National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for ww tment roject

  1. WW and WZ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipeles, Elliot; /UC, San Diego

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

  2. WW and WZ Production at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot Lipeles

    2007-01-19

    This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

  3. Jet Vetoes interfering with H ? WW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moult, Ian James

    Far off-shell Higgs production in H ? WW, ZZ, is a particularly powerful probe of Higgs properties, allowing one to disentangle Higgs width and coupling information unavailable in on-shell rate measurements. These measurements ...

  4. Gudrun's (NLO) list pp->WW jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huston, Joey

    Gudrun's (NLO) list 2->3 pp->WW jet pp->VVV pp->H + 2 jets 2->4 pp->4 jets pp->tT + 2jets p->tT bB pp->V+ 3 jets pp->VV + 2 jets pp->VVV + jet pp->WW bB From technology point-of-view start with massless cases such as + 2 jets then add progressively more difficult calculations (additional scales

  5. VP: http://ww ertson Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Prince April 2 Alumn ertson Hall vent is open a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m. p.m. ww.createsu or informatio //www.princ Princ eton Pr 24-25, 201 ni and Com Saturday 8:00 a.m , Dodds Au n to the pub Alumnia sity · Prince ram stein Galler for meals. yBreakfas marks PrizeWin PrizeWin ceinthe einaRacia orof

  6. International civil air transport : transition following WW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pogue, L. Welch

    1979-01-01

    International air transport, like many 20th Century marvels which are taken so much for granted today, broke out from its cocoon, so to speak, shortly after the end of World War II (WW II), took wing, and soared. Theretofore, ...

  7. Anomalous $WW?$ couplings with beam polarization at the Compact Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Ar?; A. A. Billur; S. C. ?nan; M. Köksal

    2015-06-30

    We study the anomalous $WW\\gamma$ couplings at the Compact Linear Collider through the processes $e^{+}e^{-}\\to W^+W^-$, $e^{-}e^{+} \\to e^{-} \\gamma^{*} e^{+} \\to e^{+} \

  8. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully leptonic WW decay channel at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LeBourgeois, Matthew; LeBourgeois, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    of the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Search for the Higgs Boson in the WW Decay Channel . . .

  9. CDF Note 11157 Measurement of WW and WZ production in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    CDF Note 11157 Measurement of WW and WZ production in the lepton+Heavy Flavor jets channel+WZ production in this final state and to extract a cross section measurement of WW+WZ = 13.7 ± 3.9 pb of the secondary-decay vertex properties allow to independently measure the WW and WZ production cross section

  10. Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W+jets Final States in pp? Collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-05-01

    We study WW and WZ production with l?qq (l=e,?) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity from pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections ?(WW) and ?(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V=W,Z) cross section to be ?(WV)=19.6+3.2-3.0 pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measuremore »?(WW)=15.9+3.7-3.2 pb and ?(WZ)=3.3+4.1-3.3 pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.« less

  11. The investigation of the gamma-gamma->WW including electromagnetic corrections at the TESLA kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Marfin; V. Mossolov; T. Shishkina

    2003-05-17

    The WW production in gamma-gamma scattering is considered in the Standard Model. The main contribution to radiative effects for the process gamma-gamma->WW has been calculating and analyzing. It is found the latter is considerable at high energies and greatly contributes to the differential cross section $d\\sigma$ at various polarizations of initial photons and final bosons. Monte-Carlo generator built based on TESLA kinematics.

  12. The investigation of the gg->WW including electromagnetic corrections at the TESLA kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marfin, I B; Shishkina, T

    2003-01-01

    The WW production in gamma-gamma scattering is considered in the Standard Model. The main contribution to radiative effects for the process gg->WW has been calculating and analyzing. It is found the latter is considerable at high energies and greatly contributes to the differential cross section $d\\sigma$ at various polarizations of initial photons and final bosons. Monte-Carlo generator built based on TESLA kinematics.

  13. Using Random Forests to Classify W+W- and ttbar Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lovelace Rainbolt; Thoth Gunter; Michael Schmitt

    2014-10-29

    We have carried out an exercise in the classification of W+W- and ttbar events as produced in a high-energy proton-proton collider, motivated in part by the current tension between the measured and predicted values of the WW cross section. The performance of the random forest classifier surpasses that of a standard cut-based analysis. Furthermore, the distortion of the distributions of key kinematic event features is relatively slight, suggesting that systematic uncertainties due to modeling might be reduced. Finally, our random forest can tolerate missing features such as missing transverse energy without a severe degradation of its performance.

  14. TMENT OF COM STATES OF AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30, 1986, the satellite orbit was changed, and the exact repeat mission (ERM) began on November 8 of about 17 days (244 revolutions in 17.05 days; average orbital period of 6037.55 sec). The ERM covered 62 of progress in refining the data set first distributed by NOAA in 1987. The previous release of the ERM data

  15. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton plus jets final state at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for WW and WZ production in final states that contain a charged lepton (electron or muon) and at least two jets, produced in ?s=1.96??TeV pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron, using data corresponding ...

  16. Measurement of Higgs Anomalous Coupling with H->WW* at International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Takubo; Katsumasa Ikematsu; Nobuchika Okada; Robert N. Hodgkinson; Keisuke Fujii

    2010-06-17

    The measurement of the Higgs coupling to W bosons is an important program at the international linear collider (ILC) to search for the anomaly in the coupling to the gauge bosons. We study the sensitivity of ILC to the Higgs anomalous coupling to W bosons by using ZH->vvWW* events. In this article, we report the status of the study.

  17. Scale effects for strength, ductility, and toughness in "brittle" materials W.W. Gerbericha)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballarini, Roberto

    Scale effects for strength, ductility, and toughness in "brittle" materials W.W. Gerbericha parameters. This gives proportionality between fracture toughness and the other mechanical properties, there has been a flourish of activity to measure length scale effects in the strength, ductility, toughness

  18. Anomalous quartic boson couplings via gamma gamma --> WW and gamma gamma --> WWZ at the TESLA kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Marfin; V. A. Mossolov; T. V. Shishkina

    2003-04-30

    The production of two and three electroweak gauge bosons in the high-energy $\\gamma\\gamma$ collisions gives the well opportunity to probe anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings. The influence of five possible anomalous couplings on the cross sections for $W^+W^-$, $W^+W^-\\gamma$, $W^+W^-Z$ productions has been investigated at the TESLA kinematics ($\\sqrt{S}\\sim 1$ TeV). There are the reasonable discriminations between various anomalous contributions.

  19. Measurement of the W+W- Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous WW? and WWZ Couplings in pp[over-bar] Collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings in pp[over-bar] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ...

  20. Bounding the Higgs width at the LHC: complementary results from H?WW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the potential of the process gg ? H? WW to provide bounds on the Higgs width. Recent studies using off-shell H? ZZ events have shown that Run 1 LHC data can constrain the Higgs width, $\\Gamma_H < (25-45) \\Gamma_{H}^{\\rm SM}$. Using 20 fb-1 of 8 TeV ATLAS data, we estimate a bound on the Higgs boson width from the WW channel between $\\Gamma_H < (100-500) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$. The large spread in limits is due to the range of cuts applied in the existing experimental analysis. The stricter cuts designed to search for the on-shell Higgs boson limit the potential number of off-shell events, weakening the constraints. As some of the cuts are lifted the bounds improve. We show that there is potential in the high transverse mass region to produce upper bounds of the order of $(25-50) \\Gamma_H^{SM}$, depending strongly on the level of systematic uncertainty that can be obtained. Thus, if these systematics can be controlled, a constraint on the Higgs boson width from the H ? WW$ decay mode can complement a corresponding limit from H ? ZZ.

  1. Threshold Resummed and Approximate NNLO results for W+W- Pair Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; Ian M. Lewis; Mao Zeng

    2013-09-19

    The next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD radiative corrections to W+W- production at hadron colliders are well understood. We combine NLO perturbative QCD calculations with soft-gluon resummation of threshold logarithms to find a next-to-next-to leading logarithmic (NNLL) prediction for the total cross section and the invariant mass distribution at the LHC. We also obtain approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) results for the total W+W- cross section at the LHC which includes all contributions from the scale dependent leading singular terms. Our result for the approximate NNLO total cross section is the most precise theoretical prediction available. Uncertainties due to scale variation are shown to be small when the threshold logarithms are included. NNLL threshold resummation increases the W+W- invariant mass distribution by ~ 3-4% in the peak region for both \\sqrt{S}=8 and 14 TeV. The NNLL threshold resummed and approximate NNLO cross sections increase the NLO cross section by 0.5-3% for \\sqrt{S}=7, 8, 13, and 14 TeV.

  2. Evidence for small-molecule-mediated loop stabilization in the structure of the isolated Pin1 WW domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortenson, David E.; Kreitler, Dale F.; Yun, Hyun Gi; Gellman, Samuel H., E-mail: gellman@chem.wisc.edu; Forest, Katrina T., E-mail: gellman@chem.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Two structures of a small protein with a defined tertiary fold, the isolated Pin1 WW domain, have been determined via racemic crystallization with small-molecule additives. These additives, which are either racemic or achiral, appear to stabilize a dynamic loop region of the structure. The human Pin1 WW domain is a small autonomously folding protein that has been useful as a model system for biophysical studies of ?-sheet folding. This domain has resisted previous attempts at crystallization for X-ray diffraction studies, perhaps because of intrinsic conformational flexibility that interferes with the formation of a crystal lattice. Here, the crystal structure of the human Pin1 WW domain has been obtained via racemic crystallization in the presence of small-molecule additives. Both enantiomers of a 36-residue variant of the Pin1 WW domain were synthesized chemically, and the l- and d-polypeptides were combined to afford diffracting crystals. The structural data revealed packing interactions of small carboxylic acids, either achiral citrate or a d,l mixture of malic acid, with a mobile loop region of the WW-domain fold. These interactions with solution additives may explain our success in crystallization of this protein racemate. Molecular-dynamics simulations starting from the structure of the Pin1 WW domain suggest that the crystal structure closely resembles the conformation of this domain in solution. The structural data presented here should provide a basis for further studies of this important model system.

  3. A Search for Higgs Boson in $H\\rightarrow W^+W^-$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Sung; for the CMS Collaboration

    2011-09-12

    A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

  4. Measuring Anomalous Couplings in H->WW* Decays at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Takubo; Robert N. Hodgkinson; Katsumasa Ikematsu; Keisuke Fujii; Nobuchika Okada; Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2013-05-17

    Measurement of the Higgs coupling to W-bosons is an important test of our understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. We study the sensitivity of the International Linear Collider (ILC) to the presence of anomalous HW+W- couplings using ZH -> nu nu WW* -> nu nu 4j events. Using an effective Lagrangian approach, we calculate the differential decay rates of the Higgs boson including the effects of new dimension-5 operators. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of events at the ILC, using a full detector simulation based on geant4 and a real event reconstruction chain. Expected constraints on the anomalous couplings are given.

  5. Study of anomalous $WW??$ coupling sensitivity at the Compact Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Koksal

    2014-09-09

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is one of the most popular linear colliders, planned to realize $e^{-}e^{+}$ collisions in three energy stages of $0.5$, $1.5$, and $3$ TeV. It has an energy scale never reached by any existing lepton collider. In this study, we present the sensitivity studies of the $WW\\gamma\\gamma$ anomalous quartic gauge boson coupling (aQGC) in the three different processes $e^{+}e^{-}\\rightarrow W^{-} W^{+}\\gamma$, $e^{+}e^{-} \\rightarrow e^{+}\\gamma^{*} e^{-} \\rightarrow e^{+} W^{-} \\gamma \

  6. Searching Heavier Higgs Boson via $H \\to hh \\to WW^*\\gamma\\gamma$ at LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, Lan-Chun; Fang, Yaquan; He, Hong-Jian; Zhang, Huijun

    2015-01-01

    The LHC discovery of a light Higgs particle $h^0$ (125GeV) opens up new prospect for searching heavier Higgs boson(s) at the LHC Run-2, which will unambiguously point to new physics beyond the standard model (SM). We study the detection of a heavier neutral Higgs boson $H^0$ via di-Higgs production channel at the LHC (14TeV), $H^0 \\to h^0h^0 \\to WW^*\\gamma\\gamma$. This directly probes the $Hhh$ cubic Higgs interaction, which exists in most extensions of the SM Higgs sector. For the decay products of final states $WW^*$, we include both pure leptonic mode $WW^* \\to \\ell\\bar{\

  7. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-11-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  8. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson in H to WW Channel at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pursley; for the CDF Collaboration

    2009-10-08

    We present a search for standard model Higgs boson to WW(*) production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final states in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 4.8/fb of integrated luminosity. To maximize sensitivity, the multivariate discriminants used to separate signal from background in the opposite-sign dilepton event sample are independently optimized for final states with zero, one, or two or more identified jets. All significant Higgs boson production modes (gluon fusion, associated production with either a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion) are considered in determining potential signal contributions. We also incorporate a separate analysis of the same-sign dilepton event sample which potentially contains additional signal events originating from associated Higgs boson production mechanisms. Cross section limits relative to the combined SM predictions are presented for a range of Higgs boson mass hypotheses between 110 and 200 GeV/c^2.

  9. QCD radiation effects on the H->WW->l nu l nu signal at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charalampos Anastasiou; Guenther Dissertori; Fabian Stoeckli; Bryan R. Webber

    2008-02-18

    The discovery of a Standard Model Higgs boson is possible when experimental cuts are applied which increase the ratio of signal and background cross-sections. In this paper we study the pp->H->WW signal cross-section at the LHC which requires a selection of Higgs bosons with small transverse momentum. We compare predictions for the efficiency of the experimental cuts from a NNLO QCD calculation, a calculation of the resummation of logarithms in the transverse momentum of the Higgs boson at NNLL, and the event generator MC@NLO. We also investigate the impact of various jet-algorithms, the underlying event and hadronization on the signal cross-section.

  10. Measurement of the WW plus WZ Production Cross Section Using the lepton plus jets Final State at CDF II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We report two complementary measurements of the WW+WZ cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using pp[over-bar] collision data at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV ...

  11. Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass efficient energy production has long been sought to solve energy and environmental problems. Fuel cells

  12. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  13. Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-01

    We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

  14. Determination of spin and parity of the Higgs boson in the WW[superscript ?] ? e??? decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    Studies of the spin and parity quantum numbers of the Higgs boson in the WW[superscript ?] ? e??? final state are presented, based on proton–proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, ...

  15. Double Higgs boson production via WW fusion in TeV e sup + e sup minus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, V.; Han, T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-04-10

    The production of two standard model Higgs bosons via the WW fusion process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} {bar v}{sub e}v{sub e}HH would test the predicted HHH, HWW and HHWW couplings. At TeV energies this fusion cross section dominates over that from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} ZHH and would give significant event rates for M{sub H}{approx lt} 1/2 M{sub z} at high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders. The authors evaluate the rates and present the dynamical distributions.

  16. Measurement of the W?W? Cross Section in ?s=7 TeV pp Collisions with ATLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-07-20

    This Letter presents a measurement of the W?W? production cross section in ?s=7 TeV pp collisions by the ATLAS experiment, using 34 pb?¹ of integrated luminosity produced by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Selecting events with two isolated leptons, each either an electron or a muon, 8 candidate events are observed with an expected background of 1.7±0.6 events. The measured cross section is 41+20-16(stat)±5(syst)±1(lumi) pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction of 44±3 pb calculated at next-to-leading order in QCD.

  17. Top Background to SM Higgs Searches in the W^-W^+=>2l2nu Decay Mode at CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Davatz; A. S. Giolo-Nicollerat; M. Zanetti

    2006-04-19

    The top quark and its properties within and beyond the Standard Model will be extensively studied at the incoming Large Hadron Collider. Nonetheless the top quark will play the role of the main background for most of the Higgs and new physics searches. In this paper the top as a background to H=>WW=>2l2nu Higgs discovery channel will be studied. The current status of the Monte Carlo tools for t-tbar and single top simulation will be presented. Finally the problem on how to evaluate the top background from the data will be addressed and the related systematics will be discussed.

  18. Search for Resonant WW and WZ Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-01

    We search for resonant WW or WZ production by using up to 5.4 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The data are consistent with the standard model background expectation, and we set limits on a resonance mass by using the sequential standard model W' boson and the Randall-Sundrum model graviton G as benchmarks. We exclude a sequential standard model W' boson in the mass range 180–690 GeV and a Randall-Sundrum graviton in the range 300–754 GeV at 95% C.L.

  19. Measurement of WW Production and Search for the Higgs Boson in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of WW production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and a search for the Higgs boson are reported. The WW candidates are selected in events with two leptons, either electrons or muons. The measurement is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The pp to WW cross section is measured to be 41.1 +/- 15.3 (stat) +/- 5.8 (syst) +/- 4.5 (lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits on WW gamma and WWZ anomalous triple gauge couplings are set. The search for the standard model Higgs boson in the WW decay mode does not reveal any evidence of excess above backgrounds. Limits are set on the production of the Higgs boson in the context of the standard model and in the presence of a sequential fourth family of fermions with high masses. In the latter context, a Higgs boson with mass between 144 and 207 GeV is ruled out at 95% confidence level.

  20. Measurement of the production and differential cross sections of W?W? bosons in association with jets in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.?A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; et al

    2015-06-23

    We present a measurement of the W-boson-pair production cross section in pp¯ collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy and the first measurement of the differential cross section as a function of jet multiplicity and leading-jet energy. The W?W? cross section is measured in the final state comprising two charged leptons and neutrinos, where either charged lepton can be an electron or a muon. Using data collected by the CDF experiment corresponding to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity, a total of 3027 collision events consistent with W?W? production are observed with an estimated background contribution of 1790 ± 190 events. Themore »measured total cross section is ?(pp¯? W?W?) = 14.0 ± 0.6(stat)?1.2?1.0(syst) ± 0.8(lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction.« less

  1. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW?l?jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2011-11-30

    A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW?l?jj channel in 1.04 fb?¹ of pp collision data at ?s=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeVH=400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H?WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

  2. Determination of spin and parity of the Higgs boson in the WW* ? e ? ? ? decay channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-27

    Research of the spin and parity quantum numbers of the Higgs boson in the WW* ? e??? final state are presented, based on proton–proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s=8 TeV. The Standard Model spin-parity JCP=0++ hypothesis is compared with alternative hypotheses for both spin and CP. The case where the observed resonance is a mixture of the Standard-Model-like Higgs boson and CP-even (JCP=0++) or CP-odd (JCP=0+–) Higgs boson in scenarios beyond the Standard Model is also studied. The datamore »are found to be consistent with the Standard Model prediction and limits are placed on alternative spin and CP hypotheses, including CP mixing in different scenarios.« less

  3. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-12-01

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4??<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  4. Measurement of the WW cross section in ?s = 7 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter reports a measurement of the WW production cross section in?s = 7 TeV pp collisions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.02 fb[superscript ?1] collected with the ATLAS detector. Using ...

  5. Search for new phenomena in the WW??????? final state in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter reports a search for a heavy particle that decays to WW using events produced in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV. The data were recorded in 2011 by the ATLAS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of ...

  6. BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR TTOO MM MM YY EEDD MM OO NN DD SS OO NN EENN DD OO WW EE DD LLEE CC TT UU RR EE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    BBIIOOLLOOGGYY SSEEMMIINNAARR TTOO MM MM YY EEDD MM OO NN DD SS OO NN EENN DD OO WW EE DD LLEE CC TT UU RR EE 44::0000 PPMM SSEE MM II NNAA RR HHII TTCC HH CC OOCC KK HH AA LL LL 113322 RREE FF RR EE

  7. Search for the Higgs boson in the H ? WW ? ?vjj decay channel at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW???jj channel using 4.7 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the ...

  8. Perturbative QCD effects and the search for a H->WW->l nu l nu signal at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charalampos Anastasiou; Guenther Dissertori; Massimiliano Grazzini; Fabian Stoeckli; Bryan R. Webber

    2009-07-21

    The Tevatron experiments have recently excluded a Standard Model Higgs boson in the mass range 160 - 170 GeV at the 95% confidence level. This result is based on sophisticated analyses designed to maximize the ratio of signal and background cross-sections. In this paper we study the production of a Higgs boson of mass 160 GeV in the gg -> H -> WW -> l nu l nu channel. We choose a set of cuts like those adopted in the experimental analysis and compare kinematical distributions of the final state leptons computed in NNLO QCD to lower-order calculations and to those obtained with the event generators PYTHIA, HERWIG and MC@NLO. We also show that the distribution of the output from an Artificial Neural Network obtained with the different tools does not show significant differences. However, the final acceptance computed with PYTHIA is smaller than those obtained at NNLO and with HERWIG and MC@NLO. We also investigate the impact of the underlying event and hadronization on our results.

  9. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to W+W- production via vector-boson fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara Jager; Carlo Oleari; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2006-03-22

    Vector-boson fusion processes constitute an important class of reactions at hadron colliders, both for signals and backgrounds of new physics in the electroweak interactions. We consider what is commonly referred to as W+W- production via vector-boson fusion (with subsequent leptonic decay of the Ws), or, more precisely, e+ nu_e mu- nubar_mu + 2 jets production in proton-proton scattering, with all resonant and non-resonant Feynman diagrams and spin correlations of the final-state leptons included, in the phase-space regions which are dominated by t-channel electroweak-boson exchange. We compute the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to this process, at order alpha^6 alpha_s. The QCD corrections are modest, changing total cross sections by less than 10%. Remaining scale uncertainties are below 2%. A fully-flexible next-to-leading order partonic Monte Carlo program allows to demonstrate these features for cross sections within typical vector-boson-fusion acceptance cuts. Modest corrections are also found for distributions.

  10. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the H -> WW -> lepton+neutrino+q'qbar Decay Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2011-04-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV in events containing a charged lepton (ell), missing transverse energy, and at least two jets, using 5.4 fb^-1 of integrated luminosity recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primarily to Higgs bosons produced through the fusion of two gluons or two electroweak bosons, with subsequent decay H->WW->ell+nu+q'qbar, where ell is an electron or muon. The search is also sensitive to contributions from other production channels, such as WH->ell+nu+bbbar In the absence of signal, we set limits at the 95% C.L. on the cross section for H production sigma(ppbar->H+X) in these final states. For a mass of MH=160 GeV, the limit is a factor of 3.9 larger than the cross section in the standard model, and consistent with expectation.

  11. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore »limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|« less

  12. Matrix penetration of W/W grain boundaries and its effect on mechanical properties of 93W-5. 6Ni-1. 4Fe heavy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joonwoong Noh; Heungsub Song; Eunpyo Kim; Woonhyung Baek; Kilsung Churn (Agency for Defense Development, Yusung, Taejon, (Korea, Republic of). Advanced Technology and Research Center); Kang, S.L. (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon, (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Ceramic Science and Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The matrix phase of 93W-5.6Ni-1.4Fe heavy alloy has penetrated into W/W grain boundaries during a newly developed heat treatment which consists of repeated isothermal holdings at 1,150 C and water quenching between them. With the matrix penetration, the impact energy increases from 57 to 170 J, whereas the ultimate tensile strength and elongation remain unchanged. The tensile fracture surface of specimens appears similar regardless of the matrix penetration: predominant cleavage of W grains and dimple fracture of matrix. The fracture surface by impact, on the other hand, reveals a change of W/W interface failure toward ductile failure of penetrated matrix with many dimples by increasing the matrix penetration. The increase in the fraction of ductile failure and observed crack blunting is attributed to the increase in impact energy with the matrix penetration.

  13. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|<0.0092 GeV?².

  14. Constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson signal strength in the high-mass ZZ and WW final states with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The measurements of the ZZ and WW final states in the mass range above the \\(2m_Z\\) and \\(2m_W\\) thresholds provide a unique opportunity to measure the off-shell coupling strength of the Higgs boson. This paper presents constraints on the off-shell Higgs boson event yields normalised to the Standard Model prediction (signal strength) in the \\(ZZ \\rightarrow 4\\ell \\), \\(ZZ\\rightarrow 2\\ell 2\

  15. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW->lnujj decay channel at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-06-26

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lnujj channel using 4.7 fb^-1 of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson candidates produced in association with zero, one or two jets are included in the analysis to maximize the acceptance for both gluon fusion and weak boson fusion Higgs boson production processes. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 300 GeV WW produced in association with zero or one jet is 2.2 pb (1.9 pb), corresponding to 1.9 (1.6) times the Standard Model prediction. In the Higgs boson plus two jets channel, which is more sensitive to the weak boson fusion process, the observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H->WW production with mH = 400 GeV is 0.7 pb (0.6 pb), corresponding to 7.9 (6.5) times the Standard Model prediction.

  16. W-W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1. .&. ' , c

  17. GM WW HP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERAL ASSIGNMENT KNOW ALL MENGLOBAL

  18. Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW(*)->lvlv decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-03-21

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lvlv channel (l=e/mu) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110Higgs boson with a mass 145

  19. Vertex Detection for a Charm Tag in e+e- -> W+W- at a High Energy Electron-Positron Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Walkowiak

    2001-10-18

    The study of the process $e^+e^- \\to W^+W^-$ at Linear Collider energies presents a good opportunity to investigate anomalous triple gauge boson couplings and $W^+_LW^-_L$ rescattering. The helicity analysis of the $e^+e^- \\to W^+_LW^-_L$ decays will benefit if the charm quark containing jet can be identified for events which contain one hadronic $W$ boson decay to a charm and another quark. A JAVA implementation of the SLD collaboration's topological vertex finding algorithm (ZVTOP) in the linear collider analysis framework has been used to extract charm tag efficiencies and purities based on vertex multiplicities.

  20. Study of $(W/Z)H$ production and Higgs boson couplings using $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-09-14

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson, in the $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, respectively. The $WH$ production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two-lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the $ZH$ production mode. The observed significance, for the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, $\\mu_{VH}$, is found to be $\\mu_{VH} =3.0^{+1.3}_{-1.1}{\\, {(\\rm stat.)}}^{+1.0}_{-0.7}{\\,{(\\rm sys.)}}$ for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The $WH$ and $ZH$ production modes are also combined with the gluon fusion and vector boson fusion production modes studied in the $H \\to WW^* \\to \\ell \

  1. Búsqueda del Bosón de Higgs del Modelo Standard en el canal de desintegración H ? WW? ? 2?2? en el experimento CMS del LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Rodrigo Anoro, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    A prospective analysis for the search of a SM Higgs boson in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the LHC is performed in this thesis, focusing in the gg ? H ? WW? ? ???? process. The search channel has a clear signature characterized by the presence of two high PT muons in the final state and a significant amount of missing ET due to the undetected neutrinos. No hard jet activity is expected. The principal sources of background come from several SM processes that may have similar final states as those of the signal, mainly W + jets, Z + jets, tt and the almost irreducible WW. Other sources of background are WZ, ZZ and tW processes. Final states coming from QCD processes have different signatures but very large cross-sections and they have also been studied. Several analysis techniques have been developed in this work. The main one is based on the application of a sequential selection criteria using a set of physical observables which characterize the main kinematic properties of the sign...

  2. Measurement of ww + wz production cross section and study of the dijet mass spectrum in the lnu + jets final state at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavaliere, Viviana; /Siena U.

    2010-12-01

    We present the measurement of the WW and WZ production cross section in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, in a final state consisting of an electron or muon, neutrino and jets. The data analyzed were collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider and correspond to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. The analysis uses a fit to the dijet mass distribution to extract the diboson contribution. We observe 1582 {+-} 275(stat.) {+-} 107(syst.) diboson candidate events and measure a cross section of {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} = 18.1 {+-} 3.3(stat.) {+-} 2.5(syst.) pb, consistent with the Standard Model prediction of 15.9 {+-} 0.9 pb. The best fit to the dijet mass of the known components shows a good agreement with the data except for the [120, 160] GeV/c{sup 2} mass range, where an excess is observed. We perform detailed checks of our background model and study the significance of the excess, assuming an additional gaussian component with a width compatible with the expected dijet mass resolution. A standard {Delta}{sub {chi}}{sup 2} test of the presence of the additional component, returns a p-value of 4.2 x 10{sup -4} when standard sources of systematics are considered, corresponding to a significance of 3.3{sigma}.

  3. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-03-13

    A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW*?l??l??¯ channel (l=e/?) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110 GeV

  4. Measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings from WW+WZ?l?jj events in pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2009-09-23

    ) give the expected order of magnitude for TGCs to be OðM2W=#2;2NPÞ. Thus, for #2;NP #7; 2 TeV, the expected order of magnitude for #3;#2;#1;, #3;gZ1 , and #3; is Oð10#1;3Þ. This gauge-invariant parametrization, also used at LEP, gives the following...). In this case, electromagnetic gauge invariance forbids any deviation of g#1;1 from its SM value (#3;gZ1 ¼ #3;g#1;1 ¼ 0) and the relations between the couplings become #3;#2; #3;#2;Z ¼ #3;#2;#1; and #3; #3;Z ¼ #3;#1;: (7) As already stated, for WW and WZ...

