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1

DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlV  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AUIJ) u.s. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlV IINATION RECIPIENT:Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority PROJECT TITl.E: SunShot New England ...

2

WW and WZ production at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

Lipeles, Elliot; /UC, San Diego

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ? e?jj production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings are presented from a study of WW/WZ? e?jj events produced in pp¯ collisions at s?=1.8?TeV. Results from the analysis of data collected using the DØ detector during the 1993–1995 Tevatron collider run...

Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

4

Jet Vetoes Interfering with H->WW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Far off-shell Higgs production in $H \\rightarrow WW,ZZ$, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements require an understanding of the cross section in the far off-shell region in the presence of realistic experimental cuts. We analytically study the effect of a $p_T$ jet veto on far off-shell cross sections, including signal-background interference, by utilizing hard functions in the soft collinear effective theory that are differential in the decay products of the $W/Z$. Summing large logarithms of $\\sqrt{\\hat s}/p_T^{veto}$, we find that the jet veto induces a strong dependence on the partonic centre of mass energy, $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$, and modifies distributions in $\\sqrt{\\hat s}$ or $M_T$. The example of $gg\\rightarrow H \\rightarrow WW$ is used to demonstrate these effects at next to leading log order. We also discuss the importance of jet vetoes and jet binning for the recent program to extract Higgs couplings and widths from far off-shell cross sections.

Ian Moult; Iain W. Stewart

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

WW Production at the LHC in NLO Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WW production via leptonic decay is studied using next-to-leading order generators. The output from the Baur, Han and Ohnemus (BHO) NLO code is compared with MC-NLO generator.

Vranjes, N.; Simic, Lj.; Reljic, D.; Vudragovic, D.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

6

International civil air transport : transition following WW II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International air transport, like many 20th Century marvels which are taken so much for granted today, broke out from its cocoon, so to speak, shortly after the end of World War II (WW II), took wing, and soared. Theretofore, ...

Pogue, L. Welch

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Effects of the Noncommutative Standard Model in WW Scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine W pair production in the Noncommutative Standard Model constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. Consideration of partial wave unitarity in the reactions WW {yields} WW and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} WW shows that the latter process is more sensitive and that tree-level unitarity is violated when scattering energies are of order a TeV and the noncommutative scale is below about a TeV. We find that WW production at the LHC is not sensitive to scales above the unitarity bounds. WW production in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, however, provides a good probe of such effects with noncommutative scales below 300-400 GeV being excluded at LEP-II, and the ILC being sensitive to scales up to 10-20 TeV. In addition, we find that the ability to measure the helicity states of the final state W bosons at the ILC provides a diagnostic tool to determine and disentangle the different possible noncommutative contributions.

Conley, John A.; Hewett, JoAnne L.

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Mini-talk slides and plots WW analysis using the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jet energy scale 2Loose lepton ID 2Tight lepton ID (%)Source #12;Result WW=24.2±6.9stat5.2 -5.7 syst±1 2PDF 7ISR/FSR 2Loose lepton ID 2Tight lepton ID (%)Source 39Fake +100 -76 Drell-Yan 20Diboson MC 10

Fermilab

9

Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing Tungsten Dimer CpW(CO)2(IMe)2. Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing...

10

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully leptonic WW decay channel at CMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Search for the Higgs Boson in the WW Decay Channel . . .

LeBourgeois, Matthew; LeBourgeois, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully leptonic WW decay channel at CMS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to W?W? is presented. Data is taken from pp collisions with center of mass energy sqrt(s)… (more)

LeBourgeois, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Using Random Forests to Classify W+W- and ttbar Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out an exercise in the classification of W+W- and ttbar events as produced in a high-energy proton-proton collider, motivated in part by the current tension between the measured and predicted values of the WW cross section. The performance of the random forest classifier surpasses that of a standard cut-based analysis. Furthermore, the distortion of the distributions of key kinematic event features is relatively slight, suggesting that systematic uncertainties due to modeling might be reduced. Finally, our random forest can tolerate missing features such as missing transverse energy without a severe degradation of its performance.

J. Lovelace Rainbolt; Thoth Gunter; Michael Schmitt

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

13

Search for WW and WZ production in lepton plus jets final state at CDF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for WW and WZ production in final states that contain a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least two jets, produced in ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, using data corresponding ...

Xie, Si

14

Testing simplified protein models of the hPin1 WW domain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The WW domain of the human Pin1 protein for its simple topology and the large amount of experimental data is an ideal candidate to assess theoretical approaches to protein folding. The purpose of the present work is to compare the reliability of the chemically-based Sorenson/Head-Gordon (SHG) model and a standard native centric model in reproducing through molecular dynamics simulations some of the well known features of the folding transition of this small domain. Our results show that the G\\={o} model correctly reproduces the cooperative, two-state, folding mechanism of the WW-domain, while the SHG model predicts a transition occurring in two stages: a collapse followed by a structural rearrangement. The lack of a cooperative folding in the SHG simulations appears to be related to the non-funnel shape of the energy landscape featuring a partitioning of the native valley in sub-basins corresponding to different chain chiralities. However the SHG approach remains more reliable in estimating the $\\Phi$-values with respect to G\\={o}-like description. This may suggest that the WW-domain folding process is stirred by energetic and topological factors as well, and it highlights the better suitability of chemically-based models in simulating mutations.

Fabio Cecconi; Carlo Guardiani; Roberto Livi

2006-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Search for Higgs Boson in $H\\rightarrow W^+W^-$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

Kevin Sung; for the CMS Collaboration

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Interconnection Effects and W+W- Decays (a critical (p)(re)view)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Color reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlations not only can have an influence on the measurement of the W-mass in the fully hadronic W+W- decay channel at LEP2, but also can give essential information on the structure of the QCD vacuum and the space-time development of a q_1\\bar q_2 system. Recent developments are critically analyzed, with particular emphasis on the models used in this field. More sensitive variables are needed to distinguish between color reconnection models, while more experimental knowledge has to be built into the Bose-Einstein models and, above all, these two closely related phenomena have to be treated in common. Both effects are determined by the space-time overlap of the W+ and W- decay products. Vital experimental information on the space-time development of the decay of the q_1\\bar q_2 system is becoming available from the high-statistics data on hadronic Z decay and models will have to be able to explain this evidence before being used to predict interference effects in hadronic W+W- decay.

Wolfram Kittel

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

17

Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson in H to WW Channel at CDF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for standard model Higgs boson to WW(*) production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final states in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 4.8/fb of integrated luminosity. To maximize sensitivity, the multivariate discriminants used to separate signal from background in the opposite-sign dilepton event sample are independently optimized for final states with zero, one, or two or more identified jets. All significant Higgs boson production modes (gluon fusion, associated production with either a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion) are considered in determining potential signal contributions. We also incorporate a separate analysis of the same-sign dilepton event sample which potentially contains additional signal events originating from associated Higgs boson production mechanisms. Cross section limits relative to the combined SM predictions are presented for a range of Higgs boson mass hypotheses between 110 and 200 GeV/c^2.

J. Pursley; for the CDF Collaboration

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

18

Combination of Tevatron Searches for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the W(+)W(?) Decay Mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W(+)W(?). The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Moulik, Tania; Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Discovery of blue companions to two southern Cepheids: WW Car and FN Vel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A large number of high-dispersion spectra of classical Cepheids were obtained in the region of the CaII H+K spectral lines. The analysis of these spectra allowed us to detect the presence of a strong Balmer line, H$\\epsilon$, for several Cepheids, interpreted as the signature of a blue companion: the presence of a sufficiently bright blue companion to the Cepheid results in a discernible strengthening of the CaII H + Hepsilon line relative to the CaII K line. We investigated 103 Cepheids, including those with known hot companions (B5-B6 main-sequence stars) in order to test the method. We could confirm the presence of a companion to WW Car and FN Vel (the existence of the former was only suspected before) and we found that these companions are blue hot stars. The method remains efficient when the orbital velocity changes in a binary system cannot be revealed and other methods of binarity detection are not efficient.

Kovtyukh, V; Chekhonadskikh, F; Lemasle, B; Belik, S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measurement of the $WW+WZ$ Production Cross Section Using a Matrix Element Technique in Lepton + Jets Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section observed in a final state consisting of an identified electron or muon, two jets, and missing transverse energy. The measurement is carried out in a data sample corresponding to up to 4.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. Matrix element calculations are used to separate the diboson signal from the large backgrounds. The WW + WZ cross section is measured to be 17.4 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with standard model predictions. A fit to the dijet invariant mass spectrum yields a compatible cross section measurement.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERG¥ EERE rROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT :University of Delaware STATE: DE PROJECT TITLE: Wind Turbine Infrastructure for Green Energy and Research on Wind Power in DE Funding Opportunity...

23

Search for Resonant WW and WZ Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We search for resonant WW or WZ production by using up to 5.4 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass by using the sequential standard model W' boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude a sequential standard model W' boson in the mass range 180–690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300–754 GeV at 95% C.L.

Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW?l?jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW?l?jj channel in 1.04 fb?¹ of pp collision data at ?s=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeVH=400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H?WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, D.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernardet, K.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

FUNDED PhD Studentship,Queen'sUniversityBelfast(HOME/EUSTUDENTS) TITLE: The Social Relationsof `Feedingthe Nation'in the UK During WW2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

`Feedingthe Nation'in the UK During WW2 FOR DETAILS SEE: http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools nation'wascirculatedby war-time government. Here,farmersgave updecision-makingandwere forcedtotake encouragedtothinkimaginativelyabouttheirresearchdesign.There isthe potential for qualitativedatagatheringtobe situatedwithinthe availablestatistical

Paxton, Anthony T.

26

Search for the Higgs boson in the H ? WW ? ?vjj decay channel at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW???jj channel using 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the ...

Taylor, Frank E.

27

Search for the Higgs boson in H -> WW(*) decays in p(p)over-bar collisions at root(s)=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in H -> WW(*) decays with e(+)e(-), e(+/-)mu(-/+), and mu(+)mu(-) final states in p (p) over bar collisions at a center-of-mass-energy of root s = 1.96 TeV. The data, collected from April 2002...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Resonant Higgs boson pair production in the $hh\\rightarrow b\\bar{b} \\; WW \\rightarrow b\\bar{b} \\ell^+ \  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adding a scalar singlet provides one of the simplest extensions of the Standard Model. In this work we briefly review the latest constraints on the mass and mixing of the new Higgs boson and study its production and decay at the LHC. We mainly focus on double Higgs production in the $hh \\rightarrow b \\bar{b} WW \\rightarrow b \\bar{b} \\ell^+ \

Martin-Lozano, Victor; Park, Chan Beom

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Search for new phenomena in the WW??????? final state in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Letter reports a search for a heavy particle that decays to WW using events produced in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of ...

Taylor, Frank E.

30

$W^{+}W^{-}$ production and triple gauge boson couplings at LEP energies up to 183 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of W-pair production in e+e- annihilations at Lep2 is presented, based on 877 W+W- candidates corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 57 pb-1 at sqrt(s) = 183 GeV. Assuming that the angular distributions of the W-pair production and decay, as well as their branching fractions, are described by the Standard Model, the W-pair production cross-section is measured to be 15.43 +- 0.61 (stat.) +- 0.26 (syst.) pb. Assuming lepton universality and combining with our results from lower centre-of-mass energies, the W branching fraction to hadrons is determined to be 67.9 +- 1.2 (stat.) +- 0.5 (syst.)%. The number of W-pair candidates and the angular distributions for each final state (qqlnu,qqqq,lnulnu) are used to determine the triple gauge boson couplings. After combining these values with our results from lower centre-of-mass energies we obtain D(kappa_g)=0.11+0.52-0.37, D(g^z_1)=0.01+0.13-0.12 and lambda=-0.10+0.13-0.12, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties and each co...

Abbiendi, G; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hobson, P R; Hoch, M; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Polok, J; Przybycien, M B; Rembser, C; Rick, Hartmut; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Colour reconnection in $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=189-209 GeV$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of the final state interaction phenomenon known as colour reconnection are investigated at centre-of-mass energies in the range $\\sqrt{s}~ 189-209 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Colour reconnection is expected to affect observables based on charged particles in hadronic decays of W+W-. Measurements of inclusive charged particle multiplicities, and of their angular distribution with respect to the four jet axes of the events, are used to test models of colour reconnection. The data are found to exclude extreme scenarios of the Sjostrand-Khoze Type I (SK-I) model and are compatible with other models, both with and without colour reconnection effects. In the context of the SK-I model, the best agreement with data is obtained for a reconnection probability of 37%. Assuming no colour reconnection, the charged particle multiplicity in hadronically decaying W bosons is measured to be (nqqch) = 19.38+-0.05(stat.)+-0.08 (syst.).

Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, Dean A; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Von, J H; Krogh, A; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J A; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

First Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Using the Semileptonic Decay Channel: H --> WW --> mu bar nu jj  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation presents the first search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in decay topologies containing a muon, an imbalance in transverse momentum (E{sub T}) and jets, using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1} recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primary to contributions from Higgs bosons produced through gluon fusion, with subsequent decay H {yields} WW {yields} {mu}{nu}jj where W represents a real or virtual W boson. In the absence of signal, limits are set at 95% confidence on the production and decay of the standard model Higgs boson for M{sub H} in the range of 115-200 GeV. For M{sub H} = 165 GeV, the observed and expected limits are factors of 11.2 larger than the standard model value. Combining this channel with e{nu}jj final states and including earlier data to increase the integrated luminosity to 5.4 fb{sup -1} produces observed(expected) limits of 5.5(3.8) times the standard model value.

Zelitch, Shannon Maura; /Virginia U.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Search for resonant WW and WZ production in ppbar collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard model of particle physics is expected to be a low energy effective theory valid for particle interactions below the TeV scale. Above this scale, extensions to the standard model (SM) augment the existing particle content, leading to enhanced production of many final states at colliders. Specifically, the production and decay of massive charged or neutral particles can produce an excess of W boson pairs for neutral particles or W and Z boson pairs for charged particles. We search for resonant WW or WZ production using up to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass using the sequential standard model (SSM) W{prime} boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude an SSM W{prime} boson in the mass range 180-690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300-754 GeV at 95% CL.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Determination of the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states in the mass range above the $2m_Z$ and $2m_W$ thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents a determination of the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the $ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell2\

ATLAS Collaboration

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Determination of the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the $ZZ$ and $WW$ final states in the mass range above the $2m_Z$ and $2m_W$ thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents a determination of the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the $ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell2\

Aad, Georges; ATLAS Collaboration; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW->lnujj decay channel at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lnujj channel using 4.7 fb^-1 of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson candidates produced in association with zero, one or two jets are included in the analysis to maximize the acceptance for both gluon fusion and weak boson fusion Higgs boson production processes. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 300 GeV WW produced in association with zero or one jet is 2.2 pb (1.9 pb), corresponding to 1.9 (1.6) times the Standard Model prediction. In the Higgs boson plus two jets channel, which is more sensitive to the weak boson fusion process, the observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H->WW production with mH = 400 GeV is 0.7 pb (0.6 pb), corresponding to 7.9 (6.5) times the Standard Model prediction.

ATLAS Collaboration

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

W-W  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCTTO:

39

A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, {mu}) and two neutrino final state in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb{sup -1}. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 {+-} 41 background events and 7.8 {+-} 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c{sup 2} at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3} with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c{sup 2} to 200GeV/c{sup 2} are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (E{sub T}) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ {yields} ll{nu}{nu} channel is 1.2{sigma}. It adds extra significance to the ZZ {yields} 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 {sigma} significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

Hsu, Shih-Chieh; /UC, San Diego

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW(*)->lvlv decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lvlv channel (l=e/mu) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110Higgs boson with a mass 145

ATLAS Collaboration

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of ww + wz production cross section and study of the dijet mass spectrum in the lnu + jets final state at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the measurement of the WW and WZ production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, in a final state consisting of an electron or muon, neutrino and jets. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider and correspond to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The analysis uses a fit to the dijet mass distribution to extract the diboson contribution. We observe 1582 {+-} 275(stat.) {+-} 107(syst.) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section of {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} = 18.1 {+-} 3.3(stat.) {+-} 2.5(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 15.9 {+-} 0.9 pb. The best fit to the dijet mass of the known components shows a good agreement with the data except for the [120, 160] GeV/c{sup 2} mass range, where an excess is observed. We perform detailed checks of our background model and study the significance of the excess, assuming an additional gaussian component with a width compatible with the expected dijet mass resolution. A standard {Delta}{sub {chi}}{sup 2} test of the presence of the additional component, returns a p-value of 4.2 x 10{sup -4} when standard sources of systematics are considered, corresponding to a significance of 3.3{sigma}.

Cavaliere, Viviana; /Siena U.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Search for a Standard Model Higgs Boson in CMS via Vector Boson Fusion in the H->WW->l?l?Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the potential for discovering the Standard Model Higgs boson produced by the vector-boson fusion mechanism. We considered the decay of Higgs bosons into the W+W- final state, with both W-bosons subsequently decaying leptonically. The main background is ttbar with one or more jets produced. This study is based on a full simulation of the CMS detector, and up-to-date reconstruction codes. The result is that a signal of 5 sigma significance can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 12-72 1/fb for Higgs boson masses between 130-200 GeV. In addition, the major background can be measured directly to 7% from the data with an integrated luminosity of 30 1/fb. In this study, we also suggested a method to obtain information in Higgs mass using the transverse mass distributions.

E. Yazgan; J. Damgov; N. Akchurin; V. Genchev; D. Green; S. Kunori; M. Schmitt; W. Wu; M. T. Zeyrek

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

43

W{gamma} Production and Limits on Anomalous WW{gamma} Couplings in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W({yields}l{nu})+{gamma} production in e{gamma} and {mu}{gamma} final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp{yields}W{gamma}+X{yields}l{nu}{gamma}+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW{gamma} couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4<{Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}<}0.4 and -0.08<{lambda}{sub {gamma}<}0.07 at the 95% C.L.

Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Jayasinghe, A.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Svoisky, P. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. K. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M.; Bazterra, V. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

44

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ channel (l=e/?) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110 GeV

Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Akiyama, A.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amorós, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Aubert, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bahinipati, S.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, M. D.; Baker, S.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barashkou, A.; Barbaro Galtieri, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blazek, T.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. B.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Böser, S.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bona, M.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Booth, C. N.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Brown, H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Search for a Standard Model-like Higgs boson decaying into WW to l nu qqbar in exclusive jet bins in pp collisions at sqrt s = 8 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for a Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into the WW final state is performed with an integrated luminosity of up to 19.3~${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$~=~8~TeV in the high mass region $600 < m_{\\rm H} < 1000$~GeV.

CMS Collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Study of the Higgs boson decaying to $WW^*$ produced in association with a weak boson with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The search for Higgs boson production in association with a $W$ or a $Z$ boson, in the decay channel $H \\to WW^*$, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7~{\\rm TeV}$ and $8~{\\rm TeV}$, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, respectively. The $WH$ production mode is studied in three and two lepton final states, while a four lepton final state is used to search for $ZH$ production. The observed significance is of 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected for a Standard Model Higgs boson. The ratio of the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, $\\mu_{\\rm VH}$, is found to be $\\mu_{\\rm VH} =3.0^{+1.3}_{-1.1}{\\, {(\\rm stat.)}}^{+1.0}_{-0.7}{\\,{(\\rm sys.)}}$ for a Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The $WH$ and $ZH$ channels are also combined with the gluon-gluon fusion and vector boson fusion ...

The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RECIPIENT: Escambia County PROJEL""T TITLE: Road Prison Geolhennal Earth Coupled HVAC Upgrade Page 1 of2 STATE : FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement...

48

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSIS (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

49

U.S. DEPAR T.MENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such...

50

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H{yields}WW{yields}l{nu}jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H{yields}WW{yields}l{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}(s)=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeVWW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

Aad, G.; Ahles, F.; Beckingham, M.; Bernhard, R.; Bitenc, U.; Bruneliere, R.; Caron, S.; Christov, A.; Consorti, V.; Eckert, S.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Flechl, M.; Glatzer, J. [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i. Br. (Germany); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma (United States); Abdallah, J.; Bosman, M.; Casado, M. P.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Conidi, M. C.; Demirkoz, B. [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies and Departament de Fisica de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H to WW to l nu jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeV < m{sub H} < 600 GeV. The best sensitivity is reached for m{sub H} = 400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H {yields} WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

First analysis of eight Algol-type systems: V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analyzing available photometry from the Super WASP and other databases, we performed the very first light curve analysis of eight eclipsing binary systems V537 And, GS Boo, AM CrB, V1298 Her, EL Lyn, FW Per, RU Tri, and WW Tri. All of these systems were found to be detached ones of Algol-type, having the orbital periods of the order of days. 722 new times of minima for these binaries were derived and presented, trying to identify the period variations caused by the third bodies in these systems.

