources Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.638448°, -105.5943388° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.638448,"lon":-105.5943388,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

380

Bessemer Bend, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bessemer Bend, Wyoming: Energy Resources Bessemer Bend, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7580196°, -106.5203123° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7580196,"lon":-106.5203123,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Clean coal  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li [Ohio State University, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Capillary pressure and wettability behavior of CO{sub 2} sequestration in coal at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced coalbed-methane (ECBM) recovery combines recovery of methane (CH{sub 4}) from coal seams with storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The efficiency of ECBM recovery depends on the CO{sub 2} transfer rate between the macrocleats, via the microcleats to the coal matrix. Diffusive transport of CO{sub 2} in the small cleats is enhanced when the coal is CO{sub 2}-wet. Indeed, for water-wet conditions, the small fracture system is filled with water and the rate of CO{sub 2} sorption and CH{sub 4} desorption is affected by slow diffusion of CO{sub 2}. This work investigates the wetting behavior of coal using capillary pressures between CO{sub 2} and water, measured continuously as a function of water saturation at in-situ conditions. To facilitate the interpretation of the coal measurements, we also obtain capillary pressure curves for unconsolidated-sand samples. For medium- and high-rank coal, the primary drainage capillary pressure curves show a water-wet behavior. Secondary forced-imbibition experiments show that the medium-rank coal becomes CO{sub 2}-wet as the CO{sub 2} pressure increases. High-rank coal is CO{sub 2}-wet during primary imbibition. The imbibition behavior is in agreement with contact-angle measurements. Hence, we conclude that imbibition tests provide the practically relevant data to evaluate the wetting properties of coal.

Plug, W.J.; Mazumder, S.; Bruining, J. [Horizon Energy Partners BV, Hague (Netherlands)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Coal industry annual 1993  

SciTech Connect

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Coal combustion science quarterly progress report, October--December 1992. Task 1, Coal char combustion [and] Task 2, Fate of mineral matter  

SciTech Connect

In the Coal Combustion Laboratory (CCL) this quarter, controlled laboratory experiments were carried out to better understand the late stages of coal combustion and its relation to unburned carbon levels in fly ash. Optical in situ measurements were made during char combustion at high carbon conversions and the optical data were related to particle morphologies revealed by optical microscopy on samples extracted under the same conditions. Results of this work are reported in detail below. In the data presented below, we compare the fraction of alkali metal loss to that of the alkaline earth metals as a function of coal rank to draw conclusions about the mechanism of release for the latter. Figure 2.1 illustrates the fractional release of the major alkali and alkaline earth metals (Na, K, Ca, Mg) as a function of coal rank for a series of coals and for several coal blends. All data are derived from combustion experiments in Sandia`s Multifuel Combustor (MFC) and represent the average of three to eight experiments under conditions where the mass loss on a dry, ash-free (daf) basis exceeds 95 %. There are no missing data in the figure. The several coals with no indicated result exhibited no mass loss of the alkali or alkaline earth metals in our experiments. There is a clear rank dependence indicated by the data in Fig. 2.1, reflecting the mode of occurrence of the material in the coal.

Hardesty, D.R. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Appalachian coal awareness conference: promoting Eastern coal  

SciTech Connect

Promoting the development and use of coal, especially coal from the Appalachian region, was the focus of introductory and keynote speeches and a discussion by representatives of the Virginia Coal Council, mining engineers, industry, and the Edison Electric Institute. Governor Dalton's keynote address noted that both producers and consumers attending the conference should work together to promote coal as a solution to the US energy future, and reported the impact that a commitment to coal has had on Virginia's economic growth. Participants in the coal consumers panel discussion raised various economic and regulatory issues.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Air toxic emissions from the combustion of coal: Identifying and quantifying hazardous air pollutants from US coals  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the key air toxic emissions likely to emanate from continued and expanded use of domestic coal. It identifies and quantifies those trace elements specified in the US 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, by tabulating selected characterization data on various source coals by region, state, and rank. On the basis of measurements by various researchers, this report also identifies those organic compounds likely to be derived from the coal combustion process (although their formation is highly dependent on specific boiler configurations and operating conditions).

Szpunar, C.B.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Rank three bipartite entangled states are distillable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the bipartite entangled state of rank three is distillable. So there is no rank three bipartite bound entangled state. By using this fact, We present some families of rank four states that are distillable. We also analyze the relation between the low rank state and the Werner state.

Lin Chen; Yi-Xin Chen

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

391

Clean Coal Power Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy processes that sharply reduce air emissions and other pollutants from coal-burning power plants.