  5. Search for production of WW / WZ resonances decaying to a lepton, neutrino and jets in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-05-12

    In this study, a search is presented for narrow diboson resonances decaying to WW or WZ in the final state where one W boson decays leptonically (to an electron or a muon plus a neutrino) and the other W/Z boson decays hadronically. The analysis is performed using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. No evidence for resonant diboson production is observed, and resonance masses below 700 and 1490 GeV are excluded at 95% confidence level for the spin-2 Randall–Sundrum bulk graviton G*more »with coupling constant of 1.0 and the extended gauge model W' boson respectively.« less

  6. Study of $(W/Z)H$ production and Higgs boson couplings using $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    A search for Higgs boson production in association with a $W$ or $Z$ boson, in the $H \\rightarrow WW^{\\ast}$ decay channel, is performed with a data sample collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 4.5 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 ${\\rm fb}^{-1}$, respectively. The $WH$ production mode is studied in two-lepton and three-lepton final states, while two-lepton and four-lepton final states are used to search for the $ZH$ production mode. The observed significance, for the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ production, is 2.5 standard deviations while a significance of 0.9 standard deviations is expected in the Standard Model Higgs boson hypothesis. The ratio of the combined $WH$ and $ZH$ signal yield to the Standard Model expectation, $\\mu_{VH}$, is found to be $\\mu_{VH} =3.0^{+1.3}_{-1.1}{\\, {(\\rm stat.)}}^{+1.0}_{-0.7}{\\,{(\\rm sys.)}}$ for the Higgs boson mass of 125.36 GeV. The $WH$ and $ZH$ produc...

  7. The Chemical Compositions of the SRd Variable Stars. III. KK Aquilae, AG Aurigae, Z Aurigae, W Leo Minoris, and WW Tauri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Giridhar; D. L. Lambert; G. Gonzalez

    2000-08-28

    Chemical compositions are derived from high-resolution spectra for five field SRd variables. These supergiants not previously analysed are shown to be metal-poor: KK Aql with [Fe/H] = -1.2, AG Aur with [Fe/H] = -1.8, Z Aur with [Fe/H] = -1.4, W LMi with [Fe/H] = -1.1, and WW Tau with [Fe/H] = -1.1. Their compositions are, except for two anomalies, identical to within the measurement errors with the compositions of subdwarfs, subgiants, and less evolved giants of the same [Fe/H]. One anomaly is an s-process enrichment for KK Aql, the first such enrichment reported for a SRd variable. The second and more remarkable anomaly is a strong lithium enrichment for W LMi, also a first for field SRds. The Li I 6707 A profile is not simply that of a photospheric line but includes strong absorption from red-shifted gas, suggesting, perhaps, that lithium enrichment results from accretion of Li-rich gas. This potential clue to lithium enrichment is discussed in light of various proposals for lithium synthesis in evolved stars.

  8. Search for the Higgs Boson in the H to WW to l nu jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA

    2011-11-30

    A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeV < m{sub H} < 600 GeV. The best sensitivity is reached for m{sub H} = 400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H {yields} WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

  9. Measured water heating performance of a vertical-bore water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for domestic water heating over twelve months under simulated occupancy loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents monthly performance metrics of a 5.275 kW (1.5 ton) WW-GSHP providing 227 L day-1 domestic hot water at 49 C. Daily water use is simulated as stipulated in the Building America Research Benchmark Definition capturing the living habits of the average U.S household. The 94.5m vertical-bore ground loop is shared with a separate GSHP for space conditioning the 251m2 residential home. Data on entering water temperatures, energy extracted from the ground, delivered energy, compressor electricity use, COP, WW-GSHP run times, and the impact of fan and pump energy consumption on efficiency are presented for each month. Factors influencing performance metrics are highlighted.

  10. Measurement of the production and differential cross sections of $W^{+}W^{-}$ bosons in association with jets in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Marchese, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; D'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Ramos, J P Fernández; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; López, O González; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucà, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Fernández, I Redondo; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Sorin, V; Song, H; Stancari, M; Denis, R St; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W -M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-01-01

    We present a measurement of the $W$-boson-pair production cross section in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy and the first measurement of the differential cross section as a function of jet multiplicity and leading-jet energy. The $W^{+}W^{-}$ cross section is measured in the final state comprising two charged leptons and neutrinos, where either charged lepton can be an electron or a muon. Using data collected by the CDF experiment corresponding to $9.7~\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, a total of $3027$ collision events consistent with $W^{+}W^{-}$ production are observed with an estimated background contribution of $1790\\pm190$ events. The measured total cross section is $\\sigma(p\\bar{p} \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}) = 14.0 \\pm 0.6~(\\rm{stat})^{+1.2}_{-1.0}~(\\rm{syst})\\pm0.8~(\\rm{lumi})$ pb, consistent with the standard model prediction.

  11. UNITED STATES DEPAR.TMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to express freed oil and water, and centrifuging to separate the oil from the press liquor. The oil in paint products. The marine oil industry is continually advancing in technology and seeking new ways. Marine oil alkyds have advanced marine oils into what is probably the most ver- satile, durable

  12. Search for $WW$ and $WZ$ resonances decaying to electron, missing $E_T$, and two jets in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01

    Using data from 2.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, we search for resonances decaying into a pair of on-shell gauge bosons, WW or WZ, where one W decays into an electron and a neutrino, and the other boson decays into two jets. We observed no statistically significant excess above the expected standard model background, and we set cross section limits at 95% confidence level on G* (Randall-Sundrum graviton), Z{prime}, and W{prime} bosons. By comparing these limits to theoretical cross sections, mass exclusion regions for the three particles are derived. The mass exclusion regions for Z{prime} and W{prime} are further evaluated as a function of their gauge coupling strength.

  13. Search for WW and WZ production in lepton, neutrino plus jets final states at CDF Run II and Silicon module production and detector control system for the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sfyrla, Anna; /Geneva U.

    2008-03-01

    In the first part of this work, we present a search for WW and WZ production in charged lepton, neutrino plus jets final states produced in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron, using 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CDF II detector. This channel is yet to be observed in hadron colliders due to the large singleWplus jets background. However, this decay mode has a much larger branching fraction than the cleaner fully leptonic mode making it more sensitive to anomalous triple gauge couplings that manifest themselves at higher transverse W momentum. Because the final state is topologically similar to associated production of a Higgs boson with a W, the techniques developed in this analysis are also applicable in that search. An Artificial Neural Network has been used for the event selection optimization. The theoretical prediction for the cross section is {sigma}{sub WW/WZ}{sup theory} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 2.09 {+-} 0.14 pb. They measured N{sub Signal} = 410 {+-} 212(stat) {+-} 102(sys) signal events that correspond to a cross section {sigma}{sub WW/WZ} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) = 1.47 {+-} 0.77(stat) {+-} 0.38(sys) pb. The 95% CL upper limit to the cross section is estimated to be {sigma} x Br(W {yields} {ell}{nu}; W/Z {yields} jj) < 2.88 pb. The second part of the present work is technical and concerns the ATLAS SemiConductor Tracker (SCT) assembly phase. Although technical, the work in the SCT assembly phase is of prime importance for the good performance of the detector during data taking. The production at the University of Geneva of approximately one third of the silicon microstrip end-cap modules is presented. This collaborative effort of the university of Geneva group that lasted two years, resulted in 655 produced modules, 97% of which were good modules, constructed within the mechanical and electrical specifications and delivered in the SCT collaboration for assembly on the end-cap disks. The SCT end-caps and barrels consist of 4088 silicon modules, with a total of 6.3 million readout channels. The coherent and safe operation of the SCT during commissioning and subsequent operation is the essential task of the Detector Control System (DCS). The main building blocks of the DCS are the cooling system, the power supplies and the environmental system. The DCS has been initially developed for the SCT assembly phase and this system is described in the present work. Particular emphasis is given in the environmental hardware and software components, that were my major contributions. Results from the DCS testing during the assembly phase are also reported.

  14. Searches for Higgs boson pair production in the $hh\\to bb\\tau\\tau, \\gamma\\gamma WW*, \\gamma\\gamma bb, bbbb$ channels with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biesuz, Nicolo Vladi; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Searches for both resonant and non-resonant Higgs boson pair production are performed in the $hh\\to bb\\tau\\tau, \\gamma\\gamma WW^*$ final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence of their production is observed and 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross sections are set. These results are then combined with the published results of the $hh\\to \\gamma\\gamma bb, bbbb$ analyses. An upper limit of 0.69 (0.47) pb on the non-resonant Standard Model like $hh$ production is observed (expected), corresponding to 70 (48) times of the SM $gg\\to hh$ cross section. For production via narrow resonances, cross section limits of $hh$ production from a heavy Higgs boson decay are set as a function of the heavy Higgs boson mass. The observed (expected) limits range from 2.1 (1.1) pb at 260 GeV to 0.011 (0.018) pb at 1000 GeV. These results are interpreted in the context of two simplified sce...

  15. JET-SUSPENDED, CALCITE-BALLASTED CYANOBACTERIAL.WATERWARTS IN A tment of Arizona State ,Tempe, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    of innumerable springs, surface and underwater streams, and sinkholes ("pozas"), which are famous (Konopka 1989) and small karstic sinkholes et al. the nature of the spring itself made the presence

  16. Iaaued by Sandiss National Laboratories. operated for the Ufited States Dep=tment of Energy by Sandia Corporation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Aerodynamic Analysis of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines Robert E. Sheldahl Aerothermodynarnics Division 5633 87185 ABSTRACT When work began on the Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) program at Sandia to describe the aerodynamics of turbine blades. Curved-bladed Darrieus turbines operate at local Reynolds

  17. ww.biocycle.net Curbside Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    municipal solid waste stream (MSW) were also requested, filling out the picture of waste management, Nickolas J. Themelis and James Thompson, Jr. 26 BroCYCLE 15th NATIONWIDE SURVEY OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE, providing a picture on how municipal solid waste (MSW) is handled throughout the United States. For this 15

  18. Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ? e?jj production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2000-08-09

    IV, V and VI describe our particle identification methods, the data sample, and event selection criteria. Sec- tions VII and VIII are devoted to detection efficiency and background estimates. Results and conclusions are presented in Secs. IX and X. II... containing a radiator ~393 foils of 18 mm thick polypropylene in a volume filled with nitrogen gas!, and an x-ray detection chamber filled with Xe gas. The TRD information is not used in this analysis.5-4 LIMITS ON ANOMALOUS WWg AND WWZ COUPLINGS...

  19. As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval ,, *' ; . Final Disposal Cell

  20. Ricerca del bosone di Higgs nel canale H WW ljj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    in Fisica Nucleare e Subnucleare 2011 Ottobre #12;ii #12;Indice Elenco delle figure v Elenco delle tabelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 4.2 Ricostruzione dei jet e dell'energia mancante . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 4-Tag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 4.2.2 Ricostruzione dell'energia mancante . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 4.3 Il trigger

  1. Archaeology 2.0: New Approaches to Communication and Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansa, Eric C.; Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Watrall, Ethan

    2011-01-01

    s Another Word for Thesaurus? Data Standards and Classifyingthesauri (such as the Thesaurus of Monument Types) in XMLRCHAEOTOOLS P ROJECT What—The Thesaurus of Monument Types (

  2. 1. This document is VM148, one of a series of the Veterinary Medicine-Large Animal Clinical Sciences Depar tment, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    to a Suspected Toxin-Induced Fish Kill 1 Ruth Francis-Floyd and Christopher Brooks, and Denise Petty2 Occasionally catastrophic fish kills occur in aquaculture production facilities as well as in home aquaria or emotional loss, and because it is often unexpected it can be a shock. A catastrophic fish kill is one

  3. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings from WW?e(+)e(?), WW?e(±)?(?), and WW??(+)?(?) events from pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Jabeen, S.; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.

    2006-09-08

    is reduced to five, and the Lagrangian takes this form: LWWV gWWV #5; igV1 #6;Wy#3;#2;W#3;V#2; #2;Wy#3;V#2;W#3;#2;#7; #1; i#4;VWy#3;W#2;V#3;#2; #1; i#5;V M2W Wy#5;#3;W #3; #2;V #2;#5; (1) where V #5; #1; or Z, W#3; is the W#2; field, W#3;#2; #5; @#3;W#2; #2... sections, violating unitarity. To keep the cross section from diverging, the anomalous coupling must vanish as s ! 1. This is done by introduc- ing a dipole form factor for an arbitrary coupling #7; [gZ1 , #4;V , or #5;V from Eq. (1)]: #7;#6;s^#7; #5; #7...

  4. Protecting Recovery Act Cleanup Site During Massive Wildfire

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL...

  5. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    P roject D irector Douglas D oerfler Trinity C hief A rchitect 2 Outline * ASC C ompung S trategy * Project D rivers a nd P rocurement P rocess * Pla;orm A rchitecture O...

  6. EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

  7. EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    decision in which OHA granted exception relief to Philips Lighting Company (Philips), GE Lighting (GE) and Osram Sylvania, Inc. (OSI), as well as several subsequent cases...

  8. CDF/ANAL/ELECTROWEAK/CDFR/2951 Limits on WWZ and WW fl couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    , 1 J. Cammerata, 12 C. Campagnari, 7 M. Campbell, 16 A. Caner, 7 W. Carithers, 14 D. Carlsmith, 34 A

  9. Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (e.g., glacial rebound). #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 910/20/2010 Maxwell relaxation time, tM t Non-linear rheology Effective viscosity: A = proportionality constant E = activation energy (100-500 k

  10. Production Costing (Chapter 8 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    ; A unit commitment decision is made; A dispatch decision is made to obtain the production costs characterizing feature is how the program makes the unit commitment (UC) and dispatch decisions. The simplest are committed first. Startup costs are added when a unit is started, but those costs do not figure

  11. Measurement of Higgs boson production and properties in the WW decay channel with leptonic final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a W-boson pair at the LHC is reported. The event sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb[superscript ?1] and 19.4 fb[superscript ?1] collected with ...

  12. AGC (Chapter 9 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    clocks Steam-turbine blades may lose life or fail under frequencies that vary from design levels. Some. 1a below). Fig. 1a Figure 9.2 should also provide a "local" loop feeding back a turbine speed signal

  13. Fuel Scheduling (Chapter 6 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    we desired within the range, at any time, to achieve optimality. In the UC problem, we went a step in reservoirs supplying hydroelectric power plants. Hydroelectric facilities are made more complex, however

  14. $WW?/Z$ production in the Randall-Sundrum model at LHC and CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Xiao-Zhou; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Guo Lei

    2013-03-26

    We study the $W^+W^-\\gamma(Z)$ productions at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) in the framework of the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model. The impacts of the virtual RS Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton on these processes are studied and compared with the standard model (SM) background. We present the integrated and differential cross sections in both the RS model and the SM. The results show that the relative RS discrepancies at the CLIC differ from those at the LHC, particularly in the transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We also find that the RS signature performance, as a result of the resonance character of the RS KK-graviton spectrum, is distinctively unlike that in the large extra dimensions model. We conclude that the CLIC with unprecedented precision and high center-of-mass energy has a potential advantage over the LHC in exploring the effects of the RS KK graviton on the $W^+W^-\\gamma(Z)$ production processes.

  15. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay mode H-> WW-> lnulnu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penning, B.; /Freiburg U.

    2009-09-01

    The question of the nature and principles of the universe and our place in it is the driving force of science since Mesopotamian astronomers glanced for the first time at the starry sky and Greek atomism has been formulated. During the last hundred years modern science was able to extend its knowledge tremendously, answering many questions, opening entirely new fields but as well raising many new questions. Particularly Astronomy, Astroparticle Physics and Particle Physics lead the race to answer these fundamental and ancient questions experimentally. Today it is known that matter consists of fermions, the quarks and leptons. Four fundamental forces are acting between these particles, the electromagnetic, the strong, the weak and the gravitational force. These forces are mediated by particles called bosons. Our confirmed knowledge of particle physics is based on these particles and the theory describing their dynamics, the Standard Model of Particles. Many experimental measurements show an excellent agreement between observation and theory but the origin of the particle masses and therefore the electroweak symmetry breaking remains unexplained. The mechanism proposed to solve this issue involves the introduction of a complex doublet of scalar fields which generates the masses of elementary particles via their mutual interactions. This Higgs mechanism also gives rise to a single neutral scalar boson with an unpredicted mass, the Higgs boson. During the last twenty years several experiments have searched for the Higgs boson but so far it escaped direct observation. Nevertheless these studies allow to further constrain its mass range. The last experimental limits on the Higgs mass have been set in 2001 at the LEP collider, an electron positron machine close to Geneva, Switzerland. The lower limit set on the Higgs boson mass is m{sub H} > 114.4 GeV/c{sup 2} and remained for many years the last experimental constraint on the Standard Model Higgs Boson due to the shutdown of the LEP collider and the experimental challenges at hadron machines as the Tevatron. This thesis was performed using data from the D0 detector located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. Final states containing two electrons or a muon and a tau in combination with missing transverse energy were studied to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson, utilizing up to 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. In 2008 the CDF and D0 experiments in a combined effort were able to reach for the first time at a hadron collider the sensitivity to further constrain the possible Standard Model Higgs boson mass range. The research conducted for this thesis played a pivotal role in this effort. Improved methods for lepton identification, background separation, assessment of systematic uncertainties and new decay channels have been studied, developed and utilized. Along with similar efforts at the CDF experiment these improvements led finally the important result of excluding the presence of a Standard Model Higgs boson in a mass range of m{sub H} = 160-170 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% Confidence Level. Many of the challenges and methods found in the present analysis will probably in a similar way be ingredients of a Higgs boson evidence or discovery in the near future, either at the Tevatron or more likely at the soon starting Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Continuing to pursue the Higgs boson we are looking forward to many exciting results at the Tevatron and soon at the LHC. In Chapter 2 an introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics and the Higgs mechanism is given, followed by a brief outline of existing theoretical and experimental constraints on the Higgs boson mass before summarizing the Higgs boson production modes. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the experimental setup. This is followed by a description of the reconstruction of the objects produced in proton-antiproton collisions in Chapter 4 and the necessary calorimeter calibrations in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 follows with an explanation of the phenomenology of the proton-antiproton colli

  16. EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,Department of EnergySessionEnergy OHA issued2013,

  17. Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport) | SciTechelement method in theSciTech

  18. Study of WW scattering in the absence of a light Higgs boson using the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanidis, Efstathios

    2007-01-01

    The Thesis investigates the possible case that the Electrow eak Symmetry Breaking is not due to a light, weakly interacting Higgs boson, but inste ad the Symmetry is broken by strongly interacting heavy resonances. In that case, the formalism of the Electroweak Chiral Lagrangian can be used as a model-independent way to c onstruct a low-energy effective theory for the electroweak interactions and using the Pad ?e unitarisation protocol, certain resonances can be predicted. The scattering of long itudinally polarized W bosons, one of which decays leptonically and the other hadronically , is used as a channel to probe the mechanism of the Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in the ma ss range of 600 GeV up to 2.4 TeV and for different resonance scenarios, includin g the case that there is no resonance in the spectrum. The reconstruction of the vector bosons is described and it is demonstrated that, by exploiting key features of the hadron ic environment, the contribution from the background processes can be reduced ...

  19. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

    2010-02-17

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

  20. Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

  1. Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Gregores, E.M.; Mercadante, P.G.; Hebbeker, T.; Kirsch, M.; Meyer, A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Mendoza, L.; /Andes U., Bogota /Argonne /Arizona U. /Athens U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bonn U. /Boston U. /Brandeis U.

    2010-01-01

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W{sup +}W{sup -}. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

  2. Measurement of the W+W- Cross Section in ?s=7??TeV pp Collisions with ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents a measurement of the W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production cross section in ?s=7??TeV pp collisions by the ATLAS experiment, using 34??pb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity produced by the ...

  3. plTW ScholArShIpS for INcomINg The OSU admission application serves as the primary scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    within the College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology, you will be considered for nearly all OF Engineering, Architecture & Technology pRoject lead the Way scholaRships The College of Engineering, Architecture and Technology is proud to offer nearly $2.3 million in scholarships annually. Thanks

  4. 06-DataManagement-Gerhardt.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global p roject d irectories - Sharing d ata b etween p eople a ndor s ystems, s hort t erm data s torage - Backed u p i f q uota l ess t han o r e qual t o 5 T B - All M PP r...

  5. CO2 storage researchers at the Australian School of Petroleum focusing on the following areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    CO2 storage researchers at the Australian School of Petroleum focusing on the following areas and Learn Student Sally Edwards ASP Associate Researcher Sally Holl CO2CRC/ASP Act ivit y Purp ose To assess t he im p act on geological st orage of CO2. Key p roject s o Gip psland Basin (onshore): Com p let ed

  6. Jian-Xin Zhu Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Orbital? e They e merge f rom c ompe9ng i nterac9ons H. C. Manoharan et al., Nature 403, 512 (2000) dIdV maps out eigenmodes Quantum m irages f ormed b y c oherent p roject...

  7. [MRO] Search for resonant diboson production in the WW/WZ???jj decay channels with the ATLAS detector at ?s=7??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search for resonant diboson production using a data sample corresponding to 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV ...

  8. Study of gamma gamma Background in e+e- -> W+W- nu nu -> H nu nu Events at the Tesla e+e- Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Battaglia; Daniel Schulte

    2000-11-27

    The effect of the overlap of gamma gamma -> hadrons to H nu nu events has been studied for the case of the Tesla e+e- linear collider at 350 GeV. It was found that, due to the significant bunch length and the track extrapolation accuracy provided by the Vertex Tracker, the gamma gamma background to physics events can be substantially reduced, with moderate loss in reconstruction efficiency, by a combination of kinematical and vertex topology observables. The remaining background, being confined to very forward hadron production, does not significantly interfere with the event reconstruction.

  9. Determination of the $WW$ polarization fractions in $pp \\to W^\\pm W^\\pm jj$ using a deep machine learning technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Searcy; Lillian Huang; Marc-André Pleier; Junjie Zhu

    2015-10-06

    The unitarization of the longitudinal vector boson scattering (VBS) cross section by the Higgs boson is a fundamental prediction of the Standard Model which has not been experimentally verified. One of the most promising ways to measure VBS uses events containing two leptonically-decaying same-electric-charge $W$ bosons produced in association with two jets. However, the angular distributions of the leptons in the $W$ boson rest frame, which are commonly used to fit polarization fractions, are not readily available in this process due to the presence of two neutrinos in the final state. In this paper we present a method to alleviate this problem by using a deep machine learning technique to recover these angular distributions from measurable event kinematics and demonstrate how the longitudinal-longitudinal scattering fraction could be studied. We show that this method doubles the expected sensitivity when compared to previous proposals.

  10. Determination of the $WW$ polarization fractions in $pp \\to W^\\pm W^\\pm jj$ using a deep machine learning technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Searcy, Jacob; Pleier, Marc-André; Zhu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    The unitarization of the longitudinal vector boson scattering (VBS) cross section by the Higgs boson is a fundamental prediction of the Standard Model which has not been experimentally verified. One of the most promising ways to measure VBS uses events containing two leptonically-decaying same-electric-charge $W$ bosons produced in association with two jets. However, the angular distributions of the leptons in the $W$ boson rest frame, which are commonly used to fit polarization fractions, are not readily available in this process due to the presence of two neutrinos in the final state. In this paper we present a method to alleviate this problem by using a deep machine learning technique to recover these angular distributions from measurable event kinematics and demonstrate how the longitudinal-longitudinal scattering fraction could be studied. We show that this method doubles the expected sensitivity when compared to previous proposals.

  11. Department of Medicine Annual Report 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Department of Medicine Annual Report 2015 #12;B Depar tment of Medicine 12015 Annual Repor t I am delighted to present the Department of Medicine FY 15 Annual Report. This year's theme focuses on the impact medicine. Our clinicians, researchers and educators are dedicated to solving complex medical problems

  12. Measurement of W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS detector and limits on anomalous WWZ and WW? couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This paper presents a measurement of the W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production cross section in pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The leptonic decay channels are analyzed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity ...

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in p anti-p Interactions with the Decay Mode H --> W+W- --> mu+nu mu-anti-nu at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Dale Morgan; /Nebraska U.

    2010-04-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions resulting in two muons and large missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected between April 2002 and December 2008 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant excess above the background estimation is observed and limits are derived on Higgs boson production.

  14. Combined fast valving and braking resistor application to improve transient stability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jen-Yeu Thomas

    1982-01-01

    COMBINED FAST VALVING AND BRAKING RESISTOR APPLICATION TO IMPROVE TRANSIENT STABILITY A Thesis by Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1982 Major Subjecta Electrical Engineering COMBINED FAST VALVING AND BRAKING RESISTOR APPLICATION TO IMPROVE TRANSIENT STABILITY A Thesis by Approved as to style and content by& herman oY mm ee ad of' De tment Member May 1982 ABSTRACT...

  15. Fermentation of sorghum dough by genus Lactobacillus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Susie Hong Nguyen

    1980-01-01

    FERMENTATION OF SORGHUM DOUGH BY THE GENUS LACTOBACILLUS A Thesis by SUSIE HONG NGUYEN CLARK Approved as to style and content by: Member Member Ilember ead of Dep tment December 1980 ABSTRACT Fermentation of Sorghum Dough by the Genus... Lactobacillus. (December 1980) Susie Hong Nguyen Clark, B. S. , Purdue University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. L. Richter Sorghum flour was fermented by naturally occurring microorganisms. These microorganisms were isolated by plating on special...

  16. A simplified mechanistic rut depth prediction procedure for low-volume roads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapa, Kashyapa A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A SIMPLIFIED MECHANISTIC RUT DEPTH PREDICTION PROCEDURE FOR LOW-UOLUME ROADS A Thesis by KASHYAPA ABEYSIRIWARDHANA SENARATH YAPA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... rt L. Lytt ( an of Committee) D as . Li tie ( ember) Walter L. Bradley (Member) Ja T. . Yao (Head of De tment) December 1988 ABSTRACT A Simplified Mechanistic Rut Depth Prediction Procedure for Low-volume Roads. (December 1988) Kashyapa...

  17. Patterns of bovine plasma luteinizing hormone and pituitary luteinizing hormone response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone during gestation and early postpartum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitlin, Susan Adele

    1983-01-01

    of Depar tment) May 1963 ABSTRACT Patterns of Bovine Plasma Luteinizing Hormone and Pituitary Luteinizing Hormone Response To Gonadotropin- Releasing Hormone Curing Gestation and Early Postpartum I, May 1983) Susan Adele Gitlin, B. S. , Purdue...)midluteal phase of wirst postpartum estr ous cycle (6 h) . A 100 ug i. v. injection of GnRH given 4 h prior to the end of all collections was used to determine pituitar y LH release. Plasma LH concentrations were quantitated by validated r...

  18. Private development of artificial reefs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Arthur Allen

    1978-01-01

    PRIVATE DEVFLOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS A Thesis ARTHUR ALLEN BURNS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Management PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS A Thesis by ARTHUR ALLEN BURNS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: irman o t e Committee { ead o the Depa tment ~Member Memb e- December 1978 12409Ei'7 ABSTRACT Private Development...

  19. Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by alkyl lithiums 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Rashmi R

    1970-01-01

    BATCH POLYYIERIZATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY ALKYL LITHIUMS A Thesis by RASHMI R. DESAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May 1970 Major... Subject: Chemical Fngineering BATCH POLYMERI2ATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY ALKYL LITHIUMS A Thesis by RASHMI R. DESAI Approved as to style and content by: / . I ?ii' (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar tment) ( ember) (Member) May 1970 111...

  20. Provenance study and environments of deposition of the Pennslyvanian-Permian Wood River Formation, south-central Idaho, and the paleotectonic character of the Wood River basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Christopher William

    1982-01-01

    PROVENANCE STUDY AND ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE PENNSYLVANIAN-PERMIAN WOOD RIVER FORMATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL IDAHO, AND THE PALEOTECTONIC CHARACTER OF THE WOOD RIVER BASIN A 'Ihesis by CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM DEAN Submitted to the Graduate..., SOUTH-CENTRAL IDAHO, AND THE PALEOTECTONIC CHARACTER OF THE WOOD RIVER BASIN A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM DEAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co ittee) (Member) (Member) (H of Dep tment) December, 1982 ABSTRACT Provenance...

  1. Search for WZ+ZZ production with missing transverse energy+jets with b enhancement at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    Diboson production (WW+WZ+ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ...

  2. The structure of the carbon black flame 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, W. Kermi

    1945-01-01

    nvd1yS w.w, w. U w . ' jomvR ?Wdp jomvR ?Wdp jomvR ?Wdp w.'F w.U3F w.U*w w.U*O w.U*C w.U8O w.UCw w.Fw w..U3F w.U38 w.U8U w.U8* w.0wO w.'w ' w.*F w.U8w w.U8F w.'w ' w.'wO w.0w* w.'Uw U.ww w.U8C w.UCF w.'w0 w.'w0 w.'w8 w.'U3 U.'F w.UCw w.UCw w.0w0... w.'w0 w.'Uw w.'UO U.Fw w.UCw w.UCF w.'w0 w.'wF w.'U0 w.'w8 U.*F w.UC3 w.UC8 w.'wO w.'wF w.'UO w.0U8 ' .ww w.UC3 w.UC3 w.'w ' w .'w8 w.'UF w.0U8 '.'F w .UC8 w.UC3 w.'w ' w.'wO w.'U8 w.0U8 ' .Fw w.'wO w.'w3 w.'w8 w.0w3 w.'UC w.' 'U EO *w w.'w8 w...