Zasche, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Measurement of the p - anti-p ---> W gamma + X cross section at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV and WW gamma anomalous coupling limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The WW{gamma} triple gauge boson coupling parameters are studied using p{bar p} {yields} {ell}{nu}{gamma} + X({ell} = e, {mu}) events at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the D0 detector from an integrated luminosity of 162 pb{sup -1} delivered by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The cross section times branching fraction for p{bar p} {yields} W({gamma}) + X {yields} {ell}{nu}{gamma} + X with E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 8 GeV and {Delta}R{sub {ell}{gamma}} > 0.7 is 14.8 {+-} 1.6(stat) {+-} 1.0(syst) {+-} 1.0(lum) pb. The one-dimensional 95% confidence level limits on anomalous couplings are -0.88 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.96 and -0.20 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.20.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is {sigma}{sub WW/WZ}{sup theory} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 2.09 {+-} 0.14 pb. They measured N{sub Signal} = 410 {+-} 212(stat) {+-} 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 1.47 {+-} 0.77(stat) {+-} 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be {sigma} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels consist of 4088 silicon modules, with a total of 6.3 million readout channels. The coherent and safe operation of the SCT during commissioning and subsequent operation is the essential task of the Detector Control System (DCS). The main building blocks of the DCS are the cooling system, the power supplies and the environmental system. The DCS has been initially developed for the SCT assembly phase and this system is described in the present work. Particular emphasis is given in the environmental hardware and software components, that were my major contributions. Results from the DCS testing during the assembly phase are also reported.

Sfyrla, Anna; /Geneva U.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'ElUI1INATION  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energy American Indian Policy TheCoast GuardDEPAR

56

As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r. aw wL2--\ AP_I ,, *'As

57

ffiregwrewKwWw 0nIneAntalctiGPeninsula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are support staff hired by Raytheon Cor- poration to run the station. Experimentsin sucha remote location it to Raytheon. (

Lee Jr., Richard E.

58

Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of...

59

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

o o o o Projects: Arizona California CA-173. Solar AquaDomeFrancisco, California Project Txpe: Award: SOLAR AQUADOMEOccidental, California P_roject T;:Ee: Award: SOLAR ENERGY

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

W$w 'ffi,ffiffiffiffi lJniversityof NewMexicoNROTCUnit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'''from 0700to 2100. Early check-inwill be coordinatedthroughmyself.Early check-inis highly encouraged you know what hall you will be in. A feeof $30will be assessedto your bursars account.Early check-inis

New Mexico, University of

62

AGC (Chapter 9 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-performance (CPS) Load performance can be frequency-dependent Motor speed (without a speed-drive) Electric by the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) as [1]: Balancing authority area: The collection ago by engineers at General Electric Company, led by a man named Nathan Cohn. Their solution, which

McCalley, James D.

63

Production Costing (Chapter 8 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the fuel costs necessary to run the thermal plants. A production cost program, also referred-by-hour simulation of the power system over a duration of T hours, where at each hour, The load is specified to as a production cost model, is widely used throughout the electric power industry for many purposes: Long

McCalley, James D.

64

QCD radiation effects on the H ---> WW ---> l nu l nu signal at the LHC.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-De Ridder, T. Gehrmann, E. W. N. Glover and G. Heinrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 132002 (2007) [arXiv:0707.1285 [hep-ph

Anastasiou, Charalampos; Dissertori, Gunther; Stockli, Fabian; Webber, Bryan R

65

Studying W+W- production at the Fermilab Tevatron with SHERPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The merging procedure of tree-level matrix elements with the subsequent parton shower as implemented in SHERPA will be studied for the example of W boson pair production at the Fermilab Tevatron. Comparisons with fixed order calculations at leading and next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant and with other Monte Carlo simulations validate once more the impact and the quality of the merging algorithm and its implementation.

T. Gleisberg; F. Krauss; A. Schaelicke; S. Schumann; J. Winter

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb[superscript ?1] and 19.4 fb[superscript ?1] collected with ...

Apyan, Aram

67

Interconnection phenomena in $W^+W^-$ and $t\\bar t$ events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I will attempt to survey some selected physics issues on QCD interconnection phenomena in the processes $e^+e^-\\to W^+W^-\\to$ 4 jets and $e^+e^-\\to t\\bar t \\to b W^+\\bar b W^-$. Possible consequences for LEP2 and future linear $e^+e^-$ colliders are briefly discussed.

Valery A. Khoze

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

68

The Higgs boson and the physics of $WW$ scattering before and after Higgs discovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work presents a comprehensive overview of the physics of vector boson scattering (VBS) in the dawn of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Recalled here are some of its most basic physics principles, the historical relation between vector boson scattering and the Higgs boson, then discussed is the physics of VBS processes after Higgs discovery, and the prospects for future VBS measurements at the LHC and beyond. This monograph reviews the work of many people, including previously published theoretical work as well as experimental results, but also contains a portion of original simulation-based studies that have not been published before.

Micha? Szleper

2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Hunt for the Higgs Boson: The WW lvlv Final State at the ATLAS Detector.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Electroweak symmetry breaking stands as the last sector of the standard model of particle physics to be experimentally verified. The electroweak symmetry must be broken… (more)

Walch, Shannon R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Off-Shell Scattering Amplitudes for WW Scattering and the Role of the Photon Pole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive analytic expressions for high energy $2 \\to 2$ off-shell scattering amplitudes of weak vector bosons. They are obtained from six fermion final states in processes of the type $e^+ e^- \\to \\bar\

J. Bartels; F. Schwennsen

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

71

EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQ Contract ESPC IDIQ ContractConsumerofof Energy EX33 - In the

72

Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES6FY 2011 OIG(SC)

73

Measurement of triple gauge boson couplings from $W^{+}W^{-}$ production at LEP energies up to 189 GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A measurement of triple gauge boson couplings is presented, based on W-pair data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP during 1998 at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 183 pb^-1. After combining with our previous measurements at centre-of-mass energies of 161-183 GeV we obtain k_g=0.97 +0.20 -0.16, g_1^z=0.991 +0.060 -0.057 and lambda_g=-0.110 +0.058 -0.055, where the errors include both statistical and systematic uncertainties and each coupling is determined by setting the other two couplings to their SM values. These results are consistent with the Standard Model expectations.

Abbiendi, G; Ainsley, C; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anderson, K J; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Baumann, S; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Böhme, J; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Bright-Thomas, P G; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Cammin, J; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Cohen, I; Cooke, O C; Couchman, J; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E; Dervan, P J; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Estabrooks, P G; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanti, M; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Grandi, C; Graham, K; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauke, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Jawahery, A; Jeremie, H; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J I; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kowalewski, R V; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; List, B; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W F; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Rick, Hartmut; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Sproston, M; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Stumpf, L; Surrow, B; Talbot, S D; Tarem, S; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Toya, D; Trefzger, T M; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Vachon, B; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; White, J S; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

Xie, Si

76

Edge-reinforced random walk on a ladder 1 2 Franz Merkl 3 Silke W.W. Rolles 4 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

walk, recurrence, random environment, Gibbs measure, transfer operator. 3 Mathematical Institute] in the special case of reversible chains. The distribution of the environment is given by a joint density which of the ladder as a random walk in a random environment. This environment is given by a marginal of a multi

Bielefeld, University of

77

6 References Allen, D. B, B. J. Flatter, and K. Fite. 1996. Redband Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1990. Status and Distribu Symposium of the Northern Wild Sheep Council. Clarkston, WA. p. 12's State of Idaho Bull Trout Conservation Plan. Bo ID. Bethesda, MD. Control-Region Sequence Data Society Special Publications, pp. 83- 138. . In: roject No. 2055). Volume 3. Prepared for Idaho Power

78

Analytical Biochemistry 267,125-134 (1999) Article ID abio.1998.3003, available online at http&ww.idealibrary.com on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Biochemistry 267,125-134 (1999) Article ID abio.1998.3003, available online at http; FAB, fast atom bombardment; MALDI, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization; ESI, electros- pray

Vertes, Akos

79

First Study of the Radiation-Amplitude Zero in W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings at s?=1.96??TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from a study of pp-bar?W?+X events utilizing data corresponding to 0.7??fb(?1) of integrated luminosity at s?=1.96??TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set limits on ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

A study of the standard model Higgs, WW and ZZ production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final state at CDF Run II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lepton id scale factor ? vtx is 0.9555 ± 0.0004(stat) ±id scale factor (see below), • ? vtx is 0.9555 ± 0.0004(stat)

Hsu, Shih-Chieh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

[MRO] Search for resonant diboson production in the WW/WZ???jj decay channels with the ATLAS detector at ?s=7??TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for resonant diboson production using a data sample corresponding to 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV ...

Taylor, Frank E.

82

Measurement of the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This poster is focused on the indirect measurement of the Higgs boson width through the constraints on the off-shell Higgs coupling in the high mass region using the H->4l decay channel. The production cross section for the off-shell Higgs boson with decay into vector bosons is proportional to the product of the couplings squared for production and decay. Unlike the on-shell cross section, this observable is independent of the total Higgs width. Therefore, the ratio of the on and off-shell couplings provides an indirect measurement on the total Higgs width. Two different versions of the posters (CONF note and paper results) are provided.

Calandri, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

iinn FFooccuussFF AA LL LL // WW II NN TT EE RR 22 00 00 66 14 A Year in the life of your DAUR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, was akin to the impact of the invention of electricity. The industry is caught in a chaotic scramble to keep up with new consumption preferences and practices, adjusting to the "technological shock with its socializing rituals and industrial organization, served its historical milieu. The recent

Barthelat, Francois

84

A spark chamber for cosmic ray research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subjects Physics LGH CG dtiZ G P, y &pproved as to sty ie and con+en i. by: eac o F Depa tment Member ember August, 196I+ ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author is greatly indebted to professor N. M. Duller, at whose suggestion the work for this thesis...

Jelinek, Al Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

An ecological study of the Gulf Menhaden (Brevoortia patronus) in a low salinity estuary in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Depar tment Member (Member DECEMBER 1970 ABSTRACT An Ecological Study of the Gulf Mhd(B t'a~t)5aL* Salinity Estuary in Texas. (December, 1970) Hoyt W. Holcomb, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. R. J. Baldauf An ecological...

Holcomb, Hoyt West

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in p anti-p Interactions with the Decay Mode H --> W+W- --> mu+nu mu-anti-nu at the D0 Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for the standard model Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions resulting in two muons and large missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected between April 2002 and December 2008 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant excess above the background estimation is observed and limits are derived on Higgs boson production.

Johnston, Dale Morgan; /Nebraska U.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Measurement of W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous WWZ and WW? couplings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a measurement of the W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production cross section in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The leptonic decay channels are analyzed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity ...

Taylor, Frank E.

89

How We Achieved a 41% Energy Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this pape~. Abbott Labo~ato~ies is a wo~ldwide health ca~e company with 1984 sales in excess of $3.1 billion. Abbott employs some 34,000 people in 28 domestic and 44 inte~ational locations. ou~ ene~gy conse~vation p~og~am was sta~ted in 1973 du...~ing the A~ab oil emba~go, but the ene~gy conse~vation depa~tment was not fo~ed until 1977. This depa~tment consists of myself, 2 enginee~s, and a sec~eta~y, and we a~e the only people in the company devoting full time to ene~gy conse~vation. Each plant...

Maze, M. E.

90

The effect of osmotic shock on purine base transport in Neurospora crassa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OP OSMOTIC SHOCK ON PURINE BASE TRANSPORT IN NEUROSPORA CRASSA A Thesis by James Hubert Thomas Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... tment) December 1977 ABSTRACT The Effect of Osmotic Shock on Purine Base Transport i ~N . (D |, 1977) James Hubert Thomas, B, S. , University of Texas Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Jane M. Magill The transport of adenine was found...

Thomas, James Hubert

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Biochemical changes in speckled trout (Cynoscion nebulosus) preserved with ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOCHEMICAL CHANGES IN SPECKLED TROUT (CYNOSCION NEBULOSUS) PRESERVED WITH ICE A Thesis by JAMES DONALD GLOVER Approved as to style and content by: (C irman of Committee) emb ) (Head of Depa tment) (Member ) August 1970 ABSTRACT... Biochemical Changes in Speckled Trout (Cynoscion Nebulosus) Preserved with Ice. (August 1970) James Donald Glover, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Bryant F. Cobb III One hundred-sixty speckled trout were purchased from retail fish markets...

Glover, James Donald

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A morals clarification module: guidelines for teacher education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1976 Major Sub)ect; Educational Curriculum and Instruction A MORALS CLARIFICATION MODULE: GUIDELINES FOR TEACHER EDUCATION A Thesis by JANICE MARIE JOHNSTON Approved as to style and content by; (Chairman of ittee) (Head f Depa tment) (Member... Table 14 Confrontation //8 Table 15 Confrontation //9 Table 16 Confrontation //10 105 106 107 108 109 110 112 113 114 Appendix E Instructions for Group Discussion on "Confrontations and Choices" 115 Vita 116 CHAPTER I A STATE OF MORAL...

Johnston, Janice Marie

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani in greenhouse bedding plant production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Comm!ttee) (Robert E. Pettit) (Member) (David id. Reed) (Member) "7~+ (Grant Yest) (Head of. Depart tment) Deceriber 1983 ABSTRACT Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani in greenhouse bedding plant production. IDecember 1983) John... iviichael Brown B. S, East Texas State University. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr . A . E . Nightingale . Isolates of Trichoderma harzianum, T. hamatum, and Gliocladium spp. capable of inhibiting the growth of Rhizoctonia solani, which may cause...

Brown, John Michael

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Flue Gas Conditioning to Reduce Particulate Emissions in Industrial Coal-Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....'::::;::::::: Il-~:!=;~:o:oo:t(.~ _.;:::::=:;:::::.":':::"':'::':":::":::.lIoo:...:...:_:?.:""'.:::::::::::::::::::;::~ . ??:.:?????????????::: Precipitator :.- .......?......... ~ ........ . ... :.:.:.:. ..:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.. ? ? ? ? ......w.;."w,1o&.I1.&r...

Miller, B.; Keon, E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Lepton + Missing Transverse Energy + Jets Final State in ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H \\rightarrow WW \\rightarrow l{\

Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

An investigation of rainfall characteristics and patterns in the Mekong Delta of Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'k%***'Aeee**ee***IHt*ee* * * * 37 98 15 * 150 PERCENT TIME BOTH HAD SAME AMTS 0. 69 Bl 14. 553 B5 ~ 53. 573 B9 = 0. 900 CI = 0. 432 40 1. 0 C 0 . 8 T . 7 I N G N C Y Month: JULY I N D E 2 X . 1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 120 130 140 Distance... of Commit e) (Head of D p tment) (Member) (Member) ABSTRACT An Investigation of Rainfall Characteristics and Patterns in the Mekong Delta of Southeast Asia (August 1972) Frank J. Klein, Jr. , B. B. A. , St. Mary's University Directed by: Professor...

Klein, Frank J

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

The effect of adding axial freedom to the blades of a two bladed helicopter rotor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cire used on the rotor, the link nas all the blades attacned to it, and tne "teeter-totter" nin!;e rr&rst be excnanSe&! for a univ& rsal point, preferably of tne con: t-rrrt velocitv tyi e. Tne a?de&& blades snoula rrnve a stabilizin;, . irif i...THE Epr'ECT OZ ADDIRQ AX' AL RREEDO?l TO THE Bl ADRS QF A TWO BLADED HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis Frank Robert Oradat, Jr. Approveo as to style and content by: (Cnair. san of Co xttee) (liead of Dep tment) May I955 THE EPPECT OP ADDING AXIAL...

Oradat, Frank Robert

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

A comparison of Tennessee Williams' Summer and smoke and The eccentricities of a nightingale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of MASTER OF ARTS May 197B Major Subject: English A COMPARISON OF TENNESSEE WILLIAMS' SUMMER AND SMOKE AND THE ECCENTRICITIES OF A NIGHTINGALE A Thesi s by SHIRLEY LOIS BOYD Approved as to style and content by: g'~t. &i7 'i IL. Chairman of Commi... tte j H ad o Depar tment Member Member May 1978 442842 ABSTRACT A Comparison of Tennessee Williensf Summer and Smoke d 7' E t ' t' f ~N' tt' 1 (N 7 19791 S hi rl ey Loi s Boyd, B. S. N. 7 Mary ? Hardin-Baylor College; Chairman of Advi sory...

Boyd, Shirley Lois

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hot gas path analysis and data evaluation of the performance parameters of a gas turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HOT GAS PATH ANALYSIS AND DATA EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF A GAS TURBINE A Thesis by DAVID AI, LEN HANAWA Approved as to style and content by: PfnA J 7 EY3 .j (Chairman... of -Committee) zr (Head of Depai'tment) Member) /i ~E" Egg(JQJ a g i (Member) (Member) December l974 ABSTRACT Ho Gas Path Ana'ysis and Data Evaluation o. the Performance Parameters of a Gas Turbine (December 1974) David Allen Hanawa, B. S. , Texas A...

Hanawa, David Allen

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A comparison of two variables in relaxation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON OF TWO VARIABLES IN RELAXATION A Thesis by PAUL EDWIN TURNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Major Subject...: Psychology A COMPARiSON OF TWO VARIABLES IN RELAXATION A Thesis by PAUL EDWIN TURNER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committ Head of Dep tment Member ?2 J L, ~Xi~ Member M-. ~~2 y May 1974 ABSTRACT A Comparison of Two Variable...

Turner, Paul Edwin

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

A study of the design criteria for drilled-and-belled footings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRILLED?AND-BELLED FOOTINGS A Thesis Clark Thomas Lehmann Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1964... Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY OF THE DESIGN CRITERIA FOR DRILLED-AND-BELLED FOOTINGS A Thesis By Clark Thomas Lehmann Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommittee Head ep tment Nay, 1964 4 0 0 N F 5 O ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

Lehmann, Clark Thomas

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effects of dietary silicon on bone characteristics of poultry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF D ETARY SILICON GN BONE CNARACTERISTICS OF POULTRY A Thesis James Edward Plyler Submitted. to tl. e Graduate College ot Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1977... Major Subject. : Poultry Science L'FFECT OF DI TARY. SILICON QN BONE CEARACTER1STICS OF POULTPY A Thesis James Edward Plyier Approued as to style and content by. (Chairman of omm' tee) (Head of Dep tment) (Mem e ) (Mem. er ) gC~ r? (Membe...

Plyler, James Edward

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ex-vessel demand by size for the Gulf shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR THE GULF SHRIMP A Thesis by MARGARET RAM-TOO CHUI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major... Subject: Agricultural Economics EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR SHRIMP IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by MARGARET KAM-TOO CHUI Approved as to style and content by: ai an of Committee) (Hea f ep tment) (Member) (Member) August 1980 ABSTRACT Ex...

Chui, Margaret Kam-Too

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A real-time airborne scatterometer data processor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Electrical Fngineering A REAL-TIME AIRBORNE SCATTEROMETER DATA PROCESSOR A Thesis by Gary James Reisor Approved as to style and content by: arrman o Committee Hea o Depa tment em er Mem er August 1976 ABSTRACT A Real-time Airborne...b. Read-Only Memory Uni. 't. III-10a, RAM Unit Block Diagram III-10b. ROM Unit Block Diagram IV-1. Asynch I/O Unit Block Diagram 48 50 50 55 IV-2. Asynchronous Data Requires Start and Stop Bits. 56 IV-3. Format and Status Port Bit...

Reisor, Gary James

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Diboson Production at D0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present recent diboson production measurements from the D0 experiment at Fermilab's Tevatron collider. The production of ZZ was observed using leptonic final states. Z{gamma} {yields} vv{gamma} was observed and used to set the most stringent limits from a hadron collider on anomalous Z{gamma}{gamma} and ZZ{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings (TGCs). WW events with leptonic final states and WW + WZ events with semi-leptonic final states were used to set limits on anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} TGCs. Finally, limits on anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} TGCs were obtained from a combination of the fully-leptonic W{gamma}, WW, and WZ channels and the semi-leptonic WW and WZ channels, giving the most stringent limits from a hadron collider.