392

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

393

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The configuration of the subscale combustor has evolved during the six years of this program from a system using only an impact separator to remove particulates to a system which also included a slagging cyclone separator before the lean-quench combustor. The system also now includes active slag tapping after the impact separator rather than a bucket to collect the slag. The subscale 12 MM Btu/hr (higher heating value, HHV) slagging combustor has demonstrated excellent coal-fired operation at 6 atm. The combustor has fired both coal-water mixtures (CWM) and pulverized coal (PC). Three Wyoming subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals have been successfully fired in the TVC. As a result of this active testing, the following conclusions may be drawn: (1) it was possible to achieve the full design thermal capacity of 12 MM Btu/hr with the subscale slagging combustor, while burning 100% pulverized coal and operating at the design pressure of 6 atm; (2) because of the separate-chamber, rich-lean design of the subscale slagging combustor, NO{sub x} emissions that easily meet the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) limits were achieved; (3) carbon burnout efficiency was in excess of 99% when 100% coal-fired; (4) ninety percent of the ash can be separated as slag in the impact separator, and a total 98 to 99% removed with the addition of the slagging cyclone separator; (5) Objectives for third-stage exit temperature (1850{degrees}F), and exit temperature pattern factor (14%) were readily achieved; (6) overall pressure loss is currently an acceptable 5 to 6% without cyclone separator and 7 to 9% with the cyclone; and (7) feeding pulverized coal or sorbent into the combustor against 6 atm pressure is achievable.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

TT--Rank: TimeRank: Time--Aware Authority RankingAware Authority Ranking KlausKlaus BerberichBerberich,, MichalisMichalis VazirgiannisVazirgiannis, Gerhard, Gerhard WeikumWeikum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TT--Rank: TimeRank: Time--Aware Authority RankingAware Authority Ranking KlausKlaus BerberichObjectives BasicsBasics TT--Rank: TimeRank: Time--aware Authority Rankingaware Authority Ranking ExperimentsExperiments ConclusionsConclusions Ongoing and future workOngoing and future work #12;10/16/2004 WAW 2004: T-Rank: Time

395

STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect

There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak temperature for volatile evolution from coal was a reliable measure of coal rank. Because of this observation, a wide variety of coals of a wide range of ranks was investigated. It was shown in this work that measuring the peak temperature for volatile evolution was quite a precise indicator of rank and correlated closely wit the rank values obtained by measuring vitrinite reflectance, a more difficult measurement to make. This prompted the desire to know the composition of the volatile materials evolved as a function of coal rank. This was then measured by coupling a TGA to a mass spectrometer using laser activation and photoionization detection TG-PI-MS. The predominant species in volatiles of low rank coal turned out to be phenols with some alkenes. As the rank increases, the relative amount of alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons increases and the oxygenated species decrease. It was shown that these volatiles were actually pyrolitic products and not volatilization products of coal. Solvent extraction experiments coupled with TG-PI-MS indicates that the low oiling and more extractable material are essentially similar in chemical types to the non-extractable portions but apparently higher molecular weight and therefor less extractable.

Michael T. Klein

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum Dallas, Texas May 17-19, 2004 Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Presentation Outline * Background * Power plant-water issues * DOE/NETL R&D program * Conclusion/future plans ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Global Water Availability Ocean 97% Fresh Water 2.5% 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ice Groundwater Lakes and Rivers ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Freshwater Withdrawals and Consumption Mgal / Day Irrigation 81,300 Irrigation 81,300 Thermoelectric 3,310 Consumption Sources: "Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1995," USGS Circular 1200, 1998

397

Coal Characterization in Relation to Coal Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most coals are used worldwide for combustion today. Generally all kinds of coals are applicable for combustion. The major methods of burning are fixed bed firing, fluidized bed firing and suspension firing. Th...

Harald Jüntgen

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal 101 Lesson 2: The Clean Coal Technology Program The Clean Coal Technology Program began in 1985 when the United States and Canada decided that something had to be done about the "acid rain" that was believed to be damaging rivers, lakes, forests, and buildings in both countries. Since many of the pollutants that formed "acid rain" were coming from big coal-burning power plants in the United States, the U.S. Government took the lead in finding a solution. One of the steps taken by the U.S. Department of Energy was to create a partnership program between the Government, several States, and private companies to test new methods developed by scientists to make coal burning much cleaner. This became the "Clean Coal Technology Program."

399

Fort Union coals of the northern Rockies and Great Plains: A linchpin toward a new approach to national coal resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey recently initiated a 5-year program to assess the Nation`s coal resources, which emphasizes a new approach relating coal quantity and quality. One assessment region includes the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains of Wyoming, Montana, and North Dakota, which contains a vast expanse of Paleocene Fort Union coal-bearing rocks that yielded about 30% (>299 million short tons) of the total coal produced (1.03 billion short tons) in the U.S. for 1994. Production is from 14 coal beds/zones (Wyodak-Anderson, Anderson-Dietz, Rosebud, Beulah-Zap, Hagel, Harmon, Ferris Nos. 23, 24, 25, 31, 38, 39, Hanna No. 80, and Deadman seams) mined in the Hanna, Green River, Powder River, and Williston Basins. About 254 million short tons produced from 25 mines are from the Wyodak-Anderson, Anderson-Dietz, and Rosebud coal beds/zones in the Powder River Basin (PRB). These coals are considered as clean and low contaminant compliance coals containing less sulfur and ash (arithmetic mean for sulfur is 0.58% and ash is 7%, as-received basis) than coals produced from other regions in the conterminous U.S. Preliminary elemental analysis of coal samples from the PRB for those hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) named in the Amendments to the 1990 Clean Air Act (including Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Se, and U), indicates that PRB coals are lower in HAPs contents than other coals from within the region and also other regions in the U.S. Arithmetic means of HAPs contents of these coals are: Sb=0.35, As=3.4, Be=0.6, Cd=0.08, Cr=6.1, Co=1.6, Pb=3.6, Mn=23.5, Hg=0.09, Ni=4.6, Se=0.9, and U=1.1 (in ppm, as-received, and on a whole-coal basis). These coal-quality parameters will be used to delineate coal quantity of the 14 Fort Union coal beds/zones defined in the resource assessment for expanded utilization of coals into the next several decades as controlled by present and future environmental constraints.

Flores, R.M.; Stricker, G.D. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Plastic coals are important feedstocks in coke manufacture, coal liquefaction, gasification, and combustion. During these processes, the thermoplastic behavior of these coals is also important since it may contribute to desirable or undesirable characteristics. For example, during liquefaction, the plastic behavior is desired since it leads to liquid-liquid reactions which are faster than solid-liquid reactions. During gasification, the elastic behavior is undesired since it leads to caking and agglomeration of coal particles which result in bed bogging in fixed or fluidized bed gasifiers. The plastic behavior of different coals was studied using a fast-response plastometer. A modified plastometer was used to measure the torque required to turn at constant angular speed a cone-shaped disk embedded in a thin layer of coal. The coal particles were packed between two metal plates which are heated electrically. Heating rates, final temperatures, pressures, and durations of experiment ranged from 200--800 K/s, 700--1300 K, vacuum-50 atm helium, and 0--40 s, respectively. The apparent viscosity of the molten coal was calculated from the measured torque using the governing equation of the cone-and-plate viscometer. Using a concentrated suspension model, the molten coal`s apparent viscosity was related to the quantity of the liquid metaplast present during pyrolysis. Seven coals from Argonne National Laboratory Premium Coal Sample Bank were studied. Five bituminous coals, from high-volatile to low-volatile bituminous, were found to have very good plastic behavior. Coal type strongly affects the magnitude and duration of plasticity. Hvb coals were most plastic. Mvb and lvb coals, though the maximum plasticity and plastic period were less. Low rank coals such as subbituminous and lignite did not exhibit any plasticity in the present studies. Coal plasticity is moderately well correlated with simple indices of coal type such as the elemental C,O, and H contents.

Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fairlawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Advanced CO2 Capture Technology for Low-Rank Coal IGCC Systems Project Number: DE-FE0007966 TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is demonstrating the technical and economic viability of a new Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant designed to efficiently process low-rank coals. The plant uses an integrated carbon dioxide (CO2) scrubber/water gas shift (WGS) catalyst to capture more than 90 percent of the CO2 emissions, while increasing the cost of electricity by less than 10 percent compared to a plant with no carbon capture. TDA is optimizing the sorbent/catalyst and process design, and assessing the efficacy of the integrated WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system, first in bench-scale experiments and then in a slipstream field demonstration using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. The results will feed into a techno-economic analysis to estimate the impact of the WGS catalyst/CO2 capture system on the thermal efficiency of the plant and the cost of electricity.

403

FP-Rank: An Effective Ranking Approach Based on Frequent Pattern Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FP-Rank: An Effective Ranking Approach Based on Frequent Pattern Analysis Yuanfeng Song, Kenneth. Ranking documents in terms of their relevance to a given query is fundamental to many real on developing efficient ranking models. While ranking mod- els are usually trained based on given training

Ng, Wilfred Siu Hung

404

NONNEGATIVE RANK FACTORIZATION VIA RANK REDUCTION BO DONG, MATTHEW M. LIN, AND MOODY T. CHU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NONNEGATIVE RANK FACTORIZATION VIA RANK REDUCTION BO DONG, MATTHEW M. LIN, AND MOODY T. CHU possible is called the nonnegative rank of A. Computing the exact nonnegative rank and the corresponding factorization are known to be NP-hard. Even if the nonnegative rank is known a priori, no simple numerical

405

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" "Item","Value","Rank" "Primary Energy Source","Coal" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",8380,36 "Electric Utilities",7278,31 "IPP & CHP",1102,43 "Net Generation...

407

CX-002464: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06032010 Location(s): Laramie,...

408

CX-006042: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06082011 Location(s): Laramie,...

409

Development of an Advanced Deshaling Technology to Improve the Energy Efficiency of Coal Handling, Processing, and Utilization Operations  

SciTech Connect

The concept of using a dry, density-based separator to achieve efficient, near-face rock removal, commonly referred to as deshaling, was evaluated in several applications across the U.S.. Varying amounts of high-density rock exist in most run-of-mine feed. In the central Appalachian coalfields, a rock content exceeding 50% in the feed to a preparation plant is commonplace due to high amounts of out-of-seam dilution made necessary by extracting coal from thin seams. In the western U.S, an increase in out-of-seam dilution and environmental regulations associated with combustion emissions have resulted in a need to clean low rank coals and dry cleaning may be the only option. A 5 ton/hr mobile deshaling unit incorporating a density-based, air-table technology commercially known as the FGX Separator has been evaluated at mine sites located within the states of Utah, Wyoming, Texas, West Virginia, Virginia, Pennsylvania and Kentucky. The FGX technology utilizes table riffling principles with air as the medium. Air enters through the table and creates a fluidized bed of particles comprised of mostly fine, high density particles. The high density particle bed lifts the low-density coal particles to the top of the bed. The low-density coal moves toward the front of the table due to mass action and the downward slope of the table. The high-density particles settle through the fluidized particle bed and, upon making contact with the table, moves toward the back of the table with the assistance of table vibration. As a result, the low-density coal particles exit the front of the table closest to the feed whereas the high-density, high-ash content particles leave on the side and front of the table located at the farthest from the feed entry. At each test site, the run-of-mine feed was either directly fed to the FGX unit or pre-screened to remove the majority of the -6mm material. The surface moisture of the feed must be maintained below 9%. Pre-screening is required when the surface moisture of the feed coal exceeds the maximum limit. However, the content of -6mm in the feed to the FGX separator should be maintained between 10% and 20% to ensure an adequate fluidized bed. A parametric evaluation was conducted using a 3-level experimental design at each test site to identify the optimum separation performance and parameter values. The test data was used to develop empirical expressions that describe the response variables (i.e., mass yield and product ash content) as a function of the operating parameter values. From this process, it was established that table frequency and longitudinal slope are the most critical factors in controlling both mass yield and clean coal ash while the cross table slope was the least significant. Fan blower frequency is a critical parameter that controls mass yield. Although the splitter positions between product and middling streams and the middling and tailing streams were held constant during the tests, a separate evaluation indicated that performance is sensitive to splitter position within certain lengths of the table and insensitive in others. For a Utah bituminous coal, the FGX separator provided clean coal ash contents that ranged from a low of 8.57% to a high of 12.48% from a feed coal containing around 17% ash. From the 29 tests involved in the statistically designed test program, the average clean coal ash content was 10.76% while the tailings ash content averaged around 72%. One of the best separation performances achieved an ash reduction from 17.36% to 10.67% while recovering 85.9% of the total feed mass, which equated to an ash rejection value of around 47%. The total sulfur content was typically decreased from 1.61% to 1.49%. These performances were quantified by blending the middlings stream with the clean coal product. At a second Utah site, coal sources from three different bituminous coal seams were treated by the FGX deshaling unit. Three parameter values were varied based on the results obtained from Site No. 1 to obtain the optimum results shown in Table E-1. Approximately 9 tests w

Rick Honaker; Gerald Luttrell

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Future Impacts of Coal Distribution Constraints on Coal Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation component of coal price should also increase;investment. Coal costs and prices are functions of a numberto forecast coal demand, supply, and prices from now to

McCollum, David L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

413

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

414

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

415

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A "Bed" for Burning Coal A "Bed" for Burning Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 4: A "Bed" for Burning Coal? It was a wet, chilly day in Washington DC in 1979 when a few scientists and engineers joined with government and college officials on the campus of Georgetown University to celebrate the completion of one of the world's most advanced coal combustors. It was a small coal burner by today's standards, but large enough to provide heat and steam for much of the university campus. But the new boiler built beside the campus tennis courts was unlike most other boilers in the world. A Fluidized Bed Boiler A Fluidized Bed Boiler In a fluidized bed boiler, upward blowing jets of air suspend burning coal, allowing it to mix with limestone that absorbs sulfur pollutants.

416

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Wyoming Water Resources Research Centter Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Not Applicable Focus Category: Models, Surface Water, None Descriptors: Channel Erosion, Coal Bed Methane, Stable Operators Group Meeting, Casper, WY. #12;Problem and Research Objectives: Coal bed methane (CBM) development. Wilkerson, G.V., J.C. Baxter, J.H. Johnson, and J. Montgomery, Aug 2000. Presentation at the Methane

418

Illinois coal reserve assessment and database development. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The new demonstrated reserve base estimate of coal of Illinois is 105 billion short tons. This estimate is an increase from the 78 billion tons in the Energy Information Administration`s demonstrated reserve base of coal, as of January 1, 1994. The new estimate arises from revised resource calculations based on recent mapping in a number of countries, as well as significant adjustments for depletion due to past mining. The new estimate for identified resources is 199 billion tons, a revision of the previous estimate of 181 billion tons. The new estimates incorporate the available analyses of sulfur, heat content, and rank group appropriate for characterizing the remaining coal resources in Illinois. Coal-quality data were examined in conjunction with coal resource mapping. Analyses of samples from exploration drill holes, channel samples from mines and outcrops, and geologic trends were compiled and mapped to allocate coal resource quantities to ranges of sulfur, heat content, and rank group. The new allocations place almost 1% of the demonstrated reserve base of Illinois in the two lowest sulfur categories, in contrast to none in the previous allocation used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The new allocations also place 89% of the demonstrated reserve base in the highest sulfur category, in contrast to the previous allocation of 69% in the highest category.

Treworgy, C.G.; Prussen, E.I.; Justice, M.A.; Chenoweth, C.A. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.

Edward K. Levy; Nenad Sarunac; Harun Bilirgen; Hugo Caram

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A summary of the draft environmental impact statement for a proposed exploratory oil drilling operation in Shoshone National Forest in Wyoming describes the drilling equipment and support facilities required for the operation. Marathon Oil Company's purpose is to test the gas and oil potential of underlying geologic structures. Although Marathon plans a reclamation and revegetation program, there would be erosion during the operation. Noise from the drilling and helicopter activity would disrupt wildlife and vacationers in nearby Yellowstone Park. Confrontations with the grizzly bear population would increase. The legal mandate for the assessment was the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The pore structure of the Argonne coals as interpreted from contrast matching small angle neutron scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contrast matching small angle neutron scattering has been performed on a series of Argonne coals using H2O/D2O mixtures using short contact times between the coal and liquid. Calculations of the neutron scattering densities of the coals based on their “formulae” and helium densities are discussed. The results of the CM-SANS are given and it is shown that the scattering from the scattering from the non-contrast-matched samples is unreliable. It is shown that porosity in coals is effectively determined by the presence of water and that porosity levels decrease with increasing rank.

P.J. Hall; S.D. Brown; J.M. Calo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of a Pilot-Scale Transport Coal Gasifier: Evaluation of Reaction Kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was found that appropriate chemical kinetics for gasification reactions are key to the numerical prediction of syngas composition and the kinetics from Niksa Energy Associate’s PC Coal Lab yielded reasonable agreement to the experimental data. ... Air for the primary burner is present below the recycle feed, and additional air is fed into the mixing zone from various locations between coal and recycle inlets; this arrangement evenly distributes heat generated from the partial combustion of the circulating solids. ... Char burning rates become faster with coals of progressively lower rank, although the reactivity is somewhat less sensitive to coal quality at elevated pressure than at atm. pressure. ...

Tingwen Li; Kiran Chaudhari; Dirk VanEssendelft; Richard Turton; Philip Nicoletti; Mehrdad Shahnam; Chris Guenther

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

423

Matrix endor studies of the carbonization of West Canadian coking coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cretaceous bituminous coals of known rank R?0 max vitrinite reflectance) have been examined by ESR (electron spin resonance) and ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance) techniques. Both highly oxidised (outcrop) and unoxidised mine?run Balmer coal from the Crowsnest field have been subjected to heat treatment (200?900°C) and the matrix proton ENDOR signal studied as a function of applied microwave and rf power. Changes in ENDOR line shape and intensity are described with particular emphasis on the presoftening region of the unoxidised coal. A comparative study of the carbonization of hvb and 1vb coking coal from the Crowsnest is reported.

P. R. West; S. E. Cannon

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for U.S. Coal by Origin and Destination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-ground coal quality data, including C, S, ash, fixed carbon, and heating values, are from COALQUAL (11), IGS (12), and Keystone (13, 14). ... For example, examination of 2082 bituminous Kentucky coals led Sakulpitakphon et al. (28) to reject the notion that a single CO2 emission factor can “be used as typical for any given rank of coal.” ... Quick, J. C.; Tabet, D. E.; Wakefield, S.; Bon, R. L. Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants: A GIS Study of Coal Chemistry, ...

Jeffrey C. Quick

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Lead contents of coal, coal ash and fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flameless atomic absorption spectrometry is applied for the determination of Pb in coal, coal ash and fly ash. Lead concentrations in coal and coal ash ranging from respectively 7 to 110 µg...?1 and 120 to 450 µg...

C. Block; R. Dams

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal Cleaning Costs Process Clean Coal Produced, * T/D (DryMM$ Net Operating Cost, $/T (Clean Coal Basis) Net OperatingCost, $/T (Clean Coal Bases) Case NA Hazen KVB Battelle

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Tensor rank : some lower and upper bounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of Strassen [25] and Raz [19] show that good enough tensor rank lower bounds have implications for algebraic circuit/formula lower bounds. We explore tensor rank lower and upper bounds, focusing on explicit ...

Forbes, Michael Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Split Rank of Triangle and Quadrilateral Inequalities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 4, 2009 ... facet-defining inequalities for (1) have a finite split rank? We prove that the split rank of all the facet-defining inequalities of conv(P(R, f)) is finite ...

2009-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

430

A New Ranking Method For Fuzzy FMEA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we extend the method introduced by Bowles and Peláez (1995) for the risk ranking in Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA). This method called as multi-ranking ... Penang, Malaysia. Comparisons we...

Muhammad Suzuri Hitam; Suresh Gobee…

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

432

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

433

Hydrogen from Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Coal Edward Schmetz Office of Sequestration, Hydrogen and Clean Coal Fuels U.S. Department of Energy DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies September 8, 2004 Presentation Outline ƒ Hydrogen Initiatives ƒ Hydrogen from Coal Central Production Goal ƒ Why Coal ƒ Why Hydrogen Separation Membranes ƒ Coal-based Synthesis Gas Characteristics ƒ Technical Barriers ƒ Targets ƒ Future Plans 2 3 Hydrogen from Coal Program Hydrogen from Coal Program FutureGen FutureGen Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Turbines Carbon Capture & Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration The Hydrogen from Coal Program Supports the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative and FutureGen * The Hydrogen Fuel Initiative is a $1.2 billion RD&D program to develop hydrogen

434

Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 6,305 7,211 7,526 1980's 9,100 9,307 9,758 10,227 10,482 10,617 9,756 10,023 10,308 10,744 1990's 9,944 9,941 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 13,562 13,650 14,226 2000's 16,158 18,398 20,527 21,744 22,632 23,774 23,549 29,710 31,143 35,283 2010's 35,074 35,290 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

435

Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.15 0.15 0.15 1970's 0.15 0.15 0.16 0.18 0.25 0.34 0.41 0.64 0.79 1.13 1980's 1.92 2.77 3.22 3.18 3.32 3.01 2.52 1.76 1.53 1.24 1990's 1.16 1.06 1.13 1.99 2.05 1.78 2.57 2.42 1.78 1.97 2000's 3.34 3.49 2.70 4.13 4.96 6.86 5.85 4.65 6.86 3.40 2010's 4.30 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Wellhead Price Wyoming Natural Gas Prices

436

Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 0.14 0.16 0.16 1970's 0.17 0.17 0.18 0.24 0.24 0.51 0.65 0.69 1.36 1.59 1980's 2.05 2.51 2.91 3.05 2.99 2.76 2.56 2.36 2.06 1.88 1990's 1.95 1.85 2.48 1.92 1.52 1.31 1.54 1.84 1.86 1.87 2000's 3.21 3.04 NA -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use Wyoming Natural Gas Prices Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use

437

Wyoming chemical flood test for oil recovery shows promise  

SciTech Connect

This project was begun in 1978 to provide data to promote surfactant chemical flooding on a commercial scale in the low-permeability reservoirs of eastern Wyoming and Colorado. The Big Muddy Field in Wyoming was selected because of the large resource, potential net pay, and high oil saturation. Injection began on February 20, 1980 with a surfactant flooding process. Water mixed with salt (brine) was injected as a preflush which was completed on January 20, 1981. This produced 12,122 bbl of oil. The next step involves injecting a surfactant, co-surfactant (alcohol), and polymer. When the injection of the surfactant is completed in the summer of 1982, polymer alone will be injected. Polymer injection will be completed sometime in 1984. The final phase will be a followup water drive scheduled for 1984-1987. As of February 1, 1982, 36,683 bbl of oil had been produced. About 88 bbl of oil per day is being produced, compared to only about 41 bbl per day in February 1981. (ATT)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,572 16,185 17,090 13,633 16,249 17,446 19,820 1990's 12,182 14,154 13,217 13,051 13,939 14,896 15,409 15,597 16,524 19,272 2000's 20,602 20,991 25,767 28,829 24,053 24,408 23,868 25,276 23,574 25,282 2010's 27,104 28,582 29,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

439

Fitting Reduced Rank Regression Models by Alternating Maximum Likelihoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fitting longitudinal reduced rank regression models byA J . (1965). Reduced-rank regression for the multivariateFITTING LONGITUDINAL REDUCED RANK REGRESSION MODELS BY

Jan de Leeuw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Commuting higher rank ordinary differential operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss some results related to commuting ordinary differential operators of rank greater than one.

Andrey E. Mironov

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wyoming coal rank" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Table 10. Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 10. Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Rank Controlling Company Name Production (thousand short tons) Percent of Total Production 1 Peabody Energy Corp 192,563 18.9 2 Arch Coal Inc 136,992 13.5 3 Alpha Natural Resources LLC 104,306 10.3 4 Cloud Peak Energy 90,721 8.9 5 CONSOL Energy Inc 55,752 5.5 6 Alliance Resource Operating Partners LP 35,406 3.5 7 Energy Future Holdings Corp 31,032 3.1 8 Murray Energy Corp 29,216 2.9 9 NACCO Industries Inc 28,207 2.8 10 Patriot Coal Corp 23,946 2.4 11 Peter Kiewit Sons Inc 22,725 2.2 12 Westmoreland Coal Co 22,215 2.2 13 BHP Billiton Ltd 12,580 1.2 14 Walter Energy Inc 11,220 1.1 15 Cline Group (The) 9,230

442

Rank Modulation with Multiplicity Anxiao (Andrew) Jiang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank Modulation with Multiplicity Anxiao (Andrew) Jiang Computer Science and Eng. Dept. Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 yuewang@cse.tamu.edu Abstract--Rank modulation is a scheme that uses-change memories, etc. An extension of rank modulation is studied in this paper, where multiple cells can have

Jiang, Anxiao "Andrew"

443

EQUATIONS FOR LOWER BOUNDS ON BORDER RANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EQUATIONS FOR LOWER BOUNDS ON BORDER RANK JONATHAN D. HAUENSTEIN, CHRISTIAN IKENMEYER, AND J of bilinear maps of border rank at most r. We apply these methods to several cases including the case r = 6 multiplication operator M2, which gives a new proof that the border rank of the multiplication of 2 Ã? 2 matrices

Hauenstein, Jonathan

444

MORLEY RANK IN HOMOGENEOUS MODELS ALEXEI KOLESNIKOV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MORLEY RANK IN HOMOGENEOUS MODELS ALEXEI KOLESNIKOV AND G.V.N.G. KRISHNAMURTHI Abstract. We define an appropriate analog of the Morley rank in a totally transcendental homogeneous model with type diagram D. We-extensions of rank . This is surprising, because the proof of the statement in the first-order case depends heavily

Kolesnikov, Alexei

445

Coal Severance Tax (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Severance Tax is imposed on all coal severed for sale or industrial purposes, except coal used for heating buildings in the state, coal used by the state or any political subdivision of...

446

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

SciTech Connect

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

447

DOE's Coal Research and Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 25, 2013 - 10:32am July 25, 2013 - 10:32am Addthis Statement of Christopher Smith, Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology Subcommittee on Energy Thank you Chairman Lummis, Ranking Member Swalwell, and members of the Subcommittee. I appreciate the opportunity to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE) coal research and development (R&D) activities. Coal fuels approximately 40 percent of our domestic electricity production. As the Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently pointed out in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 reference case, coal is projected to remain the largest energy source for electricity generation through 2040. Because it is abundant, the clean and efficient use of coal is a key part of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy.

448

Lie rank in groups of finite Morley rank with solvable local subgroups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lie rank in groups of finite Morley rank with solvable local subgroups Adrien Deloro and ´Eric Jaligot August 5, 2013 Abstract We prove a general dichotomy theorem for groups of finite Morley rank with solvable local subgroups and of Pr¨ufer p-rank at least 2, leading either to some p-strong embedding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

449

Fixed Rank Kriging A Fixed Rank Prediction Algorithm for Massive Spatial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fixed Rank Kriging A Fixed Rank Prediction Algorithm for Massive Spatial Data with Application, 2010 1 / 24 #12;Fixed Rank Kriging Outline Spatial model, assumptions and some implementation challenges. Summary of Fixed Rank Kriging by Cressie and Johannesson (2008). Propose algorithm to estimate

Gilbes, Fernando

450

Recovery of Low Rank Matrices Under Affine Constraints via a Smoothed Rank Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Recovery of Low Rank Matrices Under Affine Constraints via a Smoothed Rank Function Mohammadreza Jutten, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--In this paper, the problem of matrix rank mini- mization under affine constraints is addressed. The state-of-the- art algorithms can recover matrices with a rank much less than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

451

MEAN DIMENSION, MEAN RANK, AND VON NEUMANN-L UCK RANK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEAN DIMENSION, MEAN RANK, AND VON NEUMANN-L ¨UCK RANK HANFENG LI AND BINGBING LIANG Abstract. We introduce an invariant, called mean rank, for any module M of the integral group ring of a discrete amenable group , as an analogue of the rank of an abelian group. It is shown that the mean dimension

Li, Hanfeng

452

RANK-ONE TENSOR PROPERTY FROM RANK-ONE BALANCED-UNFOLDINGS AND APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RANK-ONE TENSOR PROPERTY FROM RANK-ONE BALANCED-UNFOLDINGS AND APPLICATIONS YUNING YANG , YUNLONG FENG , XIAOLIN HUANG , AND JOHAN A. K. SUYKENS Abstract. This paper explores the rank properties X, if log2(d) of the balanced-unfolding matrices of X are rank-1, then the tensor itself must

453

Conference Rankings I promised to send you a website for CS conference rankings. It is at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference Rankings I promised to send you a website for CS conference rankings. It is at http://www.csconferenceranking.org/conferencerankings/alltopics.html It is not the only such ranking, but it seems to agree with what I have found in attending conferences to rank conference are anonymous only revealed after their death. The reason is that people have been

Allan, Vicki H.

454

Air and steam coal partial gasification in an atmospheric fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

Using the mixture of air and steam as gasification medium, three different rank coal partial gasification studies were carried out in a bench-scale atmospheric fluidized bed with the various operating parameters. The effects of air/coal (Fa/Fc) ratio, steam/coal (Fs/Fc) ratio, bed temperature, and coal rank on the fuel gas compositions and the high heating value (HHV) were reported in this paper. The results show that there is an optimal Fa/Fc ratio and Fs/Fc ratio for coal partial gasification. A rise of bed temperature favors the semigasification reaction of coal, but the concentrations of carbon monoxide and methane and the HHV decrease with the rise of bed temperature, except hydrogen. In addition, the gas HHVs are between 2.2 and 3.4 MJ/Nm{sup 3}. The gas yield and carbon conversion increase with Fa/Fc ratio, Fs/Fc ratio, and bed temperature, while they decrease with the rise of the rank of coal. 7 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jing; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang; Rui Xiao [Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing (China). Department of Environmental Science & Engineering

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CBM and CO2-ECBM related sorption processes in coal: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article reviews the state of research on sorption of gases (CO2, CH4) and water on coal for primary recovery of coalbed methane (CBM), secondary recovery by an enhancement with carbon dioxide injection (CO2-ECBM), and for permanent storage of CO2 in coal seams. Especially in the last decade a large amount of data has been published characterizing coals from various coal basins world-wide for their gas sorption capacity. This research was either related to commercial CBM production or to the usage of coal seams as a permanent sink for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Presently, producing methane from coal beds is an attractive option and operations are under way or planned in many coal basins around the globe. Gas-in-place determinations using canister desorption tests and CH4 isotherms are performed routinely and have provided large datasets for correlating gas transport and sorption properties with coal characteristic parameters. Publicly funded research projects have produced large datasets on the interaction of CO2 with coals. The determination of sorption isotherms, sorption capacities and rates has meanwhile become a standard approach. In this study we discuss and compare the manometric, volumetric and gravimetric methods for recording sorption isotherms and provide an uncertainty analysis. Using published datasets and theoretical considerations, water sorption is discussed in detail as an important mechanisms controlling gas sorption on coal. Most sorption isotherms are still recorded for dry coals, which usually do not represent in-seam conditions, and water present in the coal has a significant control on CBM gas contents and CO2 storage potential. This section is followed by considerations of the interdependence of sorption capacity and coal properties like coal rank, maceral composition or ash content. For assessment of the most suitable coal rank for CO2 storage data on the CO2/CH4 sorption ratio data have been collected and compared with coal rank. Finally, we discuss sorption rates and gas diffusion in the coal matrix as well as the different unipore or bidisperse models used for describing these processes. This review does not include information on low-pressure sorption measurements (BET approach) to characterize pore sizes or pore volume since this would be a review of its own. We also do not consider sorption of gas mixtures since the data base is still limited and measurement techniques are associated with large uncertainties.

Andreas Busch; Yves Gensterblum

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Coal Combustion Science  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this activity is to support the Office of Fossil Energy in executing research on coal combustion science. This activity consists of basic research on coal combustion that supports both the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Direct Utilization Advanced Research and Technology Development Program, and the International Energy Agency Coal Combustion Science Project. Specific tasks for this activity include: (1) coal devolatilization - the objective of this risk is to characterize the physical and chemical processes that constitute the early devolatilization phase of coal combustion as a function of coal type, heating rate, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxidizer concentration; (2) coal char combustion -the objective of this task is to characterize the physical and chemical processes involved during coal char combustion as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, and gas phase temperature and oxygen concentration; (3) fate of mineral matter during coal combustion - the objective of this task is to establish a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms and rates of transformation, fragmentation, and deposition of mineral matter in coal combustion environments as a function of coal type, particle size and temperature, the initial forms and distribution of mineral species in the unreacted coal, and the local gas temperature and composition.

Hardesty, D.R. (ed.); Fletcher, T.H.; Hurt, R.H.; Baxter, L.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The ENCOAL Mild Coal Gasification Project, A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report is a post-project assessment of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Mild Coal Gasification Project, which was selected under Round III of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program. The CCT Demonstration Program is a government and industry cofunded technology development effort to demonstrate a new generation of innovative coal utilization processes in a series of commercial-scale facilities. The ENCOAL{reg_sign} Corporation, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Bluegrass Coal Development Company (formerly SMC Mining Company), which is a subsidiary of Ziegler Coal Holding Company, submitted an application to the DOE in August 1989, soliciting joint funding of the project in the third round of the CCT Program. The project was selected by DOE in December 1989, and the Cooperative Agreement (CA) was approved in September 1990. Construction, commissioning, and start-up of the ENCOAL{reg_sign} mild coal gasification facility was completed in June 1992. In October 1994, ENCOAL{reg_sign} was granted a two-year extension of the CA with the DOE, that carried through to September 17, 1996. ENCOAL{reg_sign} was then granted a six-month, no-cost extension through March 17, 1997. Overall, DOE provided 50 percent of the total project cost of $90,664,000. ENCOAL{reg_sign} operated the 1,000-ton-per-day mild gasification demonstration plant at Triton Coal Company's Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming, for over four years. The process, using Liquids From Coal (LFC{trademark}) technology originally developed by SMC Mining Company and SGI International, utilizes low-sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) coal to produce two new fuels, Process-Derived Fuel (PDF{trademark}) and Coal-Derived Liquids (CDL{trademark}). The products, as alternative fuel sources, are capable of significantly lowering current sulfur emissions at industrial and utility boiler sites throughout the nation thus reducing pollutants causing acid rain. In support of this overall objective, the following goals were established for the ENCOAL{reg_sign} Project: Provide sufficient quantity of products for full-scale test burns; Develop data for the design of future commercial plants; Demonstrate plant and process performance; Provide capital and O&M cost data; and Support future LFC{trademark} technology licensing efforts. Each of these goals has been met and exceeded. The plant has been in operation for nearly 5 years, during which the LFC{trademark} process has been demonstrated and refined. Fuels were made, successfully burned, and a commercial-scale plant is now under contract for design and construction.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2002-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

459

Coal gasification: Belgian first  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... hope for Europe's coal production came with the announcement this month that the first gasification of coal at depths of nearly 1,000 metres would take place this May in ... of energy.

Jasper Becker

1982-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

460

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention deals with the solubilization of coal using species of Streptomyces. Also disclosed is an extracellular component from a species of Streptomyces, said component being able to solubilize coal.

Strandberg, Gerald W. (Farragut, TN); Lewis, Susan N. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z