  3. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Lepton + Missing Transverse Energy + Jets Final State in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-11

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H \\rightarrow WW \\rightarrow l{\

  4. The U.S. Research University as a Global Model: Some Fundamental Problems to Consider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    was key to the Manhattan Project and the United Statesfrom the WW II Manhattan Project, is still “considered an

  5. AGE, HABITAT, AND YEARLY VARIATION IN THE DIET OF A GENERALIST INSECTIVORE, THE SOUTHWESTERN WILLOW FLYCATCHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theimer, Tad

    , fi . W bw , b , w H D . U b , w fl b b w (Populus fremontii) ww (Salix , ó H á D . U b , E. t. extimus áb bó Populus . Salix ., ó Tamarix w b fl. I , bb Sw Ww F . T w U S, w b w (Populus .) ww (Salix .) b b

  6. A study of clear-air turbulence from detailed wind profiles over Cape Kennedy, Florida 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackburn, James Harvey

    1969-01-01

    A STUDY OF CLEAR-AIR TURBULENCE FROM DETAII. ED WIND PROFILES OVER CAPE KENNEDY, FLORIDA A Thesis by James Harvey Blackburn, Jr. Captain United States Air Force Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ittee) (Head of Dep tment...) (Amber) (Member) May 1969 ABSTRACT A Study of Clear-Air Turbulence from Detailed Wind Profiles Over Cape Kennedy, Florida. James H. Blackburn, Jr. , B. S. , Texas A6N University Directed by: Dr. James R. Scoggins Clear-air turbulence (CAT...

  7. The index of tobacco treatment quality: development of a tool to assess evidence-based treatment in a national sample of drug treatment facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cupertino, Ana Paula; Hunt, Jamie J.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Jiang, Yu; Marquis, Janet; Friedman, Peter D.; Engelman, Kimberly K.; Richter, Kimber P.

    2013-03-15

    to treatment in a national s facilities© 2013 Cupertino et al.; licensee BioMed Cent Commons Attribution License (http://creativec reproduction in any medium, provided the orOpen Access tment quality: assess evidence-based mple of drug treatmentral Ltd.... This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative ommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and iginal work is properly cited. Cupertino et al. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy 2013, 8...

  8. Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by n-butyl lithium in a cyclohexane solvent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landon, Thomas Rodman

    1971-01-01

    Committee ea Depa tment Mem er Mem er em er August 1971 ABSTRACT Batch Polymerization of Styrene Initiated by N-Butyl Lithium in Cyclohexane Solvent. (August 19 71) Thomas Rodman Landon, B, S. , Te x as A (&M Un i ve rs i ty Directed by: Dr.... Rayford G. Anthony Styrene is polymerized by n-butyl lithium with cyclo- hexane as the solvent. The polymerization is carried out in an isothermal batch reactors at three temperature 30, 40, and 50'C. The proposed reaction proceeds by a homo- geneous...

  9. A study of wind-speed maxima near the surface over the south central United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckman, Samuel Karl

    1973-01-01

    A STUDY OF WIND-SPEED MAXIMA NEAR THE SURFACE OVER THE SOUTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES A Thesis by Samuel Karl Beckman Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Addd University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1973 Major Subject: Meteorology A STUDY OF WIND-SPEED MAXIMA NEAR THE SURFACE OVER THE SOUTH CENTRAL UNITED STATES A Thesis by Samuel Karl Beckman Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Commi ee) (Head of D p tment...

  10. Hot gas path analysis and data evaluation of the performance parameters of a gas turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanawa, David Allen

    1974-01-01

    SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering HOT GAS PATH ANALYSIS AND DATA EVALUATION OF THE PERFORMANCE PARAMETERS OF A GAS TURBINE A Thesis by DAVID AI, LEN HANAWA Approved as to style and content by: PfnA J 7 EY3 .j (Chairman... of -Committee) zr (Head of Depai'tment) Member) /i ~E" Egg(JQJ a g i (Member) (Member) December l974 ABSTRACT Ho Gas Path Ana'ysis and Data Evaluation o. the Performance Parameters of a Gas Turbine (December 1974) David Allen Hanawa, B. S. , Texas A...

  11. Ex-vessel demand by size for the Gulf shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Margaret Kam-Too

    1980-01-01

    EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR THE GULF SHRIMP A Thesis by MARGARET RAM-TOO CHUI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major... Subject: Agricultural Economics EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR SHRIMP IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by MARGARET KAM-TOO CHUI Approved as to style and content by: ai an of Committee) (Hea f ep tment) (Member) (Member) August 1980 ABSTRACT Ex...

  12. The entrainment of oil droplets in flow beneath an oil slick 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Chien-Hwa

    1973-01-01

    THE ENTRAINMENT OF OIL DROPLETS IN PLOW BENEATH AN OIL SLICK A Thesis by CHIEN-HWA CHAO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OP SCIENCE August 1973 Ma...)or Sub)ect: Mechanical Engineering THE ENTRAINMENT OF OIL DROPLETS IN FLOW BENEATH AN OIL SLICK A Thesis CHIEN-HWA CHAD Approved as to style and content by: ( hairman o Committee) (Head of De tment) C ( (Member) ber) (Member) August 1973...

  13. Rivers and Streams Survey Appendix 4: Individual Mercury Page 1 of 4 Year Station Name Common Name Result Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trout 0.12 ug/g ww 241 7 5 2011 Pit River at Big Bend Sacramento Pikeminnow 0.13 ug/g ww 259 7 5 2011 Pit River at Big Bend Sacramento Pikeminnow 0.08 ug/g ww 205 7 5 2011 Pit River at Big Bend Sacramento Pikeminnow 0.05 ug/g ww 286 7 5 2011 Pit River at Big Bend Sacramento Pikeminnow 0.03 ug/g ww 174 7 5 2011

  14. c3fa52728ece 9. Sustainable cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .co.uk/energy/ cos0 QQ Lamberts Law This requires cos(), ww.brighton-web which in turn is de- pendent on location.co.uk/energy/ ii cossinsincos the azimuth angle of the plane ww.brighton-web coscoscoscos cossincossin p.co.uk/energy/ 6364.1 07995.9650572.0cos 1 AM This is due to gases and particles that absorb heat ww.brighton-web

  15. Study of the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in diboson decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the spin, parity and tensor couplings of the Higgs boson in the $H\\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4\\ell$ , $H\\rightarrow WW^* \\rightarrow e\

  16. Howard University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ww.biology.howard.edu FacultyFacultyBiosEckberg.htm Hindman, Neil - Department of Mathematics, Howard University http:mysite.verizon.netnhindman Sitaraman, Sankar -...

  17. Energy and Cost Associated with Ventilating Office Buildings in a Tropical Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rim, Donghyun; Schiavon, Stefano; Nazaroff, William W

    2015-01-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Energy and Cost Associated with VentilatingS, Nazaroff WW (2015) Energy and Cost Associated withcost on ventilation energy and cost; and 4) limitations and

  18. The Broad-band X-ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTAR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E. ; Caltech ; Stern, D. ; Caltech, JPL ; Walton, D.J. ; Caltech ; Zhang, W.W. ; NASA, Goddard less Publication Date: 2014-11-20 OSTI Identifier: 1165907 Report...

  19. Measuring the Coronal Properties of IC 4329A with NuSTAR (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E. ; Caltech ; Stern, D. ; Caltech, JPL ; Walton, D.J. ; Caltech ; Zhang, W.W. ; NASA, Goddard less Publication Date: 2014-11-20 OSTI Identifier: 1165909 Report...

  20. Hypoglycemia is associated with increased risk for brain injury and adverse neurodevelopmental outcome in neonates at risk for encephalopathy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    J Child Neurol. 2011. [23] Spar JA, Lewine JD, Orrison WW,after neonatal hypoglycemia was by Spar et al. in 1994, who

  1. Mechanisms for Fatigue of Micron-Scale Silicon Structural Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alsem, Daan Hein; Pierron, Olivier N.; Stach, Eric A.; Muhlstein, Christopher L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2003, 12, 313. 13.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2001, 10, 593. 25.Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems 2006, 15, W.W. van

  2. L. James Rainwater and the Atomic Nuclei

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Nobel Laureates "During W.W. II, I James Rainwater worked ... on the Manhattan Project, mainly doing pulsed neutron spectroscopy using the small Columbia cyclotron. ......

  3. Planning and Design of Desalination Plants Effluent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maalouf, Sami

    2014-01-01

    into the Seawaters. ” Desalination, 221: 608-613. Alvarez-Potential Impacts on Desalination Operations off Southernhttp://www.pacinst.org/reports/desalination/ Cooper, W.W. ,

  4. Observation Brenneman, L.W.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rivers, E.; Caltech; Stern, D.; Caltech, JPL; Walton, D.J.; Caltech; Zhang, W.W.; NASA, Goddard Astrophysics,ASTRO Astrophysics,ASTRO Abstract Not Provided http:...

  5. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Madejski, G.; /KIPAC, Menlo...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rivers, E.; Caltech; Stern, D.; Caltech, JPL; Walton, D.J.; Caltech; Zhang, W.W.; NASA, Goddard Astrophysics,ASTRO Astrophysics,ASTRO Abstract Not Provided http:...

  6. TO: FROM: SUBJECT,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Facility 0 Other --- 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time t material, l tc) -w-w--- --- ContractPurchase Order 9...

  7. Development of segmented x-ray mirrors for Constellation-X R. Petrec, c. Chen", L.M. Cohenc, D.A. Content', R. J. Harmsd, G. Monnellyb, T. T. Saha", ML.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .A. Content', R. J. Harmsd, G. Monnellyb, T. T. Saha", ML. Schattenburg", p j Serlemitsos a and W.W. Zhang a a

  8. Sugar, water and free volume networks in concentrated sucrose solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ) in these mixtures shows a non-monotonic behavior with water content which is consistent with experimental than 38 Æ 4% w/w [5] while the diffusion of water and sucrose decouples for water contents below $50% w/w [6]. Water diffusion in- creases with water content and decreases with temperature

  9. Folding Mechanisms Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland Appalachians Swiss Alps #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 311/7/2010 Bending and Buckling CompressionFolding Mechanisms Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2003 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 211/7/2010 Folds

  10. Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Francis

    Alan Turing, Marshall Hall, and the Alignment of WW2 Japanese Naval Intercepts Peter W. Donovan M work in all areas, from the Japanese codes to the German Enigma machine which Alan Turing had begun of communications intelligence to the WW2 Allies in the Pacific. Alan Turing's Work on Applied Probability

  11. Process for degrading hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huxtable, William P. (Concord, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A process for degrading hypochlorite waste and lithium hypochlorite solutions uses a cobalt oxide/molybdenum oxide catalyst formed from about 1-10 w/w % cobalt oxide and 1-15 w/w % molybdenum oxide disposed on a suitable substrate. The major advantage of the catalyst lies in its high degree of effectiveness and its very low cost.

  12. NAME/TEAM: ______________________________________ GCMS postlab -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    NAME/TEAM: ______________________________________ GCMS postlab - 1 GC/MS of Gasoline Postlab Last (%) (w/w) % Ethanol Benzene ________ Convert your v/v % ethanol in gasoline to units of mass % (w/w %) of oxygen in gasoline. (Density of ethanol = 0.789 g/mL, Density of gasoline = 0.66 g/mL). Use dimensional

  13. Earth Structure Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth Structure Introduction Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton, unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 210/4/2010 Aerial views #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 310/4/2010 http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/Ben/ES/ #12

  14. Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whole Earth Structure and Plate Tectonics Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed evolution of Earth: from continental drift (early 1900's) to sea-floor spreading (early 1960's) to plate

  15. Comparison of F1 cows sired by Brahman, Boran and Tuli bulls for reproductive, maternal, and cow longevity traits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maiga, Assalia Hassimi

    2007-04-25

    included sire breed of cow, dam breed of cow, and calf�s birth year/age of cow; random effects included cow and sire of cow. BW and WW were evaluated using the same model and adding gender for both and age for WW. All two-way interactions were tested...

  16. Heterogeneity of distribution for growth traits between Angus and Brahman backcross embryo transfer cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleere, Jason James

    1998-01-01

    was significant for all traits and SEX was significant for all traits excluding FG. Birth year and birth season were significant effects for WW, GG, FG, and SW. Classes set according to industry standards were BW (4 kg increments), WW (50 kg increments), GG (40 kg...

  17. 20 2 JOURNAL OF CHINESE INFORMATION PROCESSING Vol.20 No.2 1003-0077200602-008-08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Chengqing

    (ROOM_INFO) #12;AquestionA"" question(A)w"+" "w+""+"+> "w""w+""+w""+w+"N (N0) "+"question(A)MM>04MÃ?N 4MÃ?N 1 1 ( ) ( ... ) ( ) ( | ) ... ( | ... ) ... ( | ... ) (4) m i i n i m m n m Wp p w w p w p w w p w w k s 1 2 ... n W ww w= 1 2 , , , , ,..., 1 2 { }, n i s s s k k n k w i j ww 'W 1 2 ... n ww

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation of reconstituted LH1 complexes. The protein was stained using 0.75% (ww) uranyl formate, and the image recorded at a nominal magnification of 285,000 x on a Philips...

  19. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, B.

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: ??, bb, ?? , WW, and ZZ. The explored Higgs boson mass range is ...

  20. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H ? ZZ,Z?[superscript ?],?[superscript ?]?[superscript ?] ? 4?, H ? WW ? ????, and H ? ?? ...

  1. Colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1997-08-26

    Final-state interactions and interference phenomena that could affect the value of the W mass reconstructed from hadronic WW decays at LEP2 are reviewed, and possible areas for future investigation are identified.

  2. China Cools with Tighter RAC Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiang; Rosenquist, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Energy ConservationRoom Air-Conditioning Heat Pumps: An Engineering and Life-W EER W/W B A Split Heat pump Heat pump Where the standards

  3. Spatial querying for image retrieval: a user-oriented evaluation Joemon M. Jose Jonathan Fkner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose, Joemon M.

    The Robert Gordon University Aberdeen, AB25 lHG, Scotland Aberdeen, AB24 4FP, Scotland wuw The Robert Gordon University Aberdeen, AB25 lHG, Scotland ww.scms.rgu.ac.uk/staff/djh/ Abstract Epic

  4. Subsidence Reversal in a Re-established Wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Robin L.; Fram, Miranda; Fujii, Roger; Wheeler, Gail

    2008-01-01

    and Evolution Weir WW. 1950. Subsidence of peat lands of theSE, editors. Land Subsidence in the United States: U.S.Inc. Mount J, Twiss R. 2005. Subsidence, sea level rise, and

  5. Historic, Recent, and Future Subsidence, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deverel, Steven J; Leighton, David A

    2010-01-01

    32:132–135. Weir WW. 1950. Subsidence of peat lands of theLH, Chen E. 1984. Organic soil subsidence. In: Holzer TL,editor. Man-induced land subsidence. Reviews in Engineering

  6. Enhancing UCSF Chimera through web services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, CC; Meng, EC; Morris, JH; Pettersen, EF; Ferrin, TE

    2014-01-01

    W.W. (2010) Opal web services for biomedical applications.UCSF Chimera through web services Conrad C. Huang, Elaine C.ABSTRACT Integrating access to web services with desktop ap-

  7. E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OVERHEW AUDIT - .- SYEB0LrFAtRCSjld Furswrnt to your rsgmt (rti aaidft of the book6 ww mm-it3 at the plarxt of the submt oorxtractor oovering ovcrheacl oostls for Lhe period...

  8. Search for a high mass neutral Higgs boson using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cree, Graham; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The results of searches for high mass Higgs bosons decaying to diboson (ZZ,WW,yy) final states by the ATLAS experiment are reported. In absence of the presence of a signal in the data, exclusion limits are presented.

  9. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an ...

  10. Off the Clock: Walker Evans and the Crisis of American Capital, 1933-38

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Jessica Lee

    2010-01-01

    2009. Rotha, Paul. Documentary Film. New York: W.W. Norton,subjects for a short documentary film—all focused on theof 1936-37 to make a documentary film based on the three

  11. RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    of Radionu­ clide Contents and Radon Emanation Rates inD.L. Krinkel, and W.W. Nazaroff, Radon in Energy-EfficientStitt, and G.II. Zapalac, Radon Measurements and Emanation

  12. Enhanced Anaerobic Digestion and Hydrocarbon Precursor Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Points: * FY15 - >90% CH 4 biogas (3312015) (Task 1) * FY15 - Produce 30 gL of cells with 50% (ww) lipid content (Task 2) ANL's Patented Process (US 8,247,009)...

  13. Environmental Health Perspectives VOLUME 114 | SUPPLEMENT 1 | April 2006 81 It has been hypothesized that a wide variety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler, Charles

    effects (Rajapakse et al. 2002) via the same or different mechanisms. Wastewater treatment works (Ww­mediated) and indirect effects and between primary and secondary outcomes. Moreover, wildlife species are rarely exposed

  14. Comparison of the Efficacy of Popular Weight Loss Programs in Sedentary Overweight Women 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baetge, Claire

    2014-08-06

    This study compared the efficacy of the Curves® Complete 90-day Challenge (CC), Weight Watchers® Points Plus (WW), Jenny Craig® At Home (JC), and Nutrisystem® Advance Select™ (NS) on weight loss, body composition and/or ...

  15. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  16. Exposure-Relevant Ozone Chemistry in Occupied Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Beverly Kaye

    2009-01-01

    particles produced by ozone/limonene reactions in indoor airgas-phase reactions of ozone with organic compounds underNazaroff, W.W. , 2008. Ozone levels in passenger cabins of

  17. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-06

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  18. Effective Field Theory Techniques for Resummation in Jet Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Nicholas Daniel

    2012-01-01

    QCD corrections to WW+jet production at hadron colliders.al. Substructure of high-p T Jets at the LHC. Phys. Rev. ,decorrelations between QCD jets at all orders. Phys.Lett. ,

  19. Amperometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide vapor for security screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedet, John; Lu, Donglai; Cizek, Karel; Belle, Jeff; Wang, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    10% w/w). Hydrogel solid electrolyte preparation One hundredI-A in 1 M KCl (b) as a solid electrolyte. The SPE is placedperoxide pulses. Solid electrolyte: 2% agarose I-A prepared

  20. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rivers, E.; Caltech; Stern, D.; Caltech, JPL; Walton, D.J.; Caltech; Zhang, W.W.; NASA, Goddard","2014-11-20T05:00:00Z",1165909,"10.10880004-637X781283","SLAC-PUB-16150",...

  1. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rivers, E.; Caltech; Stern, D.; Caltech, JPL; Walton, D.J.; Caltech; Zhang, W.W.; NASA, Goddard","2014-11-20T05:00:00Z",1165907,"10.10880004-637X788161","SLAC-PUB-16152",...

  2. Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    in the scattered Kuiper Belt. Astrophys. J. , 635, L97-L100.al. (2002). The binary Kuiper-belt object 1998 WW31. Nature,2005). The high-albedo Kuiper Belt object (55565) 2002 AW

  3. Linear Algebra Chapter 4 Test Name: Ar15Wec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Tin-Yau

    -wiing@ww.tu-Berlin.de, abacus@math.tu-berlin.de, Pr¨ufungs¨amter IB 1,IB 2,IB 3,IB 4, IB 5 Pr¨ufungsberechtigte im Mathematik

  4. Primary Structures Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primary Structures Earth Structure (2nd Edition), 2004 W.W. Norton & Co, New York Slide show by Ben van der Pluijm © WW Norton; unless noted otherwise 9/7/2010 3:52 PM #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 29/7/2010 Stratigraphic Facing a. Ripple marks b. Cross beds (AZ) c. Pillow basalt (CA) #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 39

  5. Examen Parcial de Automatas y Lenguajes Formales 16 de diciembre de 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocha, Jairo

    regular entonces S(L) es regular, donde S(L) = {w | 1, 2 (w12 L)}. 3. Dado un n´umero natural fijo n y el alfabeto = {a, b}, se define el lenguaje Ln = {w$w | w, w n w = w }. Demostrar que 2n es una (w12 L)}. 3. Dado un n´umero natural fijo n y el alfabeto = {a, b}, se define el lenguaje Ln = {w$w

  6. Neural-Symbolic Learning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    and semi-linear neurons such that N computesTp r1 : A (B C D) r2 : A (E F) r3 : B #12;Logic Programs #12;Why Neurons and Symbols · To study the statistical nature of learning and the logical nature Programming A B !A !B W WW !1 h1 !2 h2 !3 h3 B FEDC WWW -WW Interpretations For each propositional general

  7. Measurement of $W^+ W^-$ Production and Search for the Higgs Boson in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Aremenia); et al.,

    2011-05-01

    A measurement of WW production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and a search for the Higgs boson are reported. The WW candidates are selected in events with two leptons, either electrons or muons. The measurement is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The pp to WW cross section is measured to be 41.1 +/- 15.3 (stat) +/- 5.8 (syst) +/- 4.5 (lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits on WW gamma and WWZ anomalous triple gauge couplings are set. The search for the standard model Higgs boson in the WW decay mode does not reveal any evidence of excess above backgrounds. Limits are set on the production of the Higgs boson in the context of the standard model and in the presence of a sequential fourth family of fermions with high masses. In the latter context, a Higgs boson with mass between 144 and 207 GeV is ruled out at 95% confidence level.

  8. Searching for Heavier Higgs Boson via Di-Higgs Production at LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan-Chun Lü; Chun Du; Yaquan Fang; Hong-Jian He; Huijun Zhang

    2015-07-14

    The LHC discovery of a light Higgs particle $h^0$ (125GeV) opens up new prospect for searching heavier Higgs boson(s) at the LHC Run-2, which will unambiguously point to new physics beyond the standard model (SM). We study the detection of a heavier neutral Higgs boson $H^0$ via di-Higgs production channel at the LHC (14TeV), $H^0 \\to h^0h^0 \\to WW^*\\gamma\\gamma$. This directly probes the $Hhh$ cubic Higgs interaction, which exists in most extensions of the SM Higgs sector. For the decay products of final states $WW^*$, we include both pure leptonic mode $WW^* \\to \\ell\\bar{\

  9. Search for WZ + ZZ productions with missing transverse energy + jets with b enhancement at \\(\\sqrt{s} = 1.96\\) TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-06

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for eventsmore »with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.« less

  10. Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; et al

    2012-01-06

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for eventsmore »with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.« less

  11. Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G [Fermilab; Appel, J A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2012-01-06

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for events with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

  12. Search for WZ+ZZ production with MET + jets with b enhancement at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2012-01-06

    Diboson production (WW + WZ + ZZ) has been observed at the Tevatron in hadronic decay modes dominated by the WW process. This paper describes the measurement of the cross section of WZ and ZZ events in final states with large ET and using b-jet identification as a tool to suppress WW contributions. Due to the limited energy resolution, we cannot distinguish between partially hadronic decays of WZ and ZZ, and we measure the sum of these processes. The number of signal events is extracted using a simultaneous fit to the invariant mass distribution of the two jets for events with two b-jet candidates and events without two b-jet candidates. We measure a cross section ?(pp? ? WZ,ZZ) = 5.8-3.0+3.6 pb, in agreement with the standard model.

  13. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01

    analysis of above flow resistance and energy cost, we know that the economy flux ratio of transfer heat-transfer means is between 0.54 and 0.85, namely sewage flux is smaller, and minC Cr min wwCVc?= . It is necessary to point out that though depending... efficiency of contranatant two pass thimble: ()213 1 11 21wwNn wz tt Cr tt 1n? ?? ?==?+ ? (1) Fig.1 Reverse-flow heat efficiency of TDHTS Contranatant single pass heat-transfer efficiency: ( ) ()1 1exp (1 ) 1exp (1)n Cr NTU Cr? = ?? ? ? Put...

  14. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNPHEP/2004008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 2004 Study of Bose­Einstein Correlations in e + e - #W + W - Events at LEP The OPAL Collaboration Abstract Bose­Einstein correlations between like­sign charged­particle pairs in e + e - #W + W - events--WW Bose­Einstein correlations is obtained. The data are also compared with predictions of a recent imple

  15. EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERNPHEP/2004008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH CERN­PH­EP/2004­008 24th March 2004 Study of Bose­Einstein Correlations in e + e - #W + W - Events at LEP The OPAL Collaboration Abstract Bose­Einstein correlations events. Within the statistics of the data sample no evidence for inter--WW Bose­Einstein correlations

  16. Minimal RED Cell Pairs Markedly Improve Electrode Kinetics and Power Production in Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple electrodes used in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) are placed on each side of a reverse electrodialysis (RED increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m2 ; WW: 1.9 W/m2 ). By maintaining near optimal electrode power

  17. Piyahu Nadu - Land of Flowing Waters: The Water Transfer from Owens Valley to Los Angeles 1913-1939

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    sTAZMz4hrai2dDYnsV7w&bvm=bv.65636070,bs.1,d.aWw. Gordon R.=AFQjCNGGeH25WzlDKfM8D5xh20G1DaDbVw&bvm= bv.65636070,bs.1,d.

  18. Search for high-mass states with one lepton plus missing transverse momentum in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The ATLAS detector is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W?,W*), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp ...

  19. Schizophrenia Gene Networks Found, and a Link to Autism | Columbia University Medical Center http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/...tworks-found-and-a-link-to-autism/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=schizophrenia-gene-networks-found-and-a-link-to-auti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schizophrenia Gene Networks Found, and a Link to Autism | Columbia University Medical Center http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/...tworks-found-and-a-link-to-autism/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=schizophrenia-gene-networks-found-and-a-link-to-autism#.UKEj9m_A9ww[11/13/2012 9:42:35 AM] Archives Select Month

  20. Kheshbn No. 100- Fall 1982 - Journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    pn ,oyfr PK aayisnyji a*n osti ,aBKttnrnosti ,PK yreKfrsayaacp "ww^pk pn^i h p*B0"a PK pXQyaa^K PK OSTI ya^Vt pn pfl y-pK B*a ya^n

  1. Nano-wire Photoelectrochemical cell For water splitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    ;Motivation · Renewable Energy replace Fossil Fuel 264 GW (2008) 70 GWe (2011) Car running on Biomass (WW II #12;Outline 1. Motivation of PEC 2. Mechanism of PEC 3. Some examples 4. Future direction #12 Motivation 1>20% Electricity 2>80% 3

  2. Characterization of biochars to evaluate recalcitrance and agronomic performance Akio Enders a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    a , Kelly Hanley a , Thea Whitman a , Stephen Joseph b , Johannes Lehmann a, a Department of Crop and Soil Keywords: Biomass Black carbon Charcoal Proximate analysis Pyrolysis a b s t r a c t Biochars (n = 94) were from 0% to 77.4% (w/w). Greater pyrolysis temperature for low-ash biochars increased fixed carbon

  3. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1999-12-10

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  4. The Relation of the Color and Carotene Content of Butter Fat to its Vitamin A Potency. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treichler, Ray; Grimes, Mary Anna; Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1935-01-01

    YlhlNN a -- - 8 - NNNNNNNNNNNN NNN'SNN-JNNNNN mmmmm gggggggggggg z'ggggg2ggggg ggzgg dddddr1dr1dddd ddr1dr1dddddr1d d,-4ddd 2 * 0, .- .- ." ." I, d - ----- --- -- a.3cDcD.aaCoat-L-t-t- aCoawwawct-L-t-t- t-L-t-ww mmmmmmmmmmmm...

  5. The Despatch Issue 19 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    2009-01-01

    . The two ships are fighting what is 18 basically WW JJ submarine warfare (hence photon torpedoes). The use of sensors to get a somewhat inaccurate picture when visual sighting is impossible is similar to sonar tracking. A submarine rising to periscope...

  6. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7??fb(?1) of pp-bar collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, Gemma; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.

    2013-09-17

    We present a search for the Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW??????? decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7??fb(?1) of pp...

  7. http://foo.org/bar/ W W W. D O C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowd, Daniel

    http://foo.org/bar/ W W W. D O C file://c:/xyz.doc W W W http://asdf.com/ W W W http://foo.org/ ABA://foo.org/ http://foo.org/bar/ W W WW W W http://asdf.com/ ABA ? . D O C file://c:/xyz.doc Statistics for each

  8. LTC1563-2/LTC1563-3 s Extremely Easy to Use--A Single Resistor Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    -16 package (SO-8 footprint). s Replaces Discrete RC Active Filters and Modules s Antialiasing Filters RATINGS W WW U PACKAGE/ORDER INFORMATION W UU ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS TOP VIEW GN PACKAGE 16-LEAD EN NOTE: PINS LABELED NC ARE NOT CONNECTED INTERNALLY AND SHOULD BE CONNECTED TO THE SYSTEM GROUND

  9. ZU: The Life of a Sumerian Verb in Early Mesopotamia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Jared Norris

    2015-01-01

    Hallo, W.W. and van Dijk, J.J.A. 1968 The Exaltation ofwords 8. Ninge$zida A (= van Dijk 1960, 81-107) TCL XV 25 27Ninurta’s Exploits (= van Dijk 1983) 464 $a 3 dab 5 -ba KA

  10. Aisle Marking Requirements permanent workplace aisles should have appropriate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    , brown paper bags, glass jars, metal cans, milk/juice cartons, plastic #1-7. No food contamination · packing peanuts: no recycling, but can send to mail services reuse program. ­ place sealed bags on top of campus mail boxes, addressed to "Packing Peanuts Reuse Program, WW15" http://web.mit.edu/facilities/environmental/reuse

  11. Physics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , Vibrations and Waves (W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1971). First, we compute the kinetic energyPhysics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String Consider the kinetic energy and the potential energy of this string segment due to the passage of a traveling wave

  12. LAIS 498/598: Rhetoric, Energy, and Public Policy Fall 2011 Syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, NY: W.W. Norton. · Nelson, V. (2011). Introduction to renewable energy 1 LAIS 498/598: Rhetoric, Energy, and Public Policy Fall 2011 Syllabus, and to the integrity of the democracy we create together. --College Learning in the New Global

  13. Hurricanes: Observations and Dynamics Houze Section 10.1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    1 Hurricanes: Observations and Dynamics Houze Section 10.1. Holton Section 9.7. Emanuel, K. A., 1988: Toward a general theory of hurricanes. American Scientist, 76, 371-379 (web link). http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/hurr/home.rxml Definition: Hurricanes are intense vortical (rotational

  14. Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s. May 2015 Exercises IICFD2015 P 32 1 x 15°C 0°C 47°C x WW W P E EE w e x x #12;Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course particletheasvolumesamethewithsphereaofsurface obstacleofsize distancestop Stkwhere 25.0 2 2 Stk Stk X #12;Thermal and Flow Engine

  15. The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. A. GOLDIN, J. A. SMITH, O. M. SUN, A. A. AJA, M. N. BUI, AND T. HUGHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    ­time record. The elements of the WW system in- clude a surface buoy, a wire suspended from the buoy, a weight at the end of the wire, and the profiler itself. The wire and weight follow the surface motion of the buoy of the profiler requires much less precision. Buoy- ancy is adjusted simply by adding foam blocks to the structure

  16. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Phil Rockefeller Washington June 4, 2013 MEMORANDUM TO: Council Members FROM: Tony Grover, Fish and Wildlife Division Director SUBJECT: IEAB report on Cost-Effectiveness of Fish Tagging Technologies. ________________________________________ w:\\tg\\ww\\ieab interim fish tagging report may 2013.docx #12;IEAB Independent Economic Analysis Board

  17. Ozone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the U.S. Department of Energy Residential Building Envelopes Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy ResearchOzone Reductions using Residential Building Envelopes I.S. Walker, M.H. Sherman and W.W. Nazaroff

  18. Complete Two-Loop Corrections to H -> gamma gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giampiero Passarino; Christian Sturm; Sandro Uccirati

    2007-07-10

    In this paper the complete two-loop corrections to the Higgs-boson decay, H -> gamma gamma, are presented. The evaluations of both QCD and electroweak corrections are based on a numerical approach. The results cover all kinematical regions, including the WW normal-threshold, by introducing complex masses in the relevant (gauge-invariant) parts of the LO and NLO amplitudes.

  19. Author's personal copy Modeling of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Author's personal copy Modeling of a passive DMFC operating with neat methanol W.W. Yang, T.S. Zhao 2011 Keywords: Fuel cells Direct methanol fuel cells Neat methanol Mass transport Model a b s t r a c t A mathematical model is developed to simulate the fundamental transport phenomena in a passive direct methanol

  20. Effect of the cathode gas diffusion layer on the water transport behavior and the performance of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao , W.W. Yang Department Direct methanol fuel cell Passive operation Neat methanol operation a b s t r a c t The passive operation of a direct methanol fuel cell with neat methanol requires the water that is pro- duced at the cathode

  1. Are PCB Levels in Fish from the Canadian Great Lakes Still Declining?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    , Huron, and Ontario, their best projected 2007 PCB levels are below the unlimited fish consumption projected 2007 PCB levels (160 and 370 ng/g ww, respectively) will continue to result in consumption for capacitors and transformers, heat transfer and hydraulic fluids, lubricating and cutting oils

  2. SCHOOL OF DIVINITY, HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY ACADEMIC SESSION 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Tutorials: one-hour session in each of teaching weeks 3-6, 8-11, total 8 hours. See your portal or My Russia and Soviet Russia, 1914-24: Change or Continuity? 2. Interwar Europe ­ Stability or instability 2. Theme 1 Tsarist Russia on the eve of WW1 Week 3 1. Theme 1 Russia in War and Revolution, 1914

  3. Summer Student Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basan, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this project, the student investigates an extension of the jet-vertex-tagger to improve the pileup jet rejection in ATLAS MET reconstruction. Pileup correction procedures are examined in simulation for future MET performance improvements. As a side project, the implications of a forward tracker at the HL-LHC on the $H{\\rightarrow\\,}WW^{(\\ast)}{\\rightarrow\\,}\\ell\

  4. 3-106 An entrepreneur is to build a large reservoir above the lake level, and pump water from the lake to the reservoir at night using cheap power, and let the water flow from the reservoir back to the lake during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    -turbineturbine WW K Then the power consumption cost of the pump, the revenue generated by the turbine, and the net = Revenue ­ Cost = 171,900 ­114,500 = $57,400/year Discussion It appears that this pump-turbine system has on the initial cost of the system, its life, the operating and maintenance costs, the interest rate

  5. MA 266 Lecture 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MO) I 2, y'(0) = ~1-. Fvl' w/(ka WW Uta/WWW (l M. W is 'W' r'b iv) = 5" 7”” ' 9/. ,sz Win-MFQ"? % W M M“. "C. C! Q; (Ll/Q. M W" (I was M c. J; I a t - '. 7H) Gig/6(6),?

  6. Author's personal copy Kaly UL and Jones GP (1998) Mangrove restoration: A potential tool for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    1998-01-01

    (eds.) (1980) Perspectives in Coastal Dune Management. The Hague: SPB Academic Publishing. Weinstein MP Publishers. Woodhouse WW, Jr. (1978) Dune Building and Stabilization with Vegetation. Special Report 3. Fort for coastal management in tropical developing countries. Ambio 27: 656­661. Leatherman SP (1982) Barrier

  7. Scheduling: Proportional Share In this chapter, we'll examine a different type of scheduler known as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi

    9 Scheduling: Proportional Share In this chapter, we'll examine a different type of scheduler known as a proportional-share scheduler, also sometimes referred to as a fair-share scheduler. Proportional-share is based of proportional-share scheduling is found in research by Waldspurger and Weihl [WW94], and is known as lottery

  8. Evaluation of F1 cows sired by Brahman, Boran, and Tuli for reproductive and maternal performance and cow longevity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Samantha Fern

    2005-11-01

    that consisted of sire of dam breed, dam of dam breed, and calf??s birth year/age of dam as fixed effects. Sire of dam within sire breed of dam and dam within sire of dam within sire breed of dam were used as random effects. BW and WW were analyzed using the same...

  9. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: sub-classification by massive parallel quantitative RT-PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Xuemin; Zeng, Naiyan; Gao, Zifen; Du, Ming-Qing

    2014-11-24

    ;103:275-282. 7. Choi WW, Weisenburger DD, Greiner TC et al. A new immunostain algorithm classifies diffuse large B-cell lymphoma into molecular subtypes with high accuracy. Clin Cancer Res 2009;15:5494-5502. 8. Gutierrez-Garcia G, Cardesa-Salzmann T, Climent...

  10. June 1, 2009 23:55 WSPC/Trim Size: 11in x 8.5in for Proceedings joint MODELING AND INFERENCE OF SEQUENCE-STRUCTURE SPECIFICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmead, Christopher James

    for the native structure against alternate backbone structures. In a case study of WW domains, we show models to identify sequences with low internal energies for a prescribed backbone structure 4, 20 the target structure over alternatives. A few algo- rithms have been proposed to address the issue of speci

  11. Energy-Based Control of Coronal Biped Balance and Stepping Benjamin J. Stephens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy-Based Control of Coronal Biped Balance and Stepping Benjamin J. Stephens Carnegie Mellon University Abstract Linear Biped Model Coronal Energy Control Coronal Stepping Control LR L ww Dy Dy D y, an energy controller that regulates periodic motion of the system, and a foot placement controller for push

  12. Au Boulot! First-Year French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinneen, David A.; Christiansen, Hope; Kernen, Madeleine; Pensec, Herve

    1995-01-01

    and appropriate in this context than just argent. 23 Vocabulaire NOMS un agent de police6 un gendarme une bouchère, un boucher une boulangère, un boulanger une patronne, ww patron une infirmière, un infirmier une avocate, m/2 avocat une femme médecin, un...

  13. The limiting mutual diffusion coefficients of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products in near-critical hydrocarbons 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noel, James Michael

    1994-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is used to convert synthesis gas into petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. It was developed in Germany during WW 11 as an alternative fuel source during the fuel embargo and is still used as a...

  14. Measurement of ${?(H?_e\\bar{?_e})\\times BR(H\\rightarrow ZZ^\\ast)}$ and Higgs production in $ZZ$ fusion at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Milutinovi?-Dumbelovi?; I. Božovi?-Jelisav?i?; A. Robson; P. Roloff

    2015-07-19

    This paper presents the potential measurement at 1.4 TeV CLIC of the cross-section (times branching ratio) of the Higgs production via $WW$ fusion with the Higgs subsequently decaying in $ZZ^\\ast$, ${\\sigma(H\

  15. Physics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 5B Winter 2009 Rate of Energy Transfer by Sinusoidal Waves on a String Consider the kinetic energy and the potential energy of this string segment due to the passage of a traveling wave, Vibrations and Waves (W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1971). First, we compute the kinetic energy

  16. Endometrial glands as a source of nutrients, growth factors and cytokines during the first trimester of human pregnancy: A morphological and immunohistochemical study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hempstock, Joanne; Cindrova-Davies, Tereza; Jauniaux, Eric; Burton, Graham

    2004-07-20

    - tion: phenotypic and morphological characterization of the CD56++ population. Dev Immunol 1991, 1:169-190. 44. Perry JS, Crombie PR: Ultrastructure of the uterine glands of the pig. J Anat 1982, 134:339-350. 45. Basir GS, O WS, So WW, Ng EH, Ho PC...

  17. Kharisma Jaya Gemilang (KJG), an Indonesian company part-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in cooperation with xxxxxx managed to get two of its natural forest sources legally verified as well stakeholder, we hope TTAP News will be a useful resource for you. Please feel free to share this newsletter in the European Union. Quick links www.timbertradeactionplan.info ww.tft-forests.org CONSUMERS > FBCIB > UK TTF

  18. Journal of Chromatography A, 807 (1998) 111119 Microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography of fatty acids as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    1998-01-01

    /w) and n-butanol (6.55%, w/w), pH 10.2. Separation by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography of fatty acids as phenacyl esters *´ Ivan Miksik , Zdenek Deyl ´ ´Institute of Physiology, Academy of saturated fatty acids containing even number of carbon atoms was successfully separated as phenacyl esters

  19. Permeability Evaluation in Heterogcmecw Formations Eiocldy of Petroleum Engineers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    for pwnonwtloa at ttm SW W-mm RwIwJ81 MOMIIXI held In AI)clwrEua, Alaokm 20.28 M#y lBLt3, WA pap+r ww dtcwd (w wwattoth by w) SW PrqIram Commitlea fcilowlcu rwhw of Irdawnttirm cc+tdnocl In an @&tract submitted by ttw

  20. Alginate-Based Edible Coating to Enhance Quality and Shelf-Life of Fresh-Cut Watermelon (Citrullus Lanatus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sipahi, Rabia

    2012-10-19

    of multilayered antimicrobial edible coating on the shelf-life of fresh-cut watermelon while keeping its original attributes for longer, without affecting its sensory properties. A set of solutions containing sodium alginate (0.5, 1, 2% w/w), beta...

  1. Mathematics > Journal of Algebra October to December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiao-Wu

    Mathematics > Journal of Algebra October to December 2010 Back to Top 25 Print 1. W-3676 Jelonek, Z. 1/2(W)w 2011/3/1http://top25.sciencedirect.com/subject/mathematics/16/journal/journal-of-algebra-Gorenstein modules Journal of Algebra, Volume 325, Issue 1, January 2011, Pages 132-146 Geng, Y.; Ding, N. 2

  2. Mathematics > Journal of Algebra July to September 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiao-Wu

    Mathematics > Journal of Algebra July to September 2009 Back to Top 25 Print 1. Rings over which theory Journal of Algebra Elmer, J. 22. 1/2(W)w 2010/3/13http://top25.sciencedirect the transpose of every invertible matrix is invertible Journal of Algebra Gupta, R.N.; Khurana, A.; Khurana, D

  3. Figure 1. Example Current Weather Product INTEGRATING REAL-TIME WEATHER INTO AN INTERNET LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelmson, Robert

    Figure 1. Example Current Weather Product INTEGRATING REAL-TIME WEATHER INTO AN INTERNET LEARNING ENVIRONMENT: WW2010 CURRENT WEATHER PRODUCTS Daniel J. Bramer, David P. Wojtowicz, Joel Plutchak, Robert B ­ is that accurate, useful, and if possible, real-life examples of weather phenomena are necessary to best enhance

  4. Copyright c 2006 by Sebastian Carron Montero All rights reserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Copyright c 2006 by Sebastian Carron Montero All rights reserved #12;MEASUREMENT OF THE t¯t, WW AND Z PRODUCTION CROSS SECTIONS IN p¯p COLLISIONS AT s = 1.96 TeV by Sebastian Carron Montero¯p COLLISIONS AT s = 1.96 TeV by Sebastian Carron Montero Department of Physics Duke University Date: Approved

  5. Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain Justin E. Stopa model Wave atlas Wave energy Wave power a b s t r a c t Hawaii's access to the ocean and remoteness from as nearshore wave energy resources in Hawaii. A global WAVEWATCH III (WW3) model forced by surface winds from

  6. Urban Mining: Quality and quantity of recyclable and recoverable material mechanically and physically extractable from residual waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Maria, Francesco Micale, Caterina; Sordi, Alessio; Cirulli, Giuseppe; Marionni, Moreno

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Material recycling and recovery from residual waste by physical and mechanical process has been investigated. • About 6% of recyclable can be extracted by NIR and 2-3Dimension selector. • Another 2% of construction materials can be extracted by adopting modified soil washing process. • Extracted material quality is quite high even some residual heavy metal have been detected by leaching test. - Abstract: The mechanically sorted dry fraction (MSDF) and Fines (<20 mm) arising from the mechanical biological treatment of residual municipal solid waste (RMSW) contains respectively about 11% w/w each of recyclable and recoverable materials. Processing a large sample of MSDF in an existing full-scale mechanical sorting facility equipped with near infrared and 2-3 dimensional selectors led to the extraction of about 6% w/w of recyclables with respect to the RMSW weight. Maximum selection efficiency was achieved for metals, about 98% w/w, whereas it was lower for Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), about 2% w/w. After a simulated lab scale soil washing treatment it was possible to extract about 2% w/w of inert exploitable substances recoverable as construction materials, with respect to the amount of RMSW. The passing curve showed that inert materials were mainly sand with a particle size ranging from 0.063 to 2 mm. Leaching tests showed quite low heavy metal concentrations with the exception of the particles retained by the 0.5 mm sieve. A minimum pollutant concentration was in the leachate from the 10 and 20 mm particle size fractions.

  7. Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-08-01

    Search for massive resonances in dijet systems containing jets tagged as W or Z boson decays in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV05/08/2014A search is reported for massive resonances decaying into a quark and a vector boson (W or Z), or two vector bosons (WW, WZ, or ZZ). The analysis is performed on an inclusive sample of multijet events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns, collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The search uses novel jet-substructure identification techniques that provide sensitivity to the presence of highly boosted vector bosons decaying into a pair of quarks. Exclusion limits are set at a confidence level of 95% on the production of: (i) excited quark resonances q* decaying to qW and qZ for masses less than 3.2 TeV and 2.9 TeV, respectively, (ii) a Randall-Sundrum graviton G[RS] decaying into WW for masses below 1.2 TeV, and (iii) a heavy partner of the W boson W' decaying into WZ for masses less than 1.7 TeV. For the first time mass limits are set on W' to WZ and G[RS] to WW in the all-jets final state. The mass limits on q* to qW, q* to qZ, W' to WZ, G[RS] to WW are the most stringent to date. A model with a "bulk" graviton G[Bulk] that decays into WW or ZZ bosons is also studied.

  8. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 ���± 0.7% and 8.8 ���± 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 ���± 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 ���± 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 ���± 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  9. STUDY OF HIGGS BOSON PRODUCTION IN BOSONIC DECAY CHANNELS AT THE LHC (INCLUDING OFF-SHELL PRODUCTION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oda, Susumu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of the Higgs boson production in bosonic decay channels by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC are described in this paper. The Higgs boson was the last undiscovered particle in the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. The bosonic decay channels include $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$, $ZZ^*$, $WW^*$. In the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z\\gamma$ and $ZZ^*$ decay channels, the whole event topology can be reconstructed. The $Z\\gamma$ decay channel can be sensitive to exotic Higgs decay beyond the SM. Because of its large branching fraction, the $WW^*$ decay channel is adequate to study bosonic production. Off-shell production is considered to be sensitive to the total Higgs decay width. The bosonic decay channels are a key to probe the SM and beyond.

  10. High Mass Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjoern Penning

    2010-12-02

    We present results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for high mass standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at \\sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Compared to previous Higgs boson Tevatron combinations, more data and new channels (H -> W+W- -> lnujj, H -> WW -> l+tau + X and trilepton final states) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. Analyzing 5.9 fb^-1 of data at CDF, and 5.4-6.7 fb^-1 at D0, the combination excludes with 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of m_H = 158-175 GeV/c2.

  11. Search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to a $W$ pair in the fully leptonic final state in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying to W+W- in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is reported. The data are collected at the LHC with the CMS detector, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 inverse femtobarns. The W+W- candidates are selected in events with two charged leptons and large missing transverse energy. No significant excess of events above the standard model background expectations is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production relative to the standard model Higgs expectation are derived. The standard model Higgs boson is excluded in the mass range 129-270 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  12. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Mattes, Benjamin R.

    2004-09-28

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  13. Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-07-21

    Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

  14. Search for new physics using QUAERO: A general interface to D0 event data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2001-12-01

    .7 eEH20862 T 2jp e,j 1,2 T . 20 GeV 0.61 115 6 6 pb 21 EH20862 T . 30 GeV p eEH20862 T T . 40 GeV ee2j p e 1,2 ,j 1,2 T . 20 GeV 0.70 123 6 7 pb 21 When provided with a signal model and a choice of variables V , QUAERO uses this algorithm and D0 Run I... muons in the D0 detector, the corresponding muon channels mEH20862 T 2j and mm2j have been excluded from these data. To check standard model results, we remove WW and ZZ production from the background estimate and search (i) for standard model WW...

  15. Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work/MG 0.3 MGD average flow per facility #12;Reclaimed Algae Bacteria O2 CO2 N Organics N P CO2 P CO2 Waste

  16. Search for New Physics Using Quaero: A General Interface to D0 Event Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2001-06-07

    We describe Quaero, a method that i) enables the automatic optimization of searches for physics beyond the standard model, and ii) provides a mechanism for making high energy collider data generally available. We apply Quaero to searches for standard model WW, ZZ, and ttbar production, and to searches for these objects produced through a new heavy resonance. Through this interface, we make three data sets collected by the D0 experiment at sqrt(s)=1.8 TeV publicly available.

  17. COMPARISON OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON HEATING IN VARIOUS DEVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    heating rate of a plasma in an ar bitrary magnetic field can be written as d J ! - TI neElo(B-B o )dV/2 is low (W/W2 0.01) . This paper will com pare the heating rates in a toroidal octupole, a bumpy torus, and a Tokamak. For purposes of comparison, it is convenient to write the heating rate as where d e

  18. Diboson physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, Mark S.; /UC, San Diego

    2006-05-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 detectors are being used to study diboson production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The authors summarize recent measurements of the W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, and WW cross-sections and limits on WZ and ZZ production. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings are also presented.

  19. Search for Higgs boson like high mass resonances in the bosonic decay channels with ATLAS and CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo Sterzo, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Searches for an additional heavy Higgs-like boson have been performed by both ATLAS and CMS with data collected in the Run 1 of the LHC. This document reports searches in the diboson decay channels ($\\gamma\\gamma$, $WW$, $ZZ$). Exclusion limits have been set for different hypotheses: model independent narrow-resonance, Standard Model-like Higgs, Electroweak Singlet and 2HDM. No excesses are found over the Standard Model background-only expectation.

  20. Evaluation of Yeast Cell Wall on Early Production Laying Hen Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashim, Mohammed Malik Hashim 1981-

    2012-11-08

    fed a diet containing 1.0% oligofructose-type commercial prebiotic or 1.0% (w/w) inulin (an archetypal or prototype prebiotic found in many dietary plants) there was significant improvement (P<0.05) in egg production, feed conversion, and intestine...., 16 2011). It was also noted that feeding 27-week-old laying hens a diet containing 0.25% fructooligosaccharides significantly improved egg shell thickness (Kim et al., 2009). Inulin is a naturally occurring plant polysaccharide prebiotic...

  1. Using High-Resolution NMR to Examine the Components that Contribute to the Activity and Stability of Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver (PRL-1) and Their Dependence on the Redox State of Cysteine Residues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Andria L.

    2009-12-15

    number R-017708. The mas spectrometers used in this study were purchased with support from KSTAR, Kansas administered NSF EPSCoR, the University of Kansas and KCALSI (ww.kclifesciences.org). This study also made use of the National Magnetic Resonance... Vander Velde and Dr. Asokan Anabanadam for their support, training and maintenance of the NMR spectrometers here at KU. Additional NMR training was received at the National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (NMRFAM) Protein Structure Determination...

  2. PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    from the steam turbine and the binary cycle, and the thermal efficiencies for the binary cycle from the steam turbine and the binary cycle are kW15,410 kJ/kg)7.23448.1kJ/kg)(27438.19()( 433steamT,binarynet, 98isoT, inp iso wmWW hhmW steam turbine production well reinjection well isobutane turbine heat

  3. Fast Rates for Regularized Objectives Karthik Sridharan, Nathan Srebro, Shai Shalev-Shwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srebro, Nathan

    , . . . , n. We focus on problems where f(w; ) has a generalized linear form: f(w; ) = ( w, () , ) + r(w) . (2, the empirical averages ^F(w) = ^E [f(w; )] = 1 n n i=1 f(w; i) (3) converge uniformly to their expectations F(w) with rate 1/n. This justifies using the empirical minimizer ^w = arg min wW ^F(w), (4) and we can

  4. *Corresponding author. Correspondence address: CERN, EP Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland. Tel.: #41-22-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald

    of a laser-driven plasma wake"eld accelerator K.A. Assamagan *, W.W. Buck , S.-Y. Chen , R. Ent , R.N. Green , P. Gueye , C. Keppel , G. Mourou , D. Umstadter , R. Wagner Nuclear/High Energy Physics Research employed to produce a table-sized laser with a pulse duration of 400 fs and a maximum energy of 2 J [2

  5. Notes 16. Analysis of tilting pad bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2010-01-01

    affecting tilting pad bearing force coefficients include elastic deformation of the bearing pads and pivots, thermal effects affecting the lubricant viscosity and film clearance, etc. [2,3]. ? Pad Pivot Journal Y X ? Journal speed NOTES 16... is assumed rigid. Journal motion perturbation analysis The bearing supports a static load with components { } YoXo WW , . At speed ?, the static load determines operation with the journal at its static equilibrium position ( YoXo ee ,). At equilibrium...

  6. The Utility of R-Curves for Understanding Fracture Toughness-Strength Relations in Bridging Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Ceramics J. J. Kruzic,*,w,z R. L. Satet,*,y,ww M. J. Hoffmann,**,y R. M. Cannon,**,z,{ R. O. Ritchie*,z,J z, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 y Institute for Ceramics in Mechanical Engineering, University of Karlsruhe, D-76131, California 94720 The mechanical behavior of four rare earth (RE)-Mg-doped Si3N4 ceramics (RE 5 La, Lu, Y, Yb

  7. 851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive Director 800-452-5161

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    851 S.W. Sixth Avenue, Suite 1100 Steve Crow 503-222-5161 Portland, Oregon 97204-1348 Executive. ________________________________________ q:\\jf\\ww\\2012\\71012 p4 sw market cm.docx #12;6/28/2012 1 111 Rob Diffely, BPA NW Power-Through-Cooling Regulations on Southwest Market 22 Outline Ò Background Ò Calculating the SW Surplus Ò OTC Clean Water Act

  8. Theatre in El Salvador during the Eighties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salomó n, Roberto

    1992-04-01

    Theatre in El Salvador during the Eighties Roberto Salomón Theatre in El Salvador during the 80s means wartime theatre, and theatre has had a tough time surviving censorship, political persecution, and the battlefield. The explosion of the civil war... Barbero, had provided most of the theatre in Salvador. Barbero's main objectives had been the production of classical theatre, post WW-II European Drama and the development of local playwrights. In the late sixties, different groups began multi...

  9. Searches for Higgs boson like high mass resonances in the bosonic decay channels with ATLAS and CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo Sterzo, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In this talk the searches of the ATLAS and CMS experiment for additional Higgs boson like resonances in the WW, ZZ and $\\gamma\\gamma$ final state, for high masses beyond 125 GeV are summarized. The searches are based on the full LHC run-1 dataset of each experiment. Upper limits are presented in the context of an electro-weak singlet extension of the standard model.

  10. An alternative to climate change for explaining species loss in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Charles

    : J.M., S.C., R.D., and W.W. wrote the paper. The authors declare no conflict of interest. 1To whom.'s (1) 2003­2007 floral surveys, deer densities were likely between 5.7 and 9.6 km 1 , with locally). Many of the plant species groups listed as most reduced in their surveys (dogwoods, lillies, many or

  11. Status report on survey of alternative heat pumping technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.

    1998-07-01

    The Department of Energy is studying alternative heat pumping technologies to identify possible cost effective alternatives to electric driven vapor compression heat pumps, air conditioners, and chillers that could help reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Over thirty different technologies are being considered including: engine driven systems, fuel cell powered systems, and alternative cycles. Results presented include theoretical efficiencies for all systems as well as measured performance of some commercial, prototype, or experimental systems. Theoretical efficiencies show that the alternative electric-driven technologies would have HSPFs between 4 and 8 Btu/Wh (1.2 to 2.3 W/W) and SEERs between 3 and 9.5 Btu/Wh (0.9 and 2.8 W/W). Gas-fired heat pump technologies have theoretical seasonal heating gCOPs from 1.1 to 1.7 and cooling gCOPs from 0.95 to 1.6 (a SEER 12 Btu/Wh electric air conditioner has a primary energy efficiency of approximately 1.4 W/W).

  12. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/?*??? production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O.?S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W?W?, and Z/?? ? ?? production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb?¹ of pp collisions at ?s = 7??TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore »cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/?? ? ?? underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be ?(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8????????? ± 3.3 ± 3.3??pb, ?(W?W?) = 53.3 ± 2.7???³???? ± 1.0 ± 0.5??pb, and ?(Z/?? ? ??) = 1174 ± 24??²??? ± 21 ± 9??pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W?W? measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H ? W?W?.« less

  13. Higgs constraints from vector boson fusion and scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Campbell, John M.; Ellis, R. Keith

    2015-04-07

    We present results on 4-lepton + 2-jet production, the partonic processes most commonly described as vector boson pair production in the Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) mode. This final state contains diagrams that are mediated by Higgs boson exchange. We focus particularly on the high-mass behaviour of the Higgs boson mediated diagrams, which unlike on-shell production, gives information about the Higgs couplings without assumptions on the Higgs boson total width. We assess the sensitivity of the high-mass region to Higgs coupling strengths, considering all vector boson pair channels, W?W?, W±W±, W±Z and ZZ. Because of the small background, the most promisingmore »mode is W?W? which has sensitivity to Higgs couplings because of Higgs boson exchange in the t-channel. Using the Caola-Melnikov (CM) method, the off-shell couplings can be interpreted as bounds on the Higgs boson total width. We estimate the bound that can be obtained with current data, as well as the bounds that could be obtained at ?s = 13TeV in the VBF channel for data samples of 100 and 300 fb?¹. The CM method has already been successfully applied in the gluon fusion (GGF) production channel. The VBF production channel gives important complementary information, because both production and decay of the Higgs boson occur already at tree graph level.« less

  14. 100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decai Sun

    2010-10-31

    An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramicâ?¢ and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumiledsâ?? LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

  15. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

  16. Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

    2012-12-13

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

  17. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-08-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  18. Searches for Higgs Boson(s) at the Upgraded Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregorio Bernardi; for the CDF; D0 collaborations

    2005-07-14

    We summarize the status of Higgs boson searches at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron performed by the DO and CDF collaborations. We report on three categories of searches, namely 1) the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson (p\\bar{p} --> H, WH or ZH, with H --> WW* and/or H --> b\\bar{b}), 2) the search for the minimal supersymmetric Higgs boson using p\\bar{p} --> hb\\bar{b} --> b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} and p\\bar{p} --> hX --> tau tau X, 3) the search for doubly charged Higgs boson.

  19. The synthesis of a new class of macropolycyclic polyether ligands / by Robert Martin Holdar 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdar, Robert Martin

    1979-01-01

    in the reaction flask. Gas chromatographic analyses were performed on a Varian Associates series 2400 chromatograph using an 1/8 in x 6 ft aluminium column packed with SE-30 (3% w/w) on Chromosorb G support (80-100 mesh). Gas chromatographic separations were...(hydroxymethyl)benzene (21). Dimethyl 5-bromoisophthalate (QO) (26. Z g, 96. 0 mmole) in diethyl ether (400 mL) was added dropwise to a suspension of lithium aluminium hydride (9. 3 g, 245 mmole) in ether (500 mL). The reaction mixture was stirred and heated at reflux...

  20. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in ${p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} =}$1.96 TeV}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2012-07-04

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in $H\\rightarrow WW$ decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 \\ifb\\ of integrated luminosity in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  1. A cytogenetic study of the Gossypium arboreum L. Gossypium hirsutum L. ring-of-six chromosomes and some plant characters isolated from a three-species hybrid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiranti, Ivan Nicolas

    1963-01-01

    L CXTOQQWTIC SF1NX Of TNS jgQggjg Qgggg~ Qggggggf QQgggg L, ~-SII C1RONSOINS L SOSS PLLllf CHLRKTRBS ISQLkFSS i%0M A Time Ivy Neoleo 'Nfreeef Sohaltiok to tbo OooSosto Scbool ef ibo SSSIeeliceal eo4 Noebee&el Callogo af Taas ie yerifal ALlf...'. ~v. 'p j' s '"1 ' . g, :4 ". . . 1 " 1 ~ 7 $'p & ~ ' l ":$, ". ?; ~ 9J'el; tent"V Q. jg~ +4 . 0' 'll 4+@, ?. Q ';18 NP'4i. fA. " '!y', ". f' 'i 4 . WwA j"pta)' ymiag tho ssacse of traasfsning ihe ring eosylsnes to Q. Qggg)Ni by basharweiag...

  2. Numerical Shadowing Using Componentwise Bounds and a Sharper Fixed Point Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vleck, Erik

    2001-03-05

    of this author was supported by NSF grants DMS- 9505049 and DMS-9973393. 787 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a... numerical linear algebra techniques. Recent work on shadowing has involved extending shadowing to allow for rescaling of time, i.e., allowing for perturbations in the time step (see the work of Coomes [6], Coomes, Kocak, and Palmer [7], Palmer [22], Van...

  3. Semantics and Applications of Constrained Objects 1 Bharat Jayaraman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . f t = Sy * w * h. #27; = h * l * f bn / (8 * I) constructor Bar(C,S1,l1,w1,h1,a,f1,f2) f E = S1*C, l=l1, h=h1, w=w1, angle=a, f bk=f1, f bn=f2 g g The above code illustrates the Cob programming language of Computer Science and Engineering State University of New York at Bu#11;alo Bu#11;alo, NY 14260-2000 1 Signi

  4. Machine Learning ! ! ! ! !Srihari Bayesian Linear Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    handled using Bayesian approach 3 ED (w) = 1 2 t n -wT (xn ){ } n=1 N 2 E(w) = ED (w)+ EW (w) ww 2 1 )w prior for w (which has components w0,..,wM-1) p(w) = N (w|m0 , S0) with mean m0 and covariance matrix S0) with Gaussian noise has an exponential form p(t | X,w,) = N tn | wT (xn ),-1 ( ) n=1 N

  5. COMBINATIONAL-CIRCUITCOMBINATIONAL CIRCUIT BUILDING BLOCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maeng, Seungryoul

    ) + w1 · f(1,w2, ... ,wn) The expansion can be done in terms of any of the n variables f t 11 11 wwMux)p ( ) multiplexer demultiplexer #12;2-to-1 Mux (Selector)2 to 1 Mux (Selector) 4 f s w0 w1 0 1 0 1 fs w0 w1 f=s'w0+sw1 (a) Graphical symbol 1 (b) Truth table 1 w1 w0 w0 fs w1 w1 f s (c) Sum-of-products circuit (d

  6. Wastewater Recycle- A Sustainable Approach Towards Desalination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, A.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption, Kwh/1000gal. 12 - 14 4 - 5 13 - 15 Thermal Energy Consumption, MM BTU/1000gal. 0.75 ? 1.1 0.6 ? 1.0 - Salient Comparative of Desalination Technologies Basis: Seawater TDS: 30,000 ? 40,000 ppm Seawater Temperature: 25 ? 30 C ESL-IE-13....g. MBBR, BAF) ? Tertiary Treatment ?For discharge ?Media/sand Filter ?GAC Adsorption ?Disinfection ?For Reuse ?Media Filter, MF/UF ?HERO/RO ? ZLD Raw WW Disposal Reuse ESL-IE-13-05-07 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy...

  7. Higgs CP Violation from Vectorlike Quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We explore CP violating aspects in the Higgs sector of models where new vectorlike quarks carry Yukawa couplings mainly to the third generation quarks of the Standard Model. We point out that in the simplest model, Higgs CP violating interactions only exist in the hWW channel. At low energy, we find that rare B decays can place similarly strong constraints as those from electric dipole moments on the source of CP violation. These observations offer a new handle to discriminate from other Higgs CP violating scenarios such as scalar sector extensions of the Standard Model, and imply an interesting future interplay among limits from different experiments.

  8. 1David Wilczynski, 6/14/10 3:41 PM -0700, Fwd: FAA Design Competition for University A Original-recipient: rfc822;mankin@usc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    DbJAantL+wwNw9sq4uotuS2n2TzWsxbDBxJzG8mN9X R0lnSpgbanYAQeNzoqnVCT+D0gGhMGVugUWL5Tl53RYDUPs8BnHlSCYXs7RwQVPh+lnm q to proceed with announcing your award to your institution and media contacts. Please send Virginia Space Design Competition for University A Mary Sandy Director Virginia Space Grant Consortium Debbie Ross

  9. Search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-28

    Combined results are reported from searches for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ decay modes in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-300 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9-5.1 inverse femtobarns. A fermiophobic Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass range 110-194 GeV, and at 99% confidence level in the mass ranges 110-124.5 GeV, 127-147.5 GeV, and 155-180 GeV.

  10. Pastaklan Vesla Issue 5 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1978-01-01

    Bo KclCendrick- .6, 1-0, 19 Allan Andress- 25t^L Ginnio Reynolds- 3^i 36, 4-3 No trades for other fanzines Kathy. Bushman.* 29 Peggy Barilla- 55, 56 Steve Barnes- 73, 84, 93 CAB - Bacovcr Horta Press Issue ;"*5 Rhubarb Publication.../\\ M A?TD TH5?T THERE'S. ? . 1 - ' > ?-^WW I II i,ijw" I Friends t We cano^up with this idea and we organized it and we bought the supplies and wo typed it and we glued it together and wo printed it and we collated7 w&at we printed and...

  11. Kinematics in Vector Boson Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Green

    2006-03-02

    The vector boson fusion process leads to two forward/backward jets (tag jets) and the produced state, a Higgs boson in this case, moving slowly in the p-p C.M. frame at the LHC. For the case of Higgs decaying to W+W (W*) with Higgs mass below 180 GeV, the W bosons have low momentum in the Higgs C.M. For the case of W leptonic decays, this fact allows for an approximate reconstruction of the two final state neutrinos. In turn, those solutions then provide additional kinematic cuts against background.

  12. ATLAS measurements of multi-boson production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Hays; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-10-17

    Measurements of electroweak gauge-boson pair-production in sqrt(s) = 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions at the LHC probe self-couplings and interference effects to an accuracy of O(10%) or better. ATLAS measurements of ZZ and WZ production at both center of mass energies, and of WW, Zgamma and Wgamma production at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV, are presented. Total, fiducial, and differential cross sections are given, along with limits on anomalous triple-gauge couplings.

  13. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H?WW decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

  14. Determination of spin and CP of the Higgs boson from WBF.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buszello, C P; Marquard, P

    114.4 GeV < mH < 246 GeV (95% C.L.) [1]. When the Higgs mass is above the Z pair threshold, it decays with a large branching fraction into Z bosons, that can be discovered in the “golden” ?+?+???? decay mode. As long as mH & 130 GeV the decay into four... qq ? qqH ? qqWW ? qq ?? ?? [4, 5, 6] have the largest discovery potential. In recent papers [8, 3] we discussed the possible determination of the spin/CP properties of the Higgs boson. To analyse these properties we introduced hypothetical couplings...

  15. W A W I I I W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o W - >WW A

  16. W E E R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o W - >WW AE

  17. W-Band ARM Cloud Radar - Specifications and Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o W - >WW

  18. W. Bennett Lewis, 1981 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o WW. Bennett

  19. W.-C. Wang X.-Z. Liang M. D. Dudek S. Cox Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o WW.

  20. W.-C. Wang, X.-Z. Liang, M. P. Dudek, M. Ding, L. Zhu, J. Everette, and S. Cox

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o WW.Wang,

  1. W.A. Parish Post-Combustion CO{sub 2} Capture and Sequestration Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A 035(92/02) nerg *4 o** 0, WF* W A , o WW.Wang,Phase

  2. Single Top and Higgs Production in $e^- p$ collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukesh Kumar

    2015-06-12

    In this proceedings some studies on the prospects of single top production at the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) and double Higgs production at the Future Circular Hadron Electron Collider (FCC-he) shall be presented. In particular, we investigated the $tbW$ couplings via single top quark production with the introduction of possible anomalous Lorentz structures, and measured the sensitivity of the Higgs self coupling ($\\lambda$) through double Higgs production. The studies are performed with 60 GeV electrons colliding with 7 (50) TeV protons for the LHeC (FCC-he). For the single top studies a parton level study has been performed, and we find the sensitivity of the anomalous coupling at a 95\\% C.L, considering 10-1\\% systematic errors. The double Higgs production has been studied with speculated detector parameters and the sensitivity of $\\lambda$ estimated via the cross section study around the Standard Model Higgs self coupling strength ($\\lambda_{SM}$) considering 5\\% systematic error in signal and backgrounds. Effects of non-standard CP-even and CP-odd couplings for $hhh$, $hWW$ and $hhWW$ vertices have been studied and constrained at 95\\% C.L.

  3. Searching for a Heavy Higgs boson in a Higgs-portal B-L Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Shankha; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We study the discovery prospects of a heavy neutral scalar arising from a $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) during the Large Hadron Collider's high luminosity runs (HL-LHC). This heavy neutral scalar mixes with the SM Higgs boson through a Higgs portal and interacts with the SM particles with an interaction strength proportional to the sine of the mixing angle. The mixing between the two Higgs bosons is constrained by direct and indirect measurements. We choose an experimentally viable mixing angle and explore in detail the $ZZ$ and $WW$ decay modes of the heavy Higgs boson. For the $ZZ$ case, we focus on the cleanest $4\\ell$ and $2\\ell 2j$ final states and find that a heavy Higgs boson of mass smaller than 500 GeV can be discovered at the HL-LHC. For the $WW$ decay mode, we analyze the $\\ell jj \\slashed{E}_T$ signature. We implement novel background reduction techniques in order to tackle the huge background by performing both cut-based and multivariate analyses. However, large backgrounds re...

  4. Study of the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in diboson decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-10-06

    Studies of the spin, parity and tensor couplings of the Higgs boson in the H?ZZ*?4?, H?WW*?e??? and H??? decay processes at the LHC are presented. The investigations are based on 25fb–1 of pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment at ?s=7 TeV and ?s=8 TeV. The Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson hypothesis, corresponding to the quantum numbers JP=0+, is tested against several alternative spin scenarios, including non-SM spin-0 and spin-2 models with universal and non-universal couplings to fermions and vector bosons. All tested alternative models are excluded in favour of the SM Higgs boson hypothesis at more than 99.9more »% confidence level. Using the H?ZZ*?4? and H?WW*?e??? decays, the tensor structure of the interaction between the spin-0 boson and the SM vector bosons is also investigated. Thus, the observed distributions of variables sensitive to the non SM tensor couplings are compatible with the SM predictions and constraints on the non SM couplings are derived.« less

  5. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-11-09

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  6. Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Sante Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  7. Method for preparing polyaniline fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

  8. Data, exergy, and energy analysis of a vertical-bore, ground-source heat pump to for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2015-01-01

    Evidence is provided to support the view that greater than two-thirds of energy required to produce domestic hot water may be extracted from the ground which serves as renewable energy resource. The case refers to a 345 m2 research house located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 36.01 N 84.26 W in a mixed-humid climate with HDD of 2218 C-days (3993 F-days) and CDD of 723 C-days (1301 F-days). The house is operated under simulated occupancy conditions in which the hot water use protocol is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which captures the water consumption lifestyles of the average family in the United States. The 5.275 (1.5-ton) water-to-water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) shared the same vertical bore with a 7.56 KW water-to-air ground source heat pump for space conditioning the same house. Energy and exergy analysis of data collected continuously over a twelve month period provide performance metrics and sources of inherent systemic inefficiencies. Data and analyses are vital to better understand how WW-GSHPs may be further improved to enable the ground to be used as a renewable energy resource.

  9. Searching for a Heavy Higgs boson in a Higgs-portal B-L Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shankha Banerjee; Manimala Mitra; Michael Spannowsky

    2015-09-15

    We study the discovery prospects of a heavy neutral scalar arising from a $U(1)_{B-L}$ extension of the Standard Model (SM) during the Large Hadron Collider's high luminosity runs (HL-LHC). This heavy neutral scalar mixes with the SM Higgs boson through a Higgs portal and interacts with the SM particles with an interaction strength proportional to the sine of the mixing angle. The mixing between the two Higgs bosons is constrained by direct and indirect measurements. We choose an experimentally viable mixing angle and explore in detail the $ZZ$ and $WW$ decay modes of the heavy Higgs boson. For the $ZZ$ case, we focus on the cleanest $4\\ell$ and $2\\ell 2j$ final states and find that a heavy Higgs boson of mass smaller than 500 GeV can be discovered at the HL-LHC. For the $WW$ decay mode, we analyze the $\\ell jj \\slashed{E}_T$ signature. We implement novel background reduction techniques in order to tackle the huge background by performing both cut-based and multivariate analyses. However, large backgrounds render this channel challenging. We briefly discuss the discovery prospects of the heavy $Z'$-boson arising in this model.

  10. Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-07

    We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

  11. Measurement of the Mass and Width of the W Boson in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 161 - 209 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Duperrin, A; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Kokkinias, P; Leinonen, L; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Krumshtein, Z; Lesiak, T; Kerzel, U; Liebig, W; King, B T; Lamsa, J; Liko, D; Kjaer, N J; Leder, G; Kluit, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Leitner, R; Kuznetsov, O; Kucharczyk, M; Ledroit, F; Lopes, J H; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lipniacka, A; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Paganoni, M; Nassiakou, M; Paiano, S; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Ouraou, A; Parkes, C; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Oyanguren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevski, A; Palacios, J P; Onofre, A; Palka, H; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pape, L; Papadopoulou, T D; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sopczak, A; Szeptycka, M; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Spassoff, Tz; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Simard, L; Stanitzki, M; Tegenfeldt, F; Sisakian, A; Stocchi, A; Thomas, J; Smadja, G; Strauss, J; Smirnova, O; Stugu, B; Sokolov, A; Sosnowski, R; Szumlak, T; Szczekowski, M; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Timmermans, J; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Vilanova, D; Winter, M; Van Remortel, N; Vitale, L; Witek, M; Vrba, V; Van Vulpen, I; Wahlen, H; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Weiser, C; Venus, W; Wicke, D; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Washbrook, A J; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Zimin, N I; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of the W boson mass and width has been performed by the DELPHI collaboration using the data collected during the full LEP2 programme (1996-2000). The data sample has an integrated luminosity of 660 pb^-1 and was collected over a range of centre-of-mass energies from 161 to 209 GeV. Results are obtained by applying the method of direct reconstruction of the mass of the W from its decay products in both the W+W- -> lvqq and W+W- -> qqqq channels. The W mass result for the combined data set is M_W = 80.336 +/- 0.055 (Stat.) +/- 0.028 (Syst.) +/- 0.025 (FSI) +/- 0.009 (LEP) GeV/c^2, where FSI represents the uncertainty due to final state interaction effects in the qqqq channel, and LEP represents that arising from the knowledge of the collision energy of the accelerator. The combined value for the W width is Gamma_W = 2.404 +/- 0.140 (Stat.) +/- 0.077 (Syst.) +/- 0.065 (FSI) GeV/c^2. These results supersede all values previously published by the DELPHI collaboration. This paper is dedicated to the m...

  12. Weak interactions at the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    Prospects for the study of standard model weak interactions at the SSC are reviewed, with emphasis on the unique capability of the SSC to study the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking whether the associated new quanta are at the TeV scale or higher. Symmetry breaking by the minimal Higgs mechanism and by related strong interaction dynamical variants is summarized. A set of measurements is outlined that would calibrate the proton structure functions and the backgrounds to new physics. The ability to measure the three weak gauge boson vertex is found to complement LEP II, with measurements extending to larger Q/sup 2/ at a comparable statistical level in detectable decays. B factory physics is briefly reviewed as one example of a possible broad program of high statistics studies of sub-TeV scale phenomena. The largest section of the talk is devoted to the possible manifestations of symmetry breaking in the WW and ZZ production cross sections. Some new results are presented bearing on the ability to detect high mass WW and ZZ pairs. The principal conclusion is that although nonstandard model scenarios are typically more forgiving, the capability to study symmetry breaking in the standard model (and in related strong interaction dynamical variants) requires achieving the SSC design goals of ..sqrt.. s,L = 40Tev, 10/sup 33/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Dietary linoleate-enhanced metastasis of 4526 murine mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    The influence of quantitative differences in dietary linoleic acid (18:2) and of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (IM), on the metastasis of line 4526 mammary tumors was investigated. All mice were fed high fat (20%, w/w), semipurified diets that were prepared using different mixtures of coconut (primarily saturated) and safflower (mostly 18:2) oil and thus contained either 1, 2, 4, 8, or 12% 18:2 (w/w). The spontaneous metastasis of 4526 tumor cells from primary sites, was increased 2-4 fold in mice that were fed diets containing higher levels of 18:2 (8 and 12%). Chronic treatment of mice with a relatively low dosage of IM reduced the growth rate of primary 4526 tumors, slightly reduced metastasis in mice fed 1 and 4% 18:2, and completely inhibited the increased metastasis observed in mice fed 12% 18:2. Treatment with a higher dosage of IM reduced metastasis even further compared to controls, but did not decrease growth rate compared to the low dosage of IM. The level of 18:2 in the diet did not appear to affect the incorporation of {sup 3}H-thymidine into tumor cells of metastatic lung nodules. The effect of 18:2 may be through a modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. This modulation, in turn, may affect particular steps in the metastatic cascade such as lodgement and survival of tumor cells.

  14. Search for massive resonances decaying into pairs of boosted bosons in semi-leptonic final states at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    A search for new resonances decaying to WW, ZZ, or WZ is presented. Final states are considered in which one of the vector bosons decays leptonically and the other hadronically. Results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse femtobarns recorded in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. Techniques aiming at identifying jet substructures are used to analyze signal events in which the hadronization products from the decay of highly boosted W or Z bosons are contained within a single reconstructed jet. Upper limits on the production of generic WW, ZZ, or WZ resonances are set as a function of the resonance mass and width. We increase the sensitivity of the analysis by statistically combining the results of this search with a complementary study of the all-hadronic final state. Upper limits at 95% confidence level are set on the bulk graviton production cross section in the range from 700 to 10 femtobarns for resonance masses between 600 and 2500 GeV, respectively. These limits on the bulk graviton model are the most stringent to date in the diboson final state.

  15. Lipschitzian Solutions of Perturbed Nonlinear Programming Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornet, Bernard; Vial, Jean-Phillippe

    1986-01-01

    . 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp 1126 B. CORNET AND J.-PH. VIAL Assumption A.1. The gradients Vgi(x, a), 1, , m, are linearly independent, then we...’. For all hRn, h0, such that (Vf(x,a),h)=O and (Vgi(x, a), h) 0, 1,. , ml, one has o 2 a) h,h )>0.D:f(x, a) + E AiD g,(x, It is an immediate consequence of a lemma of Debreu (1952) that (A.3’) implies (A.3). Thus the two assumptions are equivalent. We can...

  16. Probing anomalous couplings using di-Higgs production in electron-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukesh Kumar; Xifeng Ruan; Rashidul Islam; Alan S. Cornell; Max Klein; Uta Klein; Bruce Mellado

    2015-09-14

    A proposed high energy Future Circular Hadron-Electron Collider would provide sufficient energy in a clean environment to probe di-Higgs production. Using this channel we show that the azimuthal angle correlation between the missing transverse energy and the forward jet is a very good probe for the non-standard $hhh$ and $hhWW$ couplings. We give the exclusion limits on these couplings as a function of integrated luminosity at 95\\% C.L. using the fiducial cross sections. The Higgs self-coupling could be measured to be within factors of $0.84 \\, (0.89) < \\gonehhh < 1.19 \\, (1.12)$ of its expected Standard Model value at $\\sqrt{s} = 3.5 \\,(5.0)$ TeV for an ultimate 10 $\\abinv$ of integrated luminosity.

  17. Probing anomalous couplings using di-Higgs production in electron-proton collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Mukesh; Islam, Rashidul; Cornell, Alan S; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Mellado, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A proposed high energy Future Circular Hadron-Electron Collider would provide sufficient energy in a clean environment to probe di-Higgs production. Using this channel we show that the azimuthal angle correlation between the missing transverse energy and the forward jet is a very good probe for the non-standard $hhh$ and $hhWW$ couplings. We give the exclusion limits on these couplings as a function of integrated luminosity at 95\\% C.L. using the fiducial cross sections. The Higgs self-coupling could be measured to be within factors of $0.84 \\, (0.89) < \\gonehhh < 1.19 \\, (1.12)$ of its expected Standard Model value at $\\sqrt{s} = 3.5 \\,(5.0)$ TeV for an ultimate 10 $\\abinv$ of integrated luminosity.

  18. Investigating Unitarity in Presence of Anomalous Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamta Dahiya; Sukanta Dutta; Rashidul Islam

    2015-06-20

    We study the high energy behaviour of the helicity amplitudes in the $2\\to2$ scattering processes involving Higgs and gauge bosons. This model-independent analysis is performed for a SM-like Higgs in the presence of anomalous $WWV$, $WWVV$, $VVH$, $VVHH$, $HHHH$ and $HHH$ interactions ($V\\equiv Z,\\gamma$ and $W^\\pm$.) among gauge and highs bosons. We constrain these anomalous couplings by requiring the non-violation of the perturbative unitarity. Further, assuming all anomalous couplings to have arisen only from dimension-six operators, we show that unitarity violation can be evaded up to $\\sim$ 9 TeV corresponding to the best fit values of $f_{WW}/\\Lambda^2$ and $f_{BB}/\\Lambda^2$ from the combined analysis of Tevatron and LHC data.

  19. Measurement of the pp-bar?WZ+X cross section at s?=1.96??TeV and limits on WWZ trilinear gauge couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Hensel, Carsten; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2007-12-28

    transverse momentum distribution, we limit the trilinear WWZ gauge couplings to #3;0:17 #7; #3;Z #7; 0:21#5;#2;#4;Z #2; 0#6; at the 95% C.L. for a form factor scale #3; #2; 2 TeV. Further, assuming that #2;gZ1 #2; #2;#4;Z, we find #3;0:12 #7; #2;#4;Z #7; 0...-01, 2005. The authors parameterize WWZ couplings in terms of the WW#6; couplings: #2;#4;Z #2; #2;gZ1 #3; #2;#4;#6;tan2#5;W and #3;Z #2; #3;#6;. [7] V.M. Abazov et al. (D0 Collaboration), Phys. Rev. D 74, 057101 (2006). [8] T. Aaltonen et al. (CDF...

  20. Phenomenology of ``inos'' in the Light Gaugino Scenario and Possible Evidence for a $\\sim 53$ GeV Chargino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar

    1996-12-13

    The tree-level-massless gaugino scenario predicts that the lighter chargino mass is less than m_W and that gluino and lightest neutralino masses are $\\lsi 1$ GeV. In this case the dominant decay mode of charginos and non-LSP neutralinos is generically to three jets. The excess of "4j" events with total invariant mass $\\sim 105$ GeV observed in LEP running at 130-136 GeV is noted to be consistent with pair production of $\\sim 53$ GeV charginos. Data at 161 and 172 GeV from Fall, 1996, cannot conclusively test this hypothesis (because cuts to eliminate $W^+W^-$ background reduce the efficiency significantly) but is suggestive that the signal persists.

  1. Real-time determination of lubricant concentrations dissolved in alternative refrigerants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavestri, R.C.; Schafer, W.R.

    1999-07-01

    A methodology was developed and used to measure both polyolester lubricant concentrations in solution with R-134a and R-407C and mineral oils in solution with R-123. This method is unaffected by changes in pressure, temperature, refrigerant type, and lubricant type. The concentration of dissolved lubricant was measured in three alternative refrigerants with two different synthetic polyolesters and two different mineral oils over a temperature range of 68 F (20 C) to 140 F (60 C) and a concentration range of 0 to 6% w/w. The evaluation methods included density, viscosity, and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Measurements of viscosity and density were performed on an oscillating body viscometer. Lubricant concentrations determined by HPLC compared favorably with the ASHRAE Standard 41.1 method (ASHRAE 1984). Circulating lubricant, miscible and immiscible, concentration in identical R-407C operating systems was also measured to demonstrate the practical application of the test method.

  2. Matching NLO QCD computations and parton shower simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Frixione; B. R. Webber

    2002-07-12

    We propose a method for matching the next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation of a given QCD process with a parton shower Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The method has the following features: fully exclusive events are generated, with hadronization according to the MC model; total exclusive rates are accurate to NLO; NLO results for distributions are recovered upon expansion in $\\alpha_S$; hard emissions are treated as in NLO computations while soft/collinear emissions are handled by the MC simulation, with the same logarithmic accuracy as the MC; and matching between the hard- and soft/collinear-emission regions is smooth. A fraction of events with negative weight is generated, but unweighting remains possible with reasonable efficiency. The method is clarified using a simple toy model, and illustrated by application to the hadroproduction of W$^+$W$^-$ pairs.

  3. Reducible Poly(amido ethylenimine)s for Nucleic Acid Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Lane

    2006-10-26

    In ten sit y ( 10 0% ) Polymer Reaction Mn (kDa) Mw (kDa) Mw/Mn Titration % Protonated Degree of Time (#1;mol HCl) Nitrogens Branching poly(EDA/CBA) 48 h 1.6 2.0 1.26 8.2 21.9 0.37 poly(DETA/CBA) 18 h 3.3 4.8 1.47 5.0 10.1 0.72 poly(TETA/CBA) 16 h 2.3 3... is reduced 1 2 4 8 16 32 64 -50 -25 0 25 50 EDA/CBA DETA/CBA TETA/CBA n = 5 ? SEM w/DTT w/w Z e t a P o t e n t i a l ( m V ) Bioconjugate Chemistry (2006) 17; 1233-1240. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14...

  4. Updown numbers and the initial monomials of the slope variety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.; Wagner, Jennifer D.

    2009-01-01

    . For integers m ? n, we put [n] = {1,2,...,n} and [m,n] = {m,m + 1,...,n}. The set of all permutations of an integer set P will be denoted SP, and the nth symmetric group is Sn (= S[n]). We will write each permutation w ? SP as a word with n = |P| digits, w = w1......wn, where {w1,...,wn} = P. If necessary for clarity, we will separate the digits with commas. Concatenation will also be denoted with commas; for instance, if w = 12 and w? = 34, then (w,w?,5) = 12345. The reversal w? of w1w2...wn?1wn is the word wnwn...

  5. Low Frequency Modulation of Extreme Temperature Regimes in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, Robert X.

    2014-11-24

    The project examines long-term changes in extreme temperature episodes (ETE) associated with planetary climate modes (PCMs) in both the real atmospheric and climate model simulations. The focus is on cold air outbreaks (CAOs) and warm waves (WWs) occurring over the continental US during the past 60 winters. No significant long-term trends in either WWs or CAOs are observed over the US. The annual frequency of CAOs is affected by the (i) North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) over the Southeast US and (ii) Pacific–North American (PNA) pattern over the Northwest US. WW frequency is influenced by the (i) NAO over the eastern US and (ii) combined influence of PNA, Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and ENSO over the southern US. The collective influence of PCMs accounts for as much as 50% of the regional variability in ETE frequency. During CAO (WW) events occurring over the southeast US, there are low (high) pressure anomalies at higher atmospheric levels over the southeast US with oppositely-signed pressure anomalies in the lower atmosphere over the central US. These patterns lead to anomalous northerly (for CAOs) or southerly (for WWs) flow into the southeast leading to cold or warm surface air temperature anomalies, respectively. One distinction is that CAOs involve substantial air mass transport while WW formation is more local in nature. The primary differences among event categories are in the origin and nature of the pressure anomaly features linked to ETE onset. In some cases, PCMs help to provide a favorable environment for event onset. Heat budget analyses indicate that latitudinal transport in the lower atmosphere is the main contributor to regional cooling during CAO onset. This is partly offset by adiabatic warming associated with subsiding air. Additional diagnoses reveal that this latitudinal transport is partly due to the remote physical influence of a shallow cold pool of air trapped along the east side of the Rocky Mountains. ETE and PCM behavior is also studied in (CMIP5) climate model simulations. Although the climate models considered are able to represent the overall behavior of ETEs, the frequency of WWs (CAOs) is too high (low) in many models. While all models qualitatively replicate the overall structure of the PNA pattern, a small minority of models fails to properly simulate the NAO pattern. Model shortcomings in representing the NAO and PNA patterns have important consequences for simulating associated regional variability in surface air temperature and storm track behavior. The influence of PCMs on ETEs is underestimated in most CMIP5 models. In particular, none of the models are able to accurately simulate observed linkages between ETEs and the PDO, due to a gross misrepresentation of the PDO pattern in most models. Our results indicate that predictions of future CAO and WW behavior are currently limited by the ability of climate models to accurately represent PCM characteristics. Our study also considers the behavior of PCMs known as annular modes. It is determined that north-south movements in the stratospheric jet stream (related to the Polar Annular Mode) result in long-lasting impacts upon surface weather conditions including regional air temperature anomalies. The structure and dynamics of the stratospheric northern annular mode (or SNAM, related to changes in the strength of the stratospheric jet stream) was studied in CMIP5 models. In models with poorly-resolved stratospheres, the amplitude of SNAM at stratospheric altitudes is typically too weak, consistent with weaker stratospheric jet variability. However, this distinction does not carry over to the associated tropospheric signature of SNAM. A regional analysis illustrates that most CMIP5 models (regardless of whether the stratosphere is well-resolved) have anomalously weak and eastward shifted (compared to observed SNAM events) storm track and sea level pressure anomaly patterns during SNAM events. Analyses of stratosphere–troposphere coupling reveal that large-scale wave activity in the stratosphere is anomalously weak in CMIP5 model

  6. Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ATLAS Collaboration,

    2013-10-01

    Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H???, H?ZZ{sup ?}?4? and H?WW{sup ?}?????. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of {radical s}=7 TeV and {radical s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25 fb{sup ?1}. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  7. Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Kilminster

    2010-12-10

    We present combined CDF and D0 searches for the Standard Model (SM) and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) Higgs boson using up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity from 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. Specialized searches for Higgs bosons produced via gluon fusion, associated boson production, and vector boson fusion, decaying to $b\\bar{b}$, $W^{+}W^{-}$, $\\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}$, and $\\gamma\\gamma$ are combined to produce 95\\% CL upper limits on SM Higgs production as a function of mass. Current Tevatron limits are shown, including a new exclusion for SM Higgs masses between 158 and 175 GeV$/c^2$. We also present prospects for future sensitivity.

  8. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-01-28

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb^{-1} of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H -> tau tau decays or H -> WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  9. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; et al.

    2013-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb?1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ? ? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  10. Measurement of the properties of the Higgs boson at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bristow, Timothy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration

    2014-03-05

    An update on the Higgs boson search in the decay channels H???, H?ZZ{sup (*)}?4l, H?WW{sup (*)}?lvlv, H??{sup +}?{sup ?} and H?bb{sup ¯} at the ATLAS detector is presented. Proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 25/fb at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV are used for these results. The latest combined and individual channel measurements of the mass, signal strength, spin and parity, coupling constants and Higgs boson production are reported. Results on the measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson are all consistent with the Standard Model.

  11. WORK PROJECT REPORT Search for degenerate Higgs bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heikkilae, Jaana Kristiina

    2013-01-01

    Degenerate Higgs bosons have been searched as a summer student project. The goal was to implement an algorithm which would help to understand if there could be two Higgs bosons with very similar masses from the matrix of measured signal strengths $(\\sigma\\cdot B)_\\mathrm{meas.}/(\\sigma\\cdot B)_\\mathrm{SM}$ in different final states. The statistical compatibility of the observed data with a matrix of rank 1 has been evaluated. Using CMS data from the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $W^{+}W^{-}$ decay channels, a result compatible with a single Higgs boson at the level of 38% is obtained. A generalization of the algorithm to allow using all available data in the 5x4 signal strength matrix is also presented.

  12. An analysis of the egg marketing practices of Texas producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Quevedo Martin

    1949-01-01

    aaoolho ia Cbo yotat, llew hba tee 641 toothbo geoao yoo4wwK 34$ yaaetoth Ijp ~4N Sl~ A tt IX CWLEGE C 0 TIXAs t I 1 I l J. jgLlDdad $H&NIA Jaa. ' 291 O, t Sdae, SOO Oel lhte, SOS Sea SOFA SO% l 1800 NaJ' SSO, ' 1800 SN 10, 0 "e y 1%4' Oel... MF 'ILX S j- - 'ao L. et yeaIshgr %sy' geese, i e4e eheea 4aa bae e ~ seger et ~ yyeOWNm ea44ee4 ebbb twH ~ qaALly ehaaaei~ee lbwjygegy ~ 4e~eee Ne4 1' ~p S a ?e1?eNm et beeeN~ yheg be 'wg@ ha 4aa eheae ?baaeebael?lk4g aNgeQN? ewOCkwehl? awyea...

  13. Forced generation of simple and double emulsions in all-aqueous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sauret, Alban; 10.1063/1.3702434

    2012-01-01

    We report an easy-to-implement method that allows the direct generation of water-in-water (w/w) single emulsions. The method relies on direct perturbation of the pressure that drives the flow of the dispersed phase of the emulsions. The resultant inner jet is induced to break up into droplets due to the growth of the perturbation through Rayleigh-Plateau instability [L. Rayleigh, Proc. R. Soc. London 29, 71-97 (1879)]; this leads to the formation of monodisperse droplets. By implementing this method on a modified microfluidic device, we directly generate water-in-water-in-water (w/w/w) double emulsions with good control over the size and the number of encapsulated droplets. Our approach suggests a new route to apply droplet-based microfluidics to completely water-based systems.

  14. Lyapunov Spectral Intervals: Theory and Computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dieci, Luca; Van Vleck, Erik

    2002-05-05

    exponents in stability theory. Important results on stability of Lyapunov exponents that we use are due to Bylov [6], Bylov et al. [5], Bylov and Izobov [7], and Millionshchikov [24, 25]. An alternative to the spectrum of Lyapunov is based upon defining a... School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (evanvlec@mines.edu). 516 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a.p hp...

  15. A three-level BDDC algorithm for mortar discretizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyea Hyun; Tu, Xuemin

    2009-03-05

    Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 47, No. 2, pp. 1576–1600 A THREE-LEVEL BDDC ALGORITHM FOR MORTAR DISCRETIZATIONS? HYEA HYUN KIM† AND XUEMIN TU‡ Abstract. In this paper, a three-level balancing domain decomposition by constraints (BDDC...- search, U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. 1576 D ow nl oa de d 09 /2 9/ 14 to 1 29 .2 37 .4 6. 10 0. R ed ist rib ut io n su bje ct to SIA M lic en se or co py rig ht; se e h ttp ://w ww .si am .or g/j ou rna ls/ ojs a...

  16. Measurement of the W + gamma Production in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Michael H

    2004-10-01

    The authors present a measurement of the {bar p}p {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} e{nu}{gamma} + X production cross section using data form the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The p{bar p} collisions were provided by the Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Electroweak theory includes the trilinear vector boson coupling, WW{gamma}, which contributes to the e{nu}{gamma} final state. The electron decay channel of the W provides a clean sample to study the production of diboson pairs. The measurement of the production cross section tests the structure of the non-Abelian character of Electroweak theory.

  17. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Sulfur and Sulfur Diluted with Hydrogen Sulfide Flowing Through Circular Tubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Porter Walwyn

    1960-01-01

    is the tube length. Letting q = q, to obtain a relationship for equivalent heat transfer, gives h d L 6t s w w w h d L ht W s s s Substituting into the equation above, 0. 8 d 0. 2 w w w =H s w d L 0. 8d 0. 2 s s s v w s This may be simpbified... isolated. The derivation of the "geometry relationship" follows that outlined in the previous section. h ? 1 30087 d ~P c ql/3 k x 0 023 v 0. 8 d -0. 2 pr -2/3 ( ~) -0. 2 (Io w'ww wow wpw 0 3354 ( P ) 1/3 k 2/3 Pr 0/3 ( P) 0. 2 1/3d -1/3 s s s s w...

  18. 2013 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013. The report contains, as applicable, the following information: • Site description • Facility and system description • Permit required monitoring data and loading rates • Status of compliance conditions and activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant and therefore, no effluent flow volumes or samples were collected from wastewater sampling point WW-014102. However, soil samples were collected in October from soil monitoring unit SU-014101.

  19. Implementing an X-ray validation pipeline for the Protein Data Bank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Swanand; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2012-04-01

    The implementation of a validation pipeline, based on community recommendations, for future depositions of X-ray crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank is described. There is an increasing realisation that the quality of the biomacromolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive needs to be assessed critically using established and powerful validation methods. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) organization has convened several Validation Task Forces (VTFs) to advise on the methods and standards that should be used to validate all of the entries already in the PDB as well as all structures that will be deposited in the future. The recommendations of the X-ray VTF are currently being implemented in a software pipeline. Here, ongoing work on this pipeline is briefly described as well as ways in which validation-related information could be presented to users of structural data.

  20. Testing LHT at the LHC Run-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Liu, Yandong

    2016-01-01

    We study the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of $pp \\to W_H^+W_H^- \\to W^+W^- A_H A_H$ at the 14 TeV LHC. With the $W$-jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than $5\\sigma$ in the signature of two fat $W$-jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter $f$ that is crucial to testify the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  1. Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

    2005-05-11

    Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

  2. Arsenal of democracy in the face of change: Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs), their evolution and some economic considerations, Working Paper No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, C.V.

    1990-08-01

    A brief study was made of some of the forces driving the move to Precision Guided Munitions (PGMs), including the quest for military effectiveness, combat experience, and logistic compression. PGMs cost from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars per Kg but are tens to hundreds of times more effective than conventional munitions. A year's peacetime plateau production of each US PGM can be carried by a few C-5 aircraft. Surge quantities of PGMs are within US airlift capabilities, taking some of the risk out of off-shore procurement. The improving capability of antiaircraft PGMs and the escalating cost of combat aircraft (50 to 100-fold in constant dollars since WW II) may bring into question the economic viability of manned attack aircraft. The same may be true to a slightly lesser degree for heavy armored vehicles. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. Topological classification of RNA structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Bon; Graziano Vernizzi; Henri Orland; A. Zee

    2006-07-21

    We present a novel topological classification of RNA secondary structures with pseudoknots. It is based on the topological genus of the circular diagram associated to the RNA base-pair structure. The genus is a positive integer number, whose value quantifies the topological complexity of the folded RNA structure. In such a representation, planar diagrams correspond to pure RNA secondary structures and have zero genus, whereas non planar diagrams correspond to pseudoknotted structures and have higher genus. We analyze real RNA structures from the databases wwPDB and Pseudobase, and classify them according to their topological genus. We compare the results of our statistical survey with existing theoretical and numerical models. We also discuss possible applications of this classification and show how it can be used for identifying new RNA structural motifs.

  4. 2TeV Higgs boson and ATLAS diboson excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Diboson resonance with mass around 2 TeV in the dijet invariant mass spectrum is reported by ATLAS experiment in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. We propose that the candidate of resonance is a heavy neutral Higgs $H^0$ or charged Higgs $H^\\pm$ and use the extended two-Higgs-doublet (THD) to demonstrate the potentiality. We find that the large Yukawa coupling to the first generation of quarks can be realized in THD and the required value for producing the right resonance production cross section is of ${\\cal O}(0.06-0.2)$. Besides $WW/ZZ$ channels, we find that if the mass of pseudoscalar $A^0$ satisfies the jet mass tagging condition $|m_j - m_{Z/W}|< 13$ GeV, the diboson excess could be also caused by $ZA^0$ or $WA^0$ channel.

  5. Compositional and in Vitro Evaluation of Nonwoven Type I Collagen/Poly-dl-lactic Acid Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Xiangchen; Yang, Xuebin; Tronci, Giuseppe; Wood, David J

    2015-01-01

    Poly-dl-lactic acid (PDLLA) was blended with type I collagen to attempt to overcome the instantaneous gelation of electrospun collagen scaffolds in biological environments. Scaffolds based on blends of type I collagen and PDLLA were investigated for material stability in cell culture conditions (37 {\\deg}C; 5% CO2) in which post-electrospinning glutaraldehyde crosslinking was also applied. The resulting wet-stable webs were cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) for five weeks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) and biochemical assays were used to characterise the scaffolds and the consequent cell-scaffold constructs. To investigate any electrospinning-induced denaturation of collagen, identical PDLLA/collagen and PDLLA/gelatine blends were electrospun and their potential to promote osteogenic differentiation investigated. PDLLA/collagen blends with w/w ratios of 40/60, 60/40 and 80/20 resulted in satisfactory...

  6. Genuine CP-odd Observables at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Han; Yingchuan Li

    2009-11-16

    We discuss how to construct genuine CP-odd observables at the LHC. We classify the observables according to the even and odd properties under the naive T-transformation (\\hat{T}). There are two classes of observables of our interests: CP-odd and \\hat{T}-even; CP-odd and \\hat{T}-odd. We expect them to have broad applications to many processes in theories beyond Standard Model with CP violation. For the purpose of illustration, we use simple example of W+W- production and subsequent decays at the LHC, where the CP violation effects are parameterized by effective CP-violating operators of WWZ coupling. We find significant sensitivity to the CP-odd couplings.

  7. Top decays in extended models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaitan, R.; Miranda, O. G.; Cabral-Rosetti, L. G.

    2009-04-20

    Top quark decays are interesting as a mean to test the Standard Model (SM) predictions. The Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM)-suppressed process t{yields}cWW, and the rare decays t{yields}cZ, t{yields}H{sup 0}+c, and t{yields}c{gamma} an excellent window to probe the predictions of theories beyond the SM. We evaluate the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) decay t{yields}H{sup 0}+c in the context of Alternative Left-Right symmetric Models (ALRM) with extra isosinglet heavy fermions; the FCNC decays may place at tree level and are only supressed by the mixing between ordinary top and charm quarks. We also comment on the decay process t{yields}c+{gamma}, which involves radiative corrections.

  8. Quark-Antiquark Energy Density Function applied to Di-Gauge Boson Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gideon Alexander; Erez Reinherz-Aronis

    2008-09-03

    In view of the start up of the 14 TeV pp Large Hadron Collider the quark anti-quark reactions leading to the final states W^+W^-, W^+-Z^0 and Z^0Z^0 are studied, in the frame workn of the Standard Model (SM), using helicity amplitudes. The differential and total cross sections are first evaluated in the parton-parton center of mass system. They are then transformed to their expected behavior in pp collisions through the parton-parton Energy Density Functions which are here derived from the known Parton Density Functions of the proton. In particular the single and joint longitudinal polarizations of the final state di-bosons are calculated. The effect on these reactions from the presence of s-channel heavy vector bosons, like the W' and Z', are evaluated to explore the possibility to utilize the gauge boson pair production as a probe for these 'Beyond the SM' phenomena.

  9. The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2010-06-01

    We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set at 4.9 times the expected standard model cross section. We announce that the combination of this trilepton VH {yields} VWW Higgs boson search and the previous CDF dilepton H {yields} WW search achieves an expected median limit of 1.00 at 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. The expected median limit of 1.00 indicates we anticipate a 50% probability of ruling out the existence of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first time a single hadron collider experiment has achieved sensitivity to the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson. We do not see evidence for a significant signal of Higgs bosons in the data and place observed limits on the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of 165 GeV/c{sup 2} at 1.08 times Standard Model production cross section.

  10. Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

    2009-01-07

    In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most selective for CO{sub 2} due to the strong interaction of the zeolites with CO{sub 2}. For example, at 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity increased from 34.7 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 56.4. The large increase in selectivity was the result of the increase in CO{sub 2} permeability from 7.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 14.6 Barrers. At 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation was also improved from 83.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 136.7 with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability from 17.5 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 35.3 Barrers. The 10% carbon aerogel-zeolite A and -zeolite Y composite/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation from 34.7 to 71.5 (zeolite A composite) and to 57.4 (zeolite Y composite); in addition, the membrane exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation from 33.1 to 50 (zeolite A composite) and to 49.4 (zeolite Y composite), indicating that these type of materials have affinity for CO{sub 2}. The inclusion of mesoporosity enhanced the dispersion of the additive allowing loadings of up to 30% (w/w) without the formation of non-selective voids.

  11. Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R.; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

  12. A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

    2007-12-04

    We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

  13. Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

    2011-08-16

    We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

  14. Towards automated crystallographic structure refinement with phenix.refine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afonine, Pavel V., E-mail: pafonine@lbl.gov; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mustyakimov, Marat; Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Urzhumtsev, Alexandre [CNRS–INSERM–UdS, 1 Rue Laurent Fries, BP 10142, 67404 Illkirch (France); Université Henri Poincaré, Nancy 1, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Zwart, Peter H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, MS64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-01

    phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods. phenix.refine is a program within the PHENIX package that supports crystallographic structure refinement against experimental data with a wide range of upper resolution limits using a large repertoire of model parameterizations. It has several automation features and is also highly flexible. Several hundred parameters enable extensive customizations for complex use cases. Multiple user-defined refinement strategies can be applied to specific parts of the model in a single refinement run. An intuitive graphical user interface is available to guide novice users and to assist advanced users in managing refinement projects. X-ray or neutron diffraction data can be used separately or jointly in refinement. phenix.refine is tightly integrated into the PHENIX suite, where it serves as a critical component in automated model building, final structure refinement, structure validation and deposition to the wwPDB. This paper presents an overview of the major phenix.refine features, with extensive literature references for readers interested in more detailed discussions of the methods.

  15. Radiative corrections to the Triple Higgs Coupling in the Inert Higgs Doublet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Falaki, Jaouad El; Jueid, Adil

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the implication of the recent discovery of a Higgs-like particle in the first phase of the LHC Run 1 on the Inert Higgs Doublet Model (IHDM). The determination of the Higgs couplings to SM particles and its intrinsic properties will get improved during the new LHC Run 2 starting this year. The new LHC Run 2 would also shade some light on the triple Higgs coupling. Such measurement is very important in order to establish the details of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Given the importance of the Higgs couplings both at the LHC and $e^+e^-$ Linear Collider machines, accurate theoretical predictions are required. We study the radiative corrections to the triple Higgs coupling $hhh$ and to $hZZ$, $hWW$ couplings in the context of the IHDM. By combining several theoretical and experimental constraints on parameter space, we show that extra particles might modify the triple Higgs coupling near threshold regions. Finally, we discuss the effect of these corrections on the double Higgs produ...

  16. Radiative corrections to the Triple Higgs Coupling in the Inert Higgs Doublet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdesslam Arhrib; Rachid Benbrik; Jaouad El Falaki; Adil Jueid

    2015-07-13

    We investigate the implication of the recent discovery of a Higgs-like particle in the first phase of the LHC Run 1 on the Inert Higgs Doublet Model (IHDM). The determination of the Higgs couplings to SM particles and its intrinsic properties will get improved during the new LHC Run 2 starting this year. The new LHC Run 2 would also shade some light on the triple Higgs coupling. Such measurement is very important in order to establish the details of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. Given the importance of the Higgs couplings both at the LHC and $e^+e^-$ Linear Collider machines, accurate theoretical predictions are required. We study the radiative corrections to the triple Higgs coupling $hhh$ and to $hZZ$, $hWW$ couplings in the context of the IHDM. By combining several theoretical and experimental constraints on parameter space, we show that extra particles might modify the triple Higgs coupling near threshold regions. Finally, we discuss the effect of these corrections on the double Higgs production signal at the $e^+e^-$ LC and show that they can be rather important.

  17. Optimization of esterification of oleic acid and trimethylolpropane (TMP) and pentaerythritol (PE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmud, Hamizah Ammarah; Salimon, Jumat

    2014-09-03

    Vegetable oil (VO) is the most potential alternative to replace mineral oil for lubricant due to better lubricating properties and great physicochemical properties. Chemical modification has to be done to overcome low temperature performance and low oxidation instability due to the presence of ?-hydrogen atoms of glycerol molecule. The optimization of esterification of oleic acid and polyhydric alcohol with sulfuric acid catalyst was carried out to find the optimum conditions with the highest yield. Reeaction variables such as; molar ratio, temperature, duration and catalyst concentration. Two types of polyhydric alcohol have been used; TMP and PE. The optimum results showed oleic acid successfully converted 91.2% ester TMP and 92.7% ester PE at duration: 5 hours (Ester TMP), 6 hours (Ester PE); temperature: 150°C (ester TMP), 180°C (Ester PE); catalyst concentration: 1.5% (w/w); and mol ratio: 3.9:1 (ester TMP), 4.9:1 (ester PE). From the data obtained, mole ratio showed most influenced factors to the increasing yields of ester conversions.. The TMP/PE ester was confirmed using gas chromatography (GC-FID), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

  18. Measurements of the Higgs Boson in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ Decay Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jacob

    The generation of vector boson mass via the Higgs mechanism in the Standard Model has been confirmed by the 2012 discovery of a candidate Higgs boson in the $H\\rightarrow{WW}$, $H\\rightarrow{ZZ}$, and $H\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma$ decay channels. In contrast, the Yukawa couplings hypothesized to provide the mass of fermions in the Standard Model have yet to be observed. The $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel currently provides the best opportunity for observing these couplings. This thesis describes two separate but related searches for Higgs boson decays in the $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay channel using proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector. The first analysis is a general search for all Higgs boson production mechanisms leading to a $H\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$ decay using 4.5 fb$^{-1}$ of 7 TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of 8 TeV proton-proton collision data. A deviation from the background-only hypothesis is observed with a significance of $4.5\\sigma$ for a hypothetical Higgs boson mass of ${m_{H} ...

  19. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair in multilepton final states with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    A search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top quark pair is performed in multilepton final states using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Five final states, targeting the decays $H\\to WW^*$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $ZZ^*$, are examined for the presence of the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson: two same-charge light leptons ($e$ or $\\mu$) without a hadronically decaying $\\tau$ lepton; three light leptons; two same-charge light leptons with a hadronically decaying $\\tau$ lepton; four light leptons; and one light lepton and two hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons. No significant excess of events is observed above the background expectation. The best fit for the $t\\bar t H$ production cross section, assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, is $2.1 ^{+1.4}_{-1.2}$ times the SM expectation, and the observed (expected) upper limit at the 95% confidence level is 4.7 (2.4) times the SM rate. The $p$-value f...

  20. Exploring Small Extra Dimensions at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; K. Odagiri; M. J. Palmer; M. A. Parker; A. Sabetfakhri; B. R. Webber

    2002-11-13

    Many models that include small extra space dimensions predict graviton states which are well separated in mass, and which can be detected as resonances in collider experiments. It has been shown that the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider can identify such narrow states up to a mass of 2080 GeV in the decay mode G->ee, using a conservative model. This work extends the study of the ee channel over the full accessible parameter space, and shows that the reach could extend as high as 3.5 TeV. It then discusses ways in which the expected universal coupling of the resonance can be confirmed using other decay modes. In particular, the mode G-> di-photons is shown to be measurable with good precision, which would provide powerful confirmation of the graviton hypothesis. The decays G-> mu mu, WW, ZZ and jet--jet are measurable over a more limited range of couplings and masses. Using information from mass and cross-section measurements, the underlying parameters can be extracted. In one test model, the size of the extra dimension can be determined to a precision in length of 7x10^-33 m.

  1. Measurement of the top-Yukawa coupling and the search for ttH production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Jared; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    To test whether the observed Higgs boson follows the predictions of the SM, careful study and measurement of its properties are necessary. Due to the top quark's large mass, a measurement of the top-Yukawa coupling (Y_t) is paramount to an understanding of EWSB and could provide a viable probe for new physics. While most production processes provide only an indirect measurement of Y_t via loop effects, the ttH and tH production allow for a direct tree-level measurement of the coupling strength (which could differ due to new physics contamination). The ttH process is probed through various Higgs decay channels with several advantages. The H->bb channel allows for a coupling measurement of both 3rd generation quarks while profiting from the largest Higgs branching ratio. The h->?? channel has a much smaller branching ratio but benefits from a fine diphoton mass resolution. The process is also probed in the multilepton channel, which is targeted at the off-shell Higgs coupling of H->WW* and H->ZZ* as well as t...

  2. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  3. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8$ TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma,\\, ZZ^*,\\, WW^*,\\, Z\\gamma,\\, b\\bar{b},\\, \\tau\\tau$ and $\\mu\\mu$ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton--proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is $1.18^{+0.15}_{-0.14}$. The data provide unequivocal confirmation of the gluon fusion production of the Higgs boson, strong evidence of vector-boson fusion production and support Standard Model assumptions of production in association...

  4. Exergy Analysis of a Two-Stage Ground Source Heat Pump with a Vertical Bore for Residential Space Conditioning under Simulated Occupancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ally, Moonis Raza; Munk, Jeffrey D; Baxter, Van D; Gehl, Anthony C

    2015-01-01

    This twelve-month field study analyzes the performance of a 7.56W (2.16- ton) water-to-air-ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) to satisfy domestic space conditioning loads in a 253 m2 house in a mixed-humid climate in the United States. The practical feasibility of using the ground as a source of renewable energy is clearly demonstrated. Better than 75% of the energy needed for space heating was extracted from the ground. The average monthly electricity consumption for space conditioning was only 40 kWh at summer and winter thermostat set points of 24.4oC and 21.7oC, respectively. The WA-GSHP shared the same 94.5 m vertical bore ground loop with a separate water-to-water ground-source heat pump (WW-GSHP) for meeting domestic hot water needs in the same house. Sources of systemic irreversibility, the main cause of lost work are identified using Exergy and energy analysis. Quantifying the sources of Exergy and energy losses is essential for further systemic improvements. The research findings suggest that the WA-GSHPs are a practical and viable technology to reduce primary energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions under the IECC 2012 Standard, as well as the European Union (EU) 2020 targets of using renewable energy resources.

  5. Search for a dijet resonance in events with jets and missing transverse energy in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96??TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.,

    2013-11-01

    We report on a search for a dijet resonance in events with only two or three jets and large imbalance in the total event transverse momentum. This search is sensitive to the possible production of a new particle in association with a W or Z boson, where the boson decays leptonically with one or more neutrinos in the final state. We use the full data set collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider at a proton-antiproton center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb^{-1}. We study the invariant mass distribution of the two jets with highest transverse energy. We find good agreement between data and standard model background expectations and measure the combined cross section for WW, WZ, and ZZ production to be 13.8^{+3.0}_{-2.7} pb. No significant anomalies are observed in the mass spectrum and 95% credibility level upper limits are set on the production rates of a potential new particle in association with a W or Z boson.

  6. WIMPs at the galactic center

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Batell, Brian; Fox, Patrick J.; Harnik, Roni

    2015-05-01

    Simple models of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) predict dark matter annihilations into pairs of electroweak gauge bosons, Higgses or tops, which through their subsequent cascade decays produce a spectrum of gamma rays. Intriguingly, an excess in gamma rays coming from near the Galactic center has been consistently observed in Fermi data. A recent analysis by the Fermi collaboration confirms these earlier results. Taking into account the systematic uncertainties in the modelling of the gamma ray backgrounds, we show for the first time that this excess can be well fit by these final states. In particular, for annihilations to (WW,more »ZZ, hh, tt¯), dark matter with mass between threshold and approximately (165, 190, 280, 310) GeV gives an acceptable fit. The fit range for bb¯ is also enlarged to 35 GeV ? m? ? 165 GeV. These are to be compared to previous fits that concluded only much lighter dark matter annihilating into b, ?, and light quark final states could describe the excess. We demonstrate that simple, well-motivated models of WIMP dark matter including a thermal-relic neutralino of the MSSM, Higgs portal models, as well as other simplified models can explain the excess.« less

  7. Biological Macromolecular Structures Data from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) is a non-profit consortium that works to improve understanding of the function of biological systems through the study of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. The RCSB PDB is one of three sites serving as deposition, data processing, and distribution sites of the Protein Data Bank Archive. Each site provides its own view of the primary data, thus providing a variety of tools and resources for the global community. RCSB is also the official keeper for the PDB archive, with sole access authority to the PDB archive directory structure and contents. The RCSB PDB Information Portal for Biological Macromolecular Structures offers online tools for search and retrieval, for visualizing structures, for depositing, validating, or downloading data, news and highlights, a discussion forum, and links to other areas of related research. The PDB archive is a repository of atomic coordinates and other information describing proteins and other important biological macromolecules. Structural biologists use methods such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the location of each atom relative to each other in the molecule. They then deposit this information, which is then annotated and publicly released into the archive by the wwPDB. Results can be viewed as 3-D images or models.

  8. Neutral Higgs Bosons in the Higgs Triplet Model with nontrivial mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemeh Arbabifar; Sahar Bahrami; Mariana Frank

    2012-11-29

    We revisit the neutral Higgs sector of the Higgs Triplet Model, with non-negligible mixing in the CP-even Higgs sector. We examine the possibility that one of the Higgs boson state is the particle observed at the LHC at 125 GeV, and the other is either the small LEP excess at 98 GeV; or the CMS excess at 136 GeV; or that the neutral Higgs bosons are (almost) degenerate and have both mass 125 GeV. We show that, under general considerations, an (unmixed) neutral Higgs boson cannot have an enhanced decay branching ratio into gamma gamma with respect to the Standard Model one. An enhancement is however possible for the mixed case, but only for the heavier of the two neutral Higgs bosons, and not for mass-degenerate Higgs bosons. At the same time the branching ratios into WW^*,ZZ^*, bb and tau tau are similar to the Standard Model, or reduced. We correlate the branching ratios of both Higgs states into Z gamma to those into gamma gamma for the three scenarios. The mixed neutral sector of the Higgs triplet model exhibits some features which could distinguish it from other scenarios at the LHC.

  9. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb?¹ of pp collision data at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-03-01

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb?¹ to 4.9 fb?¹ of pp collisions collected at ?s=7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9–115.5 GeV, 131–238 GeV and 251–466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124–519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around mH~126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations (? ). The local significances of H ? ??, Hmore »? ZZ(?) ? ?????????? and H ? WW(?) ? ???????¯, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8?, 2.1? and 1.4?, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110–600 GeV is estimated to be ~1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2?.« less

  10. Higgs constraints from vector boson fusion and scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John M. Campbell; R. Keith Ellis

    2015-02-10

    We present results on 4-lepton + 2-jet production, the partonic processes most commonly described as vector boson pair production in the Vector Boson Fusion (VBF) mode. This final state contains diagrams that are mediated by Higgs boson exchange. We focus particularly on the high-mass behaviour of the Higgs boson mediated diagrams, which unlike on-shell production, gives information about the Higgs couplings without assumptions on the Higgs boson total width. We assess the sensitivity of the high-mass region to Higgs coupling strengths, considering all vector boson pair channels, $W^-W^+$, $W^\\pm W^\\pm$, $W^\\pm Z$ and $ZZ$. Because of the small background, the most promising mode is $W^+ W^+$ which has sensitivity to Higgs couplings because of Higgs boson exchange in the $t$-channel. Using the Caola-Melnikov (CM) method, the off-shell couplings can be interpreted as bounds on the Higgs boson total width. We estimate the bound that can be obtained with current data, as well as the bounds that could be obtained at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV in the VBF channel for data samples of 100 and 300 fb$^{-1}$. The CM method has already been successfully applied in the gluon fusion (GGF) production channel. The VBF production channel gives important complementary information, because both production and decay of the Higgs boson occur already at tree graph level.

  11. Intern experience at Arkansas Nuclear One Steam Electric Station: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William Bruce, 1953-

    2013-03-13

    FGo- NDGLFOW R)eU)FFWU)e INTERN EXPERIENCE AT ARKANSAS NUCLEAR ONE STEAM ELECTRIC STATION I) T)oFW).iUa XFatWo cf SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW IaaWt8Fn O. ot .ofLF O)n Gt)oF)o cf- i t - (ey& tiu . l(FMcFW12 I 7 N T N E l(FMcFW1 l(FMcFW1 (Of rsms ABSTRACT... T)oFW) RVaFWUF)GF Oo IW4O).O. NDGLFOW K)F PoFOM RLFGoWUG PoOoUt) l(Of rsms1 SULLUOM BWDGF (ULLFW6 B2P26 5)U8FW.Uof td (U..tDWUvXtLLOy (2R)e26 EFVO. I * ( 5)U8FW.Uof uiOUWMO) td In8U.tWf utMMUooFF- wW2 gti) w2 XO)nOLL EiU. WFatWo U. O .DW8Ff td...

  12. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  13. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Balunas, William Keaton; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$, $Z\\gamma$, $bb$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $\\mu\\mu$ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $ZZ$ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of $m_{A}>370$ GeV in the ``hMSSM'' simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model...

  14. W-Extended Fusion Algebra of Critical Percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

    2008-04-28

    Two-dimensional critical percolation is the member LM(2,3) of the infinite series of Yang-Baxter integrable logarithmic minimal models LM(p,p'). We consider the continuum scaling limit of this lattice model as a `rational' logarithmic conformal field theory with extended W=W_{2,3} symmetry and use a lattice approach on a strip to study the fundamental fusion rules in this extended picture. We find that the representation content of the ensuing closed fusion algebra contains 26 W-indecomposable representations with 8 rank-1 representations, 14 rank-2 representations and 4 rank-3 representations. We identify these representations with suitable limits of Yang-Baxter integrable boundary conditions on the lattice and obtain their associated W-extended characters. The latter decompose as finite non-negative sums of W-irreducible characters of which 13 are required. Implementation of fusion on the lattice allows us to read off the fusion rules governing the fusion algebra of the 26 representations and to construct an explicit Cayley table. The closure of these representations among themselves under fusion is remarkable confirmation of the proposed extended symmetry.

  15. Discrimination of New Physics Models with the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaki Asano; Tomoyuki Saito; Taikan Suehara; Keisuke Fujii; R. S. Hundi; Hideo Itoh; Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada; Yosuke Takubo; Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2011-09-28

    The large hadron collider (LHC) is anticipated to provide signals of new physics at the TeV scale, which are likely to involve production of a WIMP dark matter candidate. The international linear collider (ILC) is to sort out these signals and lead us to some viable model of the new physics at the TeV scale. In this article, we discuss how the ILC can discriminate new physics models, taking the following three examples: the inert Higgs model, the supersymmetric model, and the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. These models predict dark matter particles with different spins, 0, 1/2, and 1, respectively, and hence comprise representative scenarios. Specifically, we focus on the pair production process, e+e- -> chi+chi- -> chi0chi0W+W-, where chi0 and chi+- are the WIMP dark matter and a new charged particle predicted in each of these models. We then evaluate how accurately the properties of these new particles can be determined at the ILC and demonstrate that the ILC is capable of identifying the spin of the new charged particle and discriminating these models.

  16. Diboson-Jets and the Search for Resonant Zh Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Minho; Tweedie, Brock

    2012-01-01

    New particles at the TeV-scale may have sizeable decay rates into boosted Higgs bosons or other heavy scalars. Here, we investigate the possibility of identifying such processes when the Higgs/scalar subsequently decays into a pair of W bosons, constituting a highly distinctive "diboson-jet." These can appear as a simple dilepton (plus MET) configuration, as a two-prong jet with an embedded lepton, or as a four-prong jet. We study jet substructure methods to discriminate these objects from their dominant backgrounds. We then demonstrate the use of these techniques in the search for a heavy spin-one Z' boson, such as may arise from strong dynamics or an extended gauge sector, utilizing the decay chain Z' -> Zh -> Z(WW^(*)). We find that modes with multiple boosted hadronic Zs and Ws tend to offer the best prospects for the highest accessible masses. For 100/fb luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC, Z' decays into a standard 125 GeV Higgs can be observed with 5-sigma significance for masses of 1.5-2.5 TeV for a range of...

  17. Automated NNLL+NLO Resummation for Jet-Veto Cross Sections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Becher; Rikkert Frederix; Matthias Neubert; Lorena Rothen

    2015-04-02

    In electroweak-boson production processes with a jet veto, higher-order corrections are enhanced by logarithms of the veto scale over the invariant mass of the boson system. In this paper, we resum these Sudakov logarithms at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) accuracy and match our predictions to next-to-leading order (NLO) fixed-order results. We perform the calculation in an automated way, for arbitrary electroweak final states and in the presence of kinematic cuts on the leptons produced in the decays of the electroweak bosons. The resummation is based on a factorization theorem for the cross sections into hard functions, which encode the virtual corrections to the boson production process, and beam functions, which describe the low-p_T emissions collinear to the beams. The one-loop hard functions for arbitrary processes are calculated using the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework, while the beam functions are process independent. We perform the resummation for a variety of processes, in particular for W+W- pair production followed by leptonic decays of the W bosons.

  18. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and constraints on its couplings from a combined ATLAS and CMS analysis of the LHC pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 and 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CMS and ATLAS Collaborations

    2015-01-01

    Combined ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates, as well as constraints on its couplings to vector bosons and fermions, are presented. The combination is based on the analysis of five production processes and of the $H \\to ZZ, WW$, $\\gamma\\gamma, \\tau\\tau, bb$ and $\\mu\\mu$ decay modes. All results are reported assuming a value of $125.09$ GeV for the Higgs boson mass, the result of the combined Higgs boson mass measurement by ATLAS and CMS. The analysis uses the LHC proton-proton collision datasets recorded by the ATLAS and CMS detectors in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities per experiment of approximately 5 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20 $\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV. The Higgs boson production and decay rates of the two experiments are combined within the context of two generic parameterisations: one based on ratios of cross sections and branching ratios and the other based on ratios of coupling modifiers, introduced within the...

  19. Evidence for the direct decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson to fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Heracleous, Natalie; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Plestina, Roko; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a new boson with a mass of approximately 125 GeV in 2012 at the LHC has heralded a new era in understanding the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking and possibly completing the standard model of particle physics. Since the first observation in decays to gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ boson pairs, an extensive set of measurements of the mass and couplings to W and Z bosons, as well as multiple tests of the spin-parity quantum numbers, have revealed that the properties of the new boson are consistent with those of the long-sought agent responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. An important open question is whether the new particle also couples to fermions, and in particular to down-type fermions, since the current measurements mainly constrain the couplings to the up-type top quark. Determination of the couplings to down-type fermions requires direct measurement of the corresponding Higgs boson decays, as recently reported by the CMS experiment in the study of Higgs decays to bottom quarks and...

  20. First Measurement of ZZ Production in panti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the cross section for Z boson pair production at a hadron collider. This result is based on a data sample corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the {ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime} channel, we observe three ZZ candidates with an expected background of 0.096{sub -0.063}{sup +0.092} events. In the {ell}{ell}{nu}{nu} channel, we use a leading-order calculation of the relative ZZ and WW event probabilities to discriminate between signal and background. In the combination of {ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime} and {ell}{ell}{nu}{nu} channels, we observe an excess of events with a probability of 5.1 x 10{sup -6} to be due to the expected background. This corresponds to a significance of 4.4 standard deviations. The measured cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields}ZZ) = 1.4{sub -0.6}{sup +0.7} (stat.+syst.) pb, consistent with the standard model expectation.

  1. Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, SA; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Ad

    2012-03-29

    A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb{sup -1} to 4.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around m{sub H} {approx} 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations ({sigma}). The local significances of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} and H {yields} WW{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8{sigma}, 2.1{sigma} and 1.4{sigma}, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be {approx}1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2{sigma}.

  2. Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with W and Z bosons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2013-01-29

    A search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the full 2011 data sample, from an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Higgs boson decay modes to tau tau and WW are explored by selecting events with three or four leptons in the final state. No excess above background expectations is observed, resulting in exclusion limits on the product of Higgs associated production cross section and decay branching fraction for Higgs boson masses between 110 and 200 GeV in these channels. Combining these results with other CMS associated production searches using the same dataset in the H to gamma gamma and H to b b-bar decay modes, the cross section for associated Higgs boson production 3.3 times the standard model expectation or larger is ruled out at the 95% confidence level for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV.

  3. Precise determination of the mass of the Higgs boson and tests of compatibility of its couplings with the standard model predictions using proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-14

    Properties of the Higgs boson with mass near 125 GeV are measured in proton-proton collisions with the CMS experiment at the LHC. Comprehensive sets of production and decay measurements are combined. The decay channels include ??, ZZ, WW, ??, bb, and ?? pairs. The data samples were collected in 2011 and 2012 and correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb?¹ at 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb?¹ at 8 TeV. From the high-resolution ?? and ZZ channels, the mass of the Higgs boson is determined to be 125.02\\,+0.26-0.27(stat)+0.14-0.15(syst) GeV. For this mass value, the event yields obtainedmore »in the different analyses tagging specific decay channels and production mechanisms are consistent with those expected for the standard model Higgs boson. The combined best-fit signal relative to the standard model expectation is 1.00 ± 0.09 (stat), +0.08 -0.07 (theo) ± 0.07 (syst) at the measured mass. The couplings of the Higgs boson are probed for deviations in magnitude from the standard model predictions in multiple ways, including searches for invisible and undetected decays. No significant deviations are found.« less

  4. Unveiling Surface Redox Charge Storage of Interacting Two-Dimensional Hetero-Nanosheets in Hierarchical Architectures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahmood, Qasim [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University (Republic of Korea); Bak, Seong-Min [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Min G. [Beamline Research Division, Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang (Republic of Korea); Yun, Sol [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon (Republic of Korea); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shin, Hyeon S. [Department of Energy Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Low Dimensional Carbon Materials Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST) (Republic of Korea); Kim, Woo S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Kyung Hee University (Republic of Korea); Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering Materials Research Laboratory and Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana?Champaign, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Park, Ho S. [School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), Suwon (Republic of Korea)

    2015-04-08

    Two-dimensional (2D) heteronanosheets are currently the focus of intense study due to the unique properties that emerge from the interplay between two low-dimensional nanomaterials with different properties. However, the properties and new phenomena based on the two 2D heteronanosheets interacting in a 3D hierarchical architecture have yet to be explored. Here, we unveil the surface redox charge storage mechanism of surface-exposed WS2 nanosheets assembled in a 3D hierarchical heterostructure using in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic methods. The surface dominating redox charge storage of WS2 is manifested in a highly reversible and ultrafast capacitive fashion due to the interaction of heteronanosheets and the 3D connectivity of the hierarchical structure. In contrast, compositionally identical 2D WS2 structures fail to provide a fast and high capacitance with different modes of lattice vibration. The distinctive surface capacitive behavior of 3D hierarchically structured heteronanosheets is associated with rapid proton accommodation into the in-plane W–S lattice (with the softening of the E2g bands), the reversible redox transition of the surface-exposed intralayers residing in the electrochemically active 1T phase of WS2 (with the reversible change in the interatomic distance and peak intensity of W–W bonds), and the change in the oxidation state during the proton insertion/deinsertion process. This proposed mechanism agrees with the dramatic improvement in the capacitive performance of the two heteronanosheets coupled in the hierarchical structure.

  5. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.D. Wheelock

    1999-03-01

    The technical feasibility of a gas agglomeration method for cleaning coal was demonstrated by means of bench-scale tests conducted with a mixing system which enabled the treatment of ultra-fine coal particles with a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water. A suitable suspension of microbubbles was prepared by first saturating water with air or carbon dioxide under pressure then reducing the pressure to release the dissolved gas. The formation of microbubbles was facilitated by agitation and a small amount of i-octane. When the suspension of microbubbles and coal particles was mixed, agglomeration was rapid and small spherical agglomerates were produced. Since the agglomerates floated, they were separated from the nonfloating tailings in a settling chamber. By employing this process in numerous agglomeration tests of moderately hydrophobic coals with 26 wt.% ash, it was shown that the ash content would be reduced to 6--7 wt.% while achieving a coal recovery of 75 to 85% on a dry, ash-free basis. This was accomplished by employing a solids concentration of 3 to 5 w/w%, an air saturation pressure of 136 to 205 kPa (5 to 15 psig), and an i-octane concentration of 1.0 v/w% based on the weight of coal.

  6. MC4523 Sealed Cap: Component & characteristics development report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begeal, D.R.

    1997-03-01

    The MC4523 Sealed Cap is a WW42C1 Percussion Primer that is pressed into a steel cylinder. Hermaticity of the input end is then provided by welding a thin steel closure disk on the input end of the MC4523. Thus, the user is provided with a component that is prequalified in terms of ignition sensitivity and hermeticity. The first customer is the Thermal Battery Department (1522). The MC4523 will be used on the MC2736A Thermal Battery which in turn will be used on the W78 JTA. Attachment of the MC4523 to the battery is with a laser weld. Combined test results of four production lots at a commercial supplier (PPI, TMS, WR1, and WR2) show an all-fire ignition sensitivity (.999 @ 50%) of approximately 60 millijoules of mechanical energy with a 2.2 gram firing pin. The firing pin had an impact tip with a radius of 0.020 inch. This firing pin is like that to be used in the W78 JTA application. Approximately 112 millijoules of mechanical energy will be supplied in the application, thus the design margin is more than adequate.

  7. Electroweak Measurements in Electron-Positron Collisions at W-Boson-Pair Energies at LEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schael, S; Bruneliere, R; Buskulic, D; De Bonis, I; Decamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jezequel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocme, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernandez, E; Fernandez-Bosman, M; Garrido, Ll; Grauges, E; Juste, A; Martinez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, Ll. M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sanchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Buchmuller, O; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Ciulli, V; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, I; Lazeyras, P; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepe-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, L; Schlatter, D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Z; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Mollerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Waananen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rouge, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; Have, I. ten; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S; Buchmuller, O; Cavanaugh, R; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S; Marinelli, N; Martin, E B; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R.W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaitre, V; Bauerdick, L.A T; Blumenschein, U; van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Holldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Muller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, J J; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Tilquin, A; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Buscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Huttmann, K; Lutjens, G; Mannert, C; Manner, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Azzurri, P; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, Ph; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F; Lefrancois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foa, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciaba, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; Garcia-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Misiejuk, A; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, D R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Tomalin, I R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, W; Lancon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Perez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S

    2013-01-01

    Electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the electron-positron collider LEP at CERN from 1995 to 2000 are reported. The combined data set considered in this report corresponds to a total luminosity of about 3~fb$^{-1}$ collected by the four LEP experiments ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at centre-of-mass energies ranging from $130~GeV$ to $209~GeV$. Combining the published results of the four LEP experiments, the measurements include total and differential cross-sections in photon-pair, fermion-pair and four-fermion production, the latter resulting from both double-resonant WW and ZZ production as well as singly resonant production. Total and differential cross-sections are measured precisely, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model at centre-of-mass energies never explored before in electron-positron collisions. Final-state interaction effects in four-fermion production, such as those arising from colour reconnection and Bose-Einstein correlations between the two W decay systems arising ...

  8. Prospects for Precision Higgs Physics at Linear Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Simon

    2012-11-30

    A linear e+e- collider provides excellent possibilities for precision measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson. At energies close to the Z-Higgs threshold, the Higgs boson can be studied in recoil against a Z boson, to obtain not only a precision mass measurement but also direct measurements of the branching ratios for most decay modes, including possible decay to invisible species. At higher energies, the Higgs boson coupling to top quarks and the Higgs boson self-coupling can also be measured. At energies approaching 1 TeV and above, the rising cross section for Higgs production in WW fusion allows the measurement of very small branching ratios, including the branching ratio to muon pairs. These experiments make it possible to determine the complete profile of the Higgs boson in a model-independent way. The prospects for these measurements are summarized, based on the results of detailed simulation studies performed within the frameworks of the CLIC conceptual design report and the ILC technical design report.

  9. NLO QCD and electroweak corrections to W+? production with leptonic W-boson decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner; Stefan Dittmaier; Markus Hecht; Christian Pasold

    2015-11-12

    We present a calculation of the next-to-leading-order electroweak corrections to W+\\gamma\\ production, including the leptonic decay of the W boson and taking into account all off-shell effects of the W boson, where the finite width of the W boson is implemented using the complex-mass scheme. Corrections induced by incoming photons are fully included and find particular emphasis in the discussion of phenomenological predictions for the LHC. The corresponding next-to-leading-order QCD corrections are reproduced as well. In order to separate hard photons from jets, a quark-to-photon fragmentation function a la Glover and Morgan is employed. Our results are implemented into Monte Carlo programs allowing for the evaluation of arbitrary differential cross sections. We present integrated cross sections for the LHC at 7TeV, 8TeV, and 14TeV as well as differential distributions at 14TeV for bare muons and dressed leptons. Finally, we discuss the impact of anomalous WW\\gamma\\ couplings.

  10. A Survey of lamba Repressor Fragments from Two-State to to Downhill Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, F.; Gao, Y; Gruebele, M

    2010-01-01

    We survey the two-state to downhill folding transition by examining 20 {lambda}{sub 6-85}* mutants that cover a wide range of stabilities and folding rates. We investigated four new {lambda}{sub 6-85}* mutants designed to fold especially rapidly. Two were engineered using the core remodeling of Lim and Sauer, and two were engineered using Ferreiro et al.'s frustratometer. These proteins have probe-dependent melting temperatures as high as 80 C and exhibit a fast molecular phase with the characteristic temperature dependence of the amplitude expected for downhill folding. The survey reveals a correlation between melting temperature and downhill folding previously observed for the {beta}-sheet protein WW domain. A simple model explains this correlation and predicts the melting temperature at which downhill folding becomes possible. An X-ray crystal structure with a 1.64-{angstrom} resolution of a fast-folding mutant fragment shows regions of enhanced rigidity compared to the full wild-type protein.

  11. Capture of Inelastic Dark Matter in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmuel Nussinov; Lian-Tao Wang; Itay Yavin

    2009-09-02

    We consider the capture of dark matter in the Sun by inelastic scattering against nuclei as in the inelastic dark matter scenario. We show that, assuming a WIMP-nucleon cross-section of \\sigma_n = 10^{-40}\\cm^2 the resulting capture rate and density are sufficiently high so that current bounds on the muon neutrino flux from the Sun rule out any appreciable annihilation branching ratio of WIMPs into W^+W^-, Z^0Z^0, \\tau^+\\tau^-, t\\bar{t} and neutrinos. Slightly weaker bounds are also available for annihilations into b\\bar{b} and c\\bar{c}. Annihilations into lighter particles that may produce neutrinos, such as \\mu^+\\mu^-, pions and kaons are unconstrained since those stop in the Sun before decaying. Interestingly enough, this is consistent with some recent proposals motivated by the PAMELA results for the annihilation of WIMPs into light bosons which subsequently decay predominantly into light leptons and pions.

  12. Physics potential for the measurement of ${?(H?\\bar?)\\times \\text{BR}(H\\rightarrow?^+?^-)}$ at the 1.4 TeV CLIC collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Milutinovi?-Dumbelovi?; I. Božovi?-Jelisav?i?; C. Grefe; G. Ka?arevi?; S. Luki?; M. Pandurovi?; P. Roloff; I. Smiljani?

    2015-07-21

    The future Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) offers a possibility for a rich precision physics programme, in particular in the Higgs sector through the energy staging. This is the first paper addressing the measurement of the Standard Model Higgs boson decay into two muons at 1.4 TeV CLIC. With respect to similar studies at future linear colliders, this paper includes several novel contributions to the statistical uncertainty of the measurement. The later includes the Equivalent Photon Approximation and realistic forward electron tagging based on energy deposition maps in the forward calorimeters, as well as several processes with the Beamstrahlung photons that results in irreducible contribution to the signal. In addition, coincidence of the Bhabha scattering with the signal and background processes is considered, altering the signal selection efficiency. The study is performed using a fully simulated CLIC_ILD detector model. It is shown that the branching ratio for the Higgs decay into a pair of muons BR(${H\\rightarrow\\mu^+\\mu^-}$) times the Higgs production cross-section in $WW$-fusion $\\sigma(H\

  13. Effect of annealing on graphene incorporated poly-(3-hexylthiophene):CuInS{sub 2} photovoltaic device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumari, Anita Dixit, Shiv Kumar; Singh, Inderpreet

    2014-10-15

    The effect of thermal annealing on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):CuInS{sub 2} quantum dot:graphene photovoltaic device has been studied by analyzing optical characteristics of composite films and electrical characteristics of the device with structure indium tin oxide/poly[ethylene dioxythiophene]:poly[styrene sulfonate] (ITO/PEDOT:PSS)/P3HT:CIS:graphene/LiF/aluminum. It was observed that after annealing at 120°C for 15 min a typical device containing 0.005 % w/w of graphene shows the best performance with a PCE of 1.3%, an open-circuit voltage of 0.44V, a short-circuit current density of 7.6 mA/cm{sup 2}, and a fill factor of 0.39. It is observed that the thermal annealing considerably enhances the efficiency of solar cells. However, an annealing at higher temperature such as at 140°C results in a decrease in the device efficiency.

  14. Measurements of W? and Z? production in pp collisions at ?s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-06-04

    The integrated and differential fiducial cross sections for the production of a W or Z boson in association with a high-energy photon are measured using pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV . The analyses use a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 4.6??fb?¹ collected by the ATLAS detector during the 2011 LHC data-taking period. Events are selected using leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons [W(e?, ??) and Z(e? e? ,?? ??,??¯) ] with the requirement of an associated isolated photon. The data are used to test the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and search for evidence for newmore »phenomena. The measurements are used to probe the anomalous WW? , ZZ? , and Z?? triple-gauge-boson couplings and to search for the production of vector resonances decaying to Z? and W? . No deviations from Standard Model predictions are observed and limits are placed on anomalous triple-gauge-boson couplings and on the production of new vector meson resonances.« less

  15. A biotemplated nickel nanostructure: Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashtari, Khadijeh; Fasihi, Javad; Mollania, Nasrin; Khajeh, Khosro

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Nickel nanostructure-encapsulated bacteria were prepared using electroless deposition. • Bacterium surface was activated by red-ox reaction of its surface amino acids. • Interfacial changes at cell surfaces were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. • TEM and AFM depicted morphological changes. • Antibacterial activity of nanostructure was examined against different bacteria strains. - Abstract: Nickel nanostructure-encapsulated bacteria were prepared using the electroless deposition procedure and activation of bacterium cell surface by red-ox reaction of surface amino acids. The electroless deposition step occurred in the presence of Ni(II) and dimethyl amine boran (DMAB). Interfacial changes at bacteria cell surfaces during the coating process were investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence of tryptophan residues was completely quenched after the deposition of nickel onto bacteria surfaces. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) depicted morphological changes on the surface of the bacterium. It was found that the Ni coated nanostructure was mechanically stable after ultrasonication for 20 min. Significant increase in surface roughness of bacteria was also observed after deposition of Ni clusters. The amount of coated Ni on the bacteria surface was calculated as 36% w/w. The antibacterial activity of fabricated nanostructure in culture media was examined against three different bacteria strains; Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Xantomonas campestris. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined as 500 mg/L, 350 mg/L and 200 mg/L against bacteria, respectively.

  16. Preozonation of primary-treated municipal wastewater for reuse in biofuel feedstock generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mondala, Andro H.; Hernandez, Rafael; French, William Todd; Estevez, L. Antonio; Meckes, Mark; Trillo, Marlene; Hall, Jacqueline

    2011-12-01

    The results of a laboratory scale investigation on ozone pretreatment of primary-treated municipal wastewater for potential reuse in fermentation processes for the production of biofuels and bio-based feedstock chemicals were presented. Semi-batch preozonation with 3.0% (w/w) ozone at 1 L min -1 resulted into a considerable inactivation of the indigenous heterotrophic bacteria in the wastewater with less than 0.0002% comprising the ozone-resistant fraction of the microbial population. The disinfection process was modeled using first-order inactivation kinetics with a rate constant of 4.39 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -3 s -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) levels were reduced by 30% in 1-h experiments. COD depletion was also modeled using a pseudo-first-order kinetics at a rate constant of 9.50 Ã?Â?Ã?Â? 10 -5 s -1. Biological oxygen demand (BOD 5) values were reduced by 60% up to 20 min of ozonation followed by a plateau and some slight increases attributed to partial oxidation of recalcitrant materials. Ozone also had no substantial effect on the concentration of ammonium and phosphate ions, which are essential for microbial growth and metabolism. Preliminary tests indicated that oleaginous microorganisms could be cultivated in the ozonated wastewater, resulting in relatively higher cell densities than in raw wastewater and comparable results with autoclave-sterilized wastewater. This process could potentially produce significant quantities of oil for biofuel production from municipal wastewater streams.

  17. Exploring Small Extra Dimensions at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, Benjamin C; Palmer, M J; Parker, M A; Sabetfakhri, A; Webber, Bryan R

    2002-01-01

    Many models that include small extra space dimensions predict graviton states which are well separated in mass, and which can be detected as resonances in collider experiments. It has been shown that the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider can identify such narrow states up to a mass of 2080 GeV in the decay mode $Gightarrow e^+e^-$, using a conservative model. This work extends the study of the $e^+e^-$ channel over the full accessible parameter space, and shows that the reach could extend as high as 3.5 TeV. It then discusses ways in which the expected universal coupling of the resonance can be confirmed using other decay modes. In particular, the mode $Gightarrow gammagamma$ is shown to be measurable with good precision, which would provide powerful confirmation of the graviton hypothesis. The decays $Gightarrow mu^+mu^-, W^+W^-, Z^0Z^0$ and jet--jet are measurable over a more limited range of couplings and masses. Using information from mass and cross-section measurements, the underlying parameter...

  18. Supersymmetric Custodial Higgs Triplets and the Breaking of Universality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo Garcia-Pepin; Stefania Gori; Mariano Quiros; Roberto Vega; Roberto Vega-Morales; Tien-Tien Yu

    2014-12-21

    Higgs triplet models are known to have difficulties obtaining agreement with electroweak precision data and in particular constraints on the $\\rho$ parameter. Either a global $SU(2)_L \\otimes SU(2)_R$ symmetry has to be imposed on the scalar potential at the electroweak scale, as done in the well-known Georgi-Machacek (GM) model, or the triplet vacuum expectation values must be very small. We construct a supersymmetric model that can satisfy constraints on the $\\rho$ parameter, even if these two conditions are not fulfilled. We supersymmetrize the GM model by imposing the $SU(2)_L \\otimes SU(2)_R$ symmetry at a scale $\\mathcal M$, which we argue should be at or above the messenger scale, where supersymmetry breaking is transmitted to the observable sector. We show that scales $\\mathcal M$ well above 100 TeV and sizable contributions from the triplets to electroweak symmetry breaking can be comfortably accommodated. We discuss the main phenomenological properties of the model and demonstrate that the departure from custodial symmetry at the electroweak scale, due to radiative breaking, can show up at the LHC as a deviation in the `universal' relation for the Higgs couplings to $WW$ and $ZZ$. As a by-product of supersymmetry, we also show that one can easily obtain both large tree-level \\emph{and} one loop corrections to the Higgs mass. This allows for stops that can be significantly lighter and with smaller mixing than those needed in the MSSM.

  19. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-11-15

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  20. Task A, High Energy Physics Program experiment and theory: Task B, High Energy Physics Program numerical simulation of quantum field theories. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The effort of the experimental group has been concentrated on the CERN ALEPH and FERMILAB D0 collider experiments and completion of two fixed target experiments. The BNL fixed target experiment 771 took the world`s largest sample of D(1285) and E/iota(1420) events, using pion, kaon and antiproton beams. Observing the following resonances: 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1280], 1{sup {plus}{plus}} [1280], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1420], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1470], 1{sup {plus_minus}} [1415]. The Fermilab fixed target experiment E711, dihadron production in pN interactions at 800 GeV, completed data reduction and analysis. The atomic weight dependence, when parameterized as {sigma}(A) = {sigma}{sub o}A{sup {alpha}}, yielded a value of {alpha} = 1.043 {plus_minus} 0.011 {plus_minus} .012. The cross section per nucleon and angular distributions was also measured as a function of two particle mass and agrees very well with QCD calculations. The D0 Fermilab Collider Experiment E740 began its first data taking run in April 1992. The CERN collider experiment ALEPH at LEP is presently taking more data. The Z mass and width, the couplings to the upper and lower components of the hadronic isospin doublet, forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic events, and measurements of the fragmentation process have been made. The effort of detector development for the SSC has substantially increased with particular emphasis on scintillators, both in fibers and plates. Work has continued on higher-order QCD calculations using the Monte Carlo technique developed previously. This year results for WW, ZZ, WZ, and {sub {gamma}{gamma}} production have been published. A method for incorporating parton showering in such calculations was developed and applied to W production. The multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm has stood up to the promises anticipated; it was used in multicanonical simulations of first-order phase transitions and for spin glass systems.

  1. Influences of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer and thermal performance characteristics in laminar and turbulent tube flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiamsa-ard, Smith [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand); Seemawute, Panida [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand); Wongcharee, Khwanchit [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand)

    2010-09-15

    Effects of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor characteristics in a round tube were investigated. Nine different peripherally-cut twisted tapes with constant twist ratio (y/W = 3.0) and different three tape depth ratios (DR = d/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33), each with three different tape width ratios (WR = w/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33) were tested. Besides, one typical twisted tape was also tested for comparison. The measurement of heat transfer rate was conducted under uniform heat flux condition while that of friction factor was performed under isothermal condition. Tests were performed with Reynolds number in a range from 1000 to 20,000, using water as a working fluid. The experimental results revealed that both heat transfer rate and friction factor in the tube equipped with the peripherally-cut twisted tapes were significantly higher than those in the tube fitted with the typical twisted tape and plain tube, especially in the laminar flow regime. The higher turbulence intensity of fluid in the vicinity of the tube wall generated by the peripherally-cut twisted tape compared to that induced by the typical twisted tape is referred as the main reason for achieved results. The obtained results also demonstrated that as the depth ratio increased and width ratio decreased, the heat transfer enhancement increased. Over the range investigated, the peripherally-cut twisted tape enhanced heat transfer rates in term of Nusselt numbers up to 2.6 times (turbulent regime) and 12.8 times (laminar regime) of that in the plain tube. These corresponded to the maximum performance factors of 1.29 (turbulent regime) and 4.88 (laminar regime). (author)

  2. Constraints on new phenomena via Higgs boson couplings and invisible decays with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-09-02

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC has measured the Higgs boson couplings and mass, and searched for invisible Higgs boson decays, using multiple production and decay channels with up to 4.7 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV. In the current study, the measured production and decay rates of the observed Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$, $Z\\gamma$, $bb$, $\\tau\\tau$, and $\\mu\\mu$ decay channels, along with results from the associated production of a Higgs boson with a top-quark pair, are used to probe the scaling of the couplings with mass. Limits are set on parameters in extensions of the Standard Model including a composite Higgs boson, an additional electroweak singlet, and two-Higgs-doublet models. Together with the measured mass of the scalar Higgs boson in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $ZZ$ decay modes, a lower limit is set on the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass of $m_{A}>370$ GeV in the "hMSSM" simplified Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. Results from direct searches for heavy Higgs bosons are also interpreted in the hMSSM. Direct searches for invisible Higgs boson decays in the vector-boson fusion and associated production of a Higgs boson with $W/Z$ ($Z\\to ll$, $W/Z \\to jj$) modes are statistically combined to set an upper limit on the Higgs boson invisible branching ratio of 0.25. The use of the measured visible decay rates in a more general coupling fit improves the upper limit to 0.23, constraining a Higgs portal model of dark matter.

  3. Association of genetic polymorphisms in GADD45A, MDM2, and p14{sup ARF} with the risk of chronic benzene poisoning in a Chinese occupational population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Pin; Zhang Zhongbin; Wan Junxiang; Zhao Naiqing; Jin Xipeng; Xia Zhaolin

    2009-10-01

    Benzene reactive metabolites can lead to DNA damage and trigger the p53-dependent defense responses to maintain genomic stability. We hypothesized that the p53-dependent genes may play a role in the development of chronic benzene poisoning (CBP). In a case-control study of 303 patients with benzene poisoning and 295 workers occupationally exposed to benzene in south China, we investigated associations between the risk of CBP and polymorphisms in three p53-dependent genes. Potential interactions of these polymorphisms with lifestyle factors were also explored. We found p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 polymorphism was associated with risk of CBP (P = 0.014). Compared with those carrying the GG genotype, individuals carrying p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a reduced risk of CBP ([adjusted odds ratio (OR{sub adj}) = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.36-0.89]. Further analysis showed p14{sup ARF} TGA/TAG diplotype was associated with an increased risk of CBP (P = 0.0006), whereas p14{sup ARF} TGG/TAA diplotype was associated with a decreased risk of CBP (P = 0.0000001). In addition, we found individuals carrying both MDM2 Del1518 WW genotype and p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a lower risk of CBP (OR{sub adj} = 0.25; 95%CI = 0.10-0.62; P = 0.003). Although these results require confirmation and extension, our findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms in p14{sup ARF} may have an impact on the risk of CBP in the study population.

  4. Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.] [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC] [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

  5. The effect of clay catalyst on the chemical composition of bio-oil obtained by co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solak, Agnieszka; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-catalytic and catalytic fast pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene blend was carried out in a laboratory scale reactor. • Optimization of process temperature was done. • Optimization of clay catalyst type and amount for co-pyrolysis of cellulose and polyethylene was done. • The product yields and the chemical composition of bio-oil was investigated. - Abstract: Cellulose/polyethylene (CPE) mixture 3:1, w/w with and without three clay catalysts (K10 – montmorillonite K10, KSF – montmorillonite KSF, B – Bentonite) addition were subjected to pyrolysis at temperatures 400, 450 and 500 °C with heating rate of 100 °C/s to produce bio-oil with high yield. The pyrolytic oil yield was in the range of 41.3–79.5 wt% depending on the temperature, the type and the amount of catalyst. The non-catalytic fast pyrolysis at 500 °C gives the highest yield of bio-oil (79.5 wt%). The higher temperature of catalytic pyrolysis of cellulose/polyethylene mixture the higher yield of bio-oil is. Contrarily, increasing amount of montmorillonite results in significant, almost linear decrease in bio-oil yield followed by a significant increase of gas yield. The addition of clay catalysts to CPE mixture has a various influence on the distribution of bio-oil components. The addition of montmorillonite K10 to cellulose/polyethylene mixture promotes the deepest conversion of polyethylene and cellulose. Additionally, more saturated than unsaturated hydrocarbons are present in resultant bio-oils. The proportion of liquid hydrocarbons is the highest when a montmorillonite K10 is acting as a catalyst.

  6. Investigation of coal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The method was applied to standard polymers under the same condition above. The particle size distribution with volume diameters of polyvinylpyrrolidone (average molecular mass; 10,000) was measured at sample/solvent = 0.50 g/100 ml. This polymer readily dissolve in methanol and water, while the polymer does not dissolve in n-hexane and toluene, and toluene is a slightly better solvent than n-hexane. Figure 3 shows the particle size distributions in n-hexane (a) and toluene (b-1 and -2). The distribution in toluene changed time to time, and two representative distributions are shown. The mean volume diameters-were 14 [mu]m in n-hexane and 18 and 31 [mu]m in toluene. The particle size distribution of cross-linked polyvinylpyrrolidone was further examined in methanol and n-hexane. Figure 4 compares these distributions with scanned counts at sample/solvent = 0.50 g/100 ml. As a significant portion of particles was over 250 [mu]m with volume diameters, the distributions are presented with scanned counts. Figure 4 compared the specific swelling ratio (Q') versus sample/solvent (w/w %) in the same solvents for this sample. It is seen that methanol is a good solvent than n-hexane and swells the sample. It is also seen that the swelling is dependent on the sample concentration. Therefore, the particle size in good solvent methanol is expected to be larger due to swelling. However, the particle size was smaller in methanol than in n-hexane (Figure 4). The dependence of sample concentration on solvent swelling in methanol (Figure 5) is interpreted as follows: Polymer particles disaggregated at low sample concentration and the interparticle voidage of the swollen polymer after centrifugation changed depending upon disaggregation.

  7. Yes-associated protein homolog, YAP-1, is involved in the thermotolerance and aging in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasa, Hiroaki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Maimaiti, Sainawaer [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Department of Psychotherapy, The Fourth People's Hospital of Urumqi, Urumqi 830000 (China); Kuroyanagi, Hidehito [Laboratory of Gene Expression, Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Kawano, Shodai; Inami, Kazutoshi; Timalsina, Shikshya; Ikeda, Mitsunobu; Nakagawa, Kentaro [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan); Hata, Yutaka, E-mail: yuhammch@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8519 (Japan)

    2013-04-15

    The mammalian Hippo pathway comprises mammalian Ste20-like kinases (MST1/2) and large tumor suppressor kinases (LATS1/2). LATS1/2, which are activated by MST1/2, phosphorylate a transcriptional co-activator, yes-associated protein (YAP), and induce the recruitment of YAP by 14-3-3 to cytoplasm, so that the TEAD-dependent gene transcriptions are turned off. Although the core components of the Hippo pathway are well conserved in metazoans, it has been discussed that Caenorhabditis elegans lacks YAP ortholog, we found that F13E6.4 gene encodes a protein that shows sequence similarities to YAP in the N-terminal TEAD-binding domain and in the WW domain. We designated this gene as yap-1. YAP-1 is widely expressed in various cells such as epithelial cells, muscles, hypodermal cells, gonadal sheath cells, spermatheca, and hypodermal cells. YAP-1 is distributed in cytoplasm and nuclei. wts-1 (LATS ortholog) and ftt-2 (14-3-3 ortholog) knockdowns cause nuclear accumulation of YAP-1, supporting that the subcellular localization of YAP-1 is regulated in a similar way as that of YAP. Heat shock also causes the nuclear accumulation of YAP-1 but after heat shock, YAP-1 translocates to cytoplasm. Knockdowns of DAF-21 (HSP90 ortholog) and HSF-1block the nuclear export of YAP-1 during this recovery. YAP-1 overexpression is beneficial for thermotolerance, whereas YAP-1 hyperactivity induced by wts-1 and ftt-2 knockdowns is deleterious on thermal response and yap-1 deficiency promotes health aging. In short, YAP-1 partially shares basal characters with mammalian YAP and plays a role in thermal stress response and healthy aging. - Highlights: ? We named Caenorhabditis elegans F13E6.4 gene yap-1 as a putative YAP homolog. ? The localization of YAP-1 is regulated by WTS-1 and FTT-2. ? YAP-1 is involved in healthy aging and thermosensitivity.

  8. A High Temperature Hermetic Primer and a Variable Spring Tester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Begeal, D.R.

    1994-05-01

    Percussion primers are used at Sandia to ignite energetic components such as pyrotechnic actuators and thermal batteries. This report describes a High Temperature Hermetic Primer (HTHP) that was developed to replace a previous G16 Percussion Primer Subassembly (Gl6PPS). The ignition mix in these primers is the same as in the discontinued Remington 44G16 (KC1O{sub 3}, SbS{sub 3}, and Ca{sub 2}Si). The HTHP has nearly the same sensitivity as the 44G16 and a significantly lower sensitivity than the G16PPS. In parallel with the HTHP development, we also designed a Variable Spring Tester (VST) to determine percussion primer ignition sensitivity with firing pins that have the same mass as those used in field applications. The tester is capable of accelerating firing pins over a velocity range of 100 to 600 inches per second for pins weighing up to 6 grams. The desired impulse can be preselected with an accuracy of better than {plus_minus}1%. The actual impulse is measured on every shot. The VST was characterized using the WW42Cl primer, as well as with the G16PPS and the HTHP. Compared to data from conventional ball drop testers, we found that ignition sensitivities were lower and there was less scatter in the sensitivity data. Our experiments indicate that ignition sensitivity is not strictly energy dependent, but also depends on the rate of deposition, or firing pin velocity in this case. Development results for the HTHP and Variable Spring Tester are discussed and design details are shown.

  9. Unveiling Surface Redox Charge Storage of Interacting Two-Dimensional Hetero-Nanosheets in Hierarchical Architectures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahmood, Qasim; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Min G.; Yun, Sol; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Shin, Hyeon S.; Kim, Woo S.; Braun, Paul V.; Park, Ho S.

    2015-03-03

    Two-dimensional (2D) heteronanosheets are currently the focus of intense study due to the unique properties that emerge from the interplay between two low-dimensional nanomaterials with different properties. However, the properties and new phenomena based on the two 2D heteronanosheets interacting in a 3D hierarchical architecture have yet to be explored. Here, we unveil the surface redox charge storage mechanism of surface-exposed WS2 nanosheets assembled in a 3D hierarchical heterostructure using in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic methods. The surface dominating redox charge storage of WS2 is manifested in a highly reversible and ultrafast capacitive fashion due to themore »interaction of heteronanosheets and the 3D connectivity of the hierarchical structure. In contrast, compositionally identical 2D WS2 structures fail to provide a fast and high capacitance with different modes of lattice vibration. The distinctive surface capacitive behavior of 3D hierarchically structured heteronanosheets is associated with rapid proton accommodation into the in-plane W–S lattice (with the softening of the E2g bands), the reversible redox transition of the surface-exposed intralayers residing in the electrochemically active 1T phase of WS2 (with the reversible change in the interatomic distance and peak intensity of W–W bonds), and the change in the oxidation state during the proton insertion/deinsertion process. This proposed mechanism agrees with the dramatic improvement in the capacitive performance of the two heteronanosheets coupled in the hierarchical structure.« less

  10. Widening the envelope of UK HLW vitrification - Experimental studies with high waste loadings and new product formulations on a full scale non-active vitrification plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, R.; Gribble, N. [Nexia Solutions, Sellafield, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Riley, A. [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG, UK (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    The Vitrification Test Rig is a full scale waste vitrification plant that processes non-radioactive liquid HLW simulants based on the active waste streams produced by the reprocessing plants in the UK. Previous work on the rig has primarily concerned increasing the operational envelopes for the active waste vitrification plants at Sellafield to accommodate higher throughputs of Blended waste streams, higher waste oxide incorporation rates in the vitrified products, and the incorporation of legacy waste streams from early reactor commissioning and reprocessing operations at Sellafield. Recent operations have focussed on four main areas; dilute liquid feeds, very high Magnox waste stream incorporation levels, alternative base glass formulations and providing an operational envelope for 28 %w/w Magnox waste vitrification. This paper details the work performed and the major findings of that work. In summary: The VTR has been successfully used to determine operational envelopes and product quality for several HLW feed variations that will allow WVP to increase overall plant throughput via increased waste loading in canisters, increased HLW feed rates or a combination of both. The VTR has also demonstrated the ability to go to waste incorporations, feed rates and glass compositions that are currently beyond WVP specified limits, but that are feasible for future vitrification regimes. In addition, the VTR has trialled dilute feeds similar to those that are likely to be received by WVP in the future and the data obtained from these experiments will allow WVP to prepare adequately for the high throughput challenge of such feeds. Furthermore, new equipment has been trialled on the VTR in water feed mode to determine its suitability and operational limitations for WVP. Future operations will, in the short term, be concerned with increasing the throughput of WVP and are likely to focus on HLW decommissioning operations waste streams in the longer term. (authors)

  11. Spin structure measurements from E143 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions, g{sub 1}{sup p} at beam energies of 29.1, 16.2, and 9.7 GeV, and g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} at a beam energy of 29.1 GeV. The integrals {Gamma}{sub p} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2})dx and {Gamma}{sub d} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2})dx have been evaluated at fixed Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the 29.1 GeV data to yield {Gamma}{sub p} = 0.127 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.010(syst.) and {Gamma}{sub d} = 0.041 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004. The Q{sup 2} dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} has been studied and is found to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Within experimental precision, the g{sub 2} data are well-described by the twist-2 contribution, g{sub 2}{sup ww}. Twist-3 matrix elements have been extracted and are compared to theoretical predictions. The asymmetry A{sub 2} has also been measured and is found to be significantly smaller than the positivity limit {radical}R for both targets A{sub 2}{sup p} is found to be positive and inconsistent with zero.

  12. Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

    2011-02-17

    Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

  13. Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray and UHE Neutrino-Z Showering in Dark Halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Fargion; P. G. De Sanctis Lucentini; M. Grossi; M. De Santis; Barbara Mele

    2002-01-03

    The Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR), by UHE neutrino-relic neutrino--Z showering in Hot Dark Halos (HDM), shows an energy spectra, an anisotropy following the relic neutrino masses and clustering in dark halo. The lighter are the relic neutrinos masses, the higher their corresponding Z resonance energy peaks. A twin light neutrino mass splitting may reflect into a twin Z resonance and a complex UHECR spectra modulation as a twin bump at at highest GZK energy cut-off. Each possible neutrino mass associates a characteristic dark halo size (galactic, local, super cluster) and its anisotropy due to our peculiar position within that dark matter distribution. The expected Z or WW,ZZ showering into proton-anti proton and neutron-anti neutron might correspond to peculiar clustering in observed UHECR at 10^{19}, 2 10^{19}, 4 10^{19} eV. A neutrino light HDM halo around a Mpc will allow to the UHECR neutron--anti-neutron secondary component at E_n> 10^{20} eV (due to Z decay) to arise playing a role comparable with the charged p-bar{p} ones. Their un-deflected n-bar{n} flight is shorter leading to a prompt and hard UHECR trace pointing toward the original UHECR source direction. The direct proton-antiproton pairs are split and spread by random magnetic fields into a more diluted and smeared and lower energy UHECR signal around the original source direction. Additional prompt TeVs signals by synchrotron radiation of electro-magnetic Z showering must also occur solving the Infrared-TeV cut-off. The observed hard doublet and triplets spectra, their time and space clustering already favour the rising key role of UHECR n-bar n secondaries originated by neutrino-Z tail shower.

  14. Evaluation of the effect of organic pro-degradant concentration in polypropylene exposed to the natural ageing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montagna, L. S., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Catto, A. L., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Rossini, K., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Forte, M. M. C., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br; Santana, R. M. C., E-mail: larissambiental@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: andrecatto@terra.com.br, E-mail: katiandry@hotmail.com, E-mail: mmcforte@hotmail.com, E-mail: ruth.santana@ufrgs.br [Engineering School/Laboratory of Polymeric Materials, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The production and consumption of plastics in the last decade has recorded a remarkable increase in the scientific and industrial interest in environmentally degradable polymer (EDPs). Polymers wastes are deposited improperly, such as dumps, landfills, rivers and seas, causing a serious problem by the accumulation in the environment. The abiotic processes, like the photodegradation, are the most efficient occurring in the open environmental, where the polymers undergo degradation from the action of sunlight that result from direct exposure to solar radiation, however depend of the type of chemical ageing, which is the principal component of climatic ageing. The subject of this work is to study the influence of concentration of organic pro-degradant (1, 2 and 3 % w/w) in the polypropylene (PP) exposed in natural ageing. PP samples with and without the additive were processed in plates square form, obtained by thermal compression molding (TCM) using a press at 200°C under 2 tons for 5 min, and then were exposed at natural ageing during 120 days. The presence of organic additive influenced on PP degradability, this fact was assessed by changes in the thermal and morphology properties of the samples after 120 days of natural ageing. Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) results of the morphological surface of the modified PP samples showed greater degradation photochemical oxidative when compared to neat PP, due to increase of rugosity and formation of microvoids. PP samples with different pro-degradant concentration under natural ageing presented a degree of crystallinity, obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) increases in comparing the neat PP.

  15. Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

    2002-06-01

    Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

  16. Biodesulfurization techniques: Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmore, B.B.

    1993-08-01

    As an alternative to post-combustion desulfurization of coal and pre-combustion desulfurization using physicochemical techniques, the microbial desulfurization of coal may be accomplished through the use of microbial cultures that, in an application of various microbial species, may remove both the pyritic and organic fractions of sulfur found in coal. Organisms have been isolated that readily depyritize coal but often at prohibitively low rates of desulfurization. Microbes have also been isolated that may potentially remove the organic-sulfur fraction present in coal (showing promise when acting on organic sulfur model compounds such as dibenzothiophene). The isolation and study of microorganisms demonstrating a potential for removing organic sulfur from coal has been undertaken in this project. Additionally, the organisms and mechanisms by which coal is microbially depyritized has been investigated. Three cultures were isolated that grew on dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model organic-sulfur compound, as the sole sulfur source. These cultures (UMX3, UMX9, and IGTS8) also grew on coal samples as the sole sulfur source. Numerous techniques for pretreating and ``cotreating`` coal for depyritization were also evaluated for the ability to improve the rate or extent of microbial depyritization. These include prewashing the coal with various solvents and adding surfactants to the culture broth. Using a bituminous coal containing 0.61% (w/w) pyrite washed with organic solvents at low slurry concentrations (2% w/v), the extent of depyritization was increased approximately 25% in two weeks as compared to controls. At slurry concentrations of 20% w/v, a tetrachloroethylene treatment of the coal followed by depyritization with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans increased both the rate and extent of depyritization by approximately 10%.

  17. Magnetic and elastic anisotropy in magnetorheological elastomers using nickel-based nanoparticles and nanochains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landa, Romina A.; Soledad Antonel, Paula; Ruiz, Mariano M.; Negri, R. Martín; Perez, Oscar E.; Butera, Alejandro; Jorge, Guillermo; Oliveira, Cristiano L. P.

    2013-12-07

    Nickel (Ni) based nanoparticles and nanochains were incorporated as fillers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomers and then these mixtures were thermally cured in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. In this way, macroscopically structured-anisotropic PDMS-Ni based magnetorheological composites were obtained with the formation of pseudo-chains-like structures (referred as needles) oriented in the direction of the applied magnetic field when curing. Nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature, under air ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure) and then calcined at 400?°C (in air atmosphere also). The size distribution was obtained by fitting Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) experiments with a polydisperse hard spheres model and a Schulz-Zimm distribution, obtaining a size distribution centered at (10.0?±?0.6) nm with polydispersivity given by ??=?(8.0?±?0.2) nm. The SAXS, X-ray powder diffraction, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) experiments are consistent with single crystal nanoparticles of spherical shape (average particle diameter obtained by TEM: (12?±?1) nm). Nickel-based nanochains (average diameter: 360?nm; average length: 3??m, obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy; aspect ratio?=?length/diameter ? 10) were obtained at 85?°C and ambient atmosphere (open air, atmospheric pressure). The magnetic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains at room temperature are compared and discussed in terms of surface and size effects. Both Ni-based nanoparticles and nanochains were used as fillers for obtaining the PDMS structured magnetorheological composites, observing the presence of oriented needles. Magnetization curves, ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectra, and strain-stress curves of low filler's loading composites (2% w/w of fillers) were determined as functions of the relative orientation with respect to the needles. The results indicate that even at low loadings it is possible to obtain magnetorheological composites with anisotropic properties, with larger anisotropy when using nanochains. For instance, the magnetic remanence, the FMR field, and the elastic response to compression are higher when measured parallel to the needles (about 30% with nanochains as fillers). Analogously, the elastic response is also anisotropic, with larger anisotropy when using nanochains as fillers. Therefore, all experiments performed confirm the high potential of nickel nanochains to induce anisotropic effects in magnetorheological materials.

  18. Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

    2011-10-06

    Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (<260 C boiling point). Carboxylic acid content of all of the high oxygen content fractions was likely too high for these materials to be considered as fuel blendstocks although potential for blending with crude oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

  19. Recovery of yttrium from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube, CRT: Zn removal by sulphide precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innocenzi, Valentina, E-mail: valentina.innocenzi1@univaq.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); De Michelis, Ida; Ferella, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Beolchini, Francesca [Department of Marine Sciences, Polytechnic Institute of Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Kopacek, Bernd [SAT, Austrian Society for Systems Engineering and Automation, Gurkasse 43/2, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Vegliò, Francesco [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information and Economy, University of L’Aquila, Via Giovanni Gronchi n.18, Nucleo Ind.le di Pile, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Treatment of fluorescent powder of CRT waste. • Factorial experimental designs to study acid leaching of fluorescent powder and the purification of leach liquors. • Recover of yttrium by precipitation using oxalic acid. • Suitable flowsheet to recover yttrium from fluorescent powder. - Abstract: This work is focused on the recovery of yttrium and zinc from fluorescent powder of cathode ray tube (CRT). Metals are extracted by sulphuric acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Leaching tests are carried out according to a 2{sup 2} full factorial plan and the highest extraction yields for yttrium and zinc equal to 100% are observed under the following conditions: 3 M of sulphuric acid, 10% v/v of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrated solution at 30% v/v, 10% w/w pulp density, 70 °C and 3 h of reaction. Two series of precipitation tests for zinc are carried out: a 2{sup 2} full factorial design and a completely randomized factorial design. In these series the factors investigated are pH of solution during the precipitation and the amount of sodium sulphide added to precipitate zinc sulphide. The data of these tests are used to describe two empirical mathematical models for zinc and yttrium precipitation yields by regression analysis. The highest precipitation yields for zinc are obtained under the following conditions: pH equal to 2–2.5% and 10–12% v/v of Na{sub 2}S concentrated solution at 10% w/v. In these conditions the coprecipitation of yttrium is of 15–20%. Finally further yttrium precipitation experiments by oxalic acid on the residual solutions, after removing of zinc, show that yttrium could be recovered and calcined to obtain the final product as yttrium oxide. The achieved results allow to propose a CRT recycling process based on leaching of fluorescent powder from cathode ray tube and recovery of yttrium oxide after removing of zinc by precipitation. The final recovery of yttrium is 75–80%.

  20. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  1. Final Report for Research in High Energy Physics at the University of Pennsylvania for the period ending April 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Hugh H.; Balasubramanian, V.; Bernstein, G.; Beier, E. W.; Cveti?c, M.; Gladney, L.; Jain, B.; Klein, J.; Kroll, J.; Lipeles, E.; Ovrut, B.; Thomson, E.

    2015-07-23

    The University of Pennsylvania elementary particle physics/particle cosmology group, funded by the Department of Energy Office of Science, participates in research in high energy physics and particle cosmology that addresses some of the most important unanswered questions in science. The research is divided into five areas. Energy Frontier - We participate in the study of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland using the ATLAS detector. The University of Pennsylvania group was responsible for the design, installation, and commissioning of the front-end electronics for the Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) and plays the primary role in its maintenance and operation. We play an important role in the triggering of ATLAS, and we have made large contributions to the TRT performance and to the study and identification of electrons, photons, and taus. We have been actively involved in searches for the Higgs boson and for SUSY and other exotic particles. We have made significant contributions to measurement of Standard Model processes such as inclusive photon production and WW pair production. We also have participated significantly in R&D for upgrades to the ATLAS detector. Cosmic Frontier - The Dark Energy Survey (DES) telescope will be used to elucidate the nature of dark energy and the distribution of dark matter. Penn has played a leading role both in the use of weak gravitational lensing of distant galaxies and the discovery of large numbers of distant supernovae. The techniques and forecasts developed at Penn are also guiding the development of the proposed Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST).We are also developing a new detector, MiniClean, to search for direct detection of dark matter particles. Intensity Frontier - We are participating in the design and R&D of detectors for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (now DUNE), a new experiment to study the properties of neutrinos. Advanced Techology R&D - We have an extensive involvement in electronics required for sophisticated new detectors at the LHC and are developing electronics for the LSST camera. Theoretical Physics - We are carrying out a broad program studying the fundamental forces of nature and early universe cosmology and mathematical physics. Our activities span the range from model building, formal field theory, and string theory to new paradigms for cosmology and the interface of string theory with mathematics. Our effort combines extensive development of the formal aspects of string theory with a focus on real phenomena in particle physics, cosmology and gravity.

  2. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

  3. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  4. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26

    Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a ?-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 ?C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the test samples at temperatures ranging from 26-30 ?C. The metathesized sodium aluminate was then dissolved by addition of volumes of water approximately equal to 1.3 times the volumes of caustic added to the test slurries. Aluminate dissolution was allowed to proceed for 2 days at ambient temperatures of ≈29 ?C. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.0 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 crushed heel solids composite test sample. The 20 wt% of solids remaining after the dissolution tests were 85-88 wt% gibbsite. If the density of the residual solids was approximately equal to that of gibbsite, they represented ≈17 vol% of the initial crushed solids composite test sample. In the water dissolution tests, addition of a volume of water ≈6.9 times the initial volume of the crushed solids composite was sufficient to dissolve and recover essentially all of the natrophosphate present. The ratio of the weight of water required to dissolve the natrophosphate solids to the estimated weight of natrophosphate present was 8.51. The Environmental Simulation Program (OLI Systems, Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey) predicts that an 8.36 w/w ratio would be required to dissolve the estimated weight of natrophosphate present in the absence of other components of the heel solids. Only minor amounts of Al-bearing solids were removed from the composite solids in the water dissolution tests. The caustic metathesis/aluminate dissolution test sequence, executed at temperatures ranging from 27-30 ?C, dissolved and recovered ≈69 wt% of the gibbsite estimated to have been present in the initial crushed heel solids composite. This level of gibbsite recovery is consistent with that measured in previous scoping tests on the dissolution of gibbsite in strong caustic solutions. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.3 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 aggregate solids test sample. The residual solids were 92-95 wt% gibbsite. Only a minor portion (≈4.

  5. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huske, Nils Kristian; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2010-09-01

    We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 < m{sub H} < 160 GeV the SM would remain a self consistent theory up to highest energy scales O(m{sub Pl}). This could have direct implications on theories of cosmological inflation using the Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV. A light Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb{sup -1}. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 < m{sub H} < 109 GeV as well as 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV based on the observed final limits at 95% C.L. In the most interesting low mass region between 115 and 135 GeV, even the full Tevatron combination is not yet sensitive enough to exclude a Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb{sup -1} projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb{sup -1} have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H {yields} WW, H {yields} ZZ and H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.