Haley, Joseph; /Princeton U.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

c3fa52728ece 9. Sustainable cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.co.uk/energy/ cos0 QQ Lamberts Law This requires cos(), ww.brighton-web which in turn is de- pendent on location.co.uk/energy/ ii cossinsincos the azimuth angle of the plane ww.brighton-web coscoscoscos cossincossin p.co.uk/energy/ 6364.1 07995.9650572.0cos 1 AM This is due to gases and particles that absorb heat ww.brighton-web

Zevenhoven, Ron

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - antipsychotic drug treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 38 PHARMACOGENETICS OF PARKINSONISM, RIGIDITY, Summary: Fleischhacker, W.W., Meise, U., Gunther, V., and Kurz, M. (1994). Compliance with antipsychotic drug...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - antipsychotic drug ykp1358 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Idle, J.R. (1997). Antipsychotic drug-induced movement disorders... Fleischhacker, W.W., Meise, U., Gunther, V., and Kurz, M. (1994). Compliance with antipsychotic drug...

109

Analysis on the energy efficiency of variable-frequency air conditioners (Hitachi models as an example) Jim Jr-Min Lin 2014.09.26  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis on the energy efficiency of variable-frequency air conditioners (Hitachi models (Max) Energy Efficiency @min load Energy Efficiency @Max load kW kW kW kW W/W W/W RAS-22NB 1.00 3.20 0 Efficiency @min load Energy Efficiency @Max load kW kW kW kW W/W W/W RAM-5FNS(B) - 12.5 - 2.91 - 4.3 RAM-6FNS

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetylcysteine mannitol combination Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the cytoplasm. Mannitol stems were perfused with a 10% (ww) solution of ... Source: Stiller, Volker - Department of Biological Sciences, Southeastern Louisiana University...

111

Perfect single error-correcting codes in the Johnson scheme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a necessary condition for a code to be regular: Theorem 1: If C is k-regular, then 1(w, a) = 1 + w(w + a) 2w

Gordon, Dan

112

1775.ps - Optimization Online  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 8, 2011 ... ... the WW2 beginning to wind down in 1945 and demobilization taking ...... The coefficient of inclination between the reciprocal spaces P and K ...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Brian E. Riddell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Brian E. Riddell Appointed to Board: 1996:\\my documents\\ww\\isab\\riddell resume.doc (Chip Mcconnaha) #12;

114

Mechanisms for Fatigue of Micron-Scale Silicon Structural Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2003, 12, 313. 13.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2001, 10, 593. 25.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2006, 15, W.W. van

Alsem, Daan Hein; Pierron, Olivier N.; Stach, Eric A.; Muhlstein, Christopher L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Complete off-shell effects in top quark pair hadroproduction with leptonic decay at next-to-leading order  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results for next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the pp(p\\bar{p}) -> t \\bar{t} -> W^+W^- b\\bar{b} -> e^{+} \

Giuseppe Bevilacqua; Michal Czakon; Andreas van Hameren; Costas G. Papadopoulos; Malgorzata Worek

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

A study of acid sludge obtained in the refining of petroleum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the sludge with ocustio soda o soda ash, &nd the "mixing" of the neutrul- ised sludge eith fuel oil. Much i&ttentlon h s been:i eu t:& the recover" of tho sludge acid, i. nd but little cr no uttention to thc study of the orgunic c&ntent of the caid sludge... by the distill=-ties cf pe- tr)leum i. re nct in m. . rket bio c, nditi in, but recuire 'chemic:l trei tment tc remove the resinous mutters nd the hydroo; rbons cf the unssturi ted ~nd u. remi tic groups, which import s dork o&ior ~B well as an unpleusont...

Johnson, Albert Sidney

1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment of WW2 Japanese Naval Intercepts Peter W. Donovan M work in all areas, from the Japanese codes to the German Enigma machine which Alan Turing had begun of communications intelligence to the WW2 Allies in the Pacific. Alan Turing's Work on Applied Probability

Wright, Francis

118

Earth Structure Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

119

Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed evolution of Earth: from continental drift (early 1900's) to sea-floor spreading (early 1960's) to plate

120

Evaluation of antioxidative/antimicrobial potential of Oriental nutraceutical herb extracts in raw and cooked goat meat and beef products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to ground goat meat, and treated meat samples were aerobically stored at 4°C for 6 days, with or without cooking. Each herbal extract was also added to ground beef at 0.25% (w/w), with or without adding NaCl at 2% (w/w), and stored as raw and cooked patties...

Han, Jaejoon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pergamon Tetrahedron Letters 41 (2000) 15151518 TETRAHEDRON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% w/w), iPr2NH, 3­10 h, 120­140°C; (iv) TBDMS-C^CH (1.5 equiv.), Pd(PPh3)4 (10% w/w), iPr2NH, 3 h, 120

Rusell, K.C.

122

Low Temperature Performance Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0.0036 0.0038 0.004 0.0042 Inverse Temperature, 1K Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww) (BID 1935), 4.1V, 3 Sep. Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww)...

123

Helios FIB/SEM | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a... Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing Tungsten Dimer CpW(CO)2(IMe)2. The thermal W-W bond homolysis in CpW(CO)2(IMe)2 (IMe ...

124

NAME/TEAM: ______________________________________ GCMS postlab -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME/TEAM: ______________________________________ GCMS postlab - 1 GC/MS of Gasoline Postlab Last (%) (w/w) % Ethanol Benzene ________ Convert your v/v % ethanol in gasoline to units of mass % (w/w %) of oxygen in gasoline. (Density of ethanol = 0.789 g/mL, Density of gasoline = 0.66 g/mL). Use dimensional

Nizkorodov, Sergey

125

Heterogeneity of distribution for growth traits between Angus and Brahman backcross embryo transfer cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was significant for all traits and SEX was significant for all traits excluding FG. Birth year and birth season were significant effects for WW, GG, FG, and SW. Classes set according to industry standards were BW (4 kg increments), WW (50 kg increments), GG (40 kg...

Cleere, Jason James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

ATLAS Sensitivity to Anomalous WWV Couplings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the strategy in extracting information on triple gauge boson couplings in WW production and summarize the expected limits on WWV couplings from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

Simic, Lj.; Vranjes, N.; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

TABLE DR1. PARAMETER VALUES FOR MARS THERMAL EVOLUTION MODEL Property Symbol Units Value Reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Sound speed and thermophysical properties of liquid iron and nickel: Physical Review B, v. 42, p. 6485 Anderson, W.W., and Ahrens, T.J., 1994, An equation of state for liquid-iron and implications for the Earth

Nimmo, Francis

128

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sewa& i? %L ---- I------ .-LEG E? -q--irlc ozz----f B---m- @s w-5 &a< -ET;: ,--p,pII---- --m-w w--w -w--- ---t----- -- ,-z5 +i+, 7---...

129

Vortex dynamics : a window into the properties of type-II superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7] Anisotropy E?ects in Superconductors, edited by H. W.W. Weber, Ed. , High-T c Superconductors, Plenum Press, NewThe Physics of Superconductors, Vol I. , Conventional and

Taylor, Benjamin Jeremy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A's-1.x.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

either the Print“: of Ha H13, or Tycho Brahe, m" e:- leefl a: I my jelfe he've deee; and ... ww?ed, whereof that #0515 Tycho Brahe lmrh afordedgrmp. Eyapa) HM!

131

A retrospective on the LBNL PEM project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submitted to Physica Medica LBNL 56612 [6] M. Pedrali- Noy,Submitted to Physica Medica LBNL 56612 ARETROSPECTIVE ON THE LBNL PEM PROJECT J.S. Huber, W.W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

KINSHIP, MARRIAGE AND AGE IN ABORIGINAL AUSTRALIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

patterns in Aboriginal Australia: a gradient analysis ofStudies, Canberra, ACT, Australia. Denham, W.W. 2001.1988. The Tiwi of North Australia, 3rd ed. New York: Holt,

Denham, Woodrow

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

antimony 125: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Tevatron Higgs data are interpreted as constraints on an effective theory of a Higgs boson with mass close to 125 GeV. We focus on the diphoton, ZZ*, WW* channels at the LHC,...

134

anomalous scattering factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D. Mitra; D. R. Lorimer; A. G. Lyne 2001-11-08 5 Anomalous gauge couplings of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: Semileptonic mode in WW scatterings HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv)...

135

Empower Women, Save the Planet? Science, Strategy, and Population-Environment Advocacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1948. Our Plundered Planet. Boston, MA: Little, Brown andLester. 2003. Plan B: Rescuing a Planet Under Stress and aWake up Call for a Small Planet. NY: W.W. Norton & Co.

Sasser, Jade

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

None

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Kylteknik ("KYL")Kylteknik ("KYL") RefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Gas processing (O2, H2, CO2, LPG, LNG...) (3) Air conditioning, cooling towers, rg/pages/zon Air conditioning, cooling towers, food cooling and freezing (4) Heat pumps, heat pipes, special ww.sgisland.o p p

Zevenhoven, Ron

138

Higgs boson couplings to bosons with the ATLAS detector: run 1 legacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The final ATLAS measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in the decay channels $H \\rightarrow ZZ^{(*)} \\rightarrow \\ell\\ell\\ell\\ell$, $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and $H \\rightarrow WW^{(*)} \\rightarrow \\ell\

Petit, Elisabeth; The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Development of a Coordinated Database for Water Resources and Flow Model in the Paso Del Norte Watershed (Phase III) Part I Lower Rio Grande Flood Control Model [LRGFCM] RiverWare Model Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Anthony Bridge 1986-1989 (d), 1990-2000 (n), 2001-5/2005 (d) WW #32 (La Union East Lateral) 1979-1992 (d), 1993-1996 (n), 1997-1999 (d), 2000 (n) 2001-6/2003 (d) WW #23A (Texas Lateral) 1985-1992 (d), 1993-1996 (n), 1997-1999 (d), 2000 (n) 2001...-6/2003 (d) Mesquite/Anthony/East Drain 1975-1980 (m), 1981-1992 (d), 1993 (n), 1994-5/2005 (d) Rio Grande at Vinton Bridge 1985-1992 (d) WW #32B (Vinton Cutoff Lateral) 1985-1992 (d), 1993-1996 (n), 1997-2002 (d) WW #34 (Canutillo Lateral) 1983 (d), 1984...

Tillery, Sue; Sheng, Zhuping; King, J. Phillip; Creel, Bobby; Brown, Christopher; Michelsen, Ari; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Granados, Alfredo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: ??, bb, ?? , WW, and ZZ. The explored Higgs boson mass range is ...

Alver, B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Diboson cross sections at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief survey of the results on diboson production at the Tevatron is presented. Measured cross sections for W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, WW, and limits on WZ/ZZ are summarized.

Askew, A.W.; /Fermilab

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Diboson Cross Sections at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A brief survey of the results on diboson production at the Tevatron is presented. Measured cross sections for $W\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$, $WW$, and limits on WZ/ZZ are summarized.

A. W. Askew

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Order statistics inference for describing topological coupling and mechanical symmetry breaking in multidomain proteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooperativity is a hallmark of proteins, many of which show a modular architecture comprising discrete structural domains. Detecting and describing dynamic couplings between structural regions is difficult in view of the many-body nature of protein-protein interactions. By utilizing the GPU-based computational acceleration, we carried out simulations of the protein forced unfolding for the dimer WW-WW of the all-beta-sheet WW domains used as a model multidomain protein. We found that while the physically non-interacting identical protein domains (WW) show nearly symmetric mechanical properties at low tension, reflected, e.g., in the similarity of their distributions of unfolding times, these properties become distinctly different when tension is increased. Moreover, the uncorrelated unfolding transitions at a low pulling force become increasingly more correlated (dependent) at higher forces. Hence, the applied force not only breaks "the mechanical symmetry" but also couples the physically non-interacting prot...

Kononova, Olga; Barsegov, Valeri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

UNCORRECTED 2 Stochastic adaptive control model for traffic signal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCORRECTED PROOF 1 2 Stochastic adaptive control model for traffic signal systems 3 X.-H. Yu a,1 , W.W. Recker b,* 4 a Department of Electrical Engineering, California Polytechnic State University

Detwiler, Russell

145

Search for supersymmetry using a diphoton plus ETmiss final state with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV center-of-mass energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the underlying event by JIMMY [74]. Next-to-next-to-leadingµ + ? Z ? ?? + ? WW ZZ WZ t t Generator Alpgen +Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy Alpgen+Jimmy MadGraph+

Damiani, Daniel Scott

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

VP”? 5""(ZTI K)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1. Fr: 03/1“? @4112 1* 1-. (1)? Fit-L4 “Li "Par-tad of +14- ~F-ww'f-iipm. VP”? 5""(ZTI K). Sm.ij. $93.1: U) Th whd : L3)

147

Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 3, Electroweak symmetry breaking at colliding-beam facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics: Introduction to Electroweak Symmetry Breaking: Intermediate-Mass Higgs Bosons; Extended Higgs Sectors and Novel Searches; and Heavy Higgs Bosons and Strong WW Scattering.

Rogers, J. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W.W. Nazaroff, Radon in Energy-Efficient Houses, LawrenceStudies, pp. 18- 23 in Energy Efficient Buildings Program,AMD ITS DAUCHTERS IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINCS A.V. Nero,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

Overview and Progress of the Applied Battery Research (ABR) Activity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Benchmarking Materials Screening Silicon Electrodes & Binders 1.2M LiPF 6 in ECEMC + 3%(ww) FEC 0.05 to 2V Binders tested: -poly(vinylidenefluoride) (PVDF) -poyacrylic...

151

EA-1984: Disposition of Five Signature Properties at Idaho National...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of six ordnance-testing sites across the country and the only one to test the 16-inch guns used on battleships in the Pacific Fleet during WW II. Ordnance manufactured, rebuilt,...

152

Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Eric J. Loudenslager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Advisory Board: Member Resume Eric J. Loudenslager Appointed to Board: 1999:27-42. ________________________________________ c:\\my documents\\ww\\isab\\loudenslager resume.doc (Chip Mcconnaha) #12;

153

Relative Potencies and Combination Effects of Steroidal Estrogens in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

life-stages of roach, Rutilus rutilus, exposed to estrogenic effluent during the period of sexual of roach (9) and gudgeon, Gobio gobio, (10) living in UK rivers downstream of WwTW effluent discharges

Tyler, Charles

154

Invited Paper Journal of Nonlinear Optical Physics & Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

amounts (0.1% w/w) of a dichroic dye of the family of anthraquinone derivatives to a transparent NLC could, the used anthraquinone dyes are stable upon light excitation, and therefore, besides thermal effect

Marrucci, Lorenzo

155

Measurement of $W^+ W^-$ Production and Search for the Higgs Boson in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A measurement of WW production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and a search for the Higgs boson are reported. The WW candidates are selected in events with two leptons, either electrons or muons. The measurement is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The pp to WW cross section is measured to be 41.1 +/- 15.3 (stat) +/- 5.8 (syst) +/- 4.5 (lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits on WW gamma and WWZ anomalous triple gauge couplings are set. The search for the standard model Higgs boson in the WW decay mode does not reveal any evidence of excess above backgrounds. Limits are set on the production of the Higgs boson in the context of the standard model and in the presence of a sequential fourth family of fermions with high masses. In the latter context, a Higgs boson with mass between 144 and 207 GeV is ruled out at 95% confidence level.

Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for events with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

157

Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for events with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of final state interactions at the threshold of Higgs boson pair production in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model. We consider three major processes of the pair production in the model: lepton pair annihilation, ZZ fusion, and WW fusion. We find that the corrections caused by the effect for these processes are markedly different. According to our results, the effect can cause non-negligible corrections to the cross sections for lepton pair annihilation and small corrections for ZZ fusion, and this effect is negligible for WW fusion.

Zhang, Zhentao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ruling out a 4th generation using limits on hadron collider Higgs signals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the impact of a 4th generation on Higgs to $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $WW,ZZ$ signals and demonstrate that the Tevatron and LHC have essentially eliminated the possibility of a 4th generation if the Higgs is SM-like and has mass below 200 GeV. We also show that the absence of enhanced Higgs signals in current data sets in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $WW,ZZ$ final states can strongly constrain the possibility of a 4th generation in two-Higgs-doublet models of type II, including the MSSM.

John F. Gunion

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Vector Boson Fusion Higgs Production at the LHC - Mass Variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There exist substantial backgrounds to the vector boson fusion production of Higgs at the LHC. Mass variables are studied which may alleviate the need to assume a spin zero WW resonance in order to achieve a sufficient signal to noise ratio in the two jet plus two lepton and missing energy final state.

Dan Green

2005-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

UCD-2000-01 LC-TH-2000-022  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c) 1 Instytut Fizyki Teoretycznej UW, Hoza 69, Warsaw, Poland 2 Davis Institute for High Energy Physics, UC Davis, CA, USA Abstract Already in the simplest two-Higgs-doublet model with CP violationSM , and (for higher energies and heavier Higgs bosons) on the WW fusion process, e + e ! #23;#22;#23;h SM (ZZ

162

Characterization of biochars to evaluate recalcitrance and agronomic performance Akio Enders a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Biomass Black carbon Charcoal Proximate analysis Pyrolysis a b s t r a c t Biochars (n = 94) were, 1982) depend on the conditions during pyrolysis as well as the composition of the feedstock biomass from 0% to 77.4% (w/w). Greater pyrolysis temperature for low-ash biochars increased fixed carbon

Lehmann, Johannes

163

Physics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Vibrations and Waves (W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1971). First, we compute the kinetic energyPhysics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String Consider the kinetic energy and the potential energy of this string segment due to the passage of a traveling wave

California at Santa Cruz, University of

164

LAIS 498/598: Rhetoric, Energy, and Public Policy Fall 2011 Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

York, NY: W.W. Norton. · Nelson, V. (2011). Introduction to renewable energy 1 LAIS 498/598: Rhetoric, Energy, and Public Policy Fall 2011 Syllabus, and to the integrity of the democracy we create together. --College Learning in the New Global

165

This brief bibliography of resources available in the NPS Dudley Knox Library was created to support the "Open Doors: Vietnam POWs Thirty Years Later" exhibit hosted at the Naval Postgraduate School, May-June  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., et. al. P.O.W.: A Definitive History of the American Prisoner-Of-War Experience in Vietnam, 1964 House: The Last Secret of the War in Vietnam. New York: W.W. Norton, 1997. 371p. [subject: Robert Russell Garwood and Tom McKenney] DKL DS 559.4 .J474 1997 GENERAL Jorgenson, Kregg, P.J. MIA Rescue: LRRP

166

FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I Ww i 1 i FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS wcwotoias R I S 0 - M - 2 4 1 8 An analytical study of in-the fiald axparlanca of electronics reliability Tag© Elm Rise National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark February 1 0 8 4 #12;RIS�-M-2418 FIELD RELIABILITY OP ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS An analytical

167

*Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 814 863 7908; fax: +1 814 863 7304. E-mail address: blogan@psu.edu (B.E. Logan).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@psu.edu (B.E. Logan). SUPPORTING INFORMATION Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples/HBOD for the different refinery wastewater samples, with domestic wastewater (DW) as a positive control. #12;3 0 20 40 60 removal rate and removal efficiency of the refinery and domestic wastewaters (WW), the 50:50 refinery

168

Spring 2009 Syllabus for INSC201: Energy! Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-renewable and renewable energy sources by examining their production, efficiency, environmental consequences, cost-effectiveness (solar, wind), nuclear energy, and global climate change. The learning objectives of this course include or higher. Required Materials Energy, Environment, and Climate by Richard Wolfson, W.W. Norton & Co. ISBN

Baski, Alison

169

The limiting mutual diffusion coefficients of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products in near-critical hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is used to convert synthesis gas into petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. It was developed in Germany during WW 11 as an alternative fuel source during the fuel embargo and is still used as a...

Noel, James Michael

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

O.Traull CNRM/GMEI/TRAMM mai 2013 High frequency measurements over an instrumented profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(ventilated and not ventilated), relative humidity, wind speed and direction. 3. 1 minute solar radiation tower with multi levels wind sensors : sonics propellers humidity and temperature probes with radiation shielded sensors, ventilated or not Prevailing winds WW N-W guy wires SSWSSW #12;8 O.Traullé CNRM

Ribes, Aurélien

171

PARALLEL COMPUTING OF UNSATURATED SOILS USING ELEMENT-BY-ELEMENT AND DOMAIN DEOMPOSITON METHODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the processors with minimum data exchanges and load balancing. The linear system of equations was solved using and primary unknowns. The mass balance of water flow leads to the following equation: ( ) 0=+ ww wr div t n as in compacted soils used as fill material. The accurate analysis of unsaturated soils by the finite element

Augarde, Charles

172

A Brief History of Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for steam generation) · Hand crank replaced by Kettering's electric starter · Radiator allowed IC engines Have we come full circle?? #12;Eras of Transport Boats Animal drawn transport 1800s steam power Henry Ford uses mass manufacturing techniques to bring low manufacturing costs to IC Engine 1914 WW1 IC

Handy, Susan L.

173

Diboson production at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF and D{null} detectors at the Tevatron Collider are being used to measure {ital WW}, {ital WZ}, and {ital ZZ} production as well as {ital W}{sub {gamma}} and {ital Z}{sub {gamma}} production in order to study Trilinear Gauge Couplings. Improved limits on nonstandard coupling parameters are given and prospects for further improvement are discussed.

Nodulman, L.J.; CDF and D0 Collaborations

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Supplementary material (ESI) for Journal of Materials Chemistry This journal is The Royal Society of Chemistry 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.25% w/w with respect to the polymer) and 4 g of dry polymer into a recycling, co-rotating twin-screw mini-extruder (DACA Instruments), mixing for 5 min at 80 °C, and subsequent extrusion. Films

Mather, Patrick T.

175

851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washington Phil Rockefeller Washington June 4, 2013 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Tony Grover, Fish and Wildlife Division Director SUBJECT: IEAB report on Cost-Effectiveness of Fish Tagging Technologies. ________________________________________ w:\\tg\\ww\\ieab interim fish tagging report may 2013.docx #12;IEAB Independent Economic Analysis Board

176

[1] Sasha Abramsky, Breadline USA: The Hidden Scandal of American Hunger and How to Fix it, Poli-PointPress, Sausalito, California (2009).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Drug Companies: How They Deceive Us and What to Do About It, Random House, New York (2004). [14] Harvey That are Shaping Our Future, Worldwatch Institute, W.W. Norton & Company, New York 2007. [16] Svante August, Timber Wars, Common Courage Press, Monroe, Maine (1994). [27] David Barsamian, The Decline and Fall

Russo, Bernard

177

Joints and Veins Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ed) 69/12/2010 Ideal joint structure (a) Block diagram showing the various components of an ideal beds, shorter joints, smaller shadows Thus, closer spacing (a) Block diagram illustrating stress shadowJoints and Veins Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben

178

Heavy Higgs signal-background interference in gg --> VV in the Standard Model plus real singlet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the Standard Model extended with a real scalar singlet field, the modification of the heavy Higgs signal due to interference with the continuum background and the off-shell light Higgs contribution is studied for gg --> ZZ, WW --> 4 lepton processes at the Large Hadron Collider. A public program that allows to simulate the full interference is presented.

Kauer, Nikolas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Gravity Capillary Standing Water Waves Pietro Baldi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity Capillary Standing Water Waves Pietro Baldi Universit`a di Napoli Federico II Joint work with Thomas Alazard (ENS Paris) Pienza, 29 October 2014 Pietro Baldi Gravity Capillary Standing Water Waves, with gravity and capillarity (WW) t = G() t = -g - 1 2 2 x + (G() + xx)2 2(1 + 2 x) + xx (1 + 2 x)3/2 We

Thomann, Laurent

180

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rates of consumption steadily increase. It has been shown that HDPE/PET blends are less brittle than PET (eth- ylene terephthalate) (R-PET) (75/25 w/w) were made through reactive extrusion and post of compatibilizers did not obviously change the size of R-PET fibers in MFCs. The toughness of MFC was significantly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW??????? decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7??fb(?1) of pp...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, Gemma; Clutter, Jeffrey Scott; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

182

P O L I T I C A L E C O N O M Y R E S E A R C H I N S T I T U T E U N I V E R S I T Y O F M A S S A C H U S E T T S A M H E R S T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/9e5107f8-a75c-11e2-9fbe-00144feabdc0.html#axzz2Qk3zV4ww. Reinhart and Rogoff are wrong about

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

183

Safety and efficacy of NovaSil clay as a dietary supplement to prevent aflatoxicosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of aflatoxins. Although statistically significant changes to a few parameters were noted, the differences did not appear to be NSP- or dose-dependent, suggesting that NSP at dietary inclusion levels as great as 2.0% (w/w) does not produce overt toxicity. Thus...

Afriyie-Gyawu, Evans

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

W / Z + heavy flavor production and the standard model Higgs searches at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Searches for the Standard Model Higgs in WH and H {yields} WW channels by CDF and D0 collaborations are presented. The preliminary results are based on < 180 pb{sup -1} of data analyzed by each experiment. Important backgrounds to Higgs searches, such as heavy flavor production in association with massive vector bosons (W and Z) are studied in the process.

Choi, S.Y.; /UC, Riverside

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Comparison of the Efficacy of Popular Weight Loss Programs in Sedentary Overweight Women  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compared the efficacy of the Curves® Complete 90-day Challenge (CC), Weight Watchers® Points Plus (WW), Jenny Craig® At Home (JC), and Nutrisystem® Advance Select™ (NS) on weight loss, body composition and/or markers of health and fitness...

Baetge, Claire

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

187

ofT-IC;SIC:;SAU~.A Customized Master Menu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and WG Brown Rice Chicken Drumstick baked in a Herb Dressing and served with WG Brown Rice and Chefs on WW and Ranch Dip Yogurt with SNACK Bread Granola .llJir.p. .hlir.p. .It Jir.p. .It Jir.p. .11 lir

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

188

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO Serving Customized Master Menu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drumstick and WG Brown Rice Chicken Drumstick baked in a Herb Dressing and served with WG Brown Rice Sandwich on WW Bread Fresh Vegetables and Ranch Dip Natural Fruit Yogurt with Granola 0.5 2.5 0.25 2.5 0 2

Toronto, University of

189

Enhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to achieve the neat-methanol operation is to passively transport the water produced at the cathode throughEnhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao*, R. Chen, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering

Zhao, Tianshou

190

ORIGINAL PAPER Post-processing of concentrated fermented milk: influence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Post-processing of concentrated fermented milk: influence of temperature and holding of particle clusters in concentrated, fermented milk (protein content 8.2% (w/w)) during post temperature load, thus, rapid cooling reduces the Dairy Sci. & Technol. (2012) 92:91­107 DOI 10.1007/s13594

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Potato Research 45 (2002) 215-224 Foliar and tuber assessment of late blight (Phytophthora  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potato Research 45 (2002) 215-224 Foliar and tuber assessment of late blight (Phytophthora infestans(Mont.) de Bary) reaction in cultivated potato (SolanumtuberosumL.) D.S. DOUCHES I*, W.W. KIRK2,M is an important component to the management of potato late blight, Phy- tophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary

Douches, David S.

192

First Report of Boscalid and Penthiopyrad-Resistant Isolates of Alternaria solani1 Causing Early Blight of Potato in Michigan2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blight of Potato in Michigan2 3 T.D. Miles1 , K.L. Fairchild1 , A. Merlington2 , W.W., Kirk2 , N Lansing, MI7 8 Early blight of potato (Solanum tuberosum) is caused by Alternaria solani and occurs9 potatoes. The disease is commonly managed using succinate11 dehydrogenase inhibitor (SDHI) fungicides (1

Douches, David S.

193

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to numerically solve the Euler equations in order to predict effects of bomb blast waves following WW II­71, and was published the following year [1]. Computing power at that time was still grossly inadequate for what we.S., in Europe (especially France, Great Britain and Sweden) and in the (former) Soviet Union. Today

McDonough, James M.

195

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State School, UCSB March 23, 2007 #12;CO2 and Wastewater Treatment · WW Treatment Technologies · Scale Actinastrum sp. #12;Major Wastewater Treatment Technologies in U.S. Activated Sludge 6,800 Facilities 25

Keller, Arturo A.

196

JHEP09(2012)111 Published for SISSA by Springer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Published: September 25, 2012 Search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in pp collisions at s = 7 TeV The CMS collaboration Abstract: Combined results are reported from searches for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the , WW, and ZZ decay modes in proton-proton collisions at s = 7 TeV. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110

Winfree, Erik

197

Poly (vinyl alcohol)/3-(trimethylammonium) propyl-functionalized silica hybrid membranes for alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. As a result, the overall cost of the fuel cell system can for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells E.D. Wang, T.S. Zhao*, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering Accepted 29 December 2009 Available online 8 January 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct ethanol fuel cell

Zhao, Tianshou

198

A Terrestrial Food-Chain Bioaccumulation Model for POPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to illustrate that (i) chemicals with an octanol-air partition coefficient (KOA) in an effort to manage the production, use, and release of com- mercial chemicals into the environment chemical products with (i) a KOW far below 105 , (ii) measured BCFs generally below 5000 L kg-1 ww

Gobas, Frank

199

CURRICULUM VITAE David W. Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURRICULUM VITAE David W. Tank Personal Birthdate: June 3, 1953 Citizenship : U.S. Address: Dept Physical Society Biophysical Society #12;Research Publications 1. Tank, D.W., Wu, E.-S., and Webb, W, 207-212 (1982). 2. Webb, W.W., Barak, L.S., Tank, D.W. and Wu, E.-S., Molecular mobility on the cell

Tank, David

200

Mixtures of Estrogenic Contaminants in Bile of Fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WwTWs effluents. Sexually immature rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and sexually mature roach also detected in bile of effluent- exposed roach, and the concentrations of all these steroidal with female (E2, 740 ( 197; E1, 197 ( 37; EE2, 40 ( 6; DHQ, 8 ( 2) roach. The synthetic estrogen EE2 was also

Tyler, Charles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

12680 Biochemistry 1992, 31, 12680-12687 Dynamic Structures of Adrenocortical Cytochrome P-450 in Proteoliposomes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12680 Biochemistry 1992, 31, 12680-12687 Dynamic Structures of Adrenocortical Cytochrome P-450 reconstituted with and without NADPH4ytochromeP-450reductase in phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylethanolamine- phosphatidylserine vesicles at a lipid to P-450 ratio of 35 (w/w) by cholate dialysis procedures. Trypsinolysis

Kawato, Suguru

202

Production of acetol from glycerol using engineered Escherichia coli Hongliang Zhu a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the global biodiesel production in 2010 was about 5 billion gallons, which is 4.7-fold more than that in 2005 (Almeida et al., 2012). However, biodiesel production based on triglycerides will produce about 10% (w/w) glycerol as the main byproduct. The increasing production of biodiesel results in an increased production

Wood, Thomas K.

203

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Journal of Power Sources 174 (2007) 136147  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power source for portable and microelectronic devices because of its high efficiency, high specific and condensation W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and condensation of methanol and water. The comparison between the present model and other models indicates

Zhao, Tianshou

204

Green Pacific Biologicals Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Investors · Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae · WW exclusive license Max Planck's competitive advantage? Rapid & stable algae nuclear genetic engineering Wild-typeWild-typeWild-type GPBStrainGPBStrainGPBStrain #12;Green Pacific Biologicals Organism with high levels of oils Powerful genetic engineering GPB [no

205

CIVILAND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 2012 Anal. Geom.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Ww Coll 4322 (3) Soils Lab 3341 (1) Geotech. 3340 (3) Concrete Design 4359 (3) Transportation 4386 (3CIVILAND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING 2012 FRESHMAN FALL SP English 1157 (3) Calculus & Anal. Geom) Art Elective (3) Fluid Mech. 3318 (3) Structures 3356 (4) Project Management 3390(3) Civil Eng. Math

Kulp, Mark

206

Environmental Research 105 (2007) 2033 Synthesis of long-term nickel monitoring in San Francisco Bay$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that nickel complexes from wastewater treatment plants are not readily available for biological uptake a function of the geology of the watershed surrounding the estuary and inputs from wastewater treatment.L., Phinney, J.T., Bedsworth, W.W., 1997. Strongly complexed Cu and Ni in wastewater effluents and surface

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Intel Science and Technology Center for Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exceeded if we do not find a more energy efficient, scalable and cost effective way to handle this growth", analyst reports, IDC storage & networking reports, Gartner 2009 WW IT Services Forecast, BLS, Computer using online storage when sharing videos or photos, engaging in social networks, and using online

208

Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

CMS Collaboration

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 ���± 0.7% and 8.8 ���± 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 ���± 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 ���± 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 ���± 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

212

Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to in the fully leptonic final state in pp collisions at  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to W+W- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is reported. The data are collected at the LHC with the CMS detector, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns. The W+W- candidates are selected in events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy. No significant excess of events above the standard model background expectations is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production relative to the standard model Higgs expectation are derived. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the mass range 129-270 GeV at 95% confidence level.

Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

High Mass Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for high mass standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at \\sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Compared to previous Higgs boson Tevatron combinations, more data and new channels (H -> W+W- -> lnujj, H -> WW -> l+tau + X and trilepton final states) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. Analyzing 5.9 fb^-1 of data at CDF, and 5.4-6.7 fb^-1 at D0, the combination excludes with 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of m_H = 158-175 GeV/c2.

Bjoern Penning

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

ENEA-UCI Structures of the low frequency Alfven continuous spectrum 1 Structures of the low frequency Alfven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(KTI) gap (L. Chen 2007, NF 47 S727) Diamagnetic drift: KBM (H. Biglari, et al. 1991, PRL 67 3681) Thermal ion compress.: BAE (W.W. Heidbrink, et al. 1993, PRL 71 855) Ti and wave-part. resonances: AITG Alfv´en continuous spectrum 5 R.Nazikian,etal.06,PRL96,105006 R. Nazikian, et al. 06, PRL 96, 105006

Zonca, Fulvio

215

Section 8-1 8-4: Statistical Process Control (SPC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section 8-1 8-4: Statistical Process Control (SPC) · Chance Causes and Assignable Causes. · WW . · Upper Control Limit (UCL): µW + kW . · Shewhart Control Chart: LCL = µW - kW Center Line = µW UCL = µW + kW . · Subgroup: A sample drawn at certain time. · Control Charts: Sample plots over different time

Li, Haijun

216

Theatre in El Salvador during the Eighties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPRING 1992 173 Theatre in El Salvador during the Eighties Roberto Salomón Theatre in El Salvador during the 80s means wartime theatre, and theatre has had a tough time surviving censorship, political persecution, and the battlefield... by the Spanish Republican Edmundo Barbero, had provided most of the theatre in Salvador. Barbero's main objectives had been the production of classical theatre, post WW-II European Drama and the development of local playwrights. In the late sixties, different...

Salomó n, Roberto

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Microbial Fuel Cell and Reverse Electrodialysis Technologies for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for wastewater treatment · 15 GW (USA) · 0.6 kWh/m3 (range: 0.12 to 12 kWh/m3 ) · New energy SOURCE? (waste) (20 GW available where WW flows into the ocean) · Waste Heat Energy Capture heat in "water" (USA adequate sanitation · By 2025, ¼ of all people could live in areas that face severe water shortages

218

Diboson physics at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 detectors are being used to study diboson production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The authors summarize recent measurements of the W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, and WW cross-sections and limits on WZ and ZZ production. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings are also presented.

Neubauer, Mark S.; /UC, San Diego

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

E 2004, 34(12): 13131328 1313 Hamilton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

¢¡¢£¢¤ E ¥§¦¢¨ £¢¤ 2004, 34(12): 13131328 1313 © Hamilton H13171Y1e16131f1g1@1ACh1i 100080) prq sutwvrx Hamilton yurrrrrrruwrrrd vrx Hamil- ton yefegihijikimlfnioepiqfeiiiiirfsetmufv + wixfsemyizi{ir s|~}||p~o|py|gh||| |mo|pmy|gh|||ln ww stevx Hamilton ywwyz H m ifei

Ge, Shuzhi Sam

220

Analysis of Complexity and Power Consumption in DSP-Based Optical Modulation Formats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of about 1 watt without considering thermoelectric cooler (TEC), which is used to normalize the power consumption of the various 400 GbE modulation format schemes considered here. The transceiver power consumption for each scheme takes into account all... , 39, 1402–1405, (2014). [13] J. J. Lee, et al., “Predication of TEC Power Consumption for Cooled Laser Diode Module,” in proceeding of LEOS, Paper WW3, (2004). Acknowledgments This work was supported by UK EPSRC via the INTERNET project. ...

Wei, J. L.; Cheng, Q.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.

2014-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NAME/TEAM: ______________________________________ FTIR postlab -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy Postlab Last modified: June 17, 2014 1) Summarize your results in the following table: v/v % MTBE your value % RE 100 lit. value - = Ã? 4) Convert your v/v % MTBE in gasoline to units of mass % (w/w %) of oxygen in gasoline. Density of MTBE = 0.74 g/mL, Density of gasoline = 0.66 g/mL, Molar Mass of MTBE = 88

Nizkorodov, Sergey

222

Developing New Skills And Expertise To Support Digital Scholarship And Scholarly Communication.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presented at the 74th IFLA General Conference and Council: World Library and Information Congres, Québec, Canada, August 208 htp:/ww.ifla.org/IV/ifla74/Programe208.htm> DEVELOPING NEW SKILS AND EXPERTISE TO SUPORT DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP... 1064 repositories in over 60 countries. htp:/roar.eprints.org/> 2 Karla L. Hahn. Research Library Publishing Services: New Options for University Publishing. (Asociation of Research Libraries, April 208). htp...

Rosenblum, Brian

2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

223

Status report on survey of alternative heat pumping technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is studying alternative heat pumping technologies to identify possible cost effective alternatives to electric driven vapor compression heat pumps, air conditioners, and chillers that could help reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Over thirty different technologies are being considered including: engine driven systems, fuel cell powered systems, and alternative cycles. Results presented include theoretical efficiencies for all systems as well as measured performance of some commercial, prototype, or experimental systems. Theoretical efficiencies show that the alternative electric-driven technologies would have HSPFs between 4 and 8 Btu/Wh (1.2 to 2.3 W/W) and SEERs between 3 and 9.5 Btu/Wh (0.9 and 2.8 W/W). Gas-fired heat pump technologies have theoretical seasonal heating gCOPs from 1.1 to 1.7 and cooling gCOPs from 0.95 to 1.6 (a SEER 12 Btu/Wh electric air conditioner has a primary energy efficiency of approximately 1.4 W/W).

Fischer, S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Implications of a high mass light MSSM Higgs scalar for supersymmetry searches at the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atlas and CMS groups have both reported an excess of events in the WW{sup *}{yields}l{sup +}l{sup -}+E{sub T}{sup miss} search channel, which could be the first evidence for the Higgs boson. In the MSSM, the lightest SUSY Higgs scalar h is expected to occur with mass m{sub h} < or approx. 135 GeV, depending on the range of SUSY parameters scanned over. Since the h{yields}WW* branching fraction falls swiftly with decreasing m{sub h}, a signal in the WW{sup *} channel would favor an h at the high end of its predicted mass range. We scan over general GUT scale SUSY model parameters to find those which give rise to m{sub h} > or approx. 130 GeV. A value of m{sub 0}{approx}10-20 TeV is favored, with A{sub 0}{approx}{+-}2m{sub 0}, while the lower range of m{sub 1/2} < or approx. 1 TeV is also slightly favored. This gives rise to an 'effective SUSY' type of sparticle mass spectrum. For low m{sub 1/2}, gluino pairs may be accessible to LHC searches, while for higher m{sub 1/2} values, the SUSY spectra would likely be out of range of LHC reach.

Baer, Howard [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Barger, Vernon; Huang, Peisi [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Mustafayev, Azar [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Electroweak and top physics at CDF in Run II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF experiment at the Tevatron has used p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV to measure the production cross sections of W and Z bosons using several leptonic final states. An indirect measurement of the W width and the ratio of tau and electron electroweak couplings have been extracted. The forward-backward charge asymmetry, A{sub FB}, in Drell-Yan dilectron production has been measured up to an invariant mass of 600 GeV/c{sup 2}. CDF has also started looking for WW production in the dilepton channel, WW{prime} {yields} ll{prime}vv, with the aim of measuring its cross section and derive limits on the anomalous WWZ and WW{gamma} couplings. The presence of a top quark signal in the Tevatron data has been reestablished by measuring the top quark pair production cross section in the dilepton channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} {bar l}v{sub l}bl{prime}{bar v}{sub l{prime}}{bar b} and in the lepton plus jets channel, t{bar t} {yields} WbW{bar b} {yields} q{bar q}lbl{bar b}{sub l}{bar b} + {bar l}v{sub l}bq{bar q}{prime}{bar b}. A pre-tagged lepton plus jets sample has also been used to reconstruct the top quark mass.

A. Taffard

2003-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

Measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings from at {\\boldmath$\\sqrt{s}=1.96$} TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a direct measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings at gammaWW and ZWW vertices in WW and WZ events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We consider events with one electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and at least two jets. The data were collected using the D0 detector and correspond to 1.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. Considering two different relations between the couplings at the gammaWW and ZWW vertices, we measure these couplings at 68% C.L. to be kappa{sub gamma} = 1.07{sub -0.29}{sup +0.26}, lambda = 0.00{sub -0.06}{sup +0.06}, and g{sub 1}{sup Z} = 1.04{sup -0.09}{sup +0.09} in a scenario respecting SU(2){sub L}[direct-product]U(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry and kappa = 1.04{sub -0.11}{sup +0.11} and lambda=0.00{sub -0.06}{sup +0.06} in an 'equal couplings' scenario.

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

WEEE and portable batteries in residual household waste: Quantification and characterisation of misplaced waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • We analyse 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 Danish households. • We quantify and characterise misplaced WEEE and portable batteries. • We compare misplaced WEEE and batteries to collection through dedicated schemes. • Characterisation showed that primarily small WEEE and light sources are misplaced. • Significant amounts of misplaced batteries were discarded as built-in WEEE. - Abstract: A total of 26.1 Mg of residual waste from 3129 households in 12 Danish municipalities was analysed and revealed that 89.6 kg of Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), 11 kg of batteries, 2.2 kg of toners and 16 kg of cables had been wrongfully discarded. This corresponds to a Danish household discarding 29 g of WEEE (7 items per year), 4 g of batteries (9 batteries per year), 1 g of toners and 7 g of unidentifiable cables on average per week, constituting 0.34% (w/w), 0.04% (w/w), 0.01% (w/w) and 0.09% (w/w), respectively, of residual waste. The study also found that misplaced WEEE and batteries in the residual waste constituted 16% and 39%, respectively, of what is being collected properly through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. This shows that a large amount of batteries are being discarded with the residual waste, whereas WEEE seems to be collected relatively successfully through the dedicated special waste collection schemes. Characterisation of the misplaced batteries showed that 20% (w/w) of the discarded batteries were discarded as part of WEEE (built-in). Primarily alkaline batteries, carbon zinc batteries and alkaline button cell batteries were found to be discarded with the residual household waste. Characterisation of WEEE showed that primarily small WEEE (WEEE directive categories 2, 5a, 6, 7 and 9) and light sources (WEEE directive category 5b) were misplaced. Electric tooth brushes, watches, clocks, headphones, flashlights, bicycle lights, and cables were items most frequently found. It is recommended that these findings are taken into account when designing new or improving existing special waste collection schemes. Improving the collection of WEEE is also recommended as one way to also improve the collection of batteries due to the large fraction of batteries found as built-in. The findings in this study were comparable to other western European studies, suggesting that the recommendations made in this study could apply to other western European countries as well.

Bigum, Marianne, E-mail: mkkb@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus, E-mail: claus_petersen@econet.dk [Econet A/S, Strandboulevarden 122, 5, 2100 København Ø (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte, E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering, Miljøvej 113, 2500 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramicâ?¢ and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumiledsâ?? LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

Decai Sun

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radiative ?(1S) decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30— ~ 20— LLI IO— hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

Baringer, Philip S.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The preparation and effect of structure on the reactivities and properties of the 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazine derivatives of monocarbonyl and dicarbonyl compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J ffi 1 wW a) o o w ? vo 3 s Ss; o o oin o ? i !>> 4...^20 TO l I o 1 . O 1C CQ CJ CQ O ?rll O ?rl S S rQ H H H H IH ?> H ?v H H 1 0) SCb l ?P

Jones, Louis Allman

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Despatch Issue 19  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'm also working on a movie which, hopefully, will be made at the end of the year ? a novel of the movie which, also hopefully, is to be published early next year ? and some one-act plays of mine that are to be staged very soon here in town. The use... warheads" correspond to floating mines. The basicplot ?a duel of wits betweentwo captains ? is similar to that of "The Enemy Below," a movie about WW II submarine warfare. A few submarinic details in the earlier version were cut out: a slide of a...

Multiple Contributors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Rapidly-exploring Random Tree Inspired Multi-robot Space Coverage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

joining the tree by initiating a new edge. The blue robots depict vertex robots while the grey robots denote edge robots. The edge length ( q) is 2. : : : : : : : : 7 2 An illustration of a wandering robot (W) extending an edge, initi- ated by a... then the robot begins to trace the tree in an attempt to complete an incomplete edge, i.e., performing the ExtendEdge operation. 8 qnewS W WW Fig. 2. An illustration of a wandering robot (W) extending an edge, initiated by a previously spiralling robot (S...

Ghoshal, Asish

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

The effect of product formulation and homogenization on the physical properties of the milk-fat globule and acid milk gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) or sorbitan monostearate (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) were added at 0 5'lo w/w to two of the samples containing the blend of proteins The polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20... was separated from the homogenized samples by centifugation at 10, 500 x g for 30 minutes at 20'C aAer addition of 28. 6 g of pure grade sucrose (Sigma Chemical Co, St Louis, MO) per 100 grams of sample to increase the difference in the density between...

Materon, Liliana

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

An analysis of bovine lymphocyte antigens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2, Harleco) which was used as a dif- ferential stain for nonviable lymphocytea. The entire reaction was brought to an end, 15 minutes after eosin was dropped, by introducing 2 ul of formaldehyde (pH 7. 2, 37% w/w, Fisher Scientific Company). More... was made during the course of study which included the reduction from 2 pl to I pl of each of the antiserum, cells, eosin-Y, and formaldehyde used in each well. The amount of complement used (2 pl) was not changed. This modifi- cation, having...

Chan, Wai-Hung David

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Searches for Higgs Boson(s) at the Upgraded Tevatron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We summarize the status of Higgs boson searches at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron performed by the DO and CDF collaborations. We report on three categories of searches, namely 1) the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson (p\\bar{p} --> H, WH or ZH, with H --> WW* and/or H --> b\\bar{b}), 2) the search for the minimal supersymmetric Higgs boson using p\\bar{p} --> hb\\bar{b} --> b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} and p\\bar{p} --> hX --> tau tau X, 3) the search for doubly charged Higgs boson.

Gregorio Bernardi; for the CDF; D0 collaborations

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

237

Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W-boson decays at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :0 90 2. 48 64 v2 [ he p- ph ] 22 Ju l 2 00 9 Cavendish-HEP-09/04 Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W -boson decays at hadron colliders Alan J. Barr,1, ? Ben Gripaios,2, † and Christopher G. Lester3, ‡ 1Denys Wilkinson... measurements of the Higgs boson mass using the decay h ? W+W?, followed by the leptonic decay of each W -boson, will be performed by fitting the shape of a distribution that is sensitive to the Higgs mass. We demonstrate that the variable most commonly used...

Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined results are reported from searches for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ decay modes in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-300 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9-5.1 inverse femtobarns. A fermiophobic Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass range 110-194 GeV, and at 99% confidence level in the mass ranges 110-124.5 GeV, 127-147.5 GeV, and 155-180 GeV.

CMS Collaboration

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

239

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in ${p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} =}$1.96 TeV}  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in $H\\rightarrow WW$ decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 \\ifb\\ of integrated luminosity in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

D0 Collaboration

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

240

Effect of milk consumption, forage availability and cow phenotype on rate of preweaning growth of calves in a semiarid Texas rangeland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption and adjusted for mean age at measurement. The influence of FA, adjusted milk consumption (AdjMC) and cow weight on preweaning daily gain (DG) and weaning weight (WW) was determined using GLM (SAS Institute Inc. , 1985a, b). Daily gain increased... 6. 3 and 31. 6 (P&, 01) g/d per kg increase in BW and AdjMC, respectively; age at weaning (AgeW) and FA were not related (P&. 10). Weaning weight increased 2. 4 (P&. 0001), . 72, (P&. 0001) and 4. 4 kg (P&. 12) per unit increase in BW, Age...

Saunders, Susan Lynn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Transverse Polarization for Energy Calibration at the Z peak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we deal with aspects of transverse polarization for the purpose of energy calibration of proposed circular colliders like the FCC-ee and the CEPC. The main issues of such a measurement will be discussed. The possibility of using this method to accurately determine the energy at the WW threshold as well as the Z peak will be addressed. The use of wigglers for reducing long polarization times will be discussed and a possible strategy will be presented for minimising the energy uncertainty error in these large machines.

Koratzinos, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface. |VolunteeringMap2-5: East AlternativeWW-band

244

I.N  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,992000 Short-TermSeptember» ; *ww

245

Flying lemurs - the "flying tree shrews"? Molecular cytogenetic evidence for a Scandentia-Dermoptera sister clade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be considered as absent in the T. belangeri genome. Instead, the association of HSA7b/10p should be considered as an additional derived character for T. belangeri. In Dermoptera, our Bivariate flow karyotype of G. variegatus with chromosome assignm ntsF gure 2... and the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2003, 100:1056-1061. 7. Springer MS, Stanhope MJ, Madsen O, de Jong WW: Molecules con- solidate the placental mammal tree. Trends Ecol Evol 2004, 19:430-438. 8. Bininda-Emonds ORP, Cardillo M, Jones KE...

Nie, Wenhui; Fu, Beiyuan; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Volobouev, Vitaly; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

I/O  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure the Parker ~press -ww

247

Pastaklan Vesla Issue 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bo KclCendrick- .6, 1-0, 19 Allan Andress- 25t^L Ginnio Reynolds- 3^i 36, 4-3 No trades for other fanzines Kathy. Bushman.* 29 Peggy Barilla- 55, 56 Steve Barnes- 73, 84, 93 CAB - Bacovcr Horta Press Issue ;"*5 Rhubarb Publication.../\\ M A?TD TH5?T THERE'S. ? . 1 - ' > ?-^WW I II i,ijw" I Friends t We cano^up with this idea and we organized it and we bought the supplies and wo typed it and we glued it together and wo printed it and we collated7 w&at we printed and...

Multiple Contributors

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Probe Higgs boson pair production via the $3 \\ell 2 j$ + missing $E_T$ mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a detailed hadron-level study on the sensitivity of Higgs boson pair production via the $WW^{*}WW^{*}$ channel with the final state $3 \\ell 2 j$ + missing $E_T$ at the LHC with the collision energy $\\sqrt{S} = 14$ TeV and a future 100 TeV collider. To avoid the huge background from $pp \\to Z W + \\textrm{jets}$ processes, we confine to consider the four lepton patterns: $e^\\pm e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp $ and $\\mu^\\pm \\mu^\\pm e^\\mp$. We propose a partial reconstruction method to determine the most reliable combination. After that, we examine a few crucial observables which can discriminate efficiently signal and background events, especially we notice that the observable $m_{\\rm T2}$ is very efficient. For the LHC 14 TeV collisions, with an accumulated 3000 fb$^{-1}$ dataset, we find that the sensitivity of this mode can reach up to 1.5 $\\sigma$ for the Standard Model and the triple coupling of Higgs boson $\\lambda_3$ in the simplest effective theory can be constrained into the range [-1, 8] at $95\\%$ confidence...

Li, Qiang; Yan, Qi-Shu; Zhao, Xiaoran

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Technical and economic analysis of energy efficiency of Chinese room air conditioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China has experienced tremendous growth in the production and sales of room air conditioners over the last decade. Although minimum room air conditioner energy efficiency standards have been in effect since 1989, no efforts were made during most of the 1990's to update the standard to be more reflective of current market conditions. In 1999, China's State Bureau of Technical Supervision (SBTS) included in their annual plan the development and revision of the 1989 room air conditioner standard, and experts from SBTS worked together with LBNL to analyze the new standards. Based on the engineering and life cycle-cost analyses performed, the most predominant type of room air conditioner in the Chinese market (split-type with a cooling capacity between 2500 and 4500 W (8500 Btu/h and 15,300Btu/h)) can have its efficiency increased cost-effectively to an energy efficiency ratio (EER) of 2.92 W/W (9.9 Btu/hr/W). If an EER standard of 2.92 W/W became effective in 2001, Chinese consumers would be estimated to save over 3.5 billion Yuan (420 million U.S. dollars) over the period of 2001-2020. Carbon emissions over the same period would be reduced by approximately 12 million metric tonnes.

Fridley, David G.; Rosenquist, Gregory; Jiang, Lin; Li, Aixian; Xin, Dingguo; Cheng, Jianhong

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

D0 Collaboration

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

Study of the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in HVV decays with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, studies of the spin, parity and Lagrangian tensor structure of the Higgs boson in the \\hZZ , \\hWW\\ and \\hgg\\ decay processes at the LHC are presented. The investigations are based on 25fb?1 of pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at s?=7~\\TeV\\ and s?=8~\\TeV. The Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson hypothesis, corresponding to the quantum numbers JP=0+, is tested against several alternative spin models. They include the non-SM spin-0 and the spin-2 model with universal and non-universal couplings to fermions and vector bosons. The analysed data allow to exclude all alternative models in favour of the SM Higgs boson hypothesis at more than 99.9%~confidence level. The tensor structure of the HVV interaction in the spin-0 hypothesis is also investigated using the \\hZZ\\ and \\hWW\\ decays. The observed distributions of the variables sensitive to the ratios of the non-SM tensor couplings to the SM ones, \\KtildeH\\ and \\KtildeA, are compatible with the SM predicted values of zero. Assumi...

The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The DOE Water Cycle Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Department of Energy (DOE) multi-laboratory Water Cycle Pilot Study (WCPS) investigated components of the local water budget at the Walnut River Watershed in Kansas to study the relative importance of various processes and to determine the feasibility of observational water budget closure. An extensive database of local meteorological time series and land surface characteristics was compiled. Numerical simulations of water budget components were generated and, to the extent possible, validated for three nested domains within the Southern Great Plains; the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement/Cloud Atmospheric Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), the Walnut River Watershed (WRW), and the Whitewater Watershed (WW), Kansas A 2-month Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted to gather detailed observations relevant to specific details of the water budget, including fine-scale precipitation, streamflow, and soil moisture measurements not made routinely by other programs. Event and season al water isotope (delta 18O, delta D) sampling in rainwater, streams, soils, lakes, and wells provided a means of tracing sources and sinks within and external to the WW, WRW, and the ARM/CART domains. The WCPS measured changes in leaf area index for several vegetation types, deep groundwater variations at two wells, and meteorological variables at a number of sites in the WRW. Additional activities of the WCPS include code development toward a regional climate model with water isotope processes, soil moisture transect measurements, and water level measurements in ground water wells.

Miller, N.L.; King, A.W.; Miller, M.A.; Springer, E.P.; Wesely, M.L.; Bashford, K.E.; Conrad, M.E.; Costigan, K.; Foster, P.N.; Gibbs, H.K.; Jin, J.; Klazura, J.; Lesht, B.M.; Machavaram, M.V.; Pan, F.; Song, J.; Troyan, D.; Washington-Allen, R.A.

2003-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

A simple adaptive grid method in two dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp A TWO-DIMENSIONAL ADAPTIVE GRID METHOD 783 T Xi,j Xi-l,JXi,j Xi-l,j )/Ii_1/2,j Yi,j Yi-1... j Yi,j Yi-l,j Xi+l’J Xi’J ]’[i+’,j Xi+l’J Xi’j 0, Yi+l,j Yi,j Yi+l,j Yi,j (26) {IXi,jXi,j_I]T I

Huang, Weizhang; Sloan, David M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Measurement of the Mass of the W Boson in $e^+ e^-$ collisions using the Fully Leptonic Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel method of determining the mass of the W boson in the W+W- -> lnu lnu channel is presented and applied to 667pb^-1 of data recorded at the center-of- mass energies in the range 183-207 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The Measured energies of charged leptons and the results of a new procedure based on an approximate kinematic reconstruction of the events are combined to give: Mw=80.41+-0.41+-0.13 GeV, when the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the lepton energy, which is calibrated using data, and the parameterization of the variables used in the fitting, which is obtained using Monte Carlo events. Both of these are limited by statistics.

Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, Gideon; Allison, J; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bloodworth, Ian J; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Cammin, J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Cohen, I; Csilling, Akos; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harin-Dirac, M; Hauschild, M; Hauschildt, J; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Homer, R James; Horváth, D; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jones, C R; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; Klein, K; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L L; Kowalewski, R V; Krämer, T; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Krop, D; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, Hagar Yaël; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Leins, A; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, J; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Michelini, Aldo; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A N; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, James L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Rick, Hartmut; Roney, J M; Rosati, S; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Rust, D R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Stephens, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trefzger, T M; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vachon, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Direct Numerical Simulation of the Flow in a Pebble Bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,lelt),uvdyms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ uvdzms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),uwdxms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ uwdyms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),uwdzms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ vwdxms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),vwdyms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ vwdzms(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),eps_uu(lx1...,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ eps_vv(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),eps_ww(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ eps_uv(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),eps_uw(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt), $ eps_vw(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt) common /production/ $ prd_uu(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt),prd_vv(lx1,ly1,lz1,lelt...

Ward, Paul

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

258

Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

259

An automated class scheduling process for Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'tS?ClC CC@Q t t' f l' 39. . . :, ": . ', Cax@ Co8e 'k' eont~e4, . . . . . l , ', "A', c'eid. 'i@, 'the. ejexce ef iaf'qnie41ce fW @he'. "8X. ', "eel tu tkh a~ Sat@ A, 1s ef. the, i45e@x3e jrroyem hiyuC (see je@e 4f). I 4o Scarce a... gesexi~ekgj QBghX'CC@54 M. l 1 (~pe e~eii-, "gyae~~ ~g) . A1 Wys ysg weeh- Bqurs pox 4sy I I' I k 'HX' Cax'd, l' Hearer: . -'k' esx'4 fuse %+tea Cauda tile sod. eesqmWw "~pxa~. iufonga~ 4ioa, 17 - 8) Rl 24 'xh X4 %eiuew . of mica. je@4...

Hill, Russell Edwin

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Simple Proof of the Ramsey Savings Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have: d U’=U’L,dt dd--(U’fa V’) O, B- U+ V-eU’-a(U’f,,- V’) O. U’f.- V’=0. * Received by the editors, April 15, 1976. " Department of Economics, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045. The purpose of this note is purely pedantic since it reveals... Euler’s equations are necessary conditions for an extremum. 169 D ow nl oa de d 01 /2 3/ 15 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

El-Hodiri, Mohamed

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The reemergence of medium scale gasifications technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of solid material is a well proven field, but the introduction of abundant and cheap petroleum fuels after WW II caused the technology to be neglected. There are three types of reactors: the fixed fuel bed, the fluidized bed, and the entrained fuel reactor. The advantages, but more to the point, the drawbacks of each system are reviewed. In order for gasification to fill modern industrial needs the advantages of the three types must be combined without their drawbacks. A reactor needs to be tar-free, have a high volume gas output relative to reactor size, accept a wide range of fuels, and have a comparable Btu production level of fuel gas. These specifications are met by the Series 8000 gas generator manufactured by Enerdyne Corporation.

Reindl, W.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Malate dehydrogenase in bovine spermatozoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Ir1 0 M 8 ~ W 8 5 r I & Sl 8 ld 8 4 0 8 4 . rl 08 ~WW X SW X ON SW 4 8 OO 0 g W 8 0 Sl 8W A 0 Or 8 III A NW Ol OW 8 8 0 OO g SOP ~~8 8 N Or 8 ( W/I gO I ) NOIJ. b'BJ. N30NOO/3lflNIA =6/I 50 ;(Fig. 16). A few granules were also...MALATE DEHYDROGENASE IN BOVINE SPERMATOZOA A Thesis HOZONG POBERT LIN Submitted to the Graduate College Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement, for MASTER OF SCIENCE of the degree of 1 August 1973 Major Subject...

Lin, Hozong Robert

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Accelerator research studies. Technical progress report, June 1, 1992--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, ``Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,`` (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, ``Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,`` (Co-P.I.`s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, ``Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,`` (Co-P.I.`s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Accelerator research studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Accelerator Research Studies program at the University of Maryland, sponsored by the Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG05-91ER40642, is currently in the second year of a three-year funding cycle. The program consists of the following three tasks: TASK A, Study of Transport and Longitudinal Compression of Intense, High-Brightness Beams,'' (P.I., M. Reiser); TASK B, Study of Collective Ion Acceleration by Intense Electron Beams and Pseudospark Produced High Brightness Electron Beams,'' (Co-P.I.'s, W.W. Destler, M. Reiser, M.J. Rhee, and C.D. Striffler); TASK C, Study of a Gyroklystron High-Power Microwave Source for Linear Colliders,'' (Co-P.I.'s, V.L. Granatstein, W. Lawson, M. Reiser, and C.D. Striffler). In this report we document the progress that has been made during the past year for each of the three tasks.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Scattering lengths in SU(2) gauge theory with two fundamental fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate non perturbatively scattering properties of Goldstone Bosons in an SU(2) gauge theory with two Wilson fermions in the fundamental representation. Such a theory can be used to build extensions of the Standard Model that unifies Technicolor and pseudo Goldstone composite Higgs models. The leading order contribution to the scattering amplitude of Goldstone bosons at low energy is given by the scattering lengths. In the context of technicolor extensions of the Standard Model the scattering lengths are constrained by WW scattering measurements. We first describe our setup and in particular the expected chiral symmetry breaking pattern. We then discuss how to compute them on the lattice and give preliminary results using finite size methods.

R. Arthur; V. Drach; M. Hansen; A. Hietanen; C. Pica; F. Sannino

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

266

Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H???, H?ZZ{sup ?}?4? and H?WW{sup ?}?????. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of {radical s}=7 TeV and {radical s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25 fb{sup ?1}. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

ATLAS Collaboration,

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Measurement of the properties of the Higgs boson at ATLAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An update on the Higgs boson search in the decay channels H???, H?ZZ{sup (*)}?4l, H?WW{sup (*)}?lvlv, H??{sup +}?{sup ?} and H?bb{sup ¯} at the ATLAS detector is presented. Proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 25/fb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are used for these results. The latest combined and individual channel measurements of the mass, signal strength, spin and parity, coupling constants and Higgs boson production are reported. Results on the measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson are all consistent with the Standard Model.

Bristow, Timothy [SUPA - School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb?1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ? ? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

Abazov, V.M.; et al.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Spectropolarimetric observations of Herbig Ae/Be Stars I: HiVIS spectropolarimetric calibration and reduction techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the HiVIS spectropolarimeter built for the Haleakala 3.7m AEOS telescope in Hawaii, we are collecting a large number of high precision spectropolarimetrc observations of stars. In order to precisely measure very small polarization changes, we have performed a number of polarization calibration techniques on the AEOS telescope and HiVIS spectrograph. We have extended our dedicated IDL reduction package and have performed some hardware upgrades to the instrument. We have also used the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter on CFHT to verify the HiVIS results with back-to-back observations of MWC 361 and HD163296. Comparision of this and other HiVIS data with stellar observations from the ISIS and WW spectropolarimeters in the literature further shows the usefulness of this instrument.

D. M. Harrington; J. R. Kuhn

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geometrical Scaling and the Dependence of the Average Transverse Momentum on the Multiplicity and Energy for the ALICE Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the recent ALICE data on charged particle multiplicity in p-p collisions, and show that it exhibits Geometrical Scaling (GS) with energy dependence given with characteristic exponent $\\lambda=0.22$. Next, starting from the GS hypothesis and using results of the Color Glass Condensate effective theory, we calculate $$ as a function $N_{\\rm ch}$ including dependence on the scattering energy $W$. We show that $$ both in p-p and p-Pb collisions scales in terms of scaling variable $(W/W_{0})^{\\lambda/(2+\\lambda)}% \\sqrt{N_{\\mathrm{ch}}/S_{\\bot}}$ where $S_{\\bot}$ is multiplicity dependent interaction area in the transverse plane. Furthermore, we discuss how the behavior of the interaction radius $R$ at large multiplicities affects the mean $p_{\\mathrm{T}}$ dependence on $N_{\\rm ch}$, and make a prediction that $$ at high multiplicity should reach an energy independent limit.

Larry McLerran; Michal Praszalowicz

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Combining Resummed Higgs Predictions Across Jet Bins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental analyses often use jet binning to distinguish between different kinematic regimes and separate contributions from background processes. To accurately model theoretical uncertainties in these measurements, a consistent description of the jet bins is required. We present a complete framework for the combination of resummed results for production processes in different exclusive jet bins, focusing on Higgs production in gluon fusion as an example. We extend the resummation of the Higgs + 1-jet cross section into the challenging low transverse momentum region, lowering the uncertainties considerably. We provide combined predictions with resummation for cross sections in the Higgs + 0-jet and Higgs + 1-jet bins, and give an improved theory covariance matrix for use in experimental studies. We estimate that the relevant theoretical uncertainties on the signal strength in the Higgs to WW analysis are reduced by nearly a factor of 2 compared to the current value.

Radja Boughezal; Xiaohui Liu; Frank Petriello; Frank J. Tackmann; Jonathan R. Walsh

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): a new spectrochemical technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used the breakdown spark from a focused laser beam to generate analytically useful emission spectra of minor constituents in air and other carrier gases. The medium was sampled directly. It was not necessary to reduce the sample to solution nor to introduce electrodes. The apparatus is particularly simple; a pulsed laser, spectrometer, and some method for time resolution. The latter is essential in laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) because of the strong early continuum. High temperatures in the spark result in vaporization of small particles, dissociation of molecules, and excitation of atomic and ionic spectra, including species which are normally difficult to detect. In one application, we have monitored beryllium in air at conventrations below 1 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, which is below 1 ppB (w/w). In another we have monitored chlorine and fluorine atoms in real time. LIBS has the potential for real-time direct sampling of contaminants in situ.

Radziemski, L.J.; Loree, T.R.; Cremers, D.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Low Frequency Modulation of Extreme Temperature Regimes in a Changing Climate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project examines long-term changes in extreme temperature episodes (ETE) associated with planetary climate modes (PCMs) in both the real atmospheric and climate model simulations. The focus is on cold air outbreaks (CAOs) and warm waves (WWs) occurring over the continental US during the past 60 winters. No significant long-term trends in either WWs or CAOs are observed over the US. The annual frequency of CAOs is affected by the (i) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) over the Southeast US and (ii) Pacific–North American (PNA) pattern over the Northwest US. WW frequency is influenced by the (i) NAO over the eastern US and (ii) combined influence of PNA, Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and ENSO over the southern US. The collective influence of PCMs accounts for as much as 50% of the regional variability in ETE frequency. During CAO (WW) events occurring over the southeast US, there are low (high) pressure anomalies at higher atmospheric levels over the southeast US with oppositely-signed pressure anomalies in the lower atmosphere over the central US. These patterns lead to anomalous northerly (for CAOs) or southerly (for WWs) flow into the southeast leading to cold or warm surface air temperature anomalies, respectively. One distinction is that CAOs involve substantial air mass transport while WW formation is more local in nature. The primary differences among event categories are in the origin and nature of the pressure anomaly features linked to ETE onset. In some cases, PCMs help to provide a favorable environment for event onset. Heat budget analyses indicate that latitudinal transport in the lower atmosphere is the main contributor to regional cooling during CAO onset. This is partly offset by adiabatic warming associated with subsiding air. Additional diagnoses reveal that this latitudinal transport is partly due to the remote physical influence of a shallow cold pool of air trapped along the east side of the Rocky Mountains. ETE and PCM behavior is also studied in (CMIP5) climate model simulations. Although the climate models considered are able to represent the overall behavior of ETEs, the frequency of WWs (CAOs) is too high (low) in many models. While all models qualitatively replicate the overall structure of the PNA pattern, a small minority of models fails to properly simulate the NAO pattern. Model shortcomings in representing the NAO and PNA patterns have important consequences for simulating associated regional variability in surface air temperature and storm track behavior. The influence of PCMs on ETEs is underestimated in most CMIP5 models. In particular, none of the models are able to accurately simulate observed linkages between ETEs and the PDO, due to a gross misrepresentation of the PDO pattern in most models. Our results indicate that predictions of future CAO and WW behavior are currently limited by the ability of climate models to accurately represent PCM characteristics. Our study also considers the behavior of PCMs known as annular modes. It is determined that north-south movements in the stratospheric jet stream (related to the Polar Annular Mode) result in long-lasting impacts upon surface weather conditions including regional air temperature anomalies. The structure and dynamics of the stratospheric northern annular mode (or SNAM, related to changes in the strength of the stratospheric jet stream) was studied in CMIP5 models. In models with poorly-resolved stratospheres, the amplitude of SNAM at stratospheric altitudes is typically too weak, consistent with weaker stratospheric jet variability. However, this distinction does not carry over to the associated tropospheric signature of SNAM. A regional analysis illustrates that most CMIP5 models (regardless of whether the stratosphere is well-resolved) have anomalously weak and eastward shifted (compared to observed SNAM events) storm track and sea level pressure anomaly patterns during SNAM events. Analyses of stratosphere–troposphere coupling reveal that large-scale wave activity in the stratosphere is anomalously weak in CMIP5 model

Black, Robert X.

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

Measurement of the W + gamma Production in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present a measurement of the {bar p}p {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} e{nu}{gamma} + X production cross section using data form the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The p{bar p} collisions were provided by the Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Electroweak theory includes the trilinear vector boson coupling, WW{gamma}, which contributes to the e{nu}{gamma} final state. The electron decay channel of the W provides a clean sample to study the production of diboson pairs. The measurement of the production cross section tests the structure of the non-Abelian character of Electroweak theory.

Kirby, Michael H

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Arsenal of democracy in the face of change: Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs), their evolution and some economic considerations, Working Paper No. 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief study was made of some of the forces driving the move to Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs), including the quest for military effectiveness, combat experience, and logistic compression. PGMs cost from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars per Kg but are tens to hundreds of times more effective than conventional munitions. A year's peacetime plateau production of each US PGM can be carried by a few C-5 aircraft. Surge quantities of PGMs are within US airlift capabilities, taking some of the risk out of off-shore procurement. The improving capability of antiaircraft PGMs and the escalating cost of combat aircraft (50 to 100-fold in constant dollars since WW II) may bring into question the economic viability of manned attack aircraft. The same may be true to a slightly lesser degree for heavy armored vehicles. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

Chester, C.V.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Events with Isolated Leptons and Missing Transverse Momentum and Measurement of W Production at HERA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Events with high energy isolated electrons, muons or tau leptons and missing transverse momentum are studied using the full e^\\pm p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 474 pb^{-1}. Within the Standard Model, events with isolated leptons and missing transverse momentum mainly originate from the production of single W bosons. The total single W boson production cross section is measured as 1.14 \\pm 0.25 (stat.) \\pm 0.14 (sys.) pb, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation. The data are also used to establish limits on the WW\\gamma gauge couplings and for a measurement of the W boson polarisation.

Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M.P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H.-U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-009-1160-6

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb^{-1} of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H -> tau tau decays or H -> WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

D0 Collaboration

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Charged Higgs Search via $AW^\\pm/HW^\\pm$ Channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on models with a low energy spectrum containing a pair of charged scalars $H^\\pm$, as well as a light scalar H and/or a pseudoscalar A. We study the $H^\\pm tb$ associated production with $H^\\pm \\to AW/HW$, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. With detailed collider analysis, we obtain the exclusion bounds as well as discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC for the process $pp \\to H^\\pm tb \\to AWtb/HWtb \\to \\tau\\tau bbWW, bbbbWW$. We find that for a daughter particle mass of 50 GeV, the 95% C.L. exclusion reach in $\\sigma$xBR varies from about 70 fb to 25 fb, for $m_{H^\\pm}$ ranging from 150 GeV to 500 GeV with 300 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity in the $\\tau\\tau$ mode. We further interpret these bounds in the context of Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model. We find that large regions of parameter space in $\\tan\\beta$ versus $\\sin(\\beta-\\alpha)$ can be covered when the daughter Higgs mass is relatively light, in particular, for small and large $\\tan\\beta$. The exclusion region in the $m_{H^\\pm}-\\tan\\beta$ plane can be extended to $m_{H^\\pm}=$ 600 GeV, while discovery is possible for $m_{H^\\pm}\\lesssim$ 280 GeV with 300 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity. The exotic decay mode $H^\\pm \\to AW/HW$ offers a complementary channel to the conventional mode $H^\\pm \\to \\tau\

Baradhwaj Coleppa; Felix Kling; Shufang Su

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Dispersion and combustion of a bitumen-based emulsion in bubbling fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental program was carried out with ORIMULSION{reg{underscore}sign} as a part of an R and D project aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of contemporary combustion and desulfurization in atmospheric bubbling fluidized bed. ORIMULSION is a bitumen-based emulsion that is produced in Venezuela's Orinoco region with 30% w/w water and about 3% w/w sulfur content (on a dry basis). Two atmospheric, pre-pilot, bubbling bed units were used: a 140 mm ID reactor and a 370 mm ID combustor. The first one provides qualitative and quantitative information on dispersion and in-bed retention of ORIMULSION: to this end the bed is operated batchwise in hot tests without combustion and the fuel can be injected into the bed with or without a gaseous atomization stream. With the second one, steady-state combustion tests are carried out under typical conditions of bubbling FBC. The outcome of the experiments and significance of the results are fully discussed in the paper with reference to the ORIMULSION combustion mechanism. Among the other findings, the following ones appear particularly relevant. (1) A carbon condensed phase is actually formed with the structure of tiny carbon deposits on bed particles, but at a very low rate, as a consequence, combustion (and pollutant formation) is dominated by homogeneous mechanisms. (2) Combustion efficiency is always very high, with values approaching 100% in those tests with higher excess air. (3) The in-bed combustion efficiency is enhanced by those fuel injection conditions that lead to dispersion into fine droplets and to effective mixing within the bed; therefore, contrarily to the case of water suspensions of solid fuels, intense atomization of ORIMULSION is recommended.

Miccio, F.; Miccio, M.; Repetto, L.; Gradassi, A.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most selective for CO{sub 2} due to the strong interaction of the zeolites with CO{sub 2}. For example, at 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity increased from 34.7 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 56.4. The large increase in selectivity was the result of the increase in CO{sub 2} permeability from 7.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 14.6 Barrers. At 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation was also improved from 83.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 136.7 with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability from 17.5 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 35.3 Barrers. The 10% carbon aerogel-zeolite A and -zeolite Y composite/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation from 34.7 to 71.5 (zeolite A composite) and to 57.4 (zeolite Y composite); in addition, the membrane exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation from 33.1 to 50 (zeolite A composite) and to 49.4 (zeolite Y composite), indicating that these type of materials have affinity for CO{sub 2}. The inclusion of mesoporosity enhanced the dispersion of the additive allowing loadings of up to 30% (w/w) without the formation of non-selective voids.

Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

Polyamide desalination membrane characterization and surface modification to enhance fouling resistance.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The market for polyamide desalination membranes is expected to continue to grow during the coming decades. Purification of alternative water sources will also be necessary to meet growing water demands. Purification of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, is of interest due to its dual potential to provide water for beneficial use as well as to reduce wastewater disposal costs. However, current polyamide membranes are prone to fouling, which decreases water flux and shortens membrane lifetime. This research explored surface modification using poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE) to improve the fouling resistance of commercial polyamide membranes. Characterization of commercial polyamide membrane performance was a necessary first step before undertaking surface modification studies. Membrane performance was found to be sensitive to crossflow testing conditions. Concentration polarization and feed pH strongly influenced NaCl rejection, and the use of continuous feed filtration led to higher water flux and lower NaCl rejection than was observed for similar tests performed using unfiltered feed. Two commercial polyamide membranes, including one reverse osmosis and one nanofiltration membrane, were modified by grafting PEGDE to their surfaces. Two different PEG molecular weights (200 and 1000) and treatment concentrations (1% (w/w) and 15% (w/w)) were studied. Water flux decreased and NaCl rejection increased with PEGDE graft density ({micro}g/cm{sup 2}), although the largest changes were observed for low PEGDE graft densities. Surface properties including hydrophilicity, roughness and charge were minimally affected by surface modification. The fouling resistance of modified and unmodified membranes was compared in crossflow filtration studies using model foulant solutions consisting of either a charged surfactant or an oil in water emulsion containing n-decane and a charged surfactant. Several PEGDE-modified membranes demonstrated improved fouling resistance compared to unmodified membranes of similar initial water flux, possibly due to steric hindrance imparted by the PEG chains. Fouling resistance was higher for membranes modified with higher molecular weight PEG. Fouling was more extensive for feeds containing the cationic surfactant, potentially due to electrostatic attraction with the negatively charged membranes. However, fouling was also observed in the presence of the anionic surfactant, indicating hydrodynamic forces are also responsible for fouling.

Sharma, Mukul M. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Freeman, Benny D. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Van Wagner, Elizabeth M. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Hickner, Michael A. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Altman, Susan Jeanne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica] [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C. [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas] [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Biological Macromolecular Structures Data from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) is a non-profit consortium that works to improve understanding of the function of biological systems through the study of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. The RCSB PDB is one of three sites serving as deposition, data processing, and distribution sites of the Protein Data Bank Archive. Each site provides its own view of the primary data, thus providing a variety of tools and resources for the global community. RCSB is also the official keeper for the PDB archive, with sole access authority to the PDB archive directory structure and contents. The RCSB PDB Information Portal for Biological Macromolecular Structures offers online tools for search and retrieval, for visualizing structures, for depositing, validating, or downloading data, news and highlights, a discussion forum, and links to other areas of related research. The PDB archive is a repository of atomic coordinates and other information describing proteins and other important biological macromolecules. Structural biologists use methods such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the location of each atom relative to each other in the molecule. They then deposit this information, which is then annotated and publicly released into the archive by the wwPDB. Results can be viewed as 3-D images or models.

285

SAPPHiRE: a Small Gamma-Gamma Higgs Factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new particle with mass ~ 125 GeV that resembles the Higgs boson has recently been discovered by ATLAS and CMS. We propose a low-energy gamma-gamma collider as a cost- and time-efficient option for a Higgs factory capable of studying this particle in detail. In the past, this option has been suggested as a possible application of the CLIC two-beam accelerator technology (the CLIC Higgs Experiment, CLICHE) or as an option for the ILC. Here we propose a design based on a pair of \\sim 10 GeV recirculating Linacs (Small Accelerator for Photon-Photon Higgs production using Recirculating Electrons, SAPPHiRE) similar in design to those proposed for the LHeC. We present parameters for the e- beams and sketch a laser backscattering system capable of producing a gamma-gamma peak luminosity of 0.36 \\times 10^34/cm2/s with E_CM (gamma-gamma) \\sim 125 GeV. A gamma-gamma collider with such a luminosity could be used to measure accurately the mass, bbar, WW\\ast, and gamma-gamma decays of the Higgs boson. We also comment on possible synergies with other projects such as LHeC, the ILC or CLIC, and on other physics prospects in gamma-gamma and e-gamma collisions.

S. A. Bogacz; J. Ellis; L. Lusito; D. Schulte; T. Takahashi; M. Velasco; M. Zanetti; F. Zimmermann

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effect of annealing on graphene incorporated poly-(3-hexylthiophene):CuInS{sub 2} photovoltaic device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of thermal annealing on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):CuInS{sub 2} quantum dot:graphene photovoltaic device has been studied by analyzing optical characteristics of composite films and electrical characteristics of the device with structure indium tin oxide/poly[ethylene dioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (ITO/PEDOT:PSS)/P3HT:CIS:graphene/LiF/aluminum. It was observed that after annealing at 120°C for 15 min a typical device containing 0.005 % w/w of graphene shows the best performance with a PCE of 1.3%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.44V, a short-circuit current density of 7.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, and a fill factor of 0.39. It is observed that the thermal annealing considerably enhances the efficiency of solar cells. However, an annealing at higher temperature such as at 140°C results in a decrease in the device efficiency.

Kumari, Anita, E-mail: anita.20188@gmail.com; Dixit, Shiv Kumar [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Singh, Inderpreet [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi, South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021, India and SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Paramagnetic resonance at low fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$ 15?$ 62Mo1iM1t 1J"o 5M1$kwi15Mk 1J$ o5kMiW 2K$w ?2w$ 6L6W$o) rM6w$io5Mk 1J$ 15?$ 62Mo1iM1 h$L2MS .)A o$62MSo S5S M21 i''w$65ihWL 5?m 'w2K$ 1J5o '$w-2w?iM6$ iMS ?iS$ 1J$ i?'W5-5$w S5--56"W1 12 T2w^ T51J) 0J$ ?2W$M25S $?? -???????? ??h...?'$w$o Tio 1J$ J5kJ$o1 6"ww$M1 TJ56J 62"WS h$ "o$S T51J2"1 "MS"$ J$i15Mk) ?12wik$ hi11$w5$o T$w$ "o$S io 1J$ ??S ?w T h e ESTERLINE-ANGUS C o ., In c ., I n d i a n a p o l i s , I n d . U.S. A 5 5A5 ?m??$ $9?? LS??$J?$ 6??A $9?????$J?$ .9A' ???5...

Becker, Stewart

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Measurements of W? and Z? production in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The integrated and differential fiducial cross sections for the production of a W or Z boson in association with a high-energy photon are measured using pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV . The analyses use a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb?1 collected by the ATLAS detector during the 2011 LHC data-taking period. Events are selected using leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons [W(e?, ??) and Z(e+ e? ,?+ ??, v??) ] with the requirement of an associated isolated photon. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for new phenomena. The measurements are used to probe the anomalous WW? , ZZ? , and Z?? triple-gauge-boson couplings and to search for the production of vector resonances decaying to Z? and W? . No deviations from Standard Model predictions are observed and limits are placed on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings and on the production of new vector meson resonances.

Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andrieux, M-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Atkinson, M.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bach, A. M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartsch, V.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beale, S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K. H.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P. K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertella, C.; Bertin, A.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bittner, B.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Boelaert, N.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brendlinger, K.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Broggi, F.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Capture and Indirect Detection of Inelastic Dark Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the capture rate for Dark Matter in the Sun for models where the dominant interaction with nuclei is inelastic -- the Dark Matter up-scatters to a nearby dark "partner" state with a small splitting of order a 100 keV. Such models have previously been shown to be compatible with DAMA/LIBRA data, as well as data from all other direct detection experiments. The kinematics of inelastic Dark Matter ensures that the dominant contribution to capture occurs from scattering off of iron. We give a prediction for neutrino rates for current and future neutrino telescopes based on the results from current direct detection experiments. Current bounds from Super--Kamiokande and IceCube-22 significantly constrain these models, assuming annihilations are into two-body Standard Model final states, such as W+W-, t-tbar, b-bbar or tau+tau-. Annihilations into first and second generation quarks and leptons are generally allowed, as are annihilations into new force carriers which decay dominantly into e+e-, mu+mu- and pi+pi-.

Arjun Menon; Rob Morris; Aaron Pierce; Neal Weiner

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Search for a dijet resonance in events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a search for a dijet resonance in events with only two or three jets and large imbalance in the total event transverse momentum. This search is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a W or Z boson, where the boson decays leptonically with one or more neutrinos in the final state. We use the full data set collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider at a proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb^{-1}. We study the invariant mass distribution of the two jets with highest transverse energy. We find good agreement between data and standard model background expectations and measure the combined cross section for WW, WZ, and ZZ production to be 13.8^{+3.0}_{-2.7} pb. No significant anomalies are observed in the mass spectrum and 95% credibility level upper limits are set on the production rates of a potential new particle in association with a W or Z boson.

Aaltonen, T.; et al.,

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Intern experience at Arkansas Nuclear One Steam Electric Station: an internship report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OoUt) NDGLFOW R)eU)FFWU)e bWtDa EiF INK NDGLFOW R)eU)FFWU)e bWtDa U. .DaFW8U.Fn cf oiF PoOoUt) INK AkINE (INIbRX hUeDWF r v I2 A2 * k2 bF)FWOoUt) O)n ut).oWDGoUt) wFaOWoMF)o KWeO)UxOoUt) 5 hUe DWF 7 v INK Po Oo Ut ) KW eO )U xO oU t... E l(FMcFW1 l(FMcFW1 (Of rsms ABSTRACT T)oFW) RVaFWUF)GF Oo IW4O).O. NDGLFOW K)F PoFOM RLFGoWUG PoOoUt) l(Of rsms1 SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW6 B2P26 5)U8FW.Uof td (U..tDWUvXtLLOy (2R)e26 EFVO. I * ( 5)U8FW.Uof uiOUWMO) td In8U.tWf utMMUooFF- wW2...

Miller, William Bruce, 1953-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to W+? production with leptonic W-boson decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to W+\\gamma\\ production, including the leptonic decay of the W boson and taking into account all off-shell effects of the W boson, where the finite width of the W boson is implemented using the complex-mass scheme. Corrections induced by incoming photons are fully included and find particular emphasis in the discussion of phenomenological predictions for the LHC. The corresponding next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced as well. In order to separate hard photons from jets, a quark-to-photon fragmentation function a la Glover and Morgan is employed. Our results are implemented into Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. We present integrated cross sections for the LHC at 7TeV, 8TeV, and 14TeV as well as differential distributions at 14TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we discuss the impact of anomalous WW\\gamma\\ couplings.

Ansgar Denner; Stefan Dittmaier; Markus Hecht; Christian Pasold

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Chlorophyll a sensitized redox processes in microemulsion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chlorophyll-containing microemulsion was prepared on 80% water w/w and sodium hexadecyl sulfate, hexadecane, 1-pentanol, and chlorophyll a. The droplet radius as determined by autocorrelated Rayleigh scattering is 130 angstroms. Using a pulsed ruby laser the chl-a triplet spectrum was measured. It peaks at approximately 465 nm and shows minima due to ground-state bleaching at 430 and 420 nm. Chl-a reduces methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) with a specific rate of 4 x 10/sup 8/ M/sup -1/ sec./sup -1/. At 5 x 10/sup -3/ M MV/sup 2 +/ concentration the efficiency of this process is unity. The cation radical Chl-a/sup +/ reacts with both ascorbate and NADh. In the latter case Chl-a can sensitize irreversible electron transfer from NADh to MV/sup 2 +/. If this system is coupled with a suitable hydrogenation catalyst, hydrogen evolution from water is observed. 34 references.

Kiwi, J.; Gratzel, M.

1980-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor is being developed that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Two critical materials issues are the cluster's ability to withstand high temperatures when immobilized in a porous the sol-gel support, and whether after heating to high temperatures, the sol-gel matrix maintains a high and constant permeability to oxygen to support rapid quenching of luminescence. We used a composite materials approach to prepare stable sensing layers on optical fibers. We dispersed 60 w/w% of a pre-cured sol-gel composite containing the potassium salt of molybdenum clusters (K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}) into a sol-gel binder solution, and established the conditions necessary for deposition of sol-gel films on optical fibers and planar substrates. The fiber sensor has an output signal of 5 nW when pumped with an inexpensive commercial 365 nm ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED). Quenching of the sensor signal by oxygen was observed up to a gas temperature of 175 C with no degradation of the oxygen permeability of the composite after high temperature cycling. On planar substrates the cluster containing composite responds within <1 second to a gas exchange from nitrogen to oxygen, indicating the feasibility of real-time oxygen detection.

Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

296

High energy photon-photon collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collisions of high energy photons produced at a electron-positron collider provide a comprehensive laboratory for testing QCD, electroweak interactions and extensions of the standard model. The luminosity and energy of the colliding photons produced by back-scattering laser beams is expected to be comparable to that of the primary e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions. In this overview, we shall focus on tests of electroweak theory in photon-photon annihilation, particularly {gamma}{gamma} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, {gamma}{gamma} {yields} Higgs bosons, and higher-order loop processes, such as {gamma}{gamma} {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, Z{gamma} and ZZ. Since each photon can be resolved into a W{sup +}W{sup minus} pair, high energy photon-photon collisions can also provide a remarkably background-free laboratory for studying WW collisions and annihilation. We also review high energy {gamma}{gamma} tests of quantum chromodynamics, such as the scaling of the photon structure function, t{bar t} production, mini-jet processes, and diffractive reactions.

Brodsky, S.J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb{sup -1} to 4.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around m{sub H} {approx} 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations ({sigma}). The local significances of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} and H {yields} WW{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8{sigma}, 2.1{sigma} and 1.4{sigma}, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be {approx}1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2{sigma}.

Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, SA; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Ad

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with W and Z bosons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the full 2011 data sample, from an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Higgs boson decay modes to tau tau and WW are explored by selecting events with three or four leptons in the final state. No excess above background expectations is observed, resulting in exclusion limits on the product of Higgs associated production cross section and decay branching fraction for Higgs boson masses between 110 and 200 GeV in these channels. Combining these results with other CMS associated production searches using the same dataset in the H to gamma gamma and H to b b-bar decay modes, the cross section for associated Higgs boson production 3.3 times the standard model expectation or larger is ruled out at the 95% confidence level for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV.

CMS Collaboration

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

300

Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb-1 to 4.9 fb-1 of pp collisions collected at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around mH ~ 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations (sigma). The local significance of H -> gamma gamma, H -> ZZ(*) -> lll'l' and H -> WW(*) -> lvl'v, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8 sigma, 2.1 sigma and 1.4 sigma, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be ~1.4% or, equivalently 2.2 sigma.

Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Aderholz, Michael; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; ?kesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Aliyev, Magsud; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral, Pedro; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; ?sman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Astvatsatourov, Anatoli; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Ay, Cano; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barashkou, Andrei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendel, Markus; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertinelli, Francesco; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Automated NNLL+NLO Resummation for Jet-Veto Cross Sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In electroweak-boson production processes with a jet veto, higher-order corrections are enhanced by logarithms of the veto scale over the invariant mass of the boson system. In this paper, we resum these Sudakov logarithms at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) accuracy and match our predictions to next-to-leading order (NLO) fixed-order results. We perform the calculation in an automated way, for arbitrary electroweak final states and in the presence of kinematic cuts on the leptons produced in the decays of the electroweak bosons. The resummation is based on a factorization theorem for the cross sections into hard functions, which encode the virtual corrections to the boson production process, and beam functions, which describe the low-p_T emissions collinear to the beams. The one-loop hard functions for arbitrary processes are calculated using the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework, while the beam functions are process independent. We perform the resummation for a variety of processes, in particular for W+W- pair production followed by leptonic decays of the W bosons.

Thomas Becher; Rikkert Frederix; Matthias Neubert; Lorena Rothen

2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

302

Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

304

Measuring W photon couplings in a 500 GeV e sup + e sup - collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard Model gives definite predictions for the W-photon couplings. Measuring them would test an important ingredient of the model. In this work we study the capability of a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider to measure these couplings. We study the most general C and P conserving WW{lambda} vertex. This vertex contains two free parameters, {kappa} and {lambda}. We look at three processes: e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, e{lambda} {yields} W{nu} and {lambda}{lambda} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}. For each process we present analytical expressions of helicity amplitudes for arbitrary values of {kappa} and {lambda}. We consider three different sources for the initial photon(s). The first two are breamsstrahlung and beamstrahlung (photon radiation induced by the collective fields of the opposite bunch). Both occur naturally in the collider environment. The third is a photon beam generated by scattering low energy laser light off a high energy electron beam. We examine potential observables for each process, calculating their sensitivity to {kappa} and {lambda}, and estimating the accuracy with which they can be measured. Assuming Standard Model values are actually measured, we present the region in the {kappa}-{lambda} plane to which the W couplings can be restricted with a given confidence level. We find that combining the three processes, one can measure {kappa} and {lambda} with accuracy of 0.01--0.02.

Yehudai, E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multi-lepton final states with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multi-lepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charged light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without an additional hadronically decaying tau; three light leptons; two same-charged light leptons with an additional hadronically decaying tau; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying taus. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value for comp...

The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Search for a massive resonance decaying into a Higgs boson and a W or Z boson in hadronic final states in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for a massive resonance decaying into a standard model Higgs boson (H) and a W or Z boson is reported. The analysis is performed on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7~fb$^{-1}$, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8~TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. Signal events in which the decay products of Higgs, W or Z bosons at high Lorentz boost are contained within a single reconstructed jet are identified using jet substructure techniques, including the tagging of b hadrons. This is the first search for heavy resonances decaying into HW or HZ resulting in an all-jets final state, as well as the first application of jet substructure techniques to identify ${\\rm H\\to WW^*\\to 4q}$ decays at high Lorentz boost. No significant signal is observed and limits are set at the 95\\% confidence level on the production cross section of W' and Z' in a model with mass-degenerate charged and neutral spin-1 resonances. Resonance masses are excluded for W' in [1....

CMS Collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at ?s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as of its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. Included in the combinations are the results of the decay modes H ? ??, ZZ?, WW?, Z?, bb ?, ?? and ??, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb?1 at ?s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb?1 at ?s = 8 ??TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18 ± 0.10 ± 0.07±0.08, where the first error reflects the statistical uncertainty and 0.07 the second and third errors reflect respectively the experimental and theoretical systematic uncertainties. Strong evidence is found for the vector boson fusion process with a signifi...

The ATLAS collaboration

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

MC4523 Sealed Cap: Component & characteristics development report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MC4523 Sealed Cap is a WW42C1 Percussion Primer that is pressed into a steel cylinder. Hermaticity of the input end is then provided by welding a thin steel closure disk on the input end of the MC4523. Thus, the user is provided with a component that is prequalified in terms of ignition sensitivity and hermeticity. The first customer is the Thermal Battery Department (1522). The MC4523 will be used on the MC2736A Thermal Battery which in turn will be used on the W78 JTA. Attachment of the MC4523 to the battery is with a laser weld. Combined test results of four production lots at a commercial supplier (PPI, TMS, WR1, and WR2) show an all-fire ignition sensitivity (.999 @ 50%) of approximately 60 millijoules of mechanical energy with a 2.2 gram firing pin. The firing pin had an impact tip with a radius of 0.020 inch. This firing pin is like that to be used in the W78 JTA application. Approximately 112 millijoules of mechanical energy will be supplied in the application, thus the design margin is more than adequate.

Begeal, D.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Glycolysis of carbon fiber-epoxy unidirectional mat catalysed by sodium hydroxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted to recycle carbon fibre-epoxy (CFRP) composite in woven sheet/ mat form. The CFRP was recycled through glycolysis with polyethlyene glycol (PEG 200) as the solvent. The CFRP was loaded into the solvent at a ratio of 4:1 (w/w). PEG200 was diluted with water to a ratio of 80:20 (v/v). This reaction was catalysed by sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution with varying concentrations at 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9% (w/v). The glycolysis was conducted at 180-190 °C. The recovered CF (rCF) was analysed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) while the degraded solution was analysed using FTIR and the epoxy content was determined. The FTIR spectrum of the rCF exhibited the disappearance of the COC peak belonged to epoxy and supported by the SEM micrographs that showed clear rCF. On the other hand, the analysed filtrate detected the disappearance of oxygen peak element in the EDX spectrum for all rCF samples. This gave an indication that the epoxy resin has been removed from the surface of the carbon fiber.

Zaini, Mariana Binti Mohd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Badri, Khairiah Haji [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Polymer Research Center, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43 (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Synthesis and physicochemical properties of epoxidized Tmp trioleate by in situ method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tmp trioleate was initially synthesized via esterification of trimetilolprapane and oleic acid (90%) using 1.5% of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a catalyst. The production of Tmp trioleate was observed at 98% (w/w). The iodine value of Tmp trioleate was analyzed for further reaction of epoxidation. Epoxide was important reaction as an intermediate for preparation of chemical modified lubricants from vegetable oils. Finding the best way of epoxidation process will give high quality for further modification of oil instead of reduce the cost and time for the preparation process during reaction of epoxidation. In this study, the epoxidation of unsaturation Tmp trioleate with peroxyformic acid generated in-situ from hydrogen peroxide 30% in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with formic acid was studied. 95% conversion to oxygen oxirane content (OOC) ring was obtained. The derivatization showed an improvement of the compound's oxidative stability evidenced from pressurized differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) data which are 177°C to 200°C. Physicochemical properties showed increasing of temperature of flash point from 280°C to 300°C and viscosity index (VI) from 146 to 154. However, the pour point showed increasing temperature which was ?58.81°C to ?17.32°C. From the data obtained, these derivatives have shown better performance of lubricity properties. Overall, the data indicates that these performances are compatible to the commercial lubricants.

Samidin, Salma; Salimon, Jumat [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

312

Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy {beta} and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy {alpha}. The transcript specific for CoASy {beta} was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy {beta}. In contrast to CoASy {alpha}, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy {beta} is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation.

Nemazanyy, Ivan [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)]. E-mail: nemazanyy@imbg.org.ua; Panasyuk, Ganna [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Breus, Oksana [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Zhyvoloup, Alexander [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Filonenko, Valeriy [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Gout, Ivan T. [Department of Structure and Function of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, 150 Zabolotnogo St, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine) and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Royal Free and University College Medical School, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: i.gout@ucl.ac.uk

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

313

A computer program for linear models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Z J 8 UJ 0 IU 4- IA Z a 0 IA IU K 2 O 0 Z IZ ?aa C w a 4IOO I- XVV ' ~ V ?I 2 2 J J 58 IL IU 4 4 0 0 4J UJ IU e VJ z UJ e V Z Z J W E 4 ll X RUJW ?I Vl I- I- VI ~ Z V UJ cl cl ZZ aa w V4JRZZ cl 0 ?LIL VV ZZ &I- IUIL a Vl IUW Ww... V I I 0 R H I-I 0 Z ZZ 3 3 0 0 Y Y X R Z IJI I- V I IU Z 0 4. V 4J EII Z Z K 4. Z K J 4. 3 H IU IU 0 $ +ZIU 0 0 N Pl Z I- ? J 4 Z EEI ORVIV 45 I- Z 0 V Z 4 R 0 V Z b H I- Z 0 ? V ? IA 0 IU Z a K?a IA IU ZP) LJ Q...

Zerbe, Manfred Rudolf

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Evidence for the direct decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The discovery of a new boson with a mass of approximately 125 GeV in 2012 at the LHC has heralded a new era in understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and possibly completing the standard model of particle physics. Since the first observation in decays to gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ boson pairs, an extensive set of measurements of the mass and couplings to W and Z bosons, as well as multiple tests of the spin-parity quantum numbers, have revealed that the properties of the new boson are consistent with those of the long-sought agent responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. An important open question is whether the new particle also couples to fermions, and in particular to down-type fermions, since the current measurements mainly constrain the couplings to the up-type top quark. Determination of the couplings to down-type fermions requires direct measurement of the corresponding Higgs boson decays, as recently reported by the CMS experiment in the study of Higgs decays to bottom quarks and...

Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, William Todd; Estevez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Electroless Ni coatings used in 4% NaCl corrosion control of mild steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study the behavior of electroless Ni coatings on SAE 1020 steel in aqueous 4% NaCl solution. An aqueous solution with NiSO{sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O (Nickel Sulfate), NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O (Sodium Hypophosphite), C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 3} (Lactic Acid), C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 2} (Propionic Acid) and Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Lead Nitrate) as the basic ingredients of the bath was selected for the autocatalytic deposition of Ni, with an average deposit rate of c.a. 19 {micro}m/h. Steel coupons were immersed in the bath for 1, 2, 3 h in the original solution, renewing with fresh solution every hour. Once coated with nickel, the coupons were subjected to heat treatment for 1, 2, and 3 h at 400 C, measuring hardness to determine how it is affected by thermal treatment. Salt-spray tests were carried out at 30 C in line with ASTM B117-75 and DIN 50907 standards. The corrosion rate was determined by potentiodynamic polarizing curves (0.28.10{sup {minus}3} V/s), using a 4.0% w/w NaCl solution. Corrosion resistance was higher in the coupons that underwent 2--3 h of heat treatment and 2--3 h plating time. Corrosion rate varied between 2.41 and 3.40 {micro}m/y. The surface of the coupons in the salt spray chamber had a good appearance at the end of the 568-hour test.

Sanchez, M.A.; Zambrano, J.A.; Perez, O. [Univ. del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela). Centro de Estudios de Corrosion; Podesta, J.J. [Univ. Nacional de La Plata (Argentina). Inst. de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Biodesulfurization techniques: Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coals. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an alternative to post-combustion desulfurization of coal and pre-combustion desulfurization using physicochemical techniques, the microbial desulfurization of coal may be accomplished through the use of microbial cultures that, in an application of various microbial species, may remove both the pyritic and organic fractions of sulfur found in coal. Organisms have been isolated that readily depyritize coal but often at prohibitively low rates of desulfurization. Microbes have also been isolated that may potentially remove the organic-sulfur fraction present in coal (showing promise when acting on organic sulfur model compounds such as dibenzothiophene). The isolation and study of microorganisms demonstrating a potential for removing organic sulfur from coal has been undertaken in this project. Additionally, the organisms and mechanisms by which coal is microbially depyritized has been investigated. Three cultures were isolated that grew on dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model organic-sulfur compound, as the sole sulfur source. These cultures (UMX3, UMX9, and IGTS8) also grew on coal samples as the sole sulfur source. Numerous techniques for pretreating and ``cotreating`` coal for depyritization were also evaluated for the ability to improve the rate or extent of microbial depyritization. These include prewashing the coal with various solvents and adding surfactants to the culture broth. Using a bituminous coal containing 0.61% (w/w) pyrite washed with organic solvents at low slurry concentrations (2% w/v), the extent of depyritization was increased approximately 25% in two weeks as compared to controls. At slurry concentrations of 20% w/v, a tetrachloroethylene treatment of the coal followed by depyritization with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans increased both the rate and extent of depyritization by approximately 10%.

Elmore, B.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

Electrodeposition of nickel-aluminum alloys from the aluminum chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride room temperature molten salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrodeposition of Ni and Ni-Al alloys on glassy carbon was investigated in the 66.7--33.3 mole percent (m/o) Al chloride-1-methyl-3-ethylimidazolium chloride molten salt containing electrogenerated Ni(II) at 40 C. The electrodeposition of Ni on glassy carbon involves 3-D progressive nucleation on a finite number of active sites with hemispherical diffusion-controlled growth of the nuclei. At potentials slightly more negative than those needed to induce the reduction of Ni(II) to the metal, Al is codeposited with Ni to produce Ni-Al alloys. Controlled-potential and controlled-current experiments revealed that it is possible to produce alloy deposits containing up to approximately 40 atomic percent (a/o) Al under conditions that circumvent the bulk deposition of Al. The Al content of the Ni-Al deposit was found to vary linearly with the deposition potential but nonlinearly with the current density. The electrodeposited Ni-Al alloys are thermodynamically unstable with respect to Ni(II), i.e., immersion of the alloy deposit in melt containing Ni(II) under open-circuit conditions leads to a reduction in the Al content of the alloy. The mechanism of alloy formation appears to involve underpotential deposition of Al on the developing Ni deposit; however, alloy formation must be kinetically hindered because the Al content is always less than predicted from theoretical considerations. Ni-Al alloys produced at 0.30 V in melt containing Ni(II) and 20% (w/w) benzene as a cosolvent contained about 15 a/o Ni and were of high quality with a disordered fcc structure, but alloys produced at more negative potentials had the visual appearance of a loosely adherent, finely divided, black powder and were heavily contaminated with chloride, probably as a result of the occlusion of the molten salt solvent by the dendritic alloy deposit during deposit growth.

Pitner, W.R.; Hussey, C.L. [Univ. of Mississippi, University, MS (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stafford, G.R. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Lab.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.rutkowski@pwr.wroc.pl

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

High-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting of metabolites from cecum and distal colon contents of rats fed resistant starch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-of-flight mass spectrometry along with statistical analysis was utilized to study metabolic profiles among rats fed resistant starch (RS) diets. Fischer 344 rats were fed four starch diets consisting of 55 % (w/w, dbs) starch. A control starch diet consisting of corn starch was compared against three RS diets. The RS diets were high-amylose corn starch (HA7), HA7 chemically modified with octenyl succinic anhydride, and stearic-acid-complexed HA7 starch. A subgroup received antibiotic treatment to determine if perturbations in the gut microbiome were long lasting. A second subgroup was treated with azoxymethane (AOM), a carcinogen. At the end of the 8-week study, cecal and distal colon content samples were collected from the sacrificed rats. Metabolites were extracted from cecal and distal colon samples into acetonitrile. The extracts were then analyzed on an accurate-mass time-of-flight mass spectrometer to obtain their metabolic profile. The data were analyzed using partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The PLS-DA analysis utilized a training set and verification set to classify samples within diet and treatment groups. PLS-DA could reliably differentiate the diet treatments for both cecal and distal colon samples. The PLS-DA analyses of the antibiotic and no antibiotic-treated subgroups were well classified for cecal samples and modestly separated for distal colon samples. PLS-DA analysis had limited success separating distal colon samples for rats given AOM from those not treated; the cecal samples from AOM had very poor classification. Mass spectrometry profiling coupled with PLS-DA can readily classify metabolite differences among rats given RS diets.

Anderson, Timothy J. [Ames Laboratory; Jones, Roger W. [Ames Laboratory; Ai, Yongfeng [Iowa State University; Houk, Robert S. [Ames Laboratory; Jane, Jay-lin [Iowa State University; Zhao, Yinsheng [Iowa State University; Birt, Diane F. [Iowa State University; McClelland, John F. [Ames Laboratory

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

Spin structure measurements from E143 at SLAC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions, g{sub 1}{sup p} at beam energies of 29.1, 16.2, and 9.7 GeV, and g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} at a beam energy of 29.1 GeV. The integrals {Gamma}{sub p} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2})dx and {Gamma}{sub d} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2})dx have been evaluated at fixed Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the 29.1 GeV data to yield {Gamma}{sub p} = 0.127 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.010(syst.) and {Gamma}{sub d} = 0.041 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004. The Q{sup 2} dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} has been studied and is found to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Within experimental precision, the g{sub 2} data are well-described by the twist-2 contribution, g{sub 2}{sup ww}. Twist-3 matrix elements have been extracted and are compared to theoretical predictions. The asymmetry A{sub 2} has also been measured and is found to be significantly smaller than the positivity limit {radical}R for both targets A{sub 2}{sup p} is found to be positive and inconsistent with zero.

Stuart, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Total and Inorganic Arsenic in Mid-Atlantic Marine Fish and Shellfish and Implications for Fish Advisories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Up to 33.3 metric tons of arsenic trioxide were spilled off the Middle Atlantic coast of the United States in January of 1992 during a shipping accident. Historical fish tissue data for samples collected in the Delaware Inland Bays before and after the spill reveal a prominent spike in total arsenic in summer flounder following the spill and a gradual decline ever since. In 2002, a small study was conducted to determine whether summer flounder migrating into the Delaware Inland Bays from the Continental Shelf in the spring contain higher body burdens of arsenic than summer flounder migrating out of the Inland Bays in the fall. Total arsenic was significantly higher in the incoming fish. Considering that summer flounder overwinter at the spill site, that arsenic trioxide is a dense powder of limited solubility that would tend to incorporate into the sediments, and that summer flounder are demersal fish, we conclude that summer flounder accumulate arsenic offshore and that the likely source of their extra body burden is the spilled arsenic. Speciation of arsenic in the summer flounder, as well as in Atlantic croaker, striped bass, and hard clam reveal low concentrations (0.5 ? 20 ug/kg ww) of toxic inorganic arsenic. DMA was more than an order of magnitude greater in hard clam meats than in the other species tested, a finding attributed to arsenic uptake by phytoplankton and subsequent dietary uptake by the clam. Risk assessment using the inorganic arsenic concentrations was used to conclude that a fish advisory is not warranted.

Greene, Richard; Crecelius, Eric A.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

325

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (<260 C boiling point). Carboxylic acid content of all of the high oxygen content fractions was likely too high for these materials to be considered as fuel blendstocks although potential for blending with crude oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

Magnetic and elastic anisotropy in magnetorheological elastomers using nickel-based nanoparticles and nanochains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel (Ni) based nanoparticles and nanochains were incorporated as fillers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers and then these mixtures were thermally cured in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, macroscopically structured-anisotropic PDMS-Ni based magnetorheological composites were obtained with the formation of pseudo-chains-like structures (referred as needles) oriented in the direction of the applied magnetic field when curing. Nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature, under air ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure) and then calcined at 400?°C (in air atmosphere also). The size distribution was obtained by fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments with a polydisperse hard spheres model and a Schulz-Zimm distribution, obtaining a size distribution centered at (10.0?±?0.6) nm with polydispersivity given by ??=?(8.0?±?0.2) nm. The SAXS, X-ray powder diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) experiments are consistent with single crystal nanoparticles of spherical shape (average particle diameter obtained by TEM: (12?±?1) nm). Nickel-based nanochains (average diameter: 360?nm; average length: 3??m, obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy; aspect ratio?=?length/diameter ? 10) were obtained at 85?°C and ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure). The magnetic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains at room temperature are compared and discussed in terms of surface and size effects. Both Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains were used as fillers for obtaining the PDMS structured magnetorheological composites, observing the presence of oriented needles. Magnetization curves, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra, and strain-stress curves of low filler's loading composites (2% w/w of fillers) were determined as functions of the relative orientation with respect to the needles. The results indicate that even at low loadings it is possible to obtain magnetorheological composites with anisotropic properties, with larger anisotropy when using nanochains. For instance, the magnetic remanence, the FMR field, and the elastic response to compression are higher when measured parallel to the needles (about 30% with nanochains as fillers). Analogously, the elastic response is also anisotropic, with larger anisotropy when using nanochains as fillers. Therefore, all experiments performed confirm the high potential of nickel nanochains to induce anisotropic effects in magnetorheological materials.

Landa, Romina A.; Soledad Antonel, Paula; Ruiz, Mariano M.; Negri, R. Martín, E-mail: rmn@qi.fcen.uba.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Instituto de Química Física de Materiales, Ambiente y Energía (INQUIMAE), Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, C1428EGA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, Oscar E. [Departamento de Industrias, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Butera, Alejandro [Centro Atómico Bariloche (Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica. Argentina) and Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza (Argentina); Jorge, Guillermo [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Oliveira, Cristiano L. P. [Grupo de Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Regenerating cellulose from ionic liquids for an accelerated enzymatic hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient conversion of lignocellulosic materials into fuel ethanol has become a research priority in producing affordable and renewable energy. The pretreatment of lignocelluloses is known to be key to the fast enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Recently, certain ionic liquids (ILs)were found capable of dissolving more than 10 wt% cellulose. Preliminary investigations [Dadi, A.P., Varanasi, S., Schall, C.A., 2006. Enhancement of cellulose saccharification kinetics using an ionic liquid pretreatment step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 95, 904 910; Liu, L., Chen, H., 2006. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose materials treated with ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl. Chin. Sci. Bull. 51, 2432 2436; Dadi, A.P., Schall, C.A., Varanasi, S., 2007. Mitigation of cellulose recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis by ionic liquid pretreatment. Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 137 140, 407 421] suggest that celluloses regenerated from IL solutions are subject to faster saccharification than untreated substrates. These encouraging results offer the possibility of using ILs as alternative and nonvolatile solvents for cellulose pretreatment. However, these studies are limited to two chloride-based ILs: (a) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl), which is a corrosive, toxic and extremely hygroscopic solid (m.p. 70 C), and (b) 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl), which is viscous and has a reactive side-chain. Therefore, more in-depth research involving other ILs is much needed to explore this promising pretreatment route. For this reason, we studied a number of chloride- and acetate-based ILs for cellulose regeneration, including several ILs newly developed in our laboratory. This will enable us to select inexpensive, efficient and environmentally benign solvents for processing cellulosic biomass. Our data confirm that all regenerated celluloses are less crystalline (58 75% lower) and more accessible to cellulase (>2 times) than untreated substrates. As a result, regenerated Avicel cellulose, filter paper and cottonwere hydrolyzed 2 10 times faster than the respective untreated celluloses. A complete hydrolysis of Avicel cellulose could be achieved in 6 h given the Trichoderma reesei cellulase/substrate ratio (w/w) of 3:20 at 50 C. In addition,we observed that cellulase is more thermally stable (up to 60 C) in the presence of regenerated cellulose. Furthermore, our systematic studies suggest that the presence of various ILs during the hydrolysis induced different degrees of cellulase inactivation. Therefore, a thorough removal of IL residues after cellulose regeneration is highly recommended, and a systematic investigation on this subject is much needed.

Zhao, Hua [Savannah State University; Jones, Cecil L [Savannah State University; Baker, Gary A [ORNL; Xia, Shuqian [Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; Olubajo, Olarongbe [Savannah State University; Person, Vernecia [Savannah State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

Innocenzi, Valentina, E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Kopacek, Bernd [SAT, Austrian Society for Systems Engineering and Automation, Gurkasse 43/2, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Vegliò, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

332

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Search for $p \\bar{p} \\rightarrow WZ \\rightarrow l\  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high energy physics has made huge steps forward the comprehension of the inner most nature of our universe and the matter we are composed of. The experimental discoveries, and the theories of the last 50 years that the experimental discoveries had confirmed or inspired, made possible to build a theory of the interactions. Weak interactions have been discovered and unified with the Electromagnetic ones in the Standard Model, which is the most widely experimentally tested and confirmed model of this century. The only prediction which is still unconfirmed is the existence of a particle, the Higgs boson, which provides particles with mass, interacting with them, in a spontaneous symmetry breakdown that doesn't violate the natural gauge symmetry of the Lagrangian of the system. One of the ways in which the Standard Model has been tested during the last 20 years is by accelerating e{sup +}e{sup -} (LEP) or p{bar p} (Tevatron) particles in a circular ring and colliding them inside a detector which is designed to reveal the final reaction products. We now have two operating hadron colliders in the world. The Tevatron at Fermilab laboratory of Chicago, collides protons against anti-protons since 1989 and has reached its maximum energy in the mass center of 1.96 TeV since 2001. It has collected approximately 7 fb{sup -1} of data so far, that allowed important discoveries, as the top quark one, B{sub s} mixing, precision measurements of some of the Standard Model free parameters, e.g. the W mass, and search for New Phenomena. The LHC at CERN in Geneva is a proton proton collider and has started the data acquisition in March 2010, at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, thus beating the world record of the Tevatron. LHC however has not yet either the integrated luminosity nor the detailed understanding of the detectors to start investigating Higgs or di-boson production. The purpose of this work is to analyse the data of the CDF experiment at Tevatron to search for the associate production of a W{sup {+-}} and Z gauge boson, looking for them in the lepton, neutrino plus jets final state, This process is predicted by the Standard Model but not revealed yet in this particular channel, both for its small cross section ({sigma}{sub WW/WZ} {approx} 16 pb{sup -1}) and for the huge backgrounds we have to deal with. The W{sup +}W{sup -} or W{sup {+-}}Z in l {bar {nu}}{sub l} j j process has been measured for the first time in [4] and represents the starting point of this work. Our aim is to discriminate W{sup {+-}}Z process from W{sup +}W{sup -} one requiring the decay of the Z boson in two b-quarks. The evidence of a peak on the invariant mass distribution will allow a tuning of the invariant mass resolution of b-jets. In addition, one of the main motivations for this quest is the similarity of this exactly predicted process with the W{sup {+-}}H associate production signature, for which it represents a test of the searching tools and techniques, as long as an irreducible background that must be understood before such Higgs search is performed.

Pani, Priscilla; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Comproportionation of Cationic and Anionic Tungsten Complexes Having an N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligand to Give the Isolable 17-Electron Tungsten Radical, CpW(CO)2(IMes)•  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series consisting of a tungsten anion, radical and cation, supported by the N-heterocyclic carbene IMes (1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene) and spanning formal oxidation states W(0), W(I) and W(II), has been synthesized, isolated, and characterized. Reaction of the hydride CpW(CO)2(IMes)H with KH and 18 crown 6 gives the tungsten anion [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]-[K(18 crown 6)]+. The crystal structure of this complex shows that the K+ interacts not only with the oxygen atoms in the crown ether, but also with the carbonyl oxygens. The electrochemical oxidation of [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]- in acetonitrile is fully reversible (E½ = ?1.65 V vs Cp2Fe+•/0) at all scan rates, indicating that CpW(CO)2(IMes)• is a persistent radical. Hydride transfer from CpW(CO)2(IMes)H to Ph3C+PF6 affords [cis-CpW(CO)2(IMes)(MeCN)]+PF6 . Comproportionation of [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]- with [CpW(CO)2(IMes)(MeCN)]+ gives the 17-electron tungsten radical CpW(CO)2(IMes)•. This complex shows paramagnetically shifted resonances in 1H NMR spectra and has been characterized by IR spectroscopy, low-temperature EPR spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. CpW(CO)2(IMes)• is very stable with respect to disproportionation and dimerization. NMR studies of degenerate electron transfer between CpW(CO)2(IMes)• and [CpW(CO)2(IMes)]- are reported. DFT calculations were carried out on CpW(CO)2(IMes)H, as well as on related complexes bearing NHC ligands with N,N´ substituents Me [CpW(CO)2(IMe)H] or H [CpW(CO)2(IH)H] to compare to the experimentally studied IMes complexes with mesityl substituents. These calculations reveal W H homolytic bond dissociation energies (BDEs) to decrease with increasing steric bulk of the NHC ligand, from 67 for CpW(CO)2(IH)H to 64 for CpW(CO)2(IMe)H to 63 kcal/mol for CpW(CO)2(IMes)H. The calculated spin density at W for CpW(CO)2(IMes)• is 0.63. The W radicals CpW(CO)2(IMe)• and CpW(CO)2(IH)• are calculated to form weak W W bonds. The weakly bonded complexes [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2 and [CpW(CO)2(IH)]2, are predicted to have W-W BDEs of 6 and 18 kcal/mol, respectively, and to dissociate readily to the W-centered radicals CpW(CO)2(IMe)• and CpW(CO)2(IH)•. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Roberts, John A.; Franz, James A.; van der Eide, Edwin F.; Walter, Eric D.; Petersen, Jeffrey L.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

CONTROL OF FE(III) SITE OCCUPANCY ON THE RATE AND EXTENT OF MICROBIAL REDUCTION OF FE(III) IN NONTRONITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative study was performed to understand how Fe(III) site occupancy controls Fe(III) bioreduction in nontronite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. NAu-1 and NAu-2 were nontronites and contained Fe(III) in different structure sites with 16% and 23% total iron (w/w), respectively, with almost all iron as Fe(III). Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that Fe(III) was present in the octahedral site in NAu-1 (with a small amount of goethite), but in both the tetrahedral and the octahedral sites in NAu-2. Moessbauer data further showed that the octahedral Fe(III) in NAu-2 existed in at least two environments- trans (M1) and cis (M2) sites. The microbial Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 and NAu-2 was studied in batch cultures at a nontronite concentration of 5mg/mL in bicarbonate buffer with lactate as the electron donor. Fe(II) production in inoculated treatments was determined by extraction with 0.5 N HCl and compared to uninoculated controls to establish the extent of biological reduction. The resulting solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Moessbauer spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In the presence of an electron shuttle, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the extent of bioreduction was 11-16% for NAu-1 but 28-32% for NAu-2. The extent of reduction in the absence of AQDS was only 5-7% in NAu-1 but 14-18% in NAu-2. The reduction rate was also faster in NAu-2 than that in NAu-1. Moessbauer data of the bioreduced nontronite materials indicated that the Fe(III) reduction in NAu-1 was mostly from the presence of goethite, whereas the reduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and trans-octahedral Fe(III) in the structure. The measured aqueous Fe(II) was negligible [< 2.5% of the total biogenic Fe(II)]. As a result of bioreduction, the average nontronite particle thickness remained nearly the same (from 2.1 to 2.5 nm) for NAu-1, but decreased significantly from 6 to 3.5 nm for NAu-2 with a concomitant change in crystal size distribution. The decrease in crystal size suggests reductive dissolution of nontronite NAu-2, which was supported by aqueous solution chemistry (i.e., aqueous Si). These data suggest that the more extensive Fe(III) bioreduction in NAu-2 was due to the presence of the tetrahedral and the trans-octahedral Fe(III), which was presumed to be more reducible. The biogenic Fe(II) was not associated with biogenic solids such as siderite or green rust or in the aqueous solution. We infer that it may be either adsorbed onto surfaces of nontronite particles/bacteria and in the structure of nontronite. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that natural nontronite clays were capable of supporting cell growth even in non-growth medium, possibly due to presence of naturally existing nutrients in the nontronite clays. These results suggest that crystal chemical environment of Fe(III) is an important determinant in controlling the rate and extent of microbial reduction of Fe(III) in nontronite.

Jaisi, Deb P.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Dong, Hailiang

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a ?-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 ?C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the test samples at temperatures ranging from 26-30 ?C. The metathesized sodium aluminate was then dissolved by addition of volumes of water approximately equal to 1.3 times the volumes of caustic added to the test slurries. Aluminate dissolution was allowed to proceed for 2 days at ambient temperatures of ≈29 ?C. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.0 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 crushed heel solids composite test sample. The 20 wt% of solids remaining after the dissolution tests were 85-88 wt% gibbsite. If the density of the residual solids was approximately equal to that of gibbsite, they represented ≈17 vol% of the initial crushed solids composite test sample. In the water dissolution tests, addition of a volume of water ≈6.9 times the initial volume of the crushed solids composite was sufficient to dissolve and recover essentially all of the natrophosphate present. The ratio of the weight of water required to dissolve the natrophosphate solids to the estimated weight of natrophosphate present was 8.51. The Environmental Simulation Program (OLI Systems, Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey) predicts that an 8.36 w/w ratio would be required to dissolve the estimated weight of natrophosphate present in the absence of other components of the heel solids. Only minor amounts of Al-bearing solids were removed from the composite solids in the water dissolution tests. The caustic metathesis/aluminate dissolution test sequence, executed at temperatures ranging from 27-30 ?C, dissolved and recovered ≈69 wt% of the gibbsite estimated to have been present in the initial crushed heel solids composite. This level of gibbsite recovery is consistent with that measured in previous scoping tests on the dissolution of gibbsite in strong caustic solutions. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.3 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 aggregate solids test sample. The residual solids were 92-95 wt% gibbsite. Only a minor portion (≈4.

Callaway, William S.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z