Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTJ!R1,fiNATION RECIPIENT:Sound & Sea Technology. Inc. PROJECT TITLE: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Advancemenlinitiative Page I of2 STATE: WA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number N[PA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOO293 OE-EEOOO3632 GFO-OOO3632-OO1 GOO Based on my review oflhe informatioD concerning the proposed action,.s NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, bul 1"101 limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

2

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERG¥ EERE rROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERG¥ DEPARTMENT OF ENERG¥ EERE rROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT :University of Delaware STATE: DE PROJECT TITLE: Wind Turbine Infrastructure for Green Energy and Research on Wind Power in DE Funding Opportunity Announcement Number 2010 CDP renewal Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOO297 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOOO297 -002 cm Numbe..- o Based on my review of the informatioD concerning the proposed action, as NEP A Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45 1.1 A), I have made the foUowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: Rational for determination: 201 0 COP Renewal - DOElEA#1782 FONS] and MAP signed - ex A9 and ex 83.1 determination for under NEPA control number GFO-10-328, signed March 29,

3

P"~' U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~' ~' U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETEIU.IINATION RECIPIENT:City of Oklahoma City PROJECT TITLE : EECBG City of Oklahoma City SOW Template Page 1 of2 STATE: OK Funding Opportunity Announc:emcnt Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number FOA 000001 3 DE-EE 0000920.001 0 Based on my review ofthe informatioD concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI .IA), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling). document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

4

DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUIJ) AUIJ) u.s. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlV IINATION RECIPIENT:Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority PROJECT TITl.E: SunShot New England · Open for Business Page 1 of2 STATE: CT Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Numbf-r NEPA Control Number elD Number DE·FOA-OOOO549 DE· EEOOO5688 GF0-0005688-001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.11\),1 have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A11 Technical advice and assistance to organizations Technical advice and planning assistance to international, national, state, and local organizations. A9 Infannallen gathering, analysis, and dissemination

5

U.S. DEPAR.TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERAIDIATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F. r2 a F. r2 a U.S. DEPAR.TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERAIDIATION RECIPIENT:State of South Dakota STATE: SD PROJECT TITLE : Health Lab Heat Recovery Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000052 DE-EE0000145 GFO-09-152-003 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation. and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

6

U.S. DEPAR T.MENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of of 2 RECIPIENT:County of Kern U.S. DEPAR T.MENT OF ENERGY EE RE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\IINATION PROJECf TITLE: County Administrative Center Solar Facility STATE : CA fUnding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA.QOOOO13 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOO8941000 NEPA Control Number em Number o Based on my «view of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized undu DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply

7

TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u~\ u~\ u.s. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER Nl!PA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Hawaii Natural Energy Institute STATE : HI PROJECf TITLE: Hawaii Hydrogen Power Park - Technology Validation of a Hydrogen Fueling System Funding Opportunity Announcement Number n/a Procurement Instrument Number DE·FC51-02R021399 NEPA Control Number GFO-R021399-002 Page 1 of2 em Number 21399 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description; 85.1 Adions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

8

WW and WZ Production at the Tevatron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes recent measurements of the production properties of WW and WZ pairs of bosons at the Tevatron. This includes measurements of the cross-section and triple gauge couplings in the WW process and the first evidence for WZ production.

Elliot Lipeles

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

9

As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram As you may kn&<' the~de&tment of &~er& (D&j 1s involved'in'a pronram '. to'chiiracterlze the radjologital cbndif~on of ,sites formerly used byythe . . . ., Manhattan Engineer Dlstrlct (NED) and/or Atomjc Energy Co$n~~lssiqq (AEC); in.. the development of 'nuclear energy.. As part..of this -programi' DOE is 1~ I+ preparing, ,a' series of. brJef~ summaries ,-of .the' history:. of' tho ,#D/AEC~ : : ..; 'i ..relatecl activities and 'Conditions at .thc. sneclfic. sites. The surnaaries~ are to 'document the activities 'frcmi the ~nitlation 'of a contract with' j.'., F:ED/AEC,-to the terminationof the firial.F1EO/AEC contract; The ,historical .: '_ ,,:~,st&naries aIs. briefly' describe the. currant .conditi,on of .each site.

10

Microsoft Word - PARS II CPP Upload Requirements.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U U C (C Pro U.S. D Contrac CPP) U oject A S Phon Depart ctor Pr Upload Assessm System Vers Ap Su Energy E 20440 Cent German ne 301-916- ww tment roject P d Requ ment a m (PAR sion 1.4 Dr pril 9, 2010 ubmitted by nterprise So tury Blvd. S ntown, MD -0050 Fax ww.eesllc.ne t of En Perform uireme and Re RS II) raft 0 : olutions Suite 150 20874 301-916-00 et nergy mance ents for eportin 66 y e r ng ii Title Page Document Name: Contractor Project Performance (CPP) Upload Requirements for PARS II, V1.4 Publication Date: April 9, 2010 Contract Number: DE-AT01-06IM00102 Project Number: 1ME07, CLIN 2 Prepared by: Steven Ducharme, PMC, LLC Lenore Morrison, PMC, LLC Judith Bernsen, PMC, LLC Edited by: Dennis Stoner, EES, LLC Reviewed by: Mark Landry, Dekker, LTD

11

International civil air transport : transition following WW II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International air transport, like many 20th Century marvels which are taken so much for granted today, broke out from its cocoon, so to speak, shortly after the end of World War II (WW II), took wing, and soared. Theretofore, ...

Pogue, L. Welch

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully leptonic WW decay channel at CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the Higgs boson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Search for the Higgs Boson in the WW Decay Channel . . .

LeBourgeois, Matthew; LeBourgeois, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wearable Hand Activity Recognition for Event Summarization W.W. Mayol D.W. Murray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wearable Hand Activity Recognition for Event Summarization W.W. Mayol D.W. Murray Department­182, 1999. [10] W.W. Mayol, B. Tordoff, and D.W. Murray. Wearable vi- sual robots. In IEEE Int. Symposium on Wearable Computers, pages 95­102, 2000. [11] W.W. Mayol, B. Tordoff, and D.W. Murray. Designing a miniature

Murray, David

14

PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to demonstrate that a thorough assessment of the risks associated with the operation of the Rust Geotech patented PO*WW*ER mobile treatment unit (MTU) has been performed and documented. The MTU was developed to treat aqueous mixed wastes at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office sites. The MTU uses evaporation to separate organics and water from radionuclides and solids, and catalytic oxidation to convert the hazardous into byproducts. This process hazards analysis evaluated a number of accident scenarios not directly related to the operation of the MTU, such as natural phenomena damage and mishandling of chemical containers. Worst case accident scenarios were further evaluated to determine the risk potential to the MTU and to workers, the public, and the environment. The overall risk to any group from operation of the MTU was determined to be very low; the MTU is classified as a Radiological Facility with low hazards.

Richardson, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the fully leptonic WW decay channel at CMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to W?W? is presented. Data is taken from pp collisions with center of mass energy sqrt(s) (more)

LeBourgeois, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. 3 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. On March 18, 2013, OHA issued a decision denying an Application for Exception filed by W. W. Grainger, Inc. (Grainger) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception request, Grainger asserted that it will suffer a serious hardship, gross inequity and an unfair distribution of burdens if required to adhere to the new Lighting Efficiency Standards, effective July 14, 2012 (2009 Final Rule), with respect to its LumaPro brand 700 series T8 General Service Fluorescent Lamps (GSFL). Specifically, Grainger cited a previous

17

On the Positioning of Wearable Optical Devices W.W. Mayol, B. Tordoff and D.W. Murray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Positioning of Wearable Optical Devices W.W. Mayol, B. Tordoff and D.W. Murray Department," Journal of VLSI Signal Processing Systems, vol. 21, No. 3, 1999. [4] W.W. Mayol, B. Torddoff and D.W

Oxford, University of

18

A Search for Higgs Boson in $H \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

Sung, Kevin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Search for Higgs Boson in $H\\rightarrow W^+W^-$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $W^+W^-$ has been performed on $1.1\\:$fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s}=7\\:$TeV collected with the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector in 2011. No significant excess above Standard Model background expectation is observed, and upper limits on Higgs boson cross section production are derived, excluding the presence of a Higgs boson with mass in the range of $[150, 193]\\:$GeV$/c^{2}$ at 95% confidence level.

Kevin Sung; for the CMS Collaboration

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measurements of WW and WZ Production in W plus jets Final States in p(p)over-bar Collisions  

SciTech Connect

We study WW and WZ production with {ell}{nu}qq ({ell} = e,{mu}) final states using data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Assuming the ratio between the production cross sections {sigma}(WW) and {sigma}(WZ) as predicted by the standard model, we measure the total WV (V = W,Z) cross section to be {sigma}(WV) = 19.6{sub -3.0}{sup +3.2} pb and reject the background-only hypothesis at a level of 7.9 standard deviations. We also use b-jet discrimination to separate the WZ component from the dominant WW component. Simultaneously fitting WW and WZ contributions, we measure {sigma}(WW) = 15.9{sub -3.2}{sup +3.7} pb and {sigma}(WZ) = 3.3{sub -3.3}{sup +4.1} pb, which is consistent with the standard model predictions.

Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De la Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De la Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin et al.

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the Lepton+Jets Final State at CDF II  

SciTech Connect

We report two complementary measurements of the diboson (WW + WZ) cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second method uses more of the kinematic information in the event through matrix-element calculations of the signal and background processes and has a higher sensitivity. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4{sigma} and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results from both methods gives {sigma}{sub WW+WZ} = 16.0 {+-} 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Search for the Higgs Boson in $H\\to WW^{*}\\to\\ell\  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson decaying to a pair of W bosons that in turn decay leptonically, H {yields} WW* {yields} {ell}{nu}{ell}{nu}. We consider events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, with two oppositely charged lepton candidates (e{sup +}e{sup -}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}, or {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}), and missing transverse energy. The data were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}. No excess of events over background is observed, and limits on SM Higgs boson production are determined.

Gerbaudo, Davide; /Princeton U.

2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson in H to WW Channel at CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for standard model Higgs boson to WW(*) production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final states in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 4.8/fb of integrated luminosity. To maximize sensitivity, the multivariate discriminants used to separate signal from background in the opposite-sign dilepton event sample are independently optimized for final states with zero, one, or two or more identified jets. All significant Higgs boson production modes (gluon fusion, associated production with either a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion) are considered in determining potential signal contributions. We also incorporate a separate analysis of the same-sign dilepton event sample which potentially contains additional signal events originating from associated Higgs boson production mechanisms. Cross section limits relative to the combined SM predictions are presented for a range of Higgs boson mass hypotheses between 110 and 200 GeV/c^2.

J. Pursley; for the CDF Collaboration

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

24

Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson in H ---> WW Channel at CDF  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson to WW{sup (*)} production in dilepton plus missing transverse energy final states in data collected by the CDF II detector corresponding to 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. To maximize sensitivity, the multivariate discriminants used to separate signal from background in the opposite-sign dilepton event sample are independently optimized for final states with zero, one, or two or more identified jets. All significant Higgs boson production modes (gluon fusion, associated production with either a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion) are considered in determining potential signal contributions. We also incorporate a separate analysis of the same-sign dilepton event sample which potentially contains additional signal events originating from associated Higgs boson production mechanisms. Cross section limits relative to the combined SM predictions are presented for a range of Higgs boson mass hypotheses between 110 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Pursley, J.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

First evidence for WW and WZ diboson production with semi-leptonic decays at a Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect

Presented is a measurement of the simultaneous production of a W{sup {+-}} boson in association with a second weak boson (W{sup {+-}} or Z{sup 0}) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Events are consider with one electron or one muon, missing transverse energy, and at least two hadronic jets. The data were collected by the D0 detector in Run IIa of the Tevatron accelerator and correspond to 1.07 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity for each of the two channels (WW/WZ {yields} e{nu}q{bar q} and WW/WZ {yields} {mu}{nu}q{bar q}). The cross section for WW + WZ production is measured to be 20.2 {+-} 2.5(stat) {+-} 3.6(sys) {+-} 1.2(lum) pb with a Gaussian significance of 4.4 standard deviations above the background-only scenario. This measurement is consistent with the Standard Model prediction and represents the first direct evidence for WW and WZ production with semi-leptonic decays at a hadron collider.

Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; /Princeton U.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Search for anomalous WW/WZ {r_arrow} e{nu}jj production at D0; Busqueda de produccion anomala WW/WZ {r_arrow}e{nu}jj en D-Zero  

SciTech Connect

A search for anomalous WW and WZ production in p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab is presented. With a data sample of p{anti p} {r_arrow} e{nu}jjX events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 76.5 {+-} 4.1pb{sup {minus}1}. 399 candidate events were identified, from which 387.1 {+-} 39.8 events were estimated to be background. No deviations from the Standard Model were seen, which predicts 16.2 {+-} 2.7 events. The 95% CL limit on the cross section {sigma}(p{anti p} {r_arrow} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}X) was calculated to be 93.8 pb. Limits on the CP-conserving anomalous WW{sub {gamma}} and WWZ coupling parameters were obtained from a binned likelihood fit to the transverse momentum spectrum of the W boson. Assuming that the WW{sub {gamma}} and WWZ coupling parameters are equal, the 95% CL limits on the CP-conserving couplings are {minus}0.56 < {Delta}{kappa} < 0.75 (with {lambda} = 0) and {minus}0.42 < {lambda} < 0.44 (with {Delta}{kappa} = 0), for a form factor scale {Lambda}{sub FF} = 1.5 TeV. Limits on other assumptions are also reported. These results were combined with the previous D0 WW, WZ {r_arrow} e{nu}jj published results (13.7 {+-} 0.7 pb{sup {minus}1}), and the limits on the anomalous coupling parameters were set to {minus}0.44 < {Delta}{kappa} < 0.60 (with {lambda} = 0) and {minus}0.34 < {lambda} 0.37 (with {Delta}{kappa} = 0), for a form factor scale {Lambda}{sub FF} = 2.0 TeV.

Hernandez, A.S.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant applied to the connection by applying it to the box or pin only and reducing the amount applied. Samples 3 and 4 received one makeup only. Sample 5 initially received two make/breaks to test for galling resistance before final makeup, No galling was observed. Later, three additional make/breaks were performed with no pin end collapse and galling over 1/2 a thread occurring on one of the breakouts. During the make/break tests, the stabbing and hand tight makeup of the WW connection was found to be very easy and trouble free. There was no tendency to crossthread, even when stabbed at an angle, and it screwed together very smoothly up to hand tight. During power tight makeup, there was no heat generated in the box (as checked by hand contact) and no jerkiness associated with any of the makeups or breakouts. Sample 2 was tested in pure compression. The maximum load obtained was 1,051 kips and the connection was beginning to significantly deform as the sample buckled. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 3 was capped-end pressure tested to failure. The capped-end yield pressure of the pipe was 16,572 psi and the sample began to leak at 12,000 psi. Sample 4 was tested in pure tension. The maximum load obtained was 978 kips and the connection failed by fracture at the pin critical section. Actual pipe yield was 1,226 kips. Sample 5 was tested in combined tension/compression and internal gas pressure. The sample was assembled, setup and tested four times. The first time was with a torque of 7,298 ft-lbs and the connection leaked halfway to ISO Load Point 2 with loads of 693 kips and 4,312 psi. The second time the torque was increased to 14,488 ft-lbs and a leak occurred at 849 kips and 9,400 psi, which was ISO Load Point 2. The third time the makeup torque was again increased, to 20,456 ft-lbs, and a leak occurred at 716 kips and 11,342 psi, ISO Load Point 4. The fourth test was with the same torque as before, 20,617 ft-lbs, and the connection successfully tested up to load step 56, ISO Load Point 6 (second round) before leaking at 354 kips and 11,876 psi. At this point,

John D. Watts

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through H -> WW Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

Hai-Jun Yang; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

u.s. DEPARTl\\IENT OF ENERGY EERE I'ROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that cUlllTltly approved. No te to Specialist: Kelly Daigle 1112112012 httMIwww ppN"nmr. t"np.rov povCTONF.PA FF2a Form.a.;;nx?kev14329 11 121 2012 Page 2 of2 DOE Share:...

30

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW[superscript (*)]??[superscript +]??[superscript -]?? Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW[superscript (*)]??[superscript +]??[superscript -]?? channel (?=e/?) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05??fb[superscript -1] of pp collisions at ?s=7??TeV ...

Taylor, Frank E.

31

Measurement of WW Production and Search for the Higgs Boson in pp Collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A measurement of WW production in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV and a search for the Higgs boson are reported. The WW candidates are selected in events with two leptons, either electrons or muons. The measurement is performed using LHC data recorded with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The pp to WW cross section is measured to be 41.1 +/- 15.3 (stat) +/- 5.8 (syst) +/- 4.5 (lumi) pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. Limits on WW gamma and WWZ anomalous triple gauge couplings are set. The search for the standard model Higgs boson in the WW decay mode does not reveal any evidence of excess above backgrounds. Limits are set on the production of the Higgs boson in the context of the standard model and in the presence of a sequential fourth family of fermions with high masses. In the latter context, a Higgs boson with mass between 144 and 207 GeV is ruled out at 95% confidence level.

CMS Collaboration

2011-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

32

Higgs boson finder and mass estimator: The Higgs boson to WW to leptons decay channel at the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We exploit the spin and kinematic correlations in the decay of a scalar boson into a pair of real or virtual W-bosons, with both W-bosons decaying leptonically, for Higgs boson discovery at 7 TeV LHC energy with 10 fb{sup -1} luminosity. Without reconstruction of the events, we obtain estimators of the Higgs mass from the peak and width of the signal distribution in m{sub ll}. The separation of signal and background with other distributions, such as the azimuthal angle between two W decay planes, the rapidity difference between the two leptons, missing E{sub T}, and the p{sub T} of leptons, are also prescribed. Our approach identifies the salient Higgs to dilepton signatures that allow subtraction of the continuum W*W* background.

Barger, Vernon; Huang, Peisi [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H?WW?l?jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at ?s=7??TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H?WW???jj channel in 1.04??fb[superscript -1] of pp collision data at ?s=7??TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of ...

Taylor, Frank E.

34

Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to W+W- production via vector-boson fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vector-boson fusion processes constitute an important class of reactions at hadron colliders, both for signals and backgrounds of new physics in the electroweak interactions. We consider what is commonly referred to as W+W- production via vector-boson fusion (with subsequent leptonic decay of the Ws), or, more precisely, e+ nu_e mu- nubar_mu + 2 jets production in proton-proton scattering, with all resonant and non-resonant Feynman diagrams and spin correlations of the final-state leptons included, in the phase-space regions which are dominated by t-channel electroweak-boson exchange. We compute the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to this process, at order alpha^6 alpha_s. The QCD corrections are modest, changing total cross sections by less than 10%. Remaining scale uncertainties are below 2%. A fully-flexible next-to-leading order partonic Monte Carlo program allows to demonstrate these features for cross sections within typical vector-boson-fusion acceptance cuts. Modest corrections are also found for distributions.

Barbara Jager; Carlo Oleari; Dieter Zeppenfeld

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

35

First Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Using the Semileptonic Decay Channel: H --> WW --> mu bar nu jj  

SciTech Connect

This dissertation presents the first search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in decay topologies containing a muon, an imbalance in transverse momentum (E{sub T}) and jets, using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1} recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primary to contributions from Higgs bosons produced through gluon fusion, with subsequent decay H {yields} WW {yields} {mu}{nu}jj where W represents a real or virtual W boson. In the absence of signal, limits are set at 95% confidence on the production and decay of the standard model Higgs boson for M{sub H} in the range of 115-200 GeV. For M{sub H} = 165 GeV, the observed and expected limits are factors of 11.2 larger than the standard model value. Combining this channel with e{nu}jj final states and including earlier data to increase the integrated luminosity to 5.4 fb{sup -1} produces observed(expected) limits of 5.5(3.8) times the standard model value.

Zelitch, Shannon Maura; /Virginia U.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

W-W  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the former beryllium production facility in Luckey, O h io, which is currently owned by Motor W h e e l Corporation, is designated for inclusion in the Formerly Utilized Sites...

37

Search for the Higgs boson in H ---> WW(*) decays in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in H {yields} WW{sup (*)} decays with e{sup +}e{sup -}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} final states in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data, collected from April 2002 to June 2004 with the D0 detector, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 300-325 pb{sup -1}, depending on the final state. The number of events observed is consistent with the expectation from backgrounds. Limits from the combination of all three channels on the Higgs production cross section times branching ratio {sigma} x BR(H {yields} WW{sup (*)}) are presented.

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo,

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Discovery Potential of the Standard Model Higgs Boson Through $H\\to WW$ Decay Mode with the ATLAS Detector at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results of a study of the Standard Model Higgs boson discovery potential through the W-pair leptonic decay modes with the ATLAS detector at LHC at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy. We used MC samples with full detector simulation and reconstruction of the ATLAS experiment to estimate the ATLAS detection sensitivity for the reaction of pp -> H -> WW -> e\

Yang, Hai-Jun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW->lnujj decay channel at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lnujj channel using 4.7 fb^-1 of pp collision data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Higgs boson candidates produced in association with zero, one or two jets are included in the analysis to maximize the acceptance for both gluon fusion and weak boson fusion Higgs boson production processes. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 300 GeV WW produced in association with zero or one jet is 2.2 pb (1.9 pb), corresponding to 1.9 (1.6) times the Standard Model prediction. In the Higgs boson plus two jets channel, which is more sensitive to the weak boson fusion process, the observed (expected) 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H->WW production with mH = 400 GeV is 0.7 pb (0.6 pb), corresponding to 7.9 (6.5) times the Standard Model prediction.

ATLAS Collaboration

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

40

Identification of a "Tool Box" of Digital Technology, Information Technology and Communications Technology Capabilities Matched to P roject Process Steps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of modern digital, information and communications technology capabilities provide tremendous opportunities for developing beneficial applications to improve plant and human performance in operating plants, including for replacing aging and obsolete functionality and for providing new support applications. They can also provide improved functionality that will support the high expectations for the performance of new plants. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) defined a set of project proc...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II  

SciTech Connect

We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, {mu}) and two neutrino final state in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb{sup -1}. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 {+-} 41 background events and 7.8 {+-} 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c{sup 2} at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3} with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c{sup 2} to 200GeV/c{sup 2} are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (E{sub T}) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ {yields} ll{nu}{nu} channel is 1.2{sigma}. It adds extra significance to the ZZ {yields} 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 {sigma} significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

Hsu, Shih-Chieh; /UC, San Diego

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Search for the Higgs boson in the H->WW(*)->lvlv decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson has been performed in the H->WW->lvlv channel (l=e/mu) with an integrated luminosity of 2.05/fb of pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events over the expected background is observed and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 110Higgs boson with a mass 145

ATLAS Collaboration

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT CENTER MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPADETEIU.llNATION RECIPIENT:Duke Energy Business Services l LC PROJECT TITLE: Carolinas Offshore Wind Integration Case Study Page 1 of2 STATE: NC Funding Opportunity Announ~emenf Number Pnxurement InUrumeDt Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-0000414 DE-EEOOO5368 GF0-0Q05368-001 0 Based on my review orlhe information c:om:erning Ihe proposed aetion, as NEPA Complianc:e omen (authorized uDder DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (including, but nollimiled to, computer modeling). document preparation (including. but not limited to. conceptual design.

44

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTEIU.fiNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DFTEIU.fiNATION DFTEIU.fiNATION RECIPIENT: Escambia County PROJEL""T TITLE: Road Prison Geolhennal Earth Coupled HVAC Upgrade Page 1 of2 STATE : FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-QOOOO13 DE-EEOOOO764 0 Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed aclion, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical assistance to individuals (such as builders, owners, consultants, designers), organizations (such as utilities), and state

45

U.S. DEP.~TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MA,\jAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA,\jAGEMENT CENTER MA,\jAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION Page I of2 RECIPIENT: EECBG - American Samoa Government Territorial Energy Office STATE: AS PROJECT TITLE: Improving Recycling Capacity and Solid Waste Education in American Samoa Funding Opportunity Announcement Number PrO(urement Instrument Number DE-EEOOOOB34 NEPA Control Number GFO-OOOO634.Q01 em Number o Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4S1.1A), I have made the (ollowing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 81 .31 installation or relocation of machinery and equipment Installation or relocation and operation of machinery and equipment (including, but not limited la, laboratory equipment, electronic hardware, manufacturing machinery, maintenance equipment, and health and safety equipment), provided that

46

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERMINATION DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Morris County Improvement Authority PROJECT TITLE : Renewable Energy Program Page 1 of2 ~ , . STATE: NJ funding Opportunity Announcement Number Pro<:urement Instrument Number NEPA Control Numbt'r elo Number DE-EEOOO3171 GF()-()(H)3171-OO1 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.1A), I hne made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including , but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSIS (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

47

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M~"AGEMENT ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

determination: This NEPA determination applies to the installation of a roof-mounted solar PV array at Remsen Avenue Yards (855 Remsen Avenue, Brooklyn , NY). This solar PV...

48

U.S. DEPAR.TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE TERAIDIATION RECIPIENT:State of South Dakota STATE: SD PROJECT TITLE : Health Lab Heat Recovery Funding Opportunity...

49

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H to WW to l nu jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeV < m{sub H} < 600 GeV. The best sensitivity is reached for m{sub H} = 400 GeV, where the 95% confidence level upper bound on the cross section for H {yields} WW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

Aad, G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbi, E; Acharya, BS; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, JA

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Search for the Higgs Boson in the H{yields}WW{yields}l{nu}jj Decay Channel in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for a Higgs boson has been performed in the H{yields}WW{yields}l{nu}jj channel in 1.04 fb{sup -1} of pp collision data at {radical}(s)=7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of events is observed over the expected background and limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived for a Higgs boson mass in the range 240 GeVWW production is 3.1 pb, or 2.7 times the standard model prediction.

Aad, G.; Ahles, F.; Beckingham, M.; Bernhard, R.; Bitenc, U.; Bruneliere, R.; Caron, S.; Christov, A.; Consorti, V.; Eckert, S.; Fehling-Kaschek, M.; Flechl, M.; Glatzer, J. [Fakultaet fuer Mathematik und Physik, Albert-Ludwigs-Universitaet, Freiburg i. Br. (Germany); Abbott, B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman Oklahoma (United States); Abdallah, J.; Bosman, M.; Casado, M. P.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Conidi, M. C.; Demirkoz, B. [Institut de Fisica d'Altes Energies and Departament de Fisica de la Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona and ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Facile Thermal W-W Bond Homolysis in the N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Containing Tungsten Dimer [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2  

SciTech Connect

The thermal W-W bond homolysis in [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2 (IMe = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) was investigated and was found to occur to a large extent compared to other tungsten dimers such as [CpW(CO)3]2. CpW(CO)2(IMe)H was prepared by heating a solution of [IMeH]+[CpW(CO)2(PMe3)]?, and exists in solution as a mixture of interconverting cis and trans isomers. The carbene rotation in CpW(CO)2(IMe)H was explored by DFT calculations, and low enthalpic barriers (< 3.5 kcal mol?1) are predicted. CpW(CO)2(IMe)H has pKaMeCN = 31.5(3) and deprotonation with KH gives K+[CpW(CO)2(IMe)]? ( MeCN). Hydride abstraction from CpW(CO)2(IMe)H with Ph3C+PF6? in the presence of a coordinating ligand L (MeCN or THF) gives [CpW(CO)2(IMe)(L)]+PF6?. Electrochemical measurements on the anion [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]? in MeCN, together with digital simulations, give an E1/2 of ?1.54(2) V vs Cp2Fe+/0 for the [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]/? couple. A thermochemical cycle provides the solution bond dissociation free energy of the W-H bond of CpW(CO)2(IMe)H as 61.3(6) kcal mol?1. In the electrochemical oxidation of [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]?, reversible dimerization of the electrogenerated radical CpW(CO)2(IMe) occurs, and digital simulation provides kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the monomer-dimer equilibrium: kdimerization ~ 2.5 ? 104 M?1 s?1, khomolysis ~ 0.5 s?1 (i.e., Kdim ~ 5 ? 104 M?1). Reduction of [CpW(CO)2(IMe)(MeCN)]+PF6? with cobaltocene gives the dimer [CpW(CO)2(IMe)]2, which in solution exists as a mixture of anti and gauche rotomers. As expected from the electrochemical experiments, the dimer is in equilibrium with detectable amounts of CpW(CO)2(IMe). This species was observed by IR spectroscopy, and its presence in solution is also in accordance with the observed reactivity toward 2,6-di-tert-butyl-1,4-benzoquinone, chloroform and dihydrogen. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The EPR studies were performed at EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energys Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

van der Eide, Edwin F.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Walter, Eric D.; Bullock, R. Morris

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

U.S. DEPAR TMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DE1'ElUI1INATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DE1'ElUI1INATION DE1'ElUI1INATION RECI PI ENT:SolarBridge PROJECT Module-Integrated Power Converters Based on Universal Dock TITLE: Page 1 of2 STATE : TX Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Numbu DE-FOA-0000479 DE-EEOOO5341 GF0-0005341 0 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA),1 have made the (ollowlng determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering, analysis, and dissemination Information gathering (including. but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site visits, and audits), data analysis (including, but not limited to, computer modeling), document preparation (including, but not limited to, conceptual design,

53

Higgs searches and WW scattering - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

while H survives as a real SU(2)-singlet scalar field - the Higgs boson - with mass mu = V/~v. To recover standard Fermi couplings we must have v = (~/2GF) -1/~...

54

Resource Recovery from WW in North America: Present and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flow Scheme #12;Gasification of Biosolids #12;Gasification #12;Gasification vs. Incineration Gasification · Purpose: Creation of valuable usable products · Thermal conversion using limited amounts to NOx · High Temperatures #12;Status of Gasification · Sanford, FL · Has MaxWest gasifier · Start

Stanford University

55

Demand-side management in office buildings in Kuwait through an ice-storage assisted HVAC system with model predictive control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Examining methods for controlling the electricity demand in Kuwait was the main objective and motivation of this researchp roject. The extensiveu se of air-conditioning for (more)

Al-Hadban, Yehya

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Karner Session E8.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nfrastructure Planning, e ngineering, c onstrucCon, o peraCon, m aintenance EV P roject IdenCfy I nfrastructure D eployment B arriers Demonstrate I...

57

ii. articles of incorporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

led in t. 1'. .l'tment of in the '. 84730357. Secretary of the Commonwealth. ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION. OF . ms PIEI'ALHIRGICAL SOCIETY, INC.

58

$WW?/Z$ production in the Randall-Sundrum model at LHC and CLIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the $W^+W^-\\gamma(Z)$ productions at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) in the framework of the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model. The impacts of the virtual RS Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton on these processes are studied and compared with the standard model (SM) background. We present the integrated and differential cross sections in both the RS model and the SM. The results show that the relative RS discrepancies at the CLIC differ from those at the LHC, particularly in the transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We also find that the RS signature performance, as a result of the resonance character of the RS KK-graviton spectrum, is distinctively unlike that in the large extra dimensions model. We conclude that the CLIC with unprecedented precision and high center-of-mass energy has a potential advantage over the LHC in exploring the effects of the RS KK graviton on the $W^+W^-\\gamma(Z)$ production processes.

Li Xiao-Zhou; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Guo Lei

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

On the existence of multiphase thermal detonations W.W. Yuen, T.G. Theofanous*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(than tin) nuclear reactor fuel, as illustrated in Fig. 5. It is important to note that in this case of explosive melt-water inter- actions. Advances in Heat Transfer: Heat Transfer in Nuclear Reactor Safety 29 state theory in terms of fully dynamic propagations computed numerically. A sample of the physical

Yuen, Walter W.

60

The No-Higgs Signal: Strong WW Scattering at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Hidden Symmetries and Higgs Phenomena, ed. D . Graudenz,I . P A I. -50731 The No-Higgs Signal: Strong W W Scatteringin the absence of a light Higgs boson. The general framework

Michael S. Chanowitz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Hunt for the Higgs Boson: The WW lvlv Final State at the ATLAS Detector.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electroweak symmetry breaking stands as the last sector of the standard model of particle physics to be experimentally verified. The electroweak symmetry must be broken (more)

Walch, Shannon R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Strong WW scattering physics: A comparative study for the LHC, NLC and a Muon Collider  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the model independent parameterization for a strongly interacting electroweak sector. Phenomenological studies are made to probe such a sector for future colliders such as the LHC, e{sup +}e{sup -} Linear collider and a muon collider.

Han, Tao

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fuel Scheduling (Chapter 6 of W&W) 1.0 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on fuel usage or upper bounds on fuel usage. In hydro systems, such bounds are dictated by water levels problem, bounds on fuel usage are dictated by the contracts the power plant owner makes with the fuel it in the current context of LMP electricity markets: "In this context, it is known that a thermal plant

McCalley, James D.

64

Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the decay mode H-> WW-> lnulnu  

SciTech Connect

The question of the nature and principles of the universe and our place in it is the driving force of science since Mesopotamian astronomers glanced for the first time at the starry sky and Greek atomism has been formulated. During the last hundred years modern science was able to extend its knowledge tremendously, answering many questions, opening entirely new fields but as well raising many new questions. Particularly Astronomy, Astroparticle Physics and Particle Physics lead the race to answer these fundamental and ancient questions experimentally. Today it is known that matter consists of fermions, the quarks and leptons. Four fundamental forces are acting between these particles, the electromagnetic, the strong, the weak and the gravitational force. These forces are mediated by particles called bosons. Our confirmed knowledge of particle physics is based on these particles and the theory describing their dynamics, the Standard Model of Particles. Many experimental measurements show an excellent agreement between observation and theory but the origin of the particle masses and therefore the electroweak symmetry breaking remains unexplained. The mechanism proposed to solve this issue involves the introduction of a complex doublet of scalar fields which generates the masses of elementary particles via their mutual interactions. This Higgs mechanism also gives rise to a single neutral scalar boson with an unpredicted mass, the Higgs boson. During the last twenty years several experiments have searched for the Higgs boson but so far it escaped direct observation. Nevertheless these studies allow to further constrain its mass range. The last experimental limits on the Higgs mass have been set in 2001 at the LEP collider, an electron positron machine close to Geneva, Switzerland. The lower limit set on the Higgs boson mass is m{sub H} > 114.4 GeV/c{sup 2} and remained for many years the last experimental constraint on the Standard Model Higgs Boson due to the shutdown of the LEP collider and the experimental challenges at hadron machines as the Tevatron. This thesis was performed using data from the D0 detector located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, IL. Final states containing two electrons or a muon and a tau in combination with missing transverse energy were studied to search for the Standard Model Higgs boson, utilizing up to 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. In 2008 the CDF and D0 experiments in a combined effort were able to reach for the first time at a hadron collider the sensitivity to further constrain the possible Standard Model Higgs boson mass range. The research conducted for this thesis played a pivotal role in this effort. Improved methods for lepton identification, background separation, assessment of systematic uncertainties and new decay channels have been studied, developed and utilized. Along with similar efforts at the CDF experiment these improvements led finally the important result of excluding the presence of a Standard Model Higgs boson in a mass range of m{sub H} = 160-170 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% Confidence Level. Many of the challenges and methods found in the present analysis will probably in a similar way be ingredients of a Higgs boson evidence or discovery in the near future, either at the Tevatron or more likely at the soon starting Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Continuing to pursue the Higgs boson we are looking forward to many exciting results at the Tevatron and soon at the LHC. In Chapter 2 an introduction to the Standard Model of particle physics and the Higgs mechanism is given, followed by a brief outline of existing theoretical and experimental constraints on the Higgs boson mass before summarizing the Higgs boson production modes. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the experimental setup. This is followed by a description of the reconstruction of the objects produced in proton-antiproton collisions in Chapter 4 and the necessary calorimeter calibrations in Chapter 5. Chapter 6 follows with an explanation of the phenomenology of the proton-antiproton colli

Penning, B.; /Freiburg U.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

B  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(2011MMBtu) Source: EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference Case, 2008-2040 Natural Gas Coal DOE S upported I GCC D emonstra0on P rojects Southern Company Kemper County...

66

Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SC deploy Specif exchan CST) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System...

67

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

evaluat design evaluat predict to guid * Th so in w es sy * Th is m * Th fle m de fu The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S Report Date: J ited States valuation i Why DOE ow...

68

Hyflux_8th Qtrly_report_July-Sept2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX p roject) Submitted b y: Texas A&M University --- C orpus C hristi 6300 O cean D r. Corpus C hristi, T X 7 8412...

69

Hyflux_5th Qtrly_report_OCT-DEC2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M easurements o f Methane F lux t o t he A tmosphere (HYFLUX p roject) Submitted b y: Texas A &M U niversity --- C orpus C hristi 6300 O cean D r. Corpus C hristi, T X 7 8412...

70

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel Using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using pp? collision data at ?s=1.96??TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8??fb[superscript -1]. We ...

Xie, Si

71

Inclusive Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in the WW Decay Channel using the CDF II Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for standard model (SM) Higgs boson production using ppbar collision data at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.8 fb-1. We search for Higgs bosons produced in all processes with a significant production rate and decaying to two W bosons. We find no evidence for SM Higgs boson production and place upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the SM production cross section (sigma(H)) for values of the Higgs boson mass (m_H) in the range from 110 to 200 GeV. These limits are the most stringent for m_H > 130 GeV and are 1.29 above the predicted value of sigma(H) for mH = 165 GeV.

The CDF Collaboration; T. Aaltonen

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

72

Measurement of the W+W- Cross Section in ?s=7??TeV pp Collisions with ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Letter presents a measurement of the W[superscript +]W[superscript -] production cross section in ?s=7??TeV pp collisions by the ATLAS experiment, using 34??pb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity produced by the ...

Taylor, Frank E.

73

Combination of Tevatron searches for the standard model Higgs boson in the W+W- decay mode  

SciTech Connect

We combine searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a Higgs boson decaying to W{sup +}W{sup -}. The data correspond to an integrated total luminosity of 4.8 (CDF) and 5.4 (D0) fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No excess is observed above background expectation, and resulting limits on Higgs boson production exclude a standard-model Higgs boson in the mass range 162-166 GeV at the 95% C.L.

Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Gregores, E.M.; Mercadante, P.G.; /ABC Federal U.; Hebbeker, T.; Kirsch, M.; Meyer, A.; Sonnenschein, L.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Avila, C.; Gomez, B.; Mendoza, L.; /Andes U., Bogota /Argonne /Arizona U. /Athens U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bonn U. /Boston U. /Brandeis U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Argonne's rich scientific heritage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

first usable amount of electricity from nuclear power. The date was December 20, 1951. Argonne National Laborator y is a U.S. D epar tment of Energy laborator y managed by UChicago...

75

Search for a standard model Higgs boson in CMS via vector boson fusion in the H ---> WW ---> l nu l nu channel  

SciTech Connect

We present the potential for discovering the Standard Model Higgs boson produced by the vector-boson fusion mechanism. We considered the decay of Higgs bosons into the W{sup +}W{sup -} final state, with both W-bosons subsequently decaying leptonically. The main background is t{bar t} with one or more jets produced. This study is based on a full simulation of the CMS detector, and up-to-date reconstruction codes. The result is that a signal of 5{sigma} significance can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 12 - 72 fb{sup -1} for Higgs boson masses between 130 < m{sub H} < 200 GeV . In addition, the major background can be measured directly to 7% from the data with an integrated luminosity of 30 fb{sup -1}. In this study, we suggested a method to obtain information in Higgs mass using the transverse mass distributions.

Yazgan, E.; /Middle East Tech. U., Ankara /Fermilab; Damgov, J.; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res. /Fermilab; Akchurin, N.; /Texas Tech.; Genchev, V.; /Sofiya, Inst. Nucl. Res.; Green, D.; /Fermilab; Kunori, S.; /Maryland U.; Schmitt, M.; /Northwestern U.; Wu, W.; /Fermilab; Zeyrek, M.T.; /Middle East Tech. U., Ankara

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I?%7 STGTE m rtExm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM % HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE SW...

77

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

det actual * Th th Th co no in pl * In fo op sy as di re de co an * Th en m ha ev sc The pu techni projec Site: H roject: H Report Date: S ited States valuation in Su Why DOE...

78

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in p anti-p Interactions with the Decay Mode H --> W+W- --> mu+nu mu-anti-nu at the D0 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for the standard model Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions resulting in two muons and large missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected between April 2002 and December 2008 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant excess above the background estimation is observed and limits are derived on Higgs boson production.

Johnston, Dale Morgan; /Nebraska U.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Name of Project Pi(s)/Institution(s)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for C MS a nd A TLAS Liz S exton---Kennedy Fermilab NERSC BER Requirements for 2017 September 11-12, 2012 Rockville, MD Tuesday, November 27, 12 Special T hanks: Torre W enaus ( ATLAS c ompu0ng) Oliver G utsche ( CMS c ompu0ng) Peter E lmer ( CMS O ffline S oNware) Tuesday, November 27, 12 1. P roject D escrip0on T here a re x i ns0tu0ons f rom y c ountries... t oo m any t o l ist * Summarize y our p roject(s) a nd i ts s cien0fic o bjec0ves through 2 017 * Our p resent f ocus i s H iggs a nd S USY p hysics * By 2 017 w e e xpect t o h ave e nough d ata t o ★ m easure m any p roper0es o f t he H iggs l ike resonance ★ be a ble t o r ule o ut m any S USY t heories o r d iscover i ts existence ★ m ake m any p recise S tandard M odel m easurements Tuesday, November 27, 12 2. C omputa0onal S trategies * LHC c ompu0ng i s H igh T hroughput C ompu0ng ★ g oal i s

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

David Turner! User Services Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Group User Services Group Accounts and Allocations --- 1 --- September 10, 2013 Accounts There a re t wo t ypes o f a ccounts a t N ERSC. 1. Your p ersonal, p rivate a ccount * Associated w ith y our l ogin o r u ser n ame * Iden:fies y ou t o o ur s ystems a nd u sed w hen l ogging i n t o N ERSC systems a nd w eb s ervices * Your p roject's P rincipal I nves:gator ( PI) o r P roject M anager r equests an a ccount f or y ou * Four p rimary a ccount r oles - PI, P I P roxy, P roject M anager, U ser 2. An a lloca:on a ccount, o r r epository ( aka r epo) * Like a b ank a ccount y ou u se t o " pay" f or c omputer : me * PIs r equest a lloca:ons o f : me a nd/or s torage * An i ndividual u ser m ay b elong t o m ore t han o ne r epository - But o nly o ne d efault r epo --- 2 --- Allocations * You must belong to a repo to run jobs

82

tfm_BESPowerpoint.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for for Sampling d iffusive d ynamics o n l ong 0 mescales, and s imula0ng t he c oupled dynamics o f e lectrons a nd n uclei Thomas M iller Caltech NERSC BES Requirements for 2017 October 8-9, 2013 Gaithersburg, MD 1. P roject D escrip0on T homas F . M iller / C altech * Summarize y our p roject(s) a nd i ts s cien0fic o bjec0ves through 2 017 * Our p resent f ocus i s: * To u nderstand r eac0ve t unneling i n e nzyme---catalyzed hydrogen---transfer, e lectron---transfer, a nd p roton---coupled electron t ransfer r eac0ons. * To u nderstanding a nd c ontrolling p rotein t arge0ng a nd protein e xpression i n c ells, a t t he a mino a cid l evel. * By 2 017 w e e xpect t o d evelop a nd u 0lize n ew methods t o a chieve t hese f ocuses. 2. C omputa0onal S trategies * We a pproach t his p roblem c omputa0onally a t a h igh l evel b

83

Microsoft Word - Kawamoto v3.12.01.main text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5917 5917 Ele ctricity Use d by Office Equipment and Netw ork Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and A ppendices Kaoru Kawamoto, Jonat han G. Koomey, Bruce Nor dman, Richard E . Brown, Mar y Ann Piette, Michael Ti ng, and Alan K. Meier Energy Analysis Depar tment Environmental E nergy Technologies Division Ernest Or lando Lawrence Ber keley National Laborator y Uni versit y of Califor nia Ber keley, CA 94720 To download thi s report, associat ed dat a, and relat ed research, go to htt p://enduse.l bl.gov/Projects/InfoTech.html February 2001 This work was s upported by the Of fice o f Atmo spheric Prog rams o f the U.S. Environ mental Protection Agency . Prepared for th e U.S. Depar tment of Energy un der Co ntract No. DE- AC03-7 6SF000 98. Table of Contents

84

Iatiku 03  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ayangna/ u u irls roject. ........ ......................... .... ................. ...... ......... ................ .. 5 i s/ rti l s fri s/ i isti s .. ....... .......... ................ .. .. ....... .. .... esources for aino anguage r ject... , and they ere i e t t e air a t t e t Js . I i arc t e arit issi iss e e i eli es f r t r i tr ti f riti . f rti l r relevance ere the rules concerning trading acitivities a t e r les er i t e s s rs i f researc . ince the o ission...

Ostler, Nicholas D M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Depar Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF November 9, 2011 Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved

86

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 31 Seminar Volume Resume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Pandlt lawaharlal Nehru in J95X. In the foregoing vears on several oc.::asion authontles took decision to hold Seminar which could not be materiahLed. But aft.::r the appoll1tment of the prescnt Director. the Executive Board and General councils in its... -st\\k and sllperstitlollS belief and practices. After the advent or ('lIllJ 111 Sikkilll. Bulletin of Tibetology Mahayana Buddhism, assimilated with Vajrayana and spn.:ad fllr and \\vidlo: of the land and following with the roval patronage during seventeenth century...

Ghosh, B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",39,19021,106.57 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Blount",2,"w","w" " Fayette",1,"w","w" " Franklin",1,"w","w" " Jackson",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,4298,146.04 " Marion",1,"w","w" " Tuscaloosa",7,8599,111.55 " Walker",11,2370,81.88

88

1703_Process_Letter_20120405  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April April 0 5, 2 012 NAME TITLE COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, S TATE, Z IP RE: P ROJECT N AME Dear N AME: Thank y ou f or y our o ngoing i nterest i n t he T itle X VII l oan g uarantee p rogram. I a m writing t o a dvise y ou o f t he p rocess a nd c riteria w e e xpect t o u se t o a llocate t he remaining r enewable l oan g uarantee r esources u nder t his p rogram. As y ou a re m ost l ikely a ware, C ongress h as a ppropriated $ 170 m illion f or c redit subsidy c osts u nder S ection 1 703. T his a ppropriated c redit s ubsidy m ay b e u sed f or loan g uarantees f or r enewable e nergy a nd e fficient e nd u se e nergy t echnologies. Such p rojects t hat h ave a lready a pplied f or l oan g uarantees u nder e ither S ection 1703 o r S ection 1 705 a re e ligible t o b e c onsidered f or t his f unding. I n a ddition, Congress h as p rovided s eparate

89

SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHIP CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 1 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2011 Team SCI-Arc/Caltech CHIP COMPACT HYPER_INSULATED PROTOTYPE Project Manual August 11,2011 Project Manager (Design and Construction): Reed Finlay (reed_finlay@sciarc.edu) Project Manager (PR and Development): Elisabeth Neigert (elisabeth_neigert@sciarc.edu) CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 2 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 Table o f C ontents Summary o f C hanges 2 Rules C ompliance C hecklist 3 Structural C alculations 6 Detailed W ater B udget 7 Summary o f U nlisted E lectrical C omponents 9 Summary o f R econfigurable F eatures 10 Interconnection A pplication F orm 11 Energy A nalysis R esults a nd D iscussion

90

TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation 2 WHO IS PERFORMANCE RESULTS CORPORATION? * Incorporated i n A pril 2 000 * SBA C er4fied S mall, W oman---Owned C orpora4on * Kathy C linton O wner a nd P resident * Located a t 6 C anyon R oad, M organtown, W V * Employs o ver 2 30 p ersonnel l ocated a cross 1 6 ci4es a nd 1 3 s tates * 2010 r evenue w as $ 25M, p rojected t o e xceed $30M i n 2 011 * Primary c lients a re t he D OE, D OJ, C DC, a nd A rmy 3 PRC CORE COMPETENCIES Program & P roject Management S upport Technical & E ngineering Support S ervices Informa4on T echnology Support S ervices Facili4es & Administra4ve Support S ervices Strategic P lanning & Management S upport 4 Valued P artner - T etra T ech: * Quality r eputa4on * CommiWed

91

II-GRR at GRC - Analyses slides.pptx  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview Overview Kate Young Kermit Witherbee NREL October 2, 2012 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Schedule * Progress shown by dark bands after each jurisdiction * Target dates are shown for development of materials and upcoming meetings Roadmap D evelopment S tatus Mee2ngs* 25% 50% 75% 100% Reviewed & P rinted Mee4ng #1 Agency Follow--- up Mee4ng #2 Federal 5/3 6/7 California 6/14 6/27 Nevada 6/29 7/12 7/24 Hawaii 7/13 7/26 8/7 Alaska 7/27 8/9 8/21 Idaho 8/10 8/23 9/4 Utah 8/24 9/6 9/18 Oregon 9/1 9/13 9/25 Montana 9/14 9/20 NA * M ee4ng # 1: M eet w ith a gencies t o i ntroduce p roject a nd r eview d eveloped fl owcharts M ee4ng # 2: M eet w ith i ndustry t o i ntroduce p roject a nd g et f eedback o n p ermiRng c oncerns; m eet w ith a gencies a nd i ndustry t

92

Annual_Review_2011_v02.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE---ARRA DOE---ARRA G eologic S equestra6on T raining and R esearch 2011 Y early R eview M ee6ng P roject D E---FE0002041 Modeling a nd R isk A ssessment o f C O2 Sequestra6on a t t he G eologic---Basin S cale MassachuseLs I ns6tute o f T echnology Presenter: R uben J uanes, C EE D ept. February 2 4---26, 2 011 Project P ar6cipants * PI: P rof. R uben J uanes * Two P hD s tudents * Undergraduate s tudents ( UROP) Chris M acMinn Mike S zulczewski Introduc6on * Global e missions ~ 8 G tC/yr ~ 3 0 G tCO2/yr * In t he U .S. a lone ~ 7 G tCO2/yr ( ~ 2 G tCO2/yr from c oal---fired p ower p lants) * To m ake a d ifference, w e n eed t o s equester i n the o rder o f 1 G tCO2/yr ( "1 u nit") * The p roblem ( injec6on a nd l ong---term s torage) must b e a ddressed a t t he g eologic b asin s cale * This i s w hat t his p roject i s a

93

MiraCon presentation-Lalitha-1.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crash Course on Vesta and the ALCF Crash Course on Vesta and the ALCF Lalitha M antrala Technical S upport A nalyst Argonne L eadership C ompu9ng F acility Crash Course Overview  This c rash c ourse w ill t ake a pproximately 2 5 minutes.  Get a n a ccount a nd a ccess t o a n a lloca9on  Logging i nto V esta  Copying t he s ource fi les  Building t he c ode  SubmiFng a j ob a nd s eeing t he o utput Argonne L eadership C ompu9ng F acility --- s upported b y t he O ffice o f S cience o f t he U .S. D epartment o f E nergy Getting an Account  Go t o h Ops://accounts.alcf.anl.gov/accounts/request.php a nd click o n " Request f or a n A ccount"  Select t he p roject n ame y ou w ant t o b e a p art o f  Select ( or t ype) y our p roject PI's n ame a nd e mail a ddress i n the a ccount s ponsor fi elds a nd t hen c lick s ubmit

94

UHawaii report12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H awaii Q uarkNet a ctivities --- --- S ept. 2 011 t o A ug. 2 012 The H awaii Q uarkNet g roup m et i n J an., A pril, a nd A ug. 2 012. T he 2 1 J anuary m eeting w as i n P eter Grach's c lassroom a t K amehameha H .S. M ike J ones s tarted w ith a n o verview o f d ata f rom t he 4 H awaii detectors a nd d escribed t he s tatus o f t he M aui a nd U H W indward d etectors. H anno A dams d escribed operation o f t he P unahou d etector a nd p lans f or s tudent p rojects. P eter G rach d escribed p lans t o h ave about Fifty o f h is s tudents a nalyze Q uarkNet d ata a nd m ake p osters f or e ---Lab. M ike W eber r eported t hat t he BYU---Hawaii d etector w as n ot w orking r eliably a nd t hat t he G PS a nd D AQ w ould b e r eturned t o F ermilab. Selene M ichihara d escribed a p roject d one b y o ne o f h er s tudents u sing t he L BL---design p

95

Overview of the ALCF Early Science Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALCF Early Science Program ALCF Early Science Program Timothy J . W illiams Argonne L eadership C ompu2ng F acility 2013 M iraCon W orkshop Wednesday 3 /4/2013 Session: 3 :45---4:30pm 2 § 16 projects - Large t arget a lloca-ons - Postdoc § Proposed r uns b etween M ira a cceptance a nd start of producCon § 2 billion core---hours to burn in a few months First in Mira Queue: Early Science Program h3p://esp.alcf.anl.gov 3 § MoCvaCons f or E SP: - Prepare k ey a pplica-ons f or t he a rchitecture a nd s cale o f M ira - Solidify l ibraries a nd i nfrastructure - Iden-fy s ystem p roblems § 16 Early Science projects were chosen based on computaConal and scienCfic reviews. § The p rojects h ave a r unning s tart f or d elivery o f e xciCng n ew s cience - Postdocs w ere a ssigned t o t he p rojects - ALCF

96

Power*","Other Industrial","Coke","Commercial  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,3899,"-","w","w","w",-3.3 "Arizona",23217,503,"-","-",23084,536,"-","-",23719,23620,0.4 "Colorado",18744,"w","-","w",18979,"w","-","w",19032,19585,-2.8 "Idaho","-",382,"-","w","-"...

97

Coastal Sediment Transport Concepts and Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waterways and Harbors Div. , ASCE, v. 88, n. WW1, p. 117-Conf. Coastal Engineering, ASCE, 3641 pp. Eagleson, P.S. ,Jour. Waterways, Port, etc. , ASCE, v. 106, n. WW3, p. 299-

Inman, Douglas L.; Masters, Patricia M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

JOURNALOF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY Vol. 76, No. 2, August 1996. Printed in U.S.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;GERVAIS, KLEINFELD. DELANEY, AND GELPERIN Depol. 0 - .Ww,t) F(KY) Hyperpol. 12 3456 7 Spatial Uniform

Kleinfeld, David

99

Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the Lepton + Missing Transverse Energy + Jets Final State in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson has been performed in the H \\rightarrow WW \\rightarrow l{\

Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

The U.S. Research University as a Global Model: Some Fundamental Problems to Consider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was key to the Manhattan Project and the United Statesfrom the WW II Manhattan Project, is still considered an

Rhoads, Robert A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Summary - ASCEM Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ASCEM EM is ground world. passiv at DOE Advan Manag state-o unders transp ASCE predict identify calcula quantif The re docum Implem inform The pr and st time of condu review The pu techni projec Site: A roject: E Report Date: S ited States Peer R Why DOE M Model Diagram faced with one dwater and soi A major goal ve remediation E sites. To aid nced Simulation gement (ASCE of-the-art scien standing and p port in natural a M modeling too ting releases fr ying exposure ations, and con fication. eview team was ment: ASCEM F mentation Plan ation provided rimary objective rategic develop f the review the ct a detailed te w will be schedu To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic All Sites Environmenta September 20 Departmen Review o Environ E-EM Did This

102

Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat olids/liquid sepa ). The objectiv ty of the SCIX ess of the proc n, and to provid g towards deta To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic Savannah Rive Small Column Exchange/SCIX Feb. 2011 Departmen ll Colum E-EM Did This rocess Diagram on Exchange (S

103

Hyflux_5th Qtrly_report_OCT-DEC2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October October 2 009 t o D ecember 2 009 Remote S ensing a nd S ea---Truth M easurements o f Methane F lux t o t he A tmosphere (HYFLUX p roject) Submitted b y: Texas A &M U niversity --- C orpus C hristi 6300 O cean D r. Corpus C hristi, T X 7 8412 Principal A uthors: I an R . M acDonald a nd T homas N aehr Prepared for: United S tates D epartment o f E nergy National E nergy T echnology L aboratory January 30, 2010 Office of Fossil Energy Quarterly Report October-December 2009 -II- Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi Table of Contents Executive Summary of HYFLUX Program Work ......................................................................... 1 Progress, Results, and Discussion................................................................................................... 2 Task

104

Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site Designation Survey - Palmerton, Pa. Ore Storage Site William Bibb Oak Ridge Operations Office Based on the information furnished in Aerospace's Review of the.subject site (Attachment 1) and the ORKL/RASA (Attachment 2), it Is requested that designation survey of the Palmerton Ore Storage Pennsylvania. The survey should be detailed to and subsurface data to make up for the lack of the previous AEC surveys and in keeping with ORNL/RASA group should furnish a draft survey approval prior to conducting any survey activities. If there are any questions, please call Edward DeLaney 04 FTS 253-4716. Arthur J. Whitman / '/ Division of Facility and Site ' Deconrnissioning P,rojects Office of Nuclear Energy : 2 Attachments I bee: I E. Keller, OR, w/attachs:

105

Microsoft Word - 45237 FINAL_Rulison_Risk_Report eq  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sc Sc Po Fu Pr Jeffr Jenn Febr Publ reenin otentia uture N roject R rey I. Daniel y B. Chapm ruary 2011 ication No. ng Ass al Hum Natur Ruliso ls man 45237 Prepar Divisio Desert Prepar S. M. S U.S. D sessme man-H al-Ga on in W red by on of Hydro t Research In red for Stoller Corp Department o ent of Health s Drill Weste logic Scienc nstitute, Nev oration, Offi of Energy, G Risk ling N ern Co ces, Las Veg vada System fice of Legac Grand Junctio L from Near olorad gas, NV of Higher E cy Managem on, Colorado LMS/RUL/S0 do Education ment o 08087 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or its

106

Microsoft Word - START Application_eaform_FINAL.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Technical A ssistance O pportunity f or T ribes: Strategic T echnical A ssistance R esponse T eam ( START) P rogram f or t he Development o f R enewable E nergy P rojects About t he O ffice The Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (IE) is charged by Congress to direct, foster, coordinate, and implement energy planning, education, management, and programs that assist Tribes with energy development, capacity building, energy infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. IE works within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), across government agencies, and with Indian Tribes and organizations to promote Indian energy policies and initiatives. IE performs these functions within the scope of DOE's mission and consistently with the federal government's trust responsibility, tribal self- determination policy, and government-to-government relationship with Indian Tribes.

107

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Change out down guy on power pole Date: 2-8-10 DOE Code : Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview 1 What are the environmental No impact to the environment impacts? Power pole east of B-1 -33 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 3Hr 4. What major equipment will be used if any (worl< over rig, drilling rig, Backhoe and operator for equ1 pment etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE; If Chiingroject Lead must subrnJt a new NEPA Compllai"'Ce Survey alld contact Ut TlrCh.,lcal Assunlnce DepartmenL Impacts If YES, then complete below

108

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 hltps:llwww.eere-pmc.energy.govINEPNNcpa_ef2a.aspx?K ey-6890 u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:lndie Energy Systems Company. LLC ST ATE: IL ~ROJECT TITLE Retrofit of the Local 150 of International Union of Operating Engineers Headquarters Campus Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-EEOOOO116 Procurement Instrument Number OE-EEOOO2818 NEPA Control Number cm Number GFO-10-298 2818 Based on my ~,";ew of the information concerning the proposed action. as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4Sl.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 information gathenng (including, but not limited to, literature surveys. Inventories, audits). data analYSIS (including

109

EETD's Materials Project In Scientific American's 2013 World-changing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Project In Scientific American's 2013 World-changing Materials Project In Scientific American's 2013 World-changing Ideas Issue The Materials P roject November 2013 In Scientific American magazine's December 2013 issue, "World-changing ideas," the cover story, "How supercomputers will yield a golden age of materials science," sets the scene for the issue's focus on practical innovations emerging from the laboratory. In the article, MIT's Gerbrand Ceder and Environmental Energy Technologies Division scientist Kristin Persson describe the Materials Project, a collaboration of researchers building a free, open-access database containing the fundamental thermodynamic and electronic properties of all known inorganic compounds. Using high-throughput materials design, they hope to revolutionize the

110

I"MC·F.F2. U.S. DEPART}VIENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3/2011 3/2011 "___;H---4l-~""'-'-=------'~ Page 1 of2 I"MC·F.F2. U.S. DEPART}VIENT OF ENERGY 1 1.4)'.O~ , EERE ?ROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\UNATION RECIPIENT: Presidio ISO STATE: TX PRO.IECT TITLE: Solar Panel Expansion Project funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EE0003194 gfo-0003194-001 0 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 45I.lA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation , and promote energy-efficiency that do not

111

Preliminary Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) for the Calcine Disposition Project Volume 2 (CDP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY PRELIMINARY TECHNOLOGY OF THE CALCINE Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy ECHNOLOGY READINESS ASSESSMENT ALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT VOLUME TWO Anthony F. Kluk Hoyt C. Johnson Clyde Phillip McGinnis Michael Rinker Steven L. Ross Herbert G. Sutter John Vienna February 2011 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC SSESSMENT ROJECT 412.09 (06/03/2009 - Rev. 11) CALCINE DISPOSITION PROJECT TECHNOLOGY MATURATION PLAN Identifier: Revision*: Page: PLN-1482 2 C-1 of C-317 Appendix C Appendix C Checklists for Critical Technology Elements and Technology Readiness Levels This appendix provides the CTE and TRL checklists for the CTEs. For the TRL questions that receive a "Y" (yes) response, the supporting documentation is provided with a complete reference at the

112

Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wa Wa Schem DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Balanc Activity of this techno facilitie are su WTP d Readin The as along w Level ( * Tw 1. 2. The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States aste Trea Labo Why DOE matic of Laser Ab s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including an ces of Facilities y Waste (LAW assessment w ology elements es (LAB, BOF, fficiently matur design, which n ness Level of 6 What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the L wo LAB system . Autosamplin Laser ablati AES/LA-ICP To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen atment a oratory, B E-EM Did This blation Analytical a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com n Analytical Lab s (BOF) operat ) Vitrification F was to identify t s (CTEs) in the

113

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

eere·pmc.encrgy.govINEPA/Nepa_ef2a.aspx?key=6959 eere·pmc.encrgy.govINEPA/Nepa_ef2a.aspx?key=6959 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Bali State University ~ROJECT TITLE BSU Ground Source Geothermal District Heating and Cooling System STATE: IN Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-EEOOOOl16 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EEOOO2806 NEPA Control Number GFO-10-299 cm Number 2806 Based on my review ofthe infonnation concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the follow ing detennination: CX, EA, EIS APPE NDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (in~uding, but not limited to, literature surveys. inventories. audits), data analysis (in~uding

114

u.s. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlYIINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

govINEPNNepa_ef2a.aspx?Key=10571 govINEPNNepa_ef2a.aspx?Key=10571 u.s. DEPARTlVIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETERlYIINATION RECIPIENT:ND Dept. of Commerce ~ROJECT TIT LE Minot State University Geothermal Heating Project STATE: NO Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000052 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0000142 NEPA Contro l Number cm Number GFO-09-267-005 0 Based on my review oftbe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Mions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

115

Summary - Preliminary TRA of the Calcine Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calcine Calcine The Id materi Dec. 2 Press additiv form w those project anticip 2012 a CD-1 a selecte Level ( assess Eleme assign prepar The as below achiev * R * Ba * C The Ele Site: I roject: C Report Date: ited States Prelim Why DOE e HIP Treatment daho high-level al designated t 2009) to underg (HIP) process. ves, converts th with durability a of borosilicate t is currently in pates Critical D authorizing the approval, it is t ed technology (TRL) of 4 or h sment was to id ents (CTEs) of t n the TRLs that ration for CD-1 What th ssessment team along with the ved prior to CD etrieval//Pneum atching and Mi eramic Additive To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin daho Nationa Calcine Dispo February 201 Departmen minary T E-EM Did This t Process Flow D waste calcine through an am

116

TeamWorks09-30-04  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2004 30, 2004 By the Numbers Congressional delegates tour WIPP Transportation and disposal statistics are available on pages 3 and 4. D E P A R T M E N T O F E N E R G Y U N I T E D S T A T ES O F A M E R I C A TeamWorks TeamWorks TRU A biweekly e-newsletter for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant team roject personnel were honored to host a group of distinguished visitors on a rare weekend tour that included Chairman David Hobson of the U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Water Development Appropriations subcommittee; Ambassador Linton Brooks, Under Secretary for Nuclear Security; Congressman Steve Pearce; Ines Triay, DOE-EM Deputy Chief Operating Officer, Susan Grant, DOE Chief Financial Officer and several state and city officials. CBFO Deputy Manager Lloyd Piper said it was apparent that the

117

CX-007433: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

433: Categorical Exclusion Determination 433: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007433: Categorical Exclusion Determination Washington State Ferries Biodiesel Project· Phase II CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 12/07/2011 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office DOE is proposing to provide $187,400 in State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding to the Washington Department of Commerce, subrecipient Rainier Petroleum Corporation (Rainier), to purchase and install a new 25,000 gallon biodiesel tank and associated fueling equipment. The proposed project would supply the Washington State Ferries (WSF) with a blended biodiesel at the existing fuel facility. The proposed pCX-007433 roject would supply Washington State Ferries with 300,000 gallons of biodiesel per year.

118

A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic Manhattan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic Manhattan Project Sites Gain International Media Attention A Platinum Anniversary for U.S. Atomic Heritage - EM's Historic Manhattan Project Sites Gain International Media Attention September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Traditionally, a platinum anniversary marks 70-years. The Manhattan roject legacy reached that special milestone this summer, highlighting a remarkable history nvolving the Oak Ridge and Hanford sites and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Bipartisan legislation making its way through Congress could commemorate America's atomic history by turning these sites into a national park, a prospect that continues to gain national and international media attention in print, online and on TV and

119

aps_news_template.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

has yet to achieve has yet to achieve the alchemist's dream of turn- ing lead into gold. But a group of researchers using the GeoSoilEnviroCARS (GSE- CARS) and High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HP-CAT) facilities at the Depar tment of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory, may have found a way to tur n ordinar y soft graphite (source of the "lead" found in pencils) into a new, super-hard material that "looks" just like diamond. Using the high-brilliance x-ray beams from the APS, the group discovered that, under extreme pressure, graphite (among the softest of materials and the source of the lead found in pencils) becomes as hard as diamond, the hardest known material. What's more, the new super-hard material can be induced to return to its previous soft state.

120

S A V A N N A H R I V E R S I T E  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Excerpts from Excerpts from "Strengthening Energy Security through Federal Partnerships" 67 ENE RGY The Military Engineer * No. 676 The need to shrink depen dence on fos- sil fuels is not a new conce pt in the na- tion's energy discus sion, nor is the need to invest in clean, renew able energy . But the challe nge of how to deliver solar, bioma ss, wind, wave, geothe rmal and other power genera tion techno logies in a cost effecti ve, large-s cale mann er-an d meet the chang - ing energy deman ds of the nation -is a very curren t one indeed . Throu gh a partne rship with the U.S. Army Corps of Engin eers (USAC E) Sa- vanna h Distri ct, Depar tment of Energ y (DOE ), Savan nah River Nation al Labor a- tory (SRNL ) and other federa l entitie s, the South east Energ y Initiat ive (SEEI) is pro- active

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NGMS-105 NGMS-105 A Forecast of Marginal Natural Gas and Oil Well Data Topical Report By: J. Remson June, 2005 FOR TMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Work Performed Under Contract No. DE-AD26-01NT00612 Northrop Grumman Mission Systems ion Don U. S. DEPAR Information & Technical Services Divis Tulsa, Oklahoma NGMS-105 A Forecast of Marginal Natural Gas and Oil Well Data Topical Report By Don J. Remson June, 2005 Prepared For U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Work Performed under Contract No. DE-AD26-00NT00612 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any

122

u.s. D11PARTIlIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D11PARTIlIENT OF ENERGY D11PARTIlIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETl!RMINATlON RECIPIENT:Oregon Department of Energy Page 1 of3 STATE : OR PROJECT TITLE: SEP ARM· Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Agriculture - Olson- Ashbrook-Schanno-Uhalde-Zolier Projects Funding Opportunity Announcement Number ProculTment Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-OOOOOS2 DE EEOOOO140 GF0-0000140-QIB EE140 Ba~d on my review oflbe information concerning the proposfii action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA). I have made tbe following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do nol

123

EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DEIElallNATION RECIPIENT:Clipper Windpower, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEIElallNATION DEIElallNATION RECIPIENT:Clipper Windpower, LLC PROJECf TITLE : Novel low Cost, High Reliability Wind Turbine Drivetrain Page 1 of2 STATE: CA Funding Opportunity ADDoun~tment Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA.()()()()439 DE-EE0005141 GF0-0005141-OO1 EES141 Based on my review of the Information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DO E Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathenng (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analysis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual design or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and

124

u.s. DEPARTUENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl\JlNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERl\JlNATION DETERl\JlNATION Page 1 of2 ~ '~ . , . 'c. : . RECJI'JENT:Metro Nashville & Davidson County STATE: TN PROJECT TITLE: EECBG Program Nashville & Davidson Co., TN Building Retrofit & Miscellaneous (S) Funding Opportunity Annoum::tment Number DE·FOA.()()()13 Procurement Instrument Number EEOOOO956.001 NEPA Control Number cm Number o Based on my review of the information conctrning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authoriztd under DOE Order 4SI.IA). I have made the rollowing determination: CX, EA. EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy. demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy--efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

125

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BP and Hydrogen Pipelines BP and Hydrogen Pipelines DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Gary P. Yoho, P.E. i l i * Green corporate philosophy and senior management commitment * Reduced greenhouse gas emissions nine years ahead of target * Alternatives to oil are a big part of BP' including natural gas, LNG, solar and hydrogen * Hydrogen Bus Project won Australia' prestigious environmental award * UK partnership opened the first hydrogen demonstration refueling station * Two hydrogen pipelines in Houston area BP Env ronmenta Comm tment s portfolio, s most BP' * li l " li i i * i l pl i i * Li l li l * " i i l i 2 i i ll i i l pl ifi i * 8" ly idl i i l s Hydrogen Pipelines Two nes, on y a brand new 12 ne s act ve Connect Houston area chem ca ant w th a ref nery nes come off a p

126

T OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETE~llNATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTI\IEN DEPARTI\IEN T OF ENERG Y EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DETE~llNATION RECIPIENT:lexington·Fayette Urnan County Govemment PROJECf TITLE: eeCBG Program Community Bike Project Page 1 of2 STATE: KY Funding Opportunity Announc:tment Number Proc:urtmtnt Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE· EEOOOO728.Q0 1 0 Bastd on my rtview of the information c:onc:erning the proposed ac:tion, as NEPA Complianc:e Offic:er (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.tA), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B5.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

127

Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production Jump to: navigation, search Name Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production Place Karlsruhe, Germany Zip 76187 Product String representation "Karlsruhe-based ... tment concepts." is too long. References Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production is a company located in Karlsruhe, Germany . References ↑ "Karlsruhe Institute for Industrial Production" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Karlsruhe_Institute_for_Industrial_Production&oldid=347948" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

128

C AIR O EN ROC CHICA RPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AIR AIR O EN ROC CHICA RPORT Office o NVIRON CKFO AGO RO T, WIN U.S f Energ D NMEN ORD S PRO OCKFO NNEBA . Depar gy Efficie Golden SEPT DRAFT NTAL A FOR SOLA OJEC ORD IN AGO C tment o ency and Field O TEMBER 20 ASSESS AR EN CT NTERN OUNT of Energ d Renew Office 011 SMENT NERG NATIO TY, ILL gy wable E DOE/EA- T GY ONAL LINOIS Energy -1823 S DOE/EA-1823 DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ROCKFORD SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT CHICAGO ROCKFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, WINNEBAGO COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office SEPTEMBER 2011 DOE/EA-1823 (DRAFT) iii September 2011 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Draft Environmental Assessment: Rockford Solar Energy Project, Chicago-Rockford Airport,

129

Oak Ridge Opw~tlon~  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

634 eo.7to 634 eo.7to Department of Energy Oak Ridge Opw~tlon~ P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, Tmnmeea 37Wl- September 27. 1990 ,- __ .._ .- Dr. Frank Bradley Principle Radiophy??t.ist New York State Departront of Labor 1 Main Street Brooklyn, NY 11201 Dear Dr. Bradley: DESIGNATION OF THE FORMER BAKER AND WILLIAMS WAREHOUSES INTO DOE'S FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM The purpose of this letter is to inform you that on August 9, 1990, the site of :;; former Baker and Williams warehouses, currently owned by Ralph Ferrara, located on West 20th Street in New York City, was designated into the Depa;tment of Energy's (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (WRAP). This information was discussed with Dr. Leonard Solon, Director of the Bureau of Radiation Control, New York City Department of Health, on

130

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS * More than $4 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup * 67% of EM Recovery Act funds have been paid Financial data are based on reporting as of March 9, 2011, and are subject to change. EM has made more than $4 billion in Recovery Act payments, or 32 percent of the DOE's $12.4 billion in Recovery Act payments. DOE received $35.2 billion

131

I I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I I 3 .I -1 I I .I I I, I I, I, I I I -1 I . ! ,# OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY MANAGED BY ': : pi MARTIN MARlE?A ENERGY SYSTEMS; MC; FOR THE UNITED STATES " . LlEPAfiTMENT OF ENERGY : OH 98 ORNL/lM-11817 Radiological Characterization Survey of the Former Diamond Magnesium Company Site, 720 Fairport-Nursery Road, Painesville, Ohio (DMPOOl, DMP002) R. D. Foley R. F. Carrier .' _' I I II )I I . : .~ . . ,.. ,,. ORNL/I-M-11817 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Enviromnental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 010; ADS3170000) Radiological Characterization Survey of the Former Diamond Magnesium Company Site, 720 Fairport-Nursery Road, Painesville, Ohio (DMPOOl, DMP002) R. D. Foley and R. F. Carrier Publication issued - December 1991

132

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Jones, WW; Peacock, RD; Forney, GP; Reneke, PA; Cooling Mode Fault ... Conference (IAQVEC 2004) and Multipurpose High-Rise Towers and Tall ...

133

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Krier, H.; Butler, PB; Modelling of Dropwise Evaporative Cooling on a Semi ... WW; Reconstruction of the Fires in the World Trade Center Towers. ...

134

BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE. 87(2):251274. 2011 doi:10.5343/bms.2010.1089  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projections The WW3 model domain for the GCM projections covered the region 20°N to 60°N (Aleutian Islands

135

Scientific Papers of the Bureau of Standards Volume 17  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Tests of stellar radiometers and measurements of the energy distribution in the spectra of 16 stars, S438, p. 725, (May 1922) Coblentz, WW http://dx ...

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... World Total ww (Billion Kilowatthours) 6.3 World Net Electricity Generation by Type ...

137

EIA Table E.1C  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA - - Table Posted: December 19, 2008

138

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... World Total ww--Energy Information Administration Table Notes and Sources ...

139

national total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww NA--Table Posted: December 8, ...

140

recycling.tex - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vor A. Voros, Nuclear Physics, B165 (1980) 209-236 . SW S. Wolfram and D. Hillman, private communication (1998). WW E. T. Whittaker, G. N. Watson,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NBS Bulletin Volume 14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Luminous radiation from a black body and the mechanical equivalent of light, p. 255 Coblentz, WW; Emerson, WB http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/bulletin ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fusion Engineering and Design 85 (2010) 12831289 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.DPP.NP6.133. [17] D.W. Jeppson, J.L. Ballif, W.W. Yuan, B.E. Chou, Lithium Literature Review: Lithium

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

143

Mathematical Programming Approaches for Generating p-Efficient ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[4] Charnes A, Cooper, W.W, Symonds, G.H. Cost Horizons and Certainty Equivalents: An Approach to. Stochastic Programming of Heating Oil. Management...

144

Selected Topics in Robust Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charnes, A., Cooper, W.W., Symonds, G.H.: Cost horizons and certainty equivalents: an approach to stochastic programming of heating oil. Manage-.

145

TN1421 - References  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1914; WW Coblentz, "Studies of Instruments for Measuring Radiant Energy in Absolute ... JE Martin, NP Fox and PJ Keys, "A cryogenic radiometer of ...

146

MEMORANDUM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT -----w--w--- 0 Prime 0 Subcontract& 0 Purchase Order 0 Facility Type 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored...

147

DESALINATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

w ww.els~ez:eorn/lo~ate/desal Implications of desalination for water resources in China--an economic perspective

Yuan Zhou; Richard S. J. Tol

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Climate Action Plan (New Jersey) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ww.climatestrategies.uspolicytrackerpolicyindex31 Summary The NJDEP Office of Sustainability and Green Energy coordinates programs that reduce greenhouse gas emissions that...

149

The Aerodynamic, Dual- Wavelength Optical Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Real and Imaginary Refractive Indices, Diameter and Density with a Compact Instrument (A-DWOPS) * DWOPS: Two Wavelengths, Two Angles. - A. Nagy, W.W. Szymanski,...

150

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... P. Jones, PF, Jones, P. Jones, WW, Jong, S. Josen, Y. Joseph ... B. Lange, DA, Laramee, S. Larin, IK, Latimer, DT, Latimer, DT, IV. Latimer ...

151

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactions Journal Reference: Fridlind AM, AS Ackerman, J Chaboureau, J Fan, WW Grabowski, AA Hill, TR Jones, MM Khaiyer, G Liu, P Minnis, H Morrison, L Nguyen, S...

152

Process for degrading hypochlorite and sodium hypochlorite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for degrading hypochlorite waste and lithium hypochlorite solutions uses a cobalt oxide/molybdenum oxide catalyst formed from about 1-10 w/w % cobalt oxide and 1-15 w/w % molybdenum oxide disposed on a suitable substrate. The major advantage of the catalyst lies in its high degree of effectiveness and its very low cost.

Huxtable, William P. (Concord, TN); Griffith, William L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Compere, Alicia L. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Trends in High-Performance Computer Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in High-Performance Computer Architecture David J. Lilja Department of Electrical;Historical Trends and Perspective pre-WW II: Mechanical calculating machines WW II - 50's: Technology of Minnesota April 1996 #12;Performance Metrics System throughput - work per unit time rate - used by system

Minnesota, University of

154

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lime",4,"W","W",0,0,0,0,0 327420," Gypsum",18,"Q",0,0,0,0,10,0 327993," Mineral Wool",8,"W",0,"W",0,0,"W","W" 331,"Primary Metals",387,61,46,79,30,49,107,7 331111," Iron...

155

Two gauge boson physics at future colliders  

SciTech Connect

Electroweak unification suggests that there should be WW and ZZ physics analogous to {gamma}{gamma} physics. Indeed, WW and ZZ collisions will provide an opportunity to search for the Higgs boson at future high energy colliders. Cross sections in the picobarn range are predicted for Higgs boson production at the proposed 40-TeV SSC. While other states may be produced by WW and ZZ collisions, it is the Higgs boson that looms as the most attractive objective. 31 refs., 5 figs.

Cahn, R.N.

1988-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

156

Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Product Product EM wa in Buil to extr from 23 downb mitigat concer dispos downb WIPP condu the "ba allowin assess techno The as Techn Techn * An * C (T * Pr * O The Ele Site: O roject: 2 P Report Date: S ited States 233 Ura Why DOE t Packaging Syste as directed to t ding 3019 at O ract 229 Th (an is 33 U. The missi blend the inven te security and rns and prepar sal. The projec blended materia or the Nevada cted to coincid ack-end" of the ng observation sment team to ology maturity p What th ssessment team ology Element ology Readine nalytical Labor oncentration p TRL=4) roduct Packag ffgas Treatmen To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Oak Ridge/OR 233 Uranium Do Project September 20 Departmen anium D E-EM Did This em and Interfaces ake ownership Oak Ridge that sotope used in

157

Fujifilm_NERSC_StorageOutlook.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Storage Outlook A Storage Outlook for Energy Sciences: Data Intensive, Throughput and Exascale Computing --- 1 --- October, 2 013 National Energy Research Scientific ! Computing Center (NERSC) * L ocated a t B erkeley L ab * User facility to support 6 DOE Offices of Science: * 5000 u sers, 7 00 r esearch p rojects * 48 s tates; 6 5% f rom u niversi=es * Hundreds o f u sers e ach d ay * ~1500 p ublica=ons p er y ear * With s ervices f or c onsul=ng, d ata analysis a nd m ore --- 2 --- Types of Computing at NERSC NERSC Petascale C ompu=ng, Petabyte S torage, a nd E xpert Scien=fic C onsul=ng Data I ntensive Experiments a nd Simula=ons Large S cale Capability S imula=ons High V olume Job T hroughput Data Explosion is Occurring Everywhere in DOE Genomics * Sequencer data volume increasing 12x over the next 3 years * Sequencer

158

Richard Gerber! NERSC Senior Science Advisor! User Services Group Lead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Services Group Lead User Services Group Lead NUG Webinar January 2014 --- 1 --- January 9 , 2 014 Agenda * Edison C onfigura6on f or A Y 2 014 * Alloca6on Y ear R ollover I ssues * Project D irectories p er P roject * NUG 2 014 U ser G roup M ee6ng * Automa6c I /O P rofiling f or Y our C ode * Give / T ake U 6lity f or S haring F iles * NUG Q ueue C ommiRee U pdate * User Survey Needs Your Input * Open D iscussion --- 2 --- Edison Update --- 3 --- Jeff B roughton NERSC D eputy f or O pera6ons Systems D epartment H ead Edison at a Glance * First C ray X C30 * Intel I vy B ridge 1 2---core, 2 .4GHz processors * Aries i nterconnect w ith D ragonfly topology for great scalability * Performs 2 ---4 x H opper p er n ode o n real a pplica6ons * 12 x 512GB login nodes to support visualiza6on a nd a naly6cs --- 4 --- * 3 L ustre s cratch

159

Harvey Wasserman! User Services Group NERSC Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 5, 2 013 Harvey Wasserman! User Services Group NERSC Overview * Na0onal E nergy R esearch Scien0fic Compu0ng Center - Established 1 974, fi rst u nclassified supercomputer c enter - Original m ission: t o e nable computarojects - 700 c odes; 1 00s o f u sers d aily * Alloca0ons c ontrolled primarily b y D OE - 80% D OE A nnual P roduc

160

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for SRS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workflo Workflo The ob Proces Savann Dispos assess evaluat design evaluat predict to guid * Th so in w es sy * Th is m * Th fle m de fu The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S Report Date: J ited States valuation i Why DOE ow Diagram bjective of the rev ss Simulation To nah River Site (S sition System Pla s whether the too te methods used , construction, p te methods to im ions; and (4) det e actual executio What th he current Syst oftware tools to formation, and aste. These to stimates, but th ystem planning he capability of limited. This h mid to long-term here is a need exibility, and tu model prediction ecouple safety unctions. To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa ical risk associated w ct decisions. Technic Savannah Rive SRS System M June 2009 Departmen n of Sys n Suppo E-EM Did This view was to eva

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basin K Basin DOE is Proces the va at Han subsys oxidati objecti of-fact maturi Eleme Techn The as which seven * M * M * Pr * Pr * As The Ele Site: H roject: K P Report Date: A ited States Why DOE ns Sludge Treatme s constructing ss (STP) for re rious sludge st nford. The STP stems: sludge ion, assay, pac ive of the asse t" appraisal of t ty by first ident ents (CTEs) of t ology Readine What th ssessment team was further div CTEs and the Material Mobiliza Material Transfe rocess Chemis rocess Instrum ssay (TRL=2) To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP K Basins Slud Process/STP August 2007 Departmen K Bas E-EM Did This ent Process Flow D a K Basins Slu trieving, treatin treams stored i P is comprised containerizatio ckaging, and dr ssment was to the project's ov

162

The 2nd US-China Energy Efficiency Forum Agenda - Friday  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agenda The S econd U .S.---China E nergy E fficiency F orum 1 May 5 ---6, 2 011 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Friday, M ay 6 , 2 011 8:00 a m Registration Check--In and Breakfast Hotel S hattuck P laza Crystal B allroom F oyer 9:00 a m - 1 1:45 am INTRODUCTION AND OPENING PLENARY * Rob S andoli, D irector, I nternational P rogram, O ffice o f E nergy Efficiency a nd R enewable E nergy, U .S. D epartment o f E nergy Crystal B allroom 9:00 a m Laboratory Welcome * Paul A livisatos, D irector, L awrence B erkeley N ational L aboratory 9:10 a m Opening Remarks: Perspectives o n E nergy E fficiency P olicies & J oint C ooperation * Arun M ajumdar, D irector, A dvanced R esearch P rojects A gency---Energy ( ARPA---E), U.S. D epartment o f E nergy * Xie Z henhua, V ice C hairman, N ational D evelopment a nd

163

Summary - System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools for Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The ob The ob curren plannin Dispos yield re to mod plannin to imp (4) det actual * Th th Th co no in pl * In fo op sy as di re de co an * Th en m ha ev sc The pu techni projec Site: H roject: H Report Date: S ited States valuation in Su Why DOE bjective of the r nt Process Simu ng basis for OR sition System P easonable esti del facilities cur ng or operation rove the rate o termine if addit execution of in What th he current Syst hat are limited t hese tools curr omposition, res ot meeting was itial batches. T anning tool tha ncomplete sync or tank farm ope peration (G2 dy ystem analysis ssumptions use fferent. HTWO esults in the sys esign/operation onsequence tim nalyzed. he lack of an "o ntire plant/proc maintainability (R ampers life cyc valuate system cenarios to imp To view the full E http://www.em.doe. urpose of an Externa

164

Summary - WTP Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Block Block D DOE is Immob site's t facilitie purpos techno Facility to be i The as CTEs, Readin * C * C * W * Tr * U * Pu * W * H * Pl The as require The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Wast Why DOE Diagram of Cesiu s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a P se of this asses ology elements y and determin ncorporated in What th ssessment team along with eac ness Level (TR s Nitric Acid Re s Ion Exchang Waste Feed Eva reated LAW Ev ltrafiltration Pro ulse Jet Mixer Waste Feed Rec LW Lag Storag lant Wash and ssessment team ed maturity prio To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen te Treatm E-EM Did This um Nitric Acid R a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com Pretreatment F ssment was to s (CTEs) in the

165

O  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does Does O pen D ata L ead t o Open G overnment? 2012 INTERNATIONAL OPEN G OVERNMENT D ATA CONFERENCE Anupama D okeniya Jennifer Shkabatur adokeniya@worldbank.org jshkabatur@sjd.law.harvard.edu Organized b y t he W orld B ank a nd D ata.gov 2012 INTERNATIONAL O PEN G OVERNMENT D ATA C ONFERENCE Objec@ves o f t he p roject  Develop a f ramework t o u nderstand t he impact o f t ransparency p olicies o n g overnance outcomes  Iden@fy c ri@cal e lements o f e ffec@ve transparency p olicies a nd i ni@a@ves  Preliminary f ramework, p iloted o n a f ew prominent c ase s tudies 2012 INTERNATIONAL O PEN G OVERNMENT D ATA C ONFERENCE What o pen g overnment outcomes a re w e l ooking a t ... . * Transparency, A ccountability, P ar@cipa@on ( WB 2007 G AC S trategy) * Transparency, P ar@cipa@on, C ollabora@on

166

PDSF User Meeting 08-06-13.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August August 6 , 2 013 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past / Planned Outages * Past - July 26 th 4 d ays: e liza18 d isk f ailure, d egraded a ccess - July 30 th a ll d ay: U pgrade a nd r ework n etwork, n ew kernal and n ew G PFS, A LICE g rid u pdates, t heory g roup m oved from " other" t o " pdtheory" - July 31 st 6 h ours: p roject u navailable e verywhere * Planned - August 2 0 th A ll d ay: M endel u pgrade ( PDSF w ill b e o nline, just r educed n odes) Other Topics from PDSF Staff * PDSF u ser m ee

167

RyneRevised.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robert Robert D . R yne LBNL NERSC BES Requirements for 2017 October 8-9, 2013 Gaithersburg, MD Present and Future Computing Requirements for "Frontiers in Accelerator Design: Advanced Modeling for Next-Generation BES Accelerators" (repo m669) 1. P roject D escrip6on PI: R obert R yne ( LBNL) Senior p ersonnel: J i Q iang ( LBNL), C ho N g ( SLAC), B ruce C arlsten ( LANL) * repo m 669 s upports B ES a ccelerator d esign * concept e xplora6on; a ccelerator s ystem & a ccelerator component d esign; c ode d evelopment * This p resenta6on f ocuses o n b eam d ynamics m odeling f or future l ight s ources, e specially X ---ray F ree E lectron L asers (XFELs) The LCLS XFEL is a spectacular success γε x,y = 0.4 µm (slice) I pk = 3.0 kA σ E /E = 0.01% (slice) What is so challenging about future XFEL modeling?

168

Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S Wet Air Savan contain liquid w contain potent to the option tank w Bed S condu be pur The as Techn Techn as liste * W o o The Ele Site: S roject: S P Report Date: J ited States Savanna Why DOE r Oxidation Proc nnah River Tan ning approxima waste. The wa ns tetraphenylb tially flammable tank head spa s have been id waste: Wet Air O team Reformin cted to aid in d rsued for treatin What th ssessment team ology Element ology Readine ed below: Wet Air Oxidatio Reactor sys Offgas Trea To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Savannah Rive SRS Tank 48H Project July 2007 Departmen ah River E-EM Did This cess k 48H is a 1.3 ately 250, 000 aste is a salt so borate (TPB), w e concentration ce. Two poten dentified for this Oxidation (WAO ng (FBSR). Th deciding which ng the Tank 48

169

Fusion_MHD.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acroscopic acroscopic I TER D ynamics Carl S ovinec, 1 S tephen J ardin, 2 a nd Linda S ugiyama 3 1 University o f W isconsin---Madison 2 Princeton P lasma P hysics L aboratory 3 MassachuseCs I nsEtute o f T echnology NERSC BER Requirements for 2017 September 11-12, 2012 Rockville, MD 1. P roject D escripEon Stephen J ardin/PPPL ( CEMM d irector) Alan G lasser/Univ. W A Eric H eld/USU Val I zzo/UCSD ScoC K ruger/Tech---X C orp. ScoC P arker/Univ. C O a t B oulder * Macroscopic ( magnetohydrodynamic---like) a cEvity i s problemaEc f or m agneEc c onfinement o f p lasma: * Performance---limiEng m agneEc i slands, * High t ransient h eat fl ux f rom e dge---localized m odes, * Discharge t erminaEon a nd m aterial d amage a ssociated with d isrupEve a cEvity. * ScienEfic p rogress i n t he I TER e xperiment ( ~$20B, 1 st p lasma i n 2020)

170

Summary - SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRS Co SRS Co DOE S Proces concen actinid in a se remov adjustm sorben sorben solutio passed separa stream extract sufficie separa (with S vitrifica (DWP Sr/acti federa assure and ha Critica The te (CTE) descrip Readin The Ele Site: S roject: S F Report Date: J ited States Why DOE omposite High Lev Savannah Rive ssing Facility (S ntrate targeted des) from High eries of unit ope ved by contactin ment) with a m nt in a batch m nt (containing S on by cross flow d to a solvent e ated to an aque m. The bulk so tion process, w ently low levels ated high activi Sr and actinide ation in the Def F). Provisions inides adsorpti al project direct e that the plann ave been matu al Decision-3 ap What th eam identified e of the SWPF w ption. All CTE ness Level of 6 To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin

171

Summary - WTP HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W W HLW W DOE is Immob site's t facilitie Facility to iden the HL to be i norma The as along w Level ( * H * H * H Sy * Pu D The Ele Site: H roject: W Report Date: M ited States Waste T Why DOE Waste Vitrificatio s constructing bilization Plant tank wastes. T es including a H y (HLW). The ntify the critical LW and determ ncorporated in ally requires a T What th ssessment team with each elem (TRL) for the H LW Melter Fee LW Melter Pro LW Melter Offg ystem/Process ulse Jet Mixer isposal System To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP Waste Treatme March 2007 Departmen Treatmen W E-EM Did This n Facility a Waste Treat (WTP) at Hanf The WTP is com High-Level Wa purpose of this technology ele mine if these are to the final WT Technology Re he TRA Team m identified the

172

task here, is the factorization of the??????? "!# $!%'& matrix)( of ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MC Setting ?? ( ?wD?y )and( ?w??y ) ,'?m? ?fgl?'?? o? , gives rise to the constraints. iwDiy? ? wcw. ? D ?. y?y. ? D ? s??. F andiw Diy ? ?. w?w.

173

Some statistical properties of regulatory DNA sequences, and their use in predicting regulatory regions in the Drosophilagenome: the fluffy-tail test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Alkema W, Wasserman WW, Lagergren J: Identifica- tion of functional lists of transcription factor binding motifs in genome sequences: the MSCAN algorithm. Bioinformatics 2003, 19(Suppl 1):I169-I176. 8. Lifanov AP, Makeev VJ, Nazina AG, Papatsenko DA...

Abnizova, Irina; te Boekhorst, Rene; Walter, Klaudia; Gilks, Walter R

2005-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

174

Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider Higgs boson pair production at the LHC in the $b \\bar{b} W^+ W^-$ channel, with subsequent decay of the $W^+W^-$ pair into $\\ell \

Papaefstathiou, Andreas; Zurita, Jos

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

BACTERIOCHLOROPHYLL PROTEIN STRUCTURE - - STUDIES WITH POLARIZED LIGHT AND TRIPLET STATE ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W.W. and Monger, T.G. , Brookhaven Symp. Biol. Singleton,Vredenberg and J. Amesz in Brookhaven Symp. in Biology No.Fenna and B.W. Mathews in Brookhaven Symposia in Biology No.

Bolt, John Davis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

62.01 AT (60-l) 661 - OVERHEW AUDIT - .- SYEB0LrFAtRCSjld Furswrnt to your rsgmt (rti aaidft of the book6 ww mm-it3 at the plarxt of the submt oorxtractor oovering...

177

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww 4.1 World Natural Gas Production, 2001 ...

178

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... World Total ww 1.4 World Coal Consumption, 1980-2007 (Million Short Tons) - - NA

179

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww - - NA 2.5 World Coal Production, 1980-2007 ...

180

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... World Total ww 3.5 World Apparent Consumption of Refined Petroleum Products, 2004

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww - - F.1 World Primary Energy Production (Btu ...

182

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww 3.2 World Output of Refined Petroleum ...

183

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww 8.1 World Crude Oil and Natural Gas Reserves ...

184

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... World Total ww (Quadrillion (10 15) Btu) F.4 World Dry Natural Gas Production (Btu ...

185

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... World Total ww - - NA 3.5 World Apparent Consumption of Refined Petroleum ...

186

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww - - G.2 World Production of Crude Oil, NGPL, ...

187

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR ... World Total ww - - NA (Quadrillion (10 15) Btu) F.5 World Coal Production (Btu ...

188

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww - - NA 3.1 World Petroleum Supply and ...

189

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww 6.3 World Net Electricity Generation by Type ...

190

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL Brazil BR Cayman Islands CJ ... World Total ww 3.6 World Crude Oil Refining Capacity ...

191

!#"%$& $' )(021 3$46 5879 ) @2A ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... edlky'{z sgatW WYu v 't5ww pl)&(A68' % 768 !#0&D9 s 'A e s tAGP c '056! 6!#' s ...

2002-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ) Distribution Category UC-66e CONTROL OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE EMISSION FROM GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS Final Report Volume I Summary of Results F.C. Brown W.W. Harvey - . - ...

193

Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pa. ). A 1.52.5 mg/L free chlorine residual was maintainedsulfate addition (3:1 chlorine to ammonia w/w ratio).on Al:Cl molar ratio. As the chlorine content decreases, the

Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Impact of the Reduced Drag Coefficient on Ocean Wave Modeling under Hurricane Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of new drag coefficient (Cd) parameterizations on WAVEWATCH III (WW3) model surface wave simulations are investigated. The new parameterizations are based on a coupled windwave model (CWW) and a wave tank experiment, and yields reduced C...

Il-Ju Moon; Isaac Ginis; Tetsu Hara

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Role of the Tear-Film Lipid Layer in Tear Dynamics and in Dry Eye  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown SI, Dervichian DG. The oils of the meibomian glands:AG, Pendleton WW. Mineral oil deterioration. Ind Eng Chem.Ledley RE, Bruun JH. Mineral oil oxidation. Ind Eng Chem.

Cerretani, Colin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

June 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Physics | OSTI, US Dept of...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Yuan, W.W.; Chou, B.E. (1978) 55 Analysis of Lithium-Ion Battery Degradation During Thermal Aging JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.; NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN; CRAFTS,CHRIS C.; INGERSOLL,DAVID;...

197

44_ - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We begin by defining a matrix S ? . which is the diagonal of the combined. weight matrix for data sources i and k: Si(=diagvUi(w=diagvVi(Ww. This permits...

198

Subsidence reversal in a re-established wetland in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Evolution Weir WW. 1950. Subsidence of peat lands of theSE, editors. Land Subsidence in the United States: U.S.Inc. Mount J, Twiss R. 2005. Subsidence, sea level rise, and

Miller, Robin L.; Fram, Miranda; Fujii, Roger; Wheeler, Gail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Historic, Recent, and Future Subsidence, Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32:132135. Weir WW. 1950. Subsidence of peat lands of theLH, Chen E. 1984. Organic soil subsidence. In: Holzer TL,editor. Man-induced land subsidence. Reviews in Engineering

Deverel, Steven J; Leighton, David A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

doi:10.1016/j.copbio.2008.04.007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extremely thermophilic microorganisms for biomass conversion: status and prospects Sara E Blumer-Schuette 1,4 , Irina Kataeva 2,4 , Janet Westpheling 3,4 , Michael WW Adams 2,4 and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Plasticity in W6%Re Revealed by In Situ Laue Diffraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address plasticity in WRe alloys, in-situ Laue micro-compression tests were performed on W-6%Re (w/w) oriented with the compression axis in [238] and...

202

Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #5Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #5--rzrz IntroductionIntroduction toto ComputationalComputational Fluid DynamicsFluid DynamicsIntroductionIntroduction toto ComputationalComputat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

g y mechanic, pneumatic, hydraulicmechanic, pneumatic, hydraulic -baltimore-lg.jpconveyor/coal- 1 ew.html /applications/c pne.htm m/pnu_overvie e.com/images Pneumatic conveyor / drier o.za/pro-eng-p w.mactenn.co 4 ti i i ww.protectowire ww.bateman.co 2 3 ure3:http://www 4 pneumatic conveying regimes : - Solid Dense

Zevenhoven, Ron

203

F O R M E R L Y UTILIZED S ITE S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c F O R M E R L Y UTILIZED S ITE S . R E M E D IA L A C T IO N P R O G R A M E L IM INATION R E P O R T F O R T H E F O R M E R E .I. D U P O N T D E N E M O U R S A N D C O M P A N Y ' G R A S S E L L I R E S E A R C H L A B O R A T O R Y C L E V E L A N D , O H IO D e p a r tm e n t o f E n e r g y O ffice o f N u c l e a r E n e r g y O ffice o f R e m e d i a l A c tio n a n d W a s te T e c h n o l o g y Division o f Facility a n d S ite D e c o m m i s s i o n i n g P rojects _' I, c CONTENTS INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION AHALYSIS REFERENCES I . Pa e -4 2 x 4 4 5 - ii ELIMINATION REPORT THE FORMER E.I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS AND COMPANY GRASSELLI RESEARCH LABORATORY CLEVELAND, OHIO INTRODUCTION - The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, Division of Facility and 'Site Decommissioning Projects (and/or predecessor agencies, offices and

204

Effects of 2-acetylaminofluorene, dietary fats and antioxidants on nuclear envelope cytochrome P-450  

SciTech Connect

The authors reported a marked loss of cytochrome P-450 in hepatic nuclear envelope (NE) but not in microsomes of male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semipurified diet containing 0.05% w/w 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) for 3 weeks. This may reflect loss of NE capacity to detoxify AAF metabolites generated by microsomal P-450. They are now investigating if dietary effects such as progressive decrease in the incidence of AAF-induced tumors in rats fed high polyunsaturated fat diet (HPUF) vs. high saturated fat diet (HSF) vs. low fat diet (LF), and the anticarcinogenic activity of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT; 0.3% w/w) correlate with preservation of NE P-450. Rats fed AAF HSF (25.6% w/w corn oil) showed marked loss of NE P-450 after 3 weeks; BHT protected against this loss. Rats fed AAF in HSF (25.6% w/w; 18 parts beef tallow + 2 parts corn oil), on the other hand, experienced a marked drop in NE P-450 after 9 weeks; BHT protected against this loss. Comparison of NE P-450 levels in control rats fed HPUF or HSF for 3 weeks with those of rats fed a semipurified diet with 10% fat or Purina chow (ca. 5% fat), support the prediction of an inverse correlation between the levels of dietary fat and the NE P-450 content. Studies on AAF and BHT effects using LF (2% w/w corn oil) are in progress.

Carubelli, R.; Graham, S.A.; Griffin, M.J.; McCay, P.B.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Biodiesel fuel from animal fat. Ancillary studies on transesterification of beef tallow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transesterification of beef tallow was investigated. The solubility of ethanol in beef tallow was much higher than that of methanol. At 100 C the solubility of methanol was 19% (w/w). The solubility of ethanol in beef tallow reached 100% (w/w) at about 68 C. For the distribution of methanol between beef tallow methyl esters (BTME) and glycerol, the percentage of total methanol in the glycerol phase was higher than that in the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) phase in a simulated system at room temperature. At 65--80 C, however, the percentage of total methanol in FAME (60% (w/w)) was higher than that in glycerol (40% (w/w)) in a 90:10 (w/w) blend of FAME and glycerol. This coincided with the methanol distribution in the transesterified product. The process for making beef tallow methyl esters should recover methanol using vacuum distillation, separate the ester and glycerol phases, and then wash the beef tallow methyl esters with warm water. At neutral pH, the separation of ester and glycerol and water washing was easier because it reduced emulsion formation.

Ma, F.; Clements, L.D.; Hanna, M.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)] [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

United States Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

W.W. Grainger, Inc. ) Case No.: EXC-13-0003 W.W. Grainger, Inc. ) Case No.: EXC-13-0003 ) Filing Date: February 19, 2013 ) ___________________________________ ) Issued: March 19, 2013 ____________________ Decision and Order ____________________ This Decision and Order considers an Application for Exception filed by W.W. Grainger, Inc. (Grainger or the Applicant), seeking exception relief from the applicable provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its request, the Applicant asserts that it will suffer serious hardship, gross inequity, and an unfair distribution of burdens if it is required to comply with the Lighting

207

No Slide Title  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Commission Energy Commission 1 Energy & Water Nexus: Availability & Impacts US EIA 2010 Energy Conference "Short-Term Stresses, Long-Term Change" April 6 - 7, 2010; Washington, DC Shahid Chaudhry schaudhr@energy.state.ca.us California Energy Commission California Energy Commission 2 * Water-Energy Link Energy Water for Electricity Production (Thermoelectric -- cooling) / Hydro / Mining) Energy for Water & WW (Pumping / Extraction / Transfer, W&WW Treatment, Distribution, Disposal) Reliability & Sustainability of Both Entities Linked with Each Other Strongly End Users End Users Water California Energy Commission 3 * Typical Urban Water Cycle Extraction / Transfers Pumping Source Water Ground / Surface Raw Water Treatment Distribution Pumping End Users Pumping

208

Singlet scalars as Higgs imposters at the Large Hadron Collider  

SciTech Connect

An electroweak singlet scalar can couple to pairs of vector bosons through loop-induced dimension five operators. Compared to a Standard Model Higgs boson, the singlet decay widths in the diphotons and Z{gamma} channels are generically enhanced, while decays into massive final states like WW and ZZ are kinematically disfavored. The overall event rates into {gamma}{gamma} and Z{gamma} can exceed the Standard Model expectations by orders of magnitude. Such a singlet may appear as a resonant signal in the {gamma}{gamma} and Z{gamma} channels, even with a mass above the WW kinematic threshold.

Low, Ian; Lykken, Joseph; Shaughnessy, Gabe

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Speaking Notes for November 9th Presentation of Cogeneration Facility Improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the entire site. 9. The third need we propose to address is the obsolescence of the cooling towers. The current cooling towers have reached the end of their useful lives, and need to be replaced. Cooling cooling towers on the site of some old storage buildings, including WW II Quonset huts. Thus we also need

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

210

Spectroscopy on Metal-Halide Lamps under Varying Gravity Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orange street lighting), which has a slightly lower discharge conversion efficiency, but the 589 nm line. They are mainly used for applications where a high light output is desired; examples are shop lighting, street. Haverlag Copromotor: dr.ir. W.W. Stoffels Copyright c 2008 by A.J. Flikweert This research was financially

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

211

This is an author-deposited version published in: http://oatao.univ-toulouse.fr/ Eprints ID: 5697  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of unclean and clean wheat, flour, semolina and bran). The sample collection data are summa- rized in Table 1 (flour, semolina and bran). The cleaning of wheat consists of eliminating impurities from the grain and soft wheat grain stored in a silo was 12% w/w, whereas that of the clean wheat, flour and sem- olina

Mailhes, Corinne

212

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

214

On-Road Emissions of Motor Vehicles in Brazil: Current Status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years of subsidies) ­ Ethanol Brazil (3 times over 50% - WW2, 1980s, 2008); ­ 10% CNG New Zealand 1990-4% till 2007, now 15% in 2012 ­ Early experiments prepared market, strategic timing of sales tax reduction, urban mobility, infrastructure. · Oslo: car share ­Move About · Note recent sales of Renault Twizzy, low

Denver, University of

215

World Lessons Thomas Turrentine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years of subsidies) ­ Ethanol Brazil (3 times over 50% - WW2, 1980s, 2008); ­ 10% CNG New Zealand 1990-4% till 2007, now 15% in 2012 ­ Early experiments prepared market, strategic timing of sales tax reduction, urban mobility, infrastructure. · Oslo: car share ­Move About · Note recent sales of Renault Twizzy, low

California at Davis, University of

216

Transportation in Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years of subsidies) ­ Ethanol Brazil (3 times over 50% - WW2, 1980s, 2008); ­ 10% CNG New Zealand 1990-4% till 2007, now 15% in 2012 ­ Early experiments prepared market, strategic timing of sales tax reduction, urban mobility, infrastructure. · Oslo: car share ­Move About · Note recent sales of Renault Twizzy, low

Delucchi, Mark

217

EWO Mee'ng September 2012 Petrobras Refining Decision-Making Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years of subsidies) ­ Ethanol Brazil (3 times over 50% - WW2, 1980s, 2008); ­ 10% CNG New Zealand 1990-4% till 2007, now 15% in 2012 ­ Early experiments prepared market, strategic timing of sales tax reduction, urban mobility, infrastructure. · Oslo: car share ­Move About · Note recent sales of Renault Twizzy, low

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

218

Surface morphological evolution during annealing of epitaxial Cu,,001... J. M. Purswani and D. Galla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Landowners will also benefit from de- creased mound density because high RIFA-infestation levels reduce land or reduce ant infestations. Pastures planted with WW-B.Dahl had about one-third the fire ant mounds found or in mound vitality ratings, suggesting that more than one measure of ant infestation is needed to accurately

Gall, Daniel

219

Q&CMHYPERZTM P R O C E S S P R O T E O M I C S  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and higher biomass loads. · Outstanding chemical resistance. Expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatog- raphy and load times. In addition, these sorbents are incompatible with high biomass loads (>10% ww/v); exceeding HyperZTM sorbents, and a stan- dard profile for an SP EBA sorbent: ~2 times higher linear flow

Lebendiker, Mario

220

ANAEROBIC FERMENTATION OF SIMULATED IN-SITU OIL SHALE RETORT WATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIlE ACIDS 5000 >- Ol 3c . EFFLUENT VOLATILE x E COD o w:c ACIDS & COD =U 600 .. on 3000 z U ~::'E WW ~O Uu0 lb BOD 5 /1000 ft 3 . The COD in the influent was redu ced

Ossio, E.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

STATE YJ#wIY STbNs  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

w DWLETES 111 CYIWb, hu ww REEDM XTIW IS REWIW. tEVRE?ENT OF EXTRKTIOH OF UuwIUn t-KW Lx ANP bt&LYSIS a cm FM TtE bfc N.E. RbDccoGIC.@L EQLTNLb6 k?TW. LEbD U.S. PUBLIC KALTH...

222

S M Stoller Star Center-WWNA Monthly; Largo, FL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- - - - iE - DW - DRINKINO WAT@R GW - GROUND WATER WW- WASTE WATER so- SOIL OL- SLUWE a- OIL Lm - OTHER LIQUID SQL - OTHER BOUO LAB USE ONLY 4. WlMOUlW4LD By: DATE nun: nrcENelp...

223

Measurement of Vertical Kinetic Energy and Vertical Velocity Skewness in Oceanic Boundary Layers by Imperfectly Lagrangian Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of upward buoyancy on the accuracy with which Lagrangian floats can measure the Eulerian mean variance wwE and skewness SwE of vertical fluid velocity w in the wind-driven upper-ocean boundary layer is investigated using both ...

Ramsey R. Harcourt; Eric A. DAsaro

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Original article Relationship between lipid parameters and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the incidence or severity of lesions in hearts of rats fed various dietary fats. Gudbjarnason and Oskardottir- hexaenoic acid (22:6 n―3), and hypo- thesized that this rendered the organ more susceptible acid rapeseed (LEAR) oil vs a fat mixture of lard and corn oil (3/1, w/w), coincided with an increased

Recanati, Catherine

225

Bromotyrosine-derived natural products: synthetic and biological studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

propylphosphonic anhydride Ts para-toluenesulfonyl UV ultraviolet V Volt(s) VBPO vanadium bromoperoxidase VT variable temperature v/v volume to volume w weak w/w weight to weight Xphos 2-dicyclohexylphosphino-2?,4?,6?-triisopropylbiphenyl Z...

Shearman, James

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Role of Management Practices in Closing the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, competencies, training etc. Sales Staff Agent Number of customers, sales staff, managers etc. Visual Dynamic Numberoftransactions A&TV WW Satisfied Customers 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Number (1/2) adoption fraction 0 0.5 1 difference*1 difference*2 overall number of customers 40755 41886

Aickelin, Uwe

227

EXPANDING THE HORIZON MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., 1992. On farsidedness of palaeomagnetic poles: magnetic refraction, sediment compaction and dipole off., and Sager, W.W., 1994. Magnetic properties of basalts and sediments from the Lau Basin. In Hawkins, J., and Wilson, D., 2004. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic signature of upper oceanic crust generated by superfast

Schönenberger, Christian

228

Matching NLO QCD computations and parton shower simulations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? W+W? , (4.2) qq ?? W+W?g , (4.3) qg ?? W+W?q , (4.4) where q = u, d, . . . and eq. (4.4) includes the corresponding antiquark processes. Equation (4.2) contributes to Born and virtual emission terms, whereas eqs. (4.3) and (4.4) contribute to real...

Frixione, Stefano; Webber, Bryan R

229

Biomass from Cyanobacteria:Opportunities for the Proposed Algae Biotechnology and Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using CO2 & Algae to Treat Wastewater and Produce Biofuel Feedstock Tryg Lundquist Cal Poly State ­ Biofuel feedstock · CO2 addition may: ­ Improve nutrient uptake ­ Accelerate treatment ­ Decrease algae of the Industry and Growth · Algae's Role in WW Treatment · CO2's New Role · Research at Cal Poly · Future Work

Tullos, Desiree

230

Higgs boson search significance deformations due to mixed-in scalars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The existence of exotic scalars that mix with the Standard Model Higgs boson can affect Higgs boson phenomenology in a multitude of ways. We show that the first evidence of the existence of such an extra scalar could come in the $h\\to WW \\to l \

Gupta, Rick S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

"Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"*",0,"*","*",0,0,0,"*",32.5 3274," Lime","*",0,0,"*",0,"Q","W","*",31.9 3296," Mineral Wool","*",0,"W","*","W",0,0,"*",2 33,"Primary Metal Industries",909,"W","*",22,"W",808,17,54...

232

"Table A3. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"*",0,21,"*",0,0,0,"*",32.5 3274," Lime","*",0,0,"*",0,"Q","W","*",31.9 3296," Mineral Wool","*",0,"W","*","W",0,0,"*",2 33,"Primary Metal Industries",909,"W",61,22,"W",30190,671,...

233

Higgs Coupling Measurements at a 1 TeV Linear Collider  

SciTech Connect

Methods for extracting Higgs boson signals at a 1 TeV center-of-mass energy e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider are described. In addition, estimates are given for the accuracy with which branching fractions can be measured for Higgs boson decays to b{bar b} WW, gg, and {gamma}{gamma}.

Barklow, T

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Higgs searches at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

One of the highest priority physics goals for the upgraded Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0, is the search for the Higgs boson. We present the initial results from both experiments, based on 40-90 pb{sup -1} integrated luminosity, of Higgs searches in several final states, including WH and ZH, H {yields} WW, and doubly-charged Higgs.

Qizhong Li

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Kylteknik ("KYL")Kylteknik ("KYL") RefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigerationRefrigeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refrigeration processes (4 5) Vapor-compression refrigeration processes (4-5) Absorption refrigeration; Gas processing (O2, H2, CO2, LPG, LNG...) (3) Air conditioning, cooling towers, rg/pages/zon Air conditioning, cooling towers, food cooling and freezing (4) Heat pumps, heat pipes, special ww.sgisland.o p p

Zevenhoven, Ron

236

Optimizing Locations for a Vehicle Sharing System V. Prem Kumar Michel Bierlaire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of that parameter. This study analyzes the performance of an electric car sharing service across different stations number of rides (usages) per day. The objective of this study is two-fold ­ one, to analyze transportation. After WW-II, increased incomes and lower production costs resulted in deep penetration

Bierlaire, Michel

237

Homing in on the Higgs Boson Howard E. Haber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol. 38 (2007) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 3 SEARCH FOR A LIGHT STANDARD MODEL HIGGS BOSON IN THE H) A prospective analysis for the discovery of a light Standard Model Higgs boson in the CMS experiment and the Higgs boson decay channel H WW() e+ e- ¯, for a mass MH in the range 120

California at Santa Cruz, University of

238

Author's personal copy Wave energy resources along the Hawaiian Island chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hawaii WW3 model with high-resolution winds from the Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model capture by the year 2030. Energy technologies utilizing wind and solar resources are com- mercially available and used of the weather from the far-reaching corners of the Pacific [3]. Extratropical storms near the Kuril and Aleutian

239

Rapid Prototyping of Domain-Specific Architecture Languages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

terminations except C, W-W5, Z & Z3. *DIM. "A" 3 Antirotation: Provides anti-`push-in' feature on actuator. Antirotation: Provides anti-`push-in' feature on actuator. Finish: Matte (L41 & L42 ). * Add .070 (1,78) for D materials. Not available with K, L or M contact materials. Mating quick connector available, order part

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

R I C H A R D H  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* R I C H A R D H . - B R Y A N G o v e r n o r A W i I',' '- 3 & /I ,,+ A ? - q ,& ... ' ; //, 7 : S T A T E O F N E V A D A D E P A R T M E N T O F H U M A N R E S O U R C E S B U R E A U O F R E G U L A T O R Y H E A L T H S E R V I C E S 5 0 5 East K i n g S treet, R o o m 2 0 2 C a r s o n City, N e v a d a 8 9 7 1 0 ( 7 0 2 ) 8 8 5 - 4 4 7 5 J E R R Y G R I E P E N T R O G Director February 1 9 , 1 9 8 5 J o h n E . B a u b l i tz, Director Division o f R e m e d i a l A ction P rojects O ffice o f Terminal W a s te Disposal a n d R e m e d i a l A ction O ffice o f Nuclear E n e r g y U .S . D e p t. o f E n e r g y W a s h i n g to n , D .C. 2 0 5 4 5 D e a r M r. B a u b l i tz: This is in r e s p o n s e to your letter d a te d February 8 , 1 9 8 5 , concerning th e University o f N e v a d a , M a c k a y S chool o f M ines. I m a d e a n investigation a t M a c k a y S chool o f M ines a p p r o x i m a tely two years a g o in a n a tte m p t to learn a b o u t p a s t research o n u r a n i u m o r e . It a p p e a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co KG Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name Mann Naturenergie GmbH & Co.KG Place Langenbach/Ww, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany Zip 57520 Sector Biofuels, Renewable Energy Product Mann Naturenergie is engaged in renewable energy production and distribution. It offers biofuels like wood chips, wood briquettes or vegetable oil but also technical expertise. References Mann Naturenergie GmbH & Co.KG[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mann Naturenergie GmbH & Co.KG is a company located in Langenbach/Ww, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany . References ↑ "Mann Naturenergie GmbH & Co.KG" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mann_Naturenergie_GmbH_Co_KG&oldid=3486

242

Microsoft Word - RTO-QA-Summary-Final.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Novem notice (FR (SPP), a re applies to administe period, w stakehold members kickoff we Lincoln, N Western r and email http://ww This docu response complete 1. I s R 2. I' d 9 mber 1, 2013, RN) with a rec egional transm o the transmis ered by Weste hich ended D ders, and the hip in SPP. W ebinar held N NE, Sioux Falls received writt ls Western re ww.wapa.gov ment provide provided. So d with SPP. B support West egister notice Western a additional recommen were from support an negotiatio membersh recommen m a municipa oes Western The answe customer a of the deta Questio , Western Are commendatio mission organ ssion facilities ern's Upper G December 16, public at larg Western engag ovember 13, s, SD, and Farg ten comment eceived are po

243

Process for degrading hypochlorite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved means and method for the degradation of hypochlorite in alkali waste solutions. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a more effective and less costly method for the degradation of hypochlorite. The foregoing objects and others are accomplished in accordance with the present invention, generally speaking, by providing a process to degrade hypochlorite into chloride and oxygen which includes contacting an aqueous hypochlorite basic solution with a catalyst comprising about 1--10 w/w % cobalt oxide and about 1--15 w/w % molybdenum oxide on a suitable substrate. In another embodiment a similar process for degrading lithium hypochlorite is provided in which waste solution concentration is lowered in order to minimize carbonate precipitation. 6 tabs.

Huxtable, W.P.; Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.

1989-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fermiophobia in a Higgs triplet model  

SciTech Connect

A fermiophobic Higgs boson can arise in models with an extended Higgs sector, such as models with scalars in an isospin triplet representation. In a specific model with a scalar triplet and spontaneous violation of lepton number induced by a scalar singlet field, we show that fermiophobia is not a fine-tuned situation, unlike in two higgs doublet models. We study distinctive signals of fermiophobia which can be probed at the LHC. For the case of a small Higgs mass, a characteristic signal would be a moderate B(H{yields}{gamma}{gamma}) accompanied by a large B(H{yields}JJ) (where J is a Majoron), the latter being an invisible decay. For the case of a large Higgs mass there is the possibility of dominant H{yields}ZZ, WW and suppressed H{yields}JJ decay modes. In this situation, B(H{yields}ZZ) is larger than B(H{yields}WW), which differs from the SM prediction.

Akeroyd, A. G. [Department of Physics and Center for Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, National Central University, Chungli, Taiwan 320, Taiwan (China); NExT Institute and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Diaz, Marco A.; Romero Maltrana, D. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago 690441 (Chile); Rivera, Maximiliano A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

High Mass Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from CDF and D0 on direct searches for high mass standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) in ppbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at \\sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Compared to previous Higgs boson Tevatron combinations, more data and new channels (H -> W+W- -> lnujj, H -> WW -> l+tau + X and trilepton final states) have been added. Most previously used channels have been reanalyzed to gain sensitivity. Analyzing 5.9 fb^-1 of data at CDF, and 5.4-6.7 fb^-1 at D0, the combination excludes with 95% C.L. a standard model Higgs boson in the mass range of m_H = 158-175 GeV/c2.

Bjoern Penning

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

Search for a neutral Higgs boson decaying to a W boson pair in p antip collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the results of a search for standard model Higgs boson production with decay to WW*, identified through the leptonic final states e{sup +}e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{nu}, e{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {-+}} {bar {nu}}{nu} and {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{nu}. This search uses 360 pb{sup -1} of data collected from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II). They observe no signal excess and set 95% confidence level upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio for the Higgs boson to WW* or any new scalar particle with similar decay products. These upper limits range from 5.5 to 3.2 pb for Higgs boson masses between 120 and 200 GeV/c{sup 2}.

Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Illinois U.,

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Permeable polyaniline articles for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Immersion precipitation of solutions having 15%-30% (w/w) and various molecular weights of the emeraldine base form of polyaniline in polar aprotic solvents are shown to form integrally skinned asymmetric membranes and fibers having skin layers <1 .mu.m thick which exhibit improved rates of gas transport while preserving good selectivity. These membranes can be further transformed by an acid doping process after fabrication to achieve excellent permeation rates and high selectivities for particular gas separations. Prior to the use of concentrated EB solutions, the formation of integrally skinned asymmetric membranes was not possible, since films and fibers made from <5% w/w polyaniline solutions were found to disintegrate during the IP process.

Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

248

Dependence of hadronic properties on Quark Masses and Constraints on their Cosmological Variation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We follow our previous paper on possible cosmological variation of weak scale (quark masses) and strong scale, inspired by data on cosmological variation of the electromagnetic fine structure constant from distant quasar (QSO) absorption spectra. In this work we identify the {\\em strange quark mass} $m_s$ as the most important quantity, and the {\\em sigma meson mass} as the ingredient of the nuclear forces most sensitive to it. As a result, we claim significantly stronger limits on ratio of weak/strong scale ($W=m_s/\\Lambda_{QCD}$) variation following from our previous discussion of primordial Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis ($|\\delta W/W|nuclear reactor ($|\\delta W/W|<1.2 \\cdot 10^{-10}$; there is also a non-zero solution $\\delta W/W=(-0.56 \\pm 0.05) \\cdot 10^{-9}$) .

V. V. Flambaum; E. V. Shuryak

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Annual Report Dear readers,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by L = 1 2 (µ)(µ ) - 1 2 m2 2 . 10 -4 10 -3 10 -2 10 -1 100 120 140 160 180 200 Higgs boson mass (GeV) branchingratio bb WW ZZ gluons Z The figure shows the principal branching ratios of the Higgs boson] Consider the possible decay modes of a Higgs boson with a mass of 200 GeV, and explain briefly which mode

Twente, Universiteit

250

Co-precipitation synthesis and sintering of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) powders: the eect of precipitant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vacuum sintering was performed in a furnace heated by a tungsten-mesh heater (Model M60-3X8-WW-23, Nemus co-precipitated from a mixed solution of aluminum and yttrium nitrates using ammonia water of ammonia water produced a hydroxide pre- cursor with an approximate composition of Al(OH)3 .0.3[Y2(OH)5(NO3

Lee, Jong-Heun

251

World Catalog of the Family Tethinidae (Diptera)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specimens (10 males, 7 females) of C. herbacea from the area of Bcharré/Les Cedres at Mount Lebanon; "Zorkun, 1500-1600 m, Aksaray prov., Turkey). 5. C. herbacea ("Bcharré"; Bcharré/Les Cedres, Lebanon). 6. C pass, 2600 m, 19.7.1987, Heinz leg. (2MM, 2WW)*. Cicindela herbacea ­ Lebanon: Bcharré, Les Cedres, 6

Mathis, Wayne N.

252

Anomalous Radiative Decay of Heavy Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiative decay width of a heavy Higgs boson $H \\rightarrow W^+W^-\\gamma$ for a {\\it hard} photon is calculated in the Standard Model and its extension with anomalous $\\gamma WW$ couplings. Its dependence on the Higgs mass, the two unknown anomalous couplings, and the photon energy cutoff are studied in detail. We show that this radiative decay of a heavy Higgs is not very sensitive to a wide range of the anomalous couplings compared to the Standard Model result.

Tzu Chiang Yuan

1992-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

253

FROM THE EDITOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the 20 th issue of our WW-EAP Newsletter and it is an opportunity to look back with pride of the accomplishments that our scientists and engineers made. Also, it time to look at the challenges ahead of us and the exciting possibilities and opportunities that EAP may enable. The armwrestling challenge is still far from being won but we are getting closer. This Newsletter Issue gives the reader another snapshot of the great

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Computer-Based Training Module - Plant Reliability Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plants seeking cost-effective ways to improve generating unit reliability need to establish best practices in each of five major maintenance processes: work identification, planning, scheduling, execution, and closeout. Implementing EPRI's Plant Reliability Optimization (PRO) processes, such as Maintenance Basis Optimization (MBO), Condition Based Maintenance (CBM), Predictive Maintenance (PdM), and Work Week Management (WwM), will result in the improvement of key power plant functional areas. This compu...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

Improving Higgs Sensitivity at CDF by Introducing New Muon Triggers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel using 5.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data is presented. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which event probability densities for the signal and background hypotheses are calculated and used to create a powerful disciminator (called the event probability discriminant, EPD). The EPD distributions for signal and background are fit to the data using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. To improve the limits on the H production cross section, a new muon category, CMP, is added. No evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed, and 95% confidence level upper limits on the H cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson to decay to two W of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM Higgs boson masses of between m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} are found. The expected (median) limit estimated in pseudo-experiments is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 12.5 to 41.0 at 95% C.L. The inclusion of the phi gap trigger lead to improvements in the sensitivity of up to 7.3%; on average, the improvement in the sensitivity was 3.3%.

Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; /Zurich, ETH

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Status report on survey of alternative heat pumping technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy is studying alternative heat pumping technologies to identify possible cost effective alternatives to electric driven vapor compression heat pumps, air conditioners, and chillers that could help reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Over thirty different technologies are being considered including: engine driven systems, fuel cell powered systems, and alternative cycles. Results presented include theoretical efficiencies for all systems as well as measured performance of some commercial, prototype, or experimental systems. Theoretical efficiencies show that the alternative electric-driven technologies would have HSPFs between 4 and 8 Btu/Wh (1.2 to 2.3 W/W) and SEERs between 3 and 9.5 Btu/Wh (0.9 and 2.8 W/W). Gas-fired heat pump technologies have theoretical seasonal heating gCOPs from 1.1 to 1.7 and cooling gCOPs from 0.95 to 1.6 (a SEER 12 Btu/Wh electric air conditioner has a primary energy efficiency of approximately 1.4 W/W).

Fischer, S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Catfish and Carp Collected from the Rio Grande Upstream and Downstream of Los Alamos National Laboratory: Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concern has existed for years that the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a complex of nuclear weapons research and support facilities, has released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to the environment that may have reached adjacent bodies of water through canyons that connect them. In 1997, LANL's Ecology Group began measuring PCBs in fish in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of ephemeral streams that cross LANL and later began sampling fish in Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs, which are situated on the Rio Chama and Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL, respectively. In 2002, we electroshocked channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and common carp (Carpiodes carpio) in the Rio Grande upstream and downstream of LANL and analyzed fillets for PCB congeners. We also sampled soils along the Rio Chama and Rio Grande drainages to discern whether a background atmospheric source of PCBs that could impact surface water adjacent to LANL might exist. Trace concentrations of PCBs measured in soil (mean = 4.7E-05 {micro}g/g-ww) appear to be from background global atmospheric sources, at least in part, because the bimodal distribution of low-chlorinated PCB congeners and mid-chlorinated PCB congeners in the soil samples is interpreted to be typical of volatilized PCB congeners that are found in the atmosphere and dust from global fallout. Upstream catfish (n = 5) contained statistically (P = 0.047) higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 2.80E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream catfish (n = 10) (mean = 1.50E-02 {micro}g/g-ww). Similarly, upstream carp (n = 4) contained higher concentrations of total PCBs (mean = 7.98E-02 {micro}g/g-ww) than downstream carp (n = 4) (3.07E-02 {micro}g/g-ww); however, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.42). The dominant PCB homologue in all fish samples was hexachlorobiphenyls. Total PCB concentrations in fish in 2002 are lower than 1997; however, differences in analytical methods and other uncertainties exist. A review of historical quantitative PCB data for fish from the Rio Grande and Abiquiu and Cochiti reservoirs does not indicate a distinct contribution of PCBs from LANL to fish in the Rio Grande or Cochiti. Analysis of homologue patterns for fish does not provide sufficient evidence of a LANL contribution. Nevertheless, concentrations of PCBs in fillets of fish sampled from the Rio Grande are indicative of potential adverse chronic health impact from consumption of these fish on a long-term basis.

Gilbert J. Gonzales Philip R. Fresquez

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

258

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

100 LPW 800 Lm Warm White LED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An illumination grade warm white (WW) LED, having correlated color temperature (CCT) between 2800 K and 3500K and capable of producing 800 lm output at 100 lm/W, has been developed in this program. The high power WW LED is an ideal source for use as replacement for incandescent, and Halogen reflector and general purpose lamps of similar lumen value. Over the two year period, we have made following accomplishments: developed a high power warm white LED product and made over 50% improvements in light output and efficacy. The new high power WW LED product is a die on ceramic surface mountable LED package. It has four 1x1 mm{sup 2} InGaN pump dice flip chip attached to a ceramic submount in 2x2 array, covered by warm white phosphor ceramic platelets called Lumiramic? and an overmolded silicone lens encapsulating the LED array. The performance goal was achieved through breakthroughs in following key areas: (1) High efficiency pump LED development through pump LED active region design and epi growth quality improvement (funded by internal programs). (2) Increase in injection efficiency (IE) represented by reduction in forward voltage (V{sub f}) through the improvement of the silver-based p-contact and a reduction in spreading resistance. The injection efficiency was increased from 80% at the start of the program to 96% at the end of the program at 700 mA/mm{sup 2}. (3) Improvement in thermal design as represented by reduction in thermal resistance from junction to case, through improvement of the die to submount connection in the thin film flip chip (TFFC) LED and choosing the submount material of high thermal conductivity. A thermal resistance of 1.72 K/W was demonstrated for the high power LED package. (4) Improvement in extraction efficiency from the LED package through improvement of InGaN die level and package level optical extraction efficiency improvement. (5) Improvement in phosphor system efficiency by improving the lumen equivalent (LE) and phosphor package efficiency (PPE) through improvement in phosphor-package interactions. Another achievement in the development of the phosphor integration technology is the demonstration of tight color control. The high power WW LED product developed has been proven to have good reliability. The manufacturing of the product will be done in Philips Lumileds?? LUXEON Rebel production line which has produced billions of high power LEDs. The first high power WW LED product will be released to the market in 2011.

Decai Sun

2010-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

Voudrias, Evangelos, E-mail: voudrias@env.duth.gr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece); Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini [Department of Environmental Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace, GR-671 00 Xanthi (Greece)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Improving Higgs Sensitivity at CDF by Introducing New Muon Triggers  

SciTech Connect

A search for Standard Model Higgs boson production in the H {yields} WW {yields} {ell}{nu}jj channel using 5.7 fb{sup -1} of CDF II data is presented. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which event probability densities for the signal and background hypotheses are calculated and used to create a powerful disciminator (called the event probability discriminant, EPD). The EPD distributions for signal and background are fit to the data using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. To improve the limits on the H production cross section, a new muon category, CMP, is added. No evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed, and 95% confidence level upper limits on the H cross section times the branching ratio of the Higgs boson to decay to two W of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 7.7 to 62.1 for Higgs boson masses of between m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 200 GeV/c{sup 2} are found. The expected (median) limit estimated in pseudo-experiments is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H) x BR(H {yields} WW)/SM < 12.5 to 41.0 at 95% C.L. The inclusion of the phi gap trigger lead to improvements in the sensitivity of up to 7.3%; on average, the improvement in the sensitivity was 3.3%.

Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; /Zurich, ETH

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

Climate Registry Information System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Registry Information System Climate Registry Information System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Registry Information System Agency/Company /Organization: The Climate Registry Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.theclimateregistry.org/climate-registry-information-system-cris/ Web Application Link: www.theclimateregistry.org/climate-registry-information-systhttps://ww Cost: Free References: General Reporting Protocol[1] The Climate Registry Information System (CRIS) is the official online greenhouse gas calculation, reporting, and verifcation tool for The Climate Registry, a North American registry through which members voluntarily

264

otp7134.tmp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Office of Biological and Environmental Research ................................................................................................................................................ ........................ ........................ ........................ . Us. Department of Energy A TAL EGACY I Biological and Environmental Research in the Atomic Age September 1.997 (M-" MASTER dtf3ww3tm0N m THIS DCXXJMW Is UNLf?t/Im -. . . . . . ----- --' -.. . . . . .,-:. ,. ..- -,-- . . . . . . %. --.7.---- .x -.. -.<.-.. ~.> ..- ----- .,= --. .. . . . . . --. - -- ..- .--____ Tbe Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (ER) directs long-term, basic research programs in support of the Department's vital national missions in energy technology, environmental manage- ment, and national security. The Office's $2.5 billion annual budget supports

265

Kinematics in Vector Boson Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vector boson fusion process leads to two forward/backward jets (tag jets) and the produced state, a Higgs boson in this case, moving slowly in the p-p C.M. frame at the LHC. For the case of Higgs decaying to W+W (W*) with Higgs mass below 180 GeV, the W bosons have low momentum in the Higgs C.M. For the case of W leptonic decays, this fact allows for an approximate reconstruction of the two final state neutrinos. In turn, those solutions then provide additional kinematic cuts against background.

D. Green

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(percent)" ,2012,,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",85.99,83.96,85.28,67.52,90.91,75.85 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w" "Colorado","w","w",76.65,"w","w",74.63 "Illinois",71.02,57.41,69.11,71.73,53.22,68.54

267

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

268

MEMORANDUM TO: FROM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7 7 .i$, I Db ' MEMORANDUM TO: FROM: 25- DATE m---v ---B--B SUBJECT: , SITE . NAME: cc4 % * : ---------------- . ---------w--- C -----I CITY: c-c---a. ---------------'--,,,,,,,, STATE: &&.&- BMW OWNER (" --Lz;:[ ---------B-B- &j J?-~~~,,, ------w- -------------------------- Owner contacted 0 yes 0 no; if yes1 date contacted me-----w-m--- TYPE OF OPERATION -- * --w------w--- esearch & Development 0 Production scale testing Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis ' 8< Facility Type manufacturing 0 University Q Research Organization 0 Government Sponrorrd Facility 0 Other w------------------- [7 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ----v----------m 0 Prime [3 Subcontractor fat Purchase Order

269

MEMORANDUfl DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DATE DATE cl e-w --we-- SUBJECT: __------------------------ _ OWNER (S) -----w-e Pamt a __---------------------- current: -------------------_______ Owner contacted 0 yes 0 no; if yes, date contacted --------w-w-- TYPE OF OPERATION ------------- erearch & Development a Facility Typr Praduction scale trstinq Pilot Scale Bench Seal e Process Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis n Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ---------------- 0 Prim* 7z Subcontract& Purchase Order . Mmuf l cturing University Research Organization Government Sponsored Facility Rther ----B.-------------- 0 Othrr information (i.e., cost + fixrd fee, unit prier, time 81 material, rte) -m-M--- -------------------------- ---------------------------- Contract/Purchase Order M

270

Table A20. Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" Components of Onsite Electricity Generation by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,,,"RSE" " "," "," "," "," ","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Total","Cogeneration","Renewables","Other(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,0.8,1.2,1.3 "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",562,349,"W","W",23 " 20-49",4127,3917,79,131,20.1 " 50-99",8581,7255,955,371,10

271

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy events in ${p\\bar{p}}$ collisions at ${\\sqrt{s} =}$1.96 TeV}  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using events with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in $H\\rightarrow WW$ decays. The events are selected from data corresponding to 8.6 \\ifb\\ of integrated luminosity in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. No significant excess above the standard model background expectation in the Higgs boson mass range this search is sensitive to is observed, and upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section are derived.

D0 Collaboration

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Construction and analysis of tag single nucleotide polymorphism maps for six human-mouse orthologous candidate genes in type 1 diabetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acad Sci U S A 100:14982-14987, 2003 4. Lyons PA, Hancock WW, Denny P, Lord CJ, Hill NJ, Armitage N, Siegmund T, Todd JA, Phillips MS, Hess JF, Chen SL, Fischer PA, Peterson LB, Wicker LS: The NOD Idd9 genetic interval influences the pathogenicity... AV, Alt FW, Faccio R, Brown T, Hoog J, Fredericks J, Nishi S, Mildiner S, Moores SL, Brugge J, Rosen FS, Swat W: Vav1/2/3-null mice define an essential role for Vav family proteins in lymphocyte development and activation but a differential...

Maier, Lisa M; Smyth, Deborah J; Vella, Adrian; Payne, Felicity; Cooper, Jason D; Pask, Rebecca; Lowe, Christopher E; Hulme, John S; Smink, Luc J; Fraser, Heather; Moule, Carolyn; Hunter, Kara M; Chamberlain, Giselle; Walker, Neil M; Nutland, Sarah; Undlien, Dag E; Ronningen, Kjersti S; Guja, Cristian; Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Savage, David A; Strachan, David P; Peterson, Laurence B; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S; Twells, Rebecca C J

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

273

Scrutinizing the ZW+W- vertex at the Large Hadron Collider at 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the potential of the CERN Large Hadron Collider running at 7 TeV to search for deviations from the Standard Model predictions for the triple gauge boson coupling ZW+W- assuming an integrated luminosity of 1 fb^{-1}. We show that the study of W+W- and W^\\pm Z productions, followed by the leptonic decay of the weak gauge bosons can improve the present sensitivity on the anomalous couplings \\Delta g_1^Z, \\Delta \\kappa_Z, \\lambda_Z, g_4^Z, and \\tilde{\\lambda}_Z at the 2\\sigma level.

O. J. P. Eboli; J. Gonzalez-Fraile; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

274

Search for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined results are reported from searches for a fermiophobic Higgs boson in the gamma-gamma, WW, and ZZ decay modes in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-300 GeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9-5.1 inverse femtobarns. A fermiophobic Higgs boson is excluded at 95% confidence level in the mass range 110-194 GeV, and at 99% confidence level in the mass ranges 110-124.5 GeV, 127-147.5 GeV, and 155-180 GeV.

CMS Collaboration

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W-boson decays at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :0 90 2. 48 64 v2 [ he p- ph ] 22 Ju l 2 00 9 Cavendish-HEP-09/04 Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W -boson decays at hadron colliders Alan J. Barr,1, ? Ben Gripaios,2, and Christopher G. Lester3, 1Denys Wilkinson... measurements of the Higgs boson mass using the decay h ? W+W?, followed by the leptonic decay of each W -boson, will be performed by fitting the shape of a distribution that is sensitive to the Higgs mass. We demonstrate that the variable most commonly used...

Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Determination of spin and CP of the Higgs boson from WBF.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 06 03 20 9v 1 2 4 M ar 2 00 6 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION TTP06-10 SFB/CPP-06-11 CAVENDISH-HEP-06-10 hep-ph/0603209 Determination of Spin and CP of the Higgs Boson from WBF C.-P. Buszello Cavendish... /CP properties of the Higgs boson at the LHC. To cover the mass region below the ZZ threshold we make use of the properties of the production in Weak Boson Fusion (WBF) and the decay chain H ? W+W? ? ?+????. In particular, we study the angular correlations...

Buszello, C P; Marquard, P

277

Searches for Higgs Boson(s) at the Upgraded Tevatron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the status of Higgs boson searches at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron performed by the DO and CDF collaborations. We report on three categories of searches, namely 1) the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson (p\\bar{p} --> H, WH or ZH, with H --> WW* and/or H --> b\\bar{b}), 2) the search for the minimal supersymmetric Higgs boson using p\\bar{p} --> hb\\bar{b} --> b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} and p\\bar{p} --> hX --> tau tau X, 3) the search for doubly charged Higgs boson.

Gregorio Bernardi; for the CDF; D0 collaborations

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

3003, Alclad 30031.2Mn-0.12Cu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 42   Standard specifications for alloy 3003...seamless 4065 SB210 B 210 WW-T-700/2 4067 ? ? ? Condenser ? SB234 B 234 ? Condenser with integral fins ? ? B 404 ? Welded ? ? B 313 ? ? ? B 547 ? Pipe: seamless ? ? B 241 MIL-P-25995 Gas and oil transmission ? ? B 345 ? Rivet wire and rod ? ? B 316 QQ-A-430 Forgings ? SB247 B 247 ? Foil 4010 ? ?...

279

Modified analytical interatomic potential for a W-H system with defects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We construct modified W-H and W-W analytical bond-order potentials for a W-H system. In combination with Brenners H-H potential, we demonstrate that such potentials can reproduce energetics and structural properties of W and W-H systems, including defect formation energies, surface energies and diffusion barriers as well as melting point determined from first-principles or experiments. The present potentials can be employed for modelling the behaviour of H in W containing defects such as vacancies and surfaces.

Li, Xiaochun; Shu, Xiaolin; Liu, Yinan; Gao, Fei; Lu, Guang-Hong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Detecting the heavy Higgs boson at the SSC  

SciTech Connect

Detection of a heavy Higgs boson (2M/sub z/ < M/sub H/ < 1 TeV) is considered. The production mechanisms and backgrounds are discussed. Their implementation in the PYTHIA and ISAJET Monte Carlo programs are checked. The decay modes H ..-->.. ZZ ..-->.. llll and H ..-->.. ZZ ..-->.. llvv are discussed in detail. The signal/background is evaluated and some relevant detector parameters are specified. Some remarks are also made concerning the requirements imposed on detectors by the decay mode H ..-->.. WW ..-->.. lv + jets. Experimental signatures for models in which there is no Higgs boson of mass less than 1 TeV are outlined. 44 refs.

Cahn, R.N.; Chanowitz, M.; Golden, M.; Herrero, M.J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Wang, E.M.; Paige, F.E.; Gunion, J.F.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.

1987-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Identifying heavy Higgs bosons  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques for identifying heavy Higgs bosons produced at SSC energies are discussed. In the first, the Higgs boson decays into ZZ, with one Z decaying into an e-pair or ..mu..-pair and the other into a neutrino pair. In the second, the production of the Higgs boson by WW fusion is tagged by detecting the quarks that produced the bremsstrahlung virtual W's. The associated Higgs decay is identified by one leptonic and one hadronic decay. Both methods appear capable of finding a heavy Higgs boson provided the SSC design parameters are achieved. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Cahn, R.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Searches for Higgs boson(s) at the upgraded Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We summarize the status of Higgs boson searches at the upgraded Fermilab Tevatron performed by the D0 and CDF collaborations. We report on three categories of searches, namely the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson (p{bar p} {yields} H, WH or ZH, with H {yields} WW* and/or H {yields} b{bar b}), the search for the minimal supersymmetric Higgs boson using p{bar p} {yields} hb{bar b} {yields} b{bar b}b{bar b} and p{bar p} {yields} hX {yields} {tau}{tau}X, and the search for doubly charged Higgs boson.

Bernardi, Gregorio; /Paris U., VI-VII /Fermilab

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Solid-state laser system for laser cooling of Sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a frequency-stabilized, all-solid laser source at 589 nm with up to 800 mW output power. The laser relies on sum-frequency generation from two laser sources at 1064 nm and 1319 nm through a PPKTP crystal in a doubly-resonant cavity. We obtain conversion efficiency as high as 2 W/W^2 after optimization of the cavity parameters. The output wavelength is tunable over 60 GHz, which is sufficient to lock on the Sodium D2 line. The robustness, beam quality, spectral narrowness and tunability of our source make it an alternative to dye lasers for atomic physics experiments with Sodium atoms.

Emmanuel Mimoun; Luigi de Sarlo; Jean-Jacques Zondy; Jean Dalibard; Fabrice Gerbier

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

Solid-state laser system for laser cooling of Sodium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate a frequency-stabilized, all-solid laser source at 589 nm with up to 800 mW output power. The laser relies on sum-frequency generation from two laser sources at 1064 nm and 1319 nm through a PPKTP crystal in a doubly-resonant cavity. We obtain conversion efficiency as high as 2 W/W^2 after optimization of the cavity parameters. The output wavelength is tunable over 60 GHz, which is sufficient to lock on the Sodium D2 line. The robustness, beam quality, spectral narrowness and tunability of our source make it an alternative to dye lasers for atomic physics experiments with Sodium atoms.

Mimoun, Emmanuel; Zondy, Jean-Jacques; Dalibard, Jean; Gerbier, Fabrice

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Definition of terms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RNA Base Pair Families RNA Base Pair Families RNA Base-Phosphate Families Base Stacking Interactions Non Redundant list Equivalence classes RNA 3D Motifs Relative Frequency RNA Base Pair Families No. Bond Orientation Interacting Edges Symbol Strand Orientation Abbreviated notation 1 Cis Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick Anti-Parallel cWW 2 Trans Watson-Crick/Watson-Crick Parallel tWW 3 Cis Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen Parallel cWH 4 Trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen Anti-Parallel tWH 5 Cis Watson-Crick/Sugar Edge Anti-Parallel cWS 6 Trans Watson-Crick/Sugar Edge Parallel tWS 7 Cis Hoogsteen/Hoogsteen Anti-Parallel cHH 8 Trans Hoogsteen/Hoogsteen Parallel tHH 9 Cis Hoogsteen/Sugar Edge Parallel cHS 10 Trans Hoogsteen/Sugar Edge Anti-Parallel tHS 11 Cis Sugar Edge/Sugar Edge Anti-Parallel cSS 12 Trans Sugar Edge/Sugar Edge Parallel tSS When the notation is preceded by n, it indicates that the interaction is

286

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" 9. Summary production statistics of the U.S. uranium industry, 1993-2012" "Item",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,"E2003",2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Exploration and Development" "Surface Drilling (million feet)",1.1,0.7,1.3,3,4.9,4.6,2.5,1,0.7,"W","W",1.2,1.7,2.7,5.1,5.1,3.7,4.9,6.3,7.2 "Drilling Expenditures (million dollars)1",5.7,1.1,2.6,7.2,20,18.1,7.9,5.6,2.7,"W","W",10.6,18.1,40.1,67.5,81.9,35.4,44.6,53.6,66.6 "Mine Production of Uranium" "(million pounds U3O8)",2.1,2.5,3.5,4.7,4.7,4.8,4.5,3.1,2.6,2.4,2.2,2.5,3,4.7,4.5,3.9,4.1,4.2,4.1,4.3 "Uranium Concentrate Production" "(million pounds U3O8)",3.1,3.4,6,6.3,5.6,4.7,4.6,4,2.6,2.3,2,2.3,2.7,4.1,4.5,3.9,3.7,4.2,4,4.1

287

Liquidization of dewatered organic sludge and anaerobic treatment  

SciTech Connect

Dewatered sewage sludge was thermochemically liquidized at 175 {degrees}C and the liquidized sludge was separated by centrifugation to 58% (w/w) supernatant and 42% precipitate. The amount of proteins in the liquidized sludge slightly decreased through the liquidization process, however, that of lipids increased. The supernatant separated from the sludge liquidized with dewatered sewage sludge was successfully anaerobically digested. Biogas yield from the supernatant from dewatered sewage sludge at organic loading concentrations of 1.9-2.2 g VS/l during 9 days incubation was 440 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 66% (w/w). Biogas yield in the case of dewatered sewage sludge was 257 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 45%. Similar results were obtained in the case of the anaerobically digested with sewage sludge and dewatered sludge. Anaerobic digestion of the supernatants from the liquidized sludges resulted in high biogas productivity and high digestion ratio compared with these of the original sludges. Moreover, the precipitates contained lower moisture, therefore, they can be incinerated easier than the respective original sludges.

Sawayama, Shigeki; Inoue, Seiichi; Ogi, Tomoko [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

An extra Z' gauge boson as a source of Higgs particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models with extra gauge bosons often require an extended Higgs sector, which contains a rich spectrum of Higgs bosons with properties that deviate from the Standard Model (SM). Such Higgs bosons could be searched using standard mechanisms similar to the SM. However, the existence of the new gauge bosons could provide new production mechanisms, which could probe the non-standard origin of the Higgs particle. In this paper we study how the Z' from a model with extra U(1)' could be used as a source of Higgs bosons. We study 3-bodies decays of the Z' into a Higgs boson and a top anti-top pair or WW pair, namely Z'\\to t\\bar{t} h, WW h. We find that it is possible to get {\\Br'}s as high as 10^{-2} for these modes, which could be studied at future colliders. We also study the production of the Higgs bosons in association with the Z vector boson at a linear collider, through the reaction e^+ e^- \\to Z, Z'\\to Z+h, including both the resonant and the non-resonant effects.

J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Javier M. Hernandez-Lopez; Javier A. Orduz-Ducuara

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

289

Development of miscella refining process for cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol system: laboratory-scale evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A technologically feasible cottonseed oil-isopropyl alcohol (IPA) miscella refining process was developed to produce high quality cottonseed oil. Individual steps necessary to refine cottonseed oil-IPA miscella were determined and improved. These were: 1) homogenization of the cottonseed oil-IPA miscella with caustic solution; 2) centrifugation; 3) separation of miscella layers; 4) desolventization, 5) water washing and drying; and 6) bleaching. In neutralization, the miscella was mixed with 20 Be' caustic solution (50% excess) by using a Sonolator for 15 times. The refined oils from both the bottom and top layers were water washed using 12.5% and 20% (w/w) hot water, respectively. The water washing efficiently recovered the oil from the top layer miscella and reduced the soap and phosphorus content. The water washed and dried oils from the bottom and top layers were treated with 0.5% and 4% (w/w) acid activated bleaching clay, respectively. Good quality refined and bleached oil was obtained. However, the quality of the bleached oil produced from bottom layer was better than that from the top layer. Comparative experiments with both IPA and hexane systems showed that the new refining process developed in this study could produce a higher quality refined oil from the cottonseed oil-IPA miscella than from the cottonseed oil-hexane miscella.

Chau, Chi-Fai

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Search for Higgs boson production in oppositely charged dilepton and missing energy final states in 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrts = 1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for Higgs boson in final states with two oppositely charged leptons and large missing transverse energy as expected in H -> WW -> lvlv decays. The events are selected from the full Run II data sample of 9.7 fb-1 of ppbar collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at sqrt s = 1.96 TeV. To validate our search methodology, we measure the non-resonant W W production cross section and find sigma_WW = 11.6 +/- 0.7 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction. In the Higgs boson search, no significant excess above the background expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level on the Higgs boson production cross section are therefore derived. Within the standard model, the Higgs boson mass range 159 Higgs boson production cross sections 4.1 times larger than the standard model expectation, which is compatible with the presence of a Higgs boson at this mass. Within a theoretical framework with a fourth generation of fermions, the mass range 125 Higgs boson couplings, which yields an exclusion of fermiophobic Higgs boson production cross sections 3.1 times larger than the expectation for MH = 125 GeV.

D0 Collaboration

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (between 15% and 30% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method for preparing polyaniline fibers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline and articles therefrom  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stable, concentrated solutions of high molecular weight polyaniline. In order to process high quality fibers and other articles possessing good mechanical properties, it is known that solution concentrations of the chosen polymer should be in the range from 15-30% (w/w). Moreover, it is desirable to use the highest molecular weight consistent with the solubility properties of the polymer. However, such solutions are inherently unstable, forming gels before processing can be achieved. The present invention describes the addition gel inhibitors (GIs) to the polymer solution, thereby permitting high concentrations (>15% (w/w)) of high molecular weight ((M.sub.w)>120,000, and (M.sub.n)>30,000) emeraldine base (EB) polyaniline to be dissolved. Secondary amines have been used for this purpose in concentrations which are small compared to those which might otherwise be used in a cosolvent role therefor. The resulting solutions are useful for generating excellent fibers, films, coatings and other objects, since the solutions are stable for significant time periods, and the GIs are present in too small concentrations to cause polymer deterioration. It is demonstrated that the GIs found to be useful do not act as cosolvents, and that gelation times of the solutions are directly proportional to the concentration of GI. In particular, there is a preferred concentration of GI, which if exceeded causes structural and electrical conductivity degradation of resulting articles. Heating of the solutions significantly improves solubility.

Mattes, Benjamin R. (Sante Fe, NM); Wang, Hsing-Lin (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

VBFNLO: A parton level Monte Carlo for processes with electroweak bosons -- Manual for Version 2.6.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vbfnlo is a flexible parton level Monte Carlo program for the simulation of vector boson fusion (VBF), double and triple vector boson production (plus jet) in hadronic collisions at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the strong coupling constant, as well as Higgs boson plus two jet production via gluon fusion at the one-loop level. In the new release -- Version 2.6.0 -- several new processes have been added at NLO QCD: diboson production W\\gamma, WZ, ZZ, Z\\gamma and \\gamma\\gamma), same-sign W pair production via vector boson fusion and the triboson plus jet process W\\gamma\\gamma j. In addition, gluon induced diboson production has been implemented at the leading order (one-loop) level. The diboson processes WW, WZ and W\\gamma can be run with anomalous gauge boson couplings, and anomalous couplings between a Higgs and a pair of gauge bosons is included in WW, ZZ, Z\\gamma and \\gamma\\gamma diboson production. The code has also been extended to include anomalous couplings for single vector boson production via VBF, and a spin-2 model has been implemented for diboson pair production via vector boson fusion.

K. Arnold; J. Bellm; G. Bozzi; M. Brieg; F. Campanario; C. Englert; B. Feigl; J. Frank; T. Figy; F. Geyer; C. Hackstein; V. Hankele; B. Jager; M. Kerner; M. Kubocz; C. Oleari; S. Palmer; S. Platzer; M. Rauch; H. Rzehak; F. Schissler; O. Schlimpert; M. Spannowsky; M. Worek; D. Zeppenfeld

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

HIGGS BOSON SEARCH AT PHOTON COLLIDER FOR MH = 140 ? 190 GEV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Higgs boson within the mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV can be discovered at a photon collider in the reaction ?? ? WW (with real or virtual W). Quite moderate resolution in the effective mass of the WW system is required. Preliminary remarks. A discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the main goals for the next generation of colliders. If the Higgs boson mass MH is larger than 2MZ, Higgs boson can be discovered at LHC, photon colliders [1] or e + e ? linear colliders [2] via the sizable decay mode H ? ZZ. For all types of collisions a background to this decay mode is rather small. If MH Higgs boson can be discovered at photon colliders or e + e ? linear colliders via the dominant decay mode H ? b b and at LHC via the decay mode H ? ??. The mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV is the most difficult one for the Higgs boson discovery. In this mass range the decay mode H ? W + W ? with real or virtual Ws (W ? ? qq, e?,...) is dominant, branching ratios of other decay modes decrease rapidly and their using for the Higgs boson discovery is very difficult. The use of the H ? W + W ? decay at e + e ?

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

HIGGS BOSON SEARCH AT PHOTON COLLIDER FOR MH = 140 ? 190 GEV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Higgs boson within the mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV can be discovered at a photon collider in the reaction ?? ? WW (with real or virtual W) with the luminosity integral about 1 fb ?1. The reasonable resolution in the effective mass of the WW system is required. Preliminary remarks. A discovery of the Higgs boson is one of the main goals for the next generation of colliders. If the Higgs boson mass MH is larger than 2MZ, it can be discovered at LHC, photon colliders [1] or e + e ? linear colliders [2] via the sizable decay mode H ? ZZ. For all types of collisions a background to this decay mode is rather small. If MH Higgs boson can be discovered at e + e ? linear colliders or photon colliders via the dominant decay mode H ? b b and at LHC via the decay mode H ? ??. The mass range MH = 140 ? 190 GeV is the most difficult one for the Higgs boson discovery. In this mass range the decay mode H ? W + W ? with real or virtual Ws

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effects of Variations in High Molecular Weight Glutenin Allele Composition and Resistant Starch on Wheat Flour Tortilla Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tortilla sales are projected to exceed 9.5 billion by 2014. However, currently no wheat cultivars have been identified that possess the intrinsic quality attributes needed for the production of optimum quality tortillas. Tortillas made with refined wheat flour low in dietary fiber (DF) are popular in the United States due to their sensory properties. This study explored the use of wheat lines (WL) possessing variations in high molecular weight glutenin allele sub-units (HMW-GS) for production of tortillas and also investigated the use of corn based resistant starches (RS), type II (RS2) and wheat based RS type IV (RS4) to increase DF in tortillas. Tortillas were made with 0-15 percent RS and 100 percent whole white wheat (WW). Flour protein profiles, dough, and tortilla properties were evaluated to determine the effects of the allelic variations and RS substitution on tortilla quality. Sensory properties of tortillas with RS were determined. Variations in HMW-GS composition significantly affected the protein quality and tortilla properties. Flour from WL possessing allelic combinations (2*, 17+18, 7, 2+12), (1, 17+18, 5+10), (2*, 17, 2+12) and (1, 2*, 17+18, 2+12) had 12.8-13.3 percent protein. These WL had extensible doughs and produced large diameter tortillas with superior (greater than or equal to 3.0) flexibility after 16 days compared to control. However, WL with (17+18 and 5+10) and (2*, 17+7, 5) produced extensible doughs, large, but less flexible, tortillas compared to control. WL with (2*,17+18,5+10) and (1,2*,7+9,5+10) produced smaller diameter tortillas, but with superior flexibility compared to control. RS2, WW, and cross-linked-pre-gelatinized RS4 (FiberRite) produced hard, less-extensible doughs and thinner tortillas compared to control, due to high water absorption. Cross-linked RS4 (Fibersym) dough and tortillas were comparable to control. 15 percent of RS2 and RS4 increase DF in control to 6 and 14 percent respectively, compare to control (2.8 percent DF). WW tortillas were less acceptable than control in appearance, flavor and texture, while tortillas with 15 percent Fibersym had higher overall acceptability than control. RS2 negatively affected dough machinability and tortilla shelf stability. However, 15 percent RS4 improved the DF in refined flour tortillas to meet FDA's "good source of fiber claim," without negatively affecting dough/tortilla quality.

Jondiko, Tom Odhiambo

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ferrihydrite as an Enterosorbent for Arsenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arsenic in drinking water is a problem in many developing nations such as Taiwan and Bangladesh. Currently, no oral binding agent exists for the mitigation of arsenic toxicity. The goals of this research were to 1) screen a variety of sorbents for their ability to sorb As from water and screen for potential nutrient interactions with vitamin A (VA) and riboflavin (RF) isotherms; 2) further describe the sorption of As to ferrihydrite using isothermal analysis and a simulated gastrointestinal model (GI), and by testing ferrihydrites ability to protect Hydra from As toxicity; 3) verify ferrihydrites safety and efficacy in a short term rodent model. Ferrihydrite was found to be the most effective sorbent for both As(III) and As(V). Exchanging SWy-2 with sulfur containing organic groups increased the sorption of both As(V) and As(III) compared to the parent clay, though the total As sorbed was much less than As sorption by ferrihydrite. Ferrihydrite and an industrially produced ferrihydrite (IPF) both sorbed As(V) and As(III) with high capacity. Both ferrihydrites also sorbed As(V) and As(III) at high capacity in the simulated GI model. Fe measured in the simulated GI tract was below tolerable daily limits for both ferrihydrite and IPF. Ferrihydrite at 0.25 percent w/w was found to protect Hydra up to 200 times the minimal effective concentration (MEC) for As(III) and over 2.5 times the MEC for As(V), while IPF at 0.25 percent w/w protected Hydra up to 200 times the MEC for As(III) and just over 2 times the MEC for As(V). IPF was apparently safe and well tolerated by the rats in our study over a period of 2 weeks. No statistically significant differences were seen in serum biochemistry, serum Fe, serum VA, or serum vitamin E between rats fed control diet versus those fed 0.5 percent w/w IPF. Ferrihydrite was found to reduce urinary As after a single gavage of 0.5 mL of 500 ppm As(III) or As(V). These results verify in vitro findings and suggest that ferrihydrite is apparently safe and effective as an enterosorbent for As.

Taylor, John Floyd

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Data:Bd62f50d-5229-49ce-b980-c2e653ec8652 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5229-49ce-b980-c2e653ec8652 5229-49ce-b980-c2e653ec8652 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 1000 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Data:Befd6bbb-7331-4edf-9a23-1ef5349dc436 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Befd6bbb-7331-4edf-9a23-1ef5349dc436 Befd6bbb-7331-4edf-9a23-1ef5349dc436 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 226 IRRIGATION SERVICE, Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Annual connected load charge, per horsepower: $23.22. Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

302

Data:F6284cde-2a52-412d-8120-de4b18b57087 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

84cde-2a52-412d-8120-de4b18b57087 84cde-2a52-412d-8120-de4b18b57087 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 400 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

303

History of Unified Theories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jahrelang haben Physiker nach vereinheitlichten Theorien gesucht - und Jahrelang haben Physiker nach vereinheitlichten Theorien gesucht - und diese auch gefunden. 1861-1865 James Maxwell, beschreibt in einem Artikel die Zusammenhänge zwischen elektrischen und magnetischen Feldern und vereinigt diese zur Theorie des Elektromagnetismus. Das führte zu den heute berühmten Maxwell'schen Gleichungen. 1881-1884 Heinrich Hertz demonstriert im Experiment die Existenz von Radiowellen und zeigt, dass Radiowellen und Licht elektromagnetische Wellen unterschiedlicher Frequenz darstellen - ein Faktum, das bereits von Maxwell in seiner Theorie vorhergesagt wurde. 1967-1970 Glashow, Salam und Weinberg schlagen eine Theorie vor, welche die elektromagnetische Wechselwirkung mit der schwachen WW vereinigt. Sie sagen die Masse des W Bosons, welches schwache Wechselwirkung - z.B.

304

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Friday, Nov. 14 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West Speaker: Wade Fisher, Fermilab Title: On the Road to the Higgs: Evidence for Semileptonic WW/WZ Decays at DZero 8 p.m. Fermilab Lecture Series - Ramsey Auditorium Speaker: Adrienne Kolb Title: Facing the Frontier: Fermilab 1967 - 2008 Monday, Nov. 17 2:30 p.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar - Curia II Speaker: Adam Lidz, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Title: Future Probes of Hydrogen Reionization, Current Probes of Helium Reionization 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II

305

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of Climate, 24, 1897-1912. This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the mean conditions on Earth. The current study

306

BEFORE THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wasltington, D.C. 20585 Wasltington, D.C. 20585 In the Matter of: ) ) ) ) ) Grainger International Inc., (freezers) Case Number: 2013-SE-141 l Issued: April 29, 2013 NOTICE OF NONCOMPLIANCE DETERMINATION Manufacturers and private labelers are prohibited from distributing covered products in the United States that do not comply with applicable federal energy conservation standards. 10 C.F.R. § 429.102; 42 U.S.C. § 6302. Grainger International Inc. ("Grainger"), a subsidiary of W.W. Grainger, Inc., is a private labeler and uses the "Dayton" trademark owned by its parent corporation to distribute refrigerators, freezers, and refrigerator-freezers in the United States. 0 TESTING l. The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE'>) tested four units o

307

Data:3579fd4e-9882-4d62-a095-7fa2108aacce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fd4e-9882-4d62-a095-7fa2108aacce fd4e-9882-4d62-a095-7fa2108aacce No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Mercury Vapor 100 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

308

EIS-0442: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0442: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0442: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0442: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah This Draft EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. It evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western's proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska. The EIS website is http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/western/transmission/infrastruct/Pages/Western%20FS%20EIS.aspx EIS-0442: Draft Environmental Impact Statement More Documents & Publications

309

Frequently Asked Questions on the Department of Energy's National Environmental Policy Act Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lh[)E Lh[)E F 1W:i ww,:f m ANN IOF SIIJIWEC:V "1-cl ; A'll[gl;lst :?!1.j II '9 w ... . .. . .. ,!! 'Cmk (20 f ,N]b, 1+ A ,J" (:) ![ 1[ c, y and, ,!4,:! ~; ~,',? " ., ,,. I . ) >'ii L.ll,u.r . hWl[Ik: : 6-'! 1'{!11 :?!41 :k:l?i,:$d ""~][(:(:llL]f::~)lt~[:}r ihkd '[)tl:l(:$ti![]l[ ]l$ (Ml 'thE: ]~(fl~)~l]~lt~~l(:~lit ([]~f ~][]k:][[?jf $ (lDcws:)

310

Data:3be1090a-a64e-4e7e-a12c-5bfa48ec2710 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

090a-a64e-4e7e-a12c-5bfa48ec2710 090a-a64e-4e7e-a12c-5bfa48ec2710 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 355- COGENERATING AND SMALL POWER PRODUCING FACILITIES Sector: Commercial Description: To all Consumers who have qualified cogenerating or small power producing facilities and have the appropriate metering to measure the delivery of electric energy to the District. Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

311

Data:42023343-dc13-4506-b816-1412b4f568d8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-dc13-4506-b816-1412b4f568d8 3-dc13-4506-b816-1412b4f568d8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 400 Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

312

Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center | discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at ... Don Cook discusses NNSA's Defense Programs at Woodrow Wilson Center Posted By Office of Public Affairs Cook at WW

313

Data:B9f656e1-d503-4991-b270-504c93faeda1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6e1-d503-4991-b270-504c93faeda1 6e1-d503-4991-b270-504c93faeda1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 150 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

314

Data:Ab1f37a0-ed9a-4279-ae68-6733402ec814 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a0-ed9a-4279-ae68-6733402ec814 a0-ed9a-4279-ae68-6733402ec814 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 240 GENERAL SERVICE - LARGE Sector: Description: The demand is tiered $56,100.00 for the first 5,000 kilowatts of demand, and $11.22 per kilowatt for all additional kilowatts of demand; plus An Energy Charge Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

315

Data:B186150c-7120-4086-af95-2a1f95d75ada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0c-7120-4086-af95-2a1f95d75ada 0c-7120-4086-af95-2a1f95d75ada No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Mercury Vapor 1000 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

316

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" 7. Employment in the U.S. uranium production industry by state, 2003-2012" "person-years" "State(s)",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Wyoming",134,139,181,195,245,301,308,348,424,512 "Colorado and Texas",48,140,269,263,557,696,340,292,331,248 "Nebraska and New Mexico",92,102,123,160,149,160,159,134,127,"W" "Arizona, Utah, and Washington",47,40,75,120,245,360,273,281,"W","W" "Alaska, Michigan, Nevada, and South Dakota",0,0,0,16,25,30,"W","W","W","W" "California, Montana, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia",0,0,0,0,9,17,"W","W","W","W"

317

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Physics | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Physics April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Physics Lithium literature review: lithium's properties and interactions Jeppson, D.W.; Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.; Chou, B.E. (1978) 123 Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes S. Mukhopadhyay (2003) 85 Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors Cai, Yuankun (2010) 83 White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough (2008) 79 Analysis of Lithium-Ion Battery Degradation During Thermal Aging JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.; NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN; CRAFTS,CHRIS C.; INGERSOLL,DAVID; DOUGHTY,DANIEL H. (2000) 74 Cathodic arc plasma deposition Anders, Andre (2002) 73 Energy level structure and transition probabilities in the spectra of the trivalent lanthanides in LaF/sub 3/. [Tables, diagrams]

318

LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

HEDL-TME 78-15 HEDL-TME 78-15 uc-20 LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS Hanf ord Engineering Development Laboratory -~ - - , . .. . D.W. Jeppson J.L. Ballif W.W. Yuan B.E. Chou - - - . - . - -- r - N O T l C E n ~ h u mpon w prepared as an account of work iponrored by the United States Government. Neither the Unitcd States nor the United Stater Department of Energy. nor any of their employees, nor any of then contractor^, subcontractors. or their employees, maker any warranty, cxprcu or Implied. or anumcs any legal liability or rcrponabllity for the accuracy. cornplctcncs or uvfulnes of any information. apparatus, product or p r o a s ditclorcd. or rcpments that its u s would not infringe pnvatcly owned nghts. April 1978 HANFORD ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY

319

fulltext.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose Cellulose solvent-based pretreatment for corn stover and avicel: concentrated phosphoric acid versus ionic liquid [BMIM]Cl Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh * Zhiguang Zhu * Y.-H. Percival Zhang Received: 27 October 2011 / Accepted: 26 April 2012 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012 Abstract Since cellulose accessibility has become more recognized as the major substrate characteristic limiting hydrolysis rates and glucan digestibilities, cellulose solvent-based lignocellulose pretreatments have gained attention. In this study, we employed cellulose solvent- and organic solvent-based lignocel- lulose fractionation using two cellulose solvents: concentrated phosphoric acid [*85 % (w/w) H 3 PO 4 ] and an ionic liquid Butyl-3-methylimidazolium chlo- ride ([BMIM]Cl). Enzymatic glucan digestibilities of concentrated phosphoric acid- and [BMIM]Cl-pre- treated

320

United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ooc F r325.8 ooc F r325.8 imo, EFO ,ww United States Government memorandum Department of Energy -fw?w 81ua DATE: FEB 1 5 1991 l+Ks6 sUsJECT: Elimination of the Buflovak Company Site from FUSRAP ho: The File I have reiiewed the attached preliminary site summary and recommendation for the Buflovak Company site in Buffalo, New York. I have determined that there is little likelihood of contamination at this site. Based on the above, the Buflovak Company site is hereby eliminated from further consideration under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. W. Alexander Williams Designation and Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration Attachment - I . b e e : W e s to n E M - 4 0 ( 3 ) E M - 4 2 ( 2 ) W illiams r

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diboson production cross section at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the diboson production cross-section measurements and constraints on anomalous triple-gauge boson couplings performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations using proton-proton collisions produced at a centre-of-mass energy of sqrt{s} = 7 and 8 TeV at LHC. Results for all combinations of W, Z and \\gamma\\ gauge bosons (excluding \\gamma\\gamma) are presented with emphasis on the new WZ and ZZ production cross sections measured by ATLAS at sqrt{s} = 8 TeV and on the new constraints on anomalous triple-gauge couplings set by CMS in the WW and Z\\gamma\\ modes.

Vincenzo Lombardo

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

AEM.05057-11v1.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Defining Components of the Chromosomal Origin of Replication 2 of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, Needed 3 for Construction of a Stable Replicating Shuttle Vector 4 5 Joel Farkas 1,3 , Daehwan Chung 1,3 , Megan DeBarry 1,3 , 6 Michael WW Adams 2,3 and Janet Westpheling 1,3 * 7 8 Departments of Genetics 1 and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 2 9 University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 10 and 11 The BioEnergy Science Center 3 , Department of Energy, 12 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 13 14 15 16 17 *Corresponding author: Janet Westpheling 18 Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 19 Office phone: 706-542-1436 FAX: 706-542-3910 20 Email: janwest@uga.edu 21 Running title: Replicating Shuttle Vectors for Pyrococcus furiosus 22

323

AEM.00936-12.full.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recombinogenic Properties of the Recombinogenic Properties of the Pyrococcus furiosus COM1 Strain Enable Rapid Selection of Targeted Mutants Joel Farkas 1,4 , Karen Stirrett 1,2 ,Gina L. Lipscomb 1,2 , William Nixon 1,2,4 , Robert A. Scott 2,3 , Michael W.W. Adams 2,4 , and Janet Westpheling 1,4 Departments of 1 Genetics, 2 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and 3 Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA and 4 The BioEnergy Science Center, Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Corresponding author: Westpheling Department of Genetics, University of Georgia Email: janwest@uga.edu Tel. 706-542-1436; Fax 706-542-3910 Running Title: Selection of Targeted Deletions in Pyrococcus Copyright © 2012, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

324

Data:D999ed2c-bde0-4ab2-88eb-fc7aae11e4d5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c-bde0-4ab2-88eb-fc7aae11e4d5 c-bde0-4ab2-88eb-fc7aae11e4d5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 351 Traffic Signals and Lights Sector: Lighting Description: Minimum Monthly Bill: $2.80 per location. To governmental agencies in the District's Service Area where service for such purpose is reasonably available and the use of service can reasonably be controlled and calculated without metering. Source or reference: ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability

325

2012 Domestic Uranium Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" 2. U.S. uranium mine production and number of mines and sources, 2003-2012" "Production / Mining Method",2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012 "Underground" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W" "Open Pit" "(estimated contained thousand pounds U3O8)",0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0 "In-Situ Leaching" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W",2681,4259,"W","W","W","W","W","W" "Other1" "(thousand pounds U3O8)","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W","W"

326

Data:8d2c58be-1e90-4060-b83b-5e0196dcc0df | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

be-1e90-4060-b83b-5e0196dcc0df be-1e90-4060-b83b-5e0196dcc0df No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 100 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

327

MEHORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MEHORANDUM MEHORANDUM TO: FILE FR0t-t: -~+?!+-- SUBJECT: u - 5..7. am . . ALTERNATE W% : ---\L-&--~~+. ___- ____ S-fA-rE: t-4 ;5- ------ wJ!%RLSL " Past: ------------------------ Current: --~~---~---__~~~-------~-- Owner contacted 0 yes -glnos if yes, date cotitectad TYPE OF OPERATION ---------_----__- 0 Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process *I Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & kialysis 0 Production 0 Disposal /Storage IV!?LPExB?!IBfiEI 0 Uanuf ecturing 0 University 0 Research Organization IfJ ,"WW="""s, ---------------___--_ 0 Prims 0 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time 81 material, etc) ------- Contract/Purchase Order #

328

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

/I // /s 3 /I // /s 3 ------------------- FROM: D. I&+ ---------------- SUBJECT: 5;le r 3-&-F.. SITE /+yNJs l3 ALTERNATE NAME: -w---- -SF ------------------------------ NAME: CITY: c ;A< ;,+,ZJ+ ------------,-L-----,,,,,, STATE: OH --w-w- OWNER(S) -w---s-- past: /" ' A--F5 ---w-m- -e----v-------- Current: 0~. A-+A.~~ -------------------------- Owner contacted 0 yes 0 no; if yes, date contacted ------------- TYPE OF OPERATION -------e--------w 0 Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis x Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- B Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT

329

Data:49435218-72a9-4071-a24c-08d7e198842e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

218-72a9-4071-a24c-08d7e198842e 218-72a9-4071-a24c-08d7e198842e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 200 DISTRICT Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

330

Data:3ca56631-a193-4a5d-95fe-30450510caf2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1-a193-4a5d-95fe-30450510caf2 1-a193-4a5d-95fe-30450510caf2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Mercury Vapor 700 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

331

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16 Federal Register 16 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 244 / Tuesday, December 20, 2011 / Notices 1 75 FR 66078 (October 10, 2010). 2 The Final EIS can be found on Western's Web site at: http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/Western/ transmission/interconn/Documents/ricesolar/ RiceSolarFEIS.pdf. with Rules 211 and 214 of the Commission's Rules of Practice and Procedure (18 CFR 385.211 and 385.214). Protests will be considered by the Commission in determining the appropriate action to be taken, but will not serve to make protestants parties to the proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must be filed on or before the date as indicated below. Anyone filing an intervention or protest must serve a

332

Product Efficiency Cases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Product Efficiency Cases Product Efficiency Cases Product Efficiency Cases RSS November 6, 2013 EXC-13-0004 - In the Matter of Liebherr Canada Ltd. On November 6, 2013, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Liebherr Canada Ltd. (Liebherr). In its Application, Liebherr sought relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. March 19, 2013 EXC-13-0003 - In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. On March 18, 2013, OHA issued a decision denying an Application for Exception filed by W. W. Grainger, Inc. (Grainger) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). February 22, 2013 EXC-13-0002 - In the Matter of Technical Consumer Products, Inc.

333

Oral Histories: Physiologist Nello Pace, Ph.D.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 HUMAN RADIATION STUDIES: REMEMBERING THE EARLY YEARS Oral History of Physiologist Nello Pace, Ph.D. Conducted August 16, 1994 United States Department of Energy Office of Human Radiation Experiments June 1995 CONTENTS Foreword Short Biography Education at UC Berkeley (1932–40) and Medical College of Virginia (1940–41); Service in Naval Reserves Tritium Injection Experiments in Animals and Humans During WW II Hospitality to Manhattan Project Researchers Staying in Washington Return to UC Berkeley to Research and Teach Development of Medical Physics Degree Programs at UC Berkeley Conducting the First Radiation Survey at Nagasaki After the Bomb Censured by the Military for Underclassifying His Nagasaki Report Reflections on Shields Warren The Public's Attitudes Toward Radiation, Then and Now

334

EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation 42: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah Summary This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western's proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska. The EIS website is http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/western/transmission/infrastruct/Pages/Western%20FS%20EIS.aspx.

335

Data:57b72381-6713-496b-9425-001db49badee | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b72381-6713-496b-9425-001db49badee b72381-6713-496b-9425-001db49badee No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Incandescent 150 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

336

Data:5c72c1a6-de8e-431e-bf52-bfde06bdd13d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a6-de8e-431e-bf52-bfde06bdd13d a6-de8e-431e-bf52-bfde06bdd13d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Mercury Vapor 250 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

337

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry April 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Chemistry Lithium literature review: lithium's properties and interactions Jeppson, D.W.; Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.; Chou, B.E. (1978) 123 Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous electrolyte solutions at high temperatures and high pressures Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A. (1995) 102 Vapor-liquid equilibria for nitric acid-water and plutonium nitrate-nitric acid-water solutions Maimoni, A. (1980) 95 Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis, Sensing, Drug Delivery and Gene Transfection Daniela Rodica Radu (2005) 84 Flammability characteristics of combustible gases and vapors. [249 refs] Zabetakis, M.G. (1964) 80 Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. (1996)

338

arXiv:hep-ph/0110320 v3 18 Sep 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 November 2001 Detecting and Studying Higgs Bosons in Two-Photon Collisions at a Linear Collider David M. Asner, Jeffery B. Gronberg, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California John F. Gunion University of California at Davis Davis, California November 2001 Abstract: We examine the potential for detecting and studying Higgs bosons in two-photon collisions at a future linear collider. Our study incorporates realistic two-photon spectra based on the most probable available laser technology. Results include detector simulations. We study the cases of: a) an SM-like Higgs boson; b) the heavy MSSM Higgs bosons; c) a Higgs boson with no WW/ZZ couplings from a general two Higgs doublet model. arXiv:hep-ph/0110320 v3 18 Sep 2002

339

HighYield Production of Dihydrogen from Xylose by Using a Synthetic Enzyme Cascade in a CellFree System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

300766 300766 High-Yield Production of Dihydrogen from Xylose by Using a Synthetic Enzyme Cascade in a Cell-Free System** Julia S. Martín del Campo, Joseph Rollin, Suwan Myung, You Chun, Sanjeev Chandrayan, Rodrigo PatiÇo, Michael WW Adams, and Y.-H. Percival Zhang* Approximately 50 million metric tons of dihydrogen are produced annually from nonrenewable natural gas, petro- leum, and coal. [1] H 2 production from water remains costly. [2] Technologies for generating H 2 from less costly biomass, such as microbial fermentation, [3] enzymatic decomposition, [4] gasification, [5] steam reforming, [6] and aqueous phase reform- ing, [7] suffer from low product yields. The production of H 2 from relatively evenly distributed renewable biomass resources would address challenges per- taining to 1) sustainable H 2 production without net green- house gas emissions, 2) the availability

340

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Federal Register 1 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 95 / Thursday, May 16, 2013 / Notices 1 The Final EIS can be found on Western's Web site at: http://ww2.wapa.gov/sites/Western/ transmission/interconn/Pages/ QuartzsiteSolar.aspx. Docket No. ER13-1227, Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator, Inc. Docket No. ER13-1317, Entergy Services, Inc. These meetings are open to the public. For more information, contact Patrick Clarey, Office of Energy Market Regulation, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission at (317) 249-5937 or patrick.clarey@ferc.gov. Dated: May 10, 2013. Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013-11656 Filed 5-15-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6717-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Western Area Power Administration Quartzsite Solar Energy Project Record of Decision (DOE/EIS-0440)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TO: FILE TO: FILE FROM: ~~~r&m--- SUBJECT: MEMORANDUM DATE +!~&j!?~ _______ SITE NAME: CITY: -,&a o~-,--,-,--,-_-,sT~TE:-~A- P OWNER(S) --~=c-L&& ----- -------- Cu-rc"t: B_eh& --------------_- Owner contacted 0 yes 0 no; if yes, dete contacted ------------- TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- 0 Research & Development 6 0 Production scale testing Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis Y Facility Type Bi Manufacturing University 0 Research Organization 0 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT -------------w-w 0 Prime 0 Subcontract&r 6 Purchase Order cl Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, etc) ___

342

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

p' p' : , .; ' _ ' < 3.518 MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM: -Ye L&a --------e---e--- DATE 6j8/8 7 v---s -- ---------- SUBJECT: ;&l a+-b IA T~cornqm Q afib4 SITE NAME: CITY: & &&at leg co Current: ------------------------ Owner contacted 0 yes p no; if yem, date contacted --w---w------ TYPE OF OPERATION The T$SYI L-- Tj flmf ----------------- FResearch & Development a Facility 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale p Manufacturing 0 Bench Scale Process [3 University 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Research Organization 0 Sample t Analysis 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ---------------- p Prim* tLl fo$q rJ WQ 0 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order Cl Other information (i.e., cost

343

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Simulating the Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Morrison H and WW Grabowski. 2011. "Cloud-system resolving model simulations of aerosol indirect effects on tropical deep convection and its thermodynamic environment." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11(20), doi:10.5194/acp-11-10503-201. Profiles of ensemble- and horizontally averaged a) cloud water mixing ratio, b) rain mixing ratio, c) ice mixing ratio, d) cloud droplet concentration, e) rain number concentration, and f) ice number concentration, Ni, for pristine (blue), polluted (green), and highly

344

NEWTON, Ask a Scientist at Argonne National Labs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buoyant Force on Suspended Object Buoyant Force on Suspended Object Name: Jeremy Status: student Grade: 12 Country: Singapore Date: Spring 2012 Question: An object is hung from the ceiling and immersed in a beaker of water. When it is placed on a mass balance, what would the reading be if the combined weight of the water and beaker is W, the weight of the object immersed is X and the upthrust that the object experiences is U? Replies: Jeremy, Whether hanging from the ceiling, immersed in the water, or whatever, the weight of the object will be the weight of the object. There is nothing special about it being in water, air or whatever. For your dilemma, we need to re-define the parameters. Let VO = Volume of the Object in cubic inches, feet, or whatever you wish to choose. WO = Weight of the Object in pounds WW = Weight of the water the VO displaces in pounds.

345

Data:C25e3377-77e8-4334-adb5-960fc6d03b90 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

77e8-4334-adb5-960fc6d03b90 77e8-4334-adb5-960fc6d03b90 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 250 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

346

Most Viewed Documents - Physics | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Most Viewed Documents - Physics Most Viewed Documents - Physics Computational procedures for determining parameters in Ramberg-Osgood elastoplastic model based on modulus and damping versus strain Ueng, Tzou-Shin; Chen, Jian-Chu. (1992) Analysis of Lithium-Ion Battery Degradation During Thermal Aging JUNGST,RUDOLPH G.; NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN; CRAFTS,CHRIS C.; et al. (2000) Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes S. Mukhopadhyay (2003) Lithium literature review: lithium's properties and interactions Jeppson, D.W.; Ballif, J.L.; Yuan, W.W.; et al. (1978) Fire protection system operating experience review for fusion applications Cadwallader, L.C. (1995) Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors Cai, Yuankun (2010)

347

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 5030 of 31,917 results. 21 - 5030 of 31,917 results. Download EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1388-final-environmental-assessment Download Oil Overcharge Refund Cases 2000 Access a Decision and Order issued in 2000. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/oil-overcharge-refund-cases-2000 Download CX-005573: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recycled Cellulose Insulation Business CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/03/2011 Location(s): Milwaukee, Wisconsin Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005573-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EXC-13-0003- In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. On March 18, 2013, OHA issued a decision denying an Application for

348

Data:2c2b32f2-472f-4324-a6d8-c2a0cfbcf753 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f2-472f-4324-a6d8-c2a0cfbcf753 f2-472f-4324-a6d8-c2a0cfbcf753 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 50 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

349

Data:95f1ab85-f0b8-4f49-ad1b-bcc9d474fb9a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-f0b8-4f49-ad1b-bcc9d474fb9a 5-f0b8-4f49-ad1b-bcc9d474fb9a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2010/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 355- COGENERATING AND SMALL POWER PRODUCING FACILITIES TOU Sector: Commercial Description: To all Consumers who have qualified cogenerating or small power producing facilities and have the appropriate metering to measure the delivery of electric energy to the District. Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

350

Data:F8667979-6811-4745-af14-b79a47bf3977 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

79-6811-4745-af14-b79a47bf3977 79-6811-4745-af14-b79a47bf3977 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 70 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

351

Data:512bc36d-9805-4791-b8bb-f4f60853f77c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bc36d-9805-4791-b8bb-f4f60853f77c bc36d-9805-4791-b8bb-f4f60853f77c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 357- MUNICIPAL SERVICE Sector: Commercial Description: To Municipal Utilities throughout the District's Service Area. The three phase, alternating current, electric service will be supplied by the District at a voltage not less than 2400 volts for use through a municipally-owned and maintained distribution system. Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110

352

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 8, 2010 Subscribe | Contact Us | Archive | Classifieds | Guidelines | Help Search GO Calendar Have a safe day! Friday, June 18 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. Joint Experimental-Theoretical Physics Seminar - One West Speaker: Jen Pursley, University of Wisconsin will present the result Title: CDF Update of our High Mass H→WW search for Standard Model Higgs with 6 inverse femtobarns Monday, June 21 11 a.m. Particle Astrophysics Seminar (NOTE TIME) - One West Speaker: Elisa Fenu, Université de Geneva Title: Primordial Magnetic Fields and Their Gravitational Waves Production 3:30 p.m. DIRECTOR'S COFFEE BREAK - 2nd Flr X-Over 4 p.m. All Experimenters' Meeting - Curia II Click here for NALCAL, a weekly calendar with links to additional information.

353

Microsoft Word - Shehabi_etal_2009_Manuscript_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

939E 939E Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers? A. Shehabi 1,2 , S. Ganguly 1 , L.A. Gundel 1 , A. Horvath 2 , T.W. Kirchstetter 1 , M.M. Lunden 1 , W. Tschudi 1 , A.J. Gadgil 1,2 , W.W. Nazaroff 1,2 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 University of California, Berkeley August 2009 Building and Environment, v. 45, Issue 3, pp.718-726 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information,

354

Data:5154de80-c88c-4288-870e-faf3617733b5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4de80-c88c-4288-870e-faf3617733b5 4de80-c88c-4288-870e-faf3617733b5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 226 IRRIGATION SERVICE, Single Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Annual connected load charge, per horsepower: $17.31 Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

355

MEMORANDUfl J: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J: FILE DATE J: FILE DATE // //r /so -----------w------m FROM: 9. 34oyc -w--------v----- SUBJECT: D3 Bo;s CL&;C J mL-;+J; - Rcc cap 049 /'A :j$: &336;s L-.fh~ w-f L-1 ALE"nirTE __ ------------- --- ---_------------------ CITY: &u+M- - &. -w---v------ ---B-------w STATE: 0 h' -a---- OWNER(S) --pi::;- l>cl, b af.5 CA.-*>J CD Current: Gr;W i- ~U~&;P~ -------------,,' ,-,,,,-, Owner contacted 0 yes jg no; -------------------------- if yes, date contacted ------m------ TYPE OF OPERATION --w--w----------- & Research & Development a Facility Type 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies w Sample & Analysis 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility

356

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently rtxpeetlng pemlasion to !wu mpmaentatfoee of Uallinckrodt visit 03% to review rare earth smparatlon tmkniquas. Their lntsmst In purev binstrIal In that they hop to indsti- preilnotlon '- emparntlon of thssae elwnts., Dr. %odnUf oheckad ritli Paul -1. : '/I .._ ,,,. . . w!w was will- to ao"rrlon~vit~~'thoir,Pisiffirg.~e Laboratory sliax he did not feel that it lzpliad 8.pmferentia.l tmabmnt of KalllncJwodt. Subsquently, Dr. %odmfP check~wlth Dr. Davidmnof the Office of Industrial Developmemtuho aleodid Mt objsctbutpointed Out that the Vick Chezdcal Company of 122 East l&xi Btmot, f&w PO* 17, N. ,P., had also expressed an intereat ir.having their mbsidi.arg, the J. T. Baker Chemical Coqany, get into the field. BU aeked

357

..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tf..@ tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were In pogress at the 16" and 10" mills respectively. Althm& hhls+urV8y w&d: ma& wltbout Qte dlx' aet request of the National Lead Co., I am reporting the results for your information. At the W aill whem 38 fh&m ingots were r&lad into lmgthaned rods,

358

TITLE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 111II1111111111111111111111111 1 111II1111111111111111111111111 GSB WW06 Floodplains and Wetlands Survey Results for the Gasbuggy and Gnome-Coach Sites, New Mexico December 1993 y :

359

SUBJECT: OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEHORANDUH HEHORANDUH ;;&; DC&b ------w--v SUBJECT: OWNER(S) -------- P1st a Owner contrctmd TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- 0 Research I Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scrlr 0 Bench Seal0 Procemm 0 Theoretical Studier 0 Sample & Anrlyri l 0 Production x Dimpomrl/Storrgr 0 Hmufrcturing 0 University 0 Rmsmarch Organization 0 Government Sponmored Facility 0 Other -II---------------- TYPE OF CONTRACT ----u---------- 0 d ime Subcontract& 0 Purchrre Order 0 Other information (i.e., comt -w-e--- Contrrct/Purchrsa Order 0 CONTRACTING PERIOD: ------------------ . OWNERSHIPa AEC/HED OWNED m---w LANDS 0 BUILDINSS 0 EQUIPMENT 0 ORE OR RAW HA-I-L 0 FINAL PRODUCT q WASTE & RESIDUE 0 AEC/HED LEASED ---w-w E 0 0

360

TLEP, first step in a long-term vision for HEP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of H(126) has renewed interest in circular e+e- colliders that can operate as Higgs factories, which benefit from three unique characteristics: i) high luminosity and reliability, ii) the availability of several interaction points, iii) superior beam energy accuracy. TLEP is an e+e- storage ring of 80-km circumference that can operate with very high luminosity from the Z peak (90 GeV) to the top quark pair threshold (350 GeV). It can achieve transverse beam polarization at the Z peak and WW threshold, giving it unparalleled accuracy on the beam energy. A preliminary study indicates that an 80 km tunnel could be constructed around CERN. Such a tunnel would allow a 100 TeV proton-proton collider to be established in the same ring (VHE-LHC), offering a long term vision.

Koratzinos, M; Aleksan, R; Janot, P; Zimmermann, F; Ellis, J R; Zanetti, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H --> gamma-gamma, H --> ZZ* --> 4 leptons and H --> WW --> 2 leptons + 2 neutrinos. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25/fb. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

ATLAS Collaboration

2013-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present combined CDF and D0 searches for the Standard Model (SM) and Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) Higgs boson using up to 6.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity from 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. Specialized searches for Higgs bosons produced via gluon fusion, associated boson production, and vector boson fusion, decaying to $b\\bar{b}$, $W^{+}W^{-}$, $\\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}$, and $\\gamma\\gamma$ are combined to produce 95\\% CL upper limits on SM Higgs production as a function of mass. Current Tevatron limits are shown, including a new exclusion for SM Higgs masses between 158 and 175 GeV$/c^2$. We also present prospects for future sensitivity.

Ben Kilminster

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Electroweak Monopole Production at the LHC - a Snowmass White Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We maintain that the search for the electroweak monopole is a key issue in the advancement of our understanding of the standard model. Unlike the Dirac monopole in electrodynamics, which is optional, the electroweak monopole should exist within the framework of the standard model. The mass of the electroweak monopole is estimated to be 5 to 7 TeV, but could be as large as 15 TeV. Above threshold its production rate at the LHC is expected to be relatively large, (1/alpha(em)2) times bigger than that of W+W- pairs. The search for the electroweak monopole is one of the prime motivations of the newest LHC experiment, MoEDAL, which is due to start data taking in 2015.

Y. M. Cho; J. L. Pinfold

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Measurements of Higgs boson production and couplings in diboson final states with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

SciTech Connect

Measurements are presented of production properties and couplings of the recently discovered Higgs boson using the decays into boson pairs, H???, H?ZZ{sup ?}?4? and H?WW{sup ?}?????. The results are based on the complete pp collision data sample recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at centre-of-mass energies of {radical s}=7 TeV and {radical s}=8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 25 fb{sup ?1}. Evidence for Higgs boson production through vector-boson fusion is reported. Results of combined fits probing Higgs boson couplings to fermions and bosons, as well as anomalous contributions to loop-induced production and decay modes, are presented. All measurements are consistent with expectations for the Standard Model Higgs boson.

ATLAS Collaboration,

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Model-independent Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC using the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape  

SciTech Connect

We show that combining a direct measurement of the Higgs total width from the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape with Higgs signal rate measurements allows Higgs couplings to be extracted in a model-independent way from CERN LHC data. Using existing experimental studies with 30 fb{sup -1} at one detector of the 14 TeV LHC, we show that the couplings squared of a 190 GeV Higgs to WW, ZZ, and gg can be extracted with statistical precisions of about 10%, and a 95% confidence level upper limit on an unobserved component of the Higgs decay width of about 22% of the standard model Higgs width can be set. The method can also be applied for heavier Higgs masses.

Logan, Heather E. [Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Salvail, Jeff Z. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Higgs Search Constraints on Fourth Generation Scenarios with General Lepton Sectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I present a general exclusion bound for the Higgs in fourth generation scenarios with a general lepton sector. Recent Higgs searches in fourth generation scenarios rule out the entire Higgs mass region between 120 and 600 GeV. That such a large range of Higgs masses are excluded is due to the presence of extra heavy flavors of quarks, which substantially increase Higgs production from gluon fusion over the Standard Model rate. However, if heavy fourth generation neutrinos are less than half of the Higgs mass, they can dominate the Higgs decay branching fraction, overtaking the standard Higgs to WW* decay rate. The Higgs mass exclusion in a fourth generation scenario is shown most generally to be 155-600 GeV, and is highly dependent on the fourth generation neutrino mixing parameter.

Linda M. Carpenter

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb^{-1} of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H -> tau tau decays or H -> WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

D0 Collaboration

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

Molecular dynamics simulation of interaction of H with vacancy in W  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the interaction between H and vacancy in W using an analytical bond-order potential to describe the interactions between W-W, W-H and H-H. The most stable configuration for H in W is the tetrahedron interstitial site. We calculated the binding energies of an H and a vacancy to an H-vacancy cluster (HnVm) in W, respectively, where n and m ranged from 0 to 10. The binding energy was almost unchanged. The binding energy of a vacancy to H-vacancy cluster is about 0.4eV, which is higher than the binding energy of an H to H-vacancy cluster. Vacancy is much easier to binding with H-vacancy cluster than H. And H is easier to stay in the tetrahedron interstitial site or octahedron interstitial site in bcc W.

Li, Xiaochun; Gao, Fei; Lu, Guang-Hong

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

W{sub {gamma}} and Z{sub {gamma}} production at Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results from CDF and D0 on W{sub {gamma}} and Z{sub {gamma}} productions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The goal of the analyses is to test the non-abelian self-couplings of the W, Z and photon, one of the most direct consequences of the SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(l){sub Y} gauge symmetry. We present direct measurements of WW{sub {gamma}} couplings and limits on ZZ{sub {gamma}} and Z{sub {gamma}{gamma}} couplings, based on p{bar p} {r_arrow} l{nu}{gamma} + X and p{bar p} {r_arrow} ll{gamma} + X events, respectively, observed during the 1992--1993 run of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

Aihara, H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Characteristics and development report for the MC3714 thermal battery  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design intent, design considerations, system use, development, product characteristics, and early production history of the MC3714 Thermal Battery. This battery has a required operating life of 146 s above 24.0 V with a constant current load of 0.5 A. It is activated when the MC3830 Actuator initiates the WW42C1 Percussion Primer in the battery. The MC3714 employs the Li(Si)/LiCl-CCl/lithiated FeS{sub 2} electrochemical system. The battery is a hermetically sealed right-circular cylinder with an antirotation ring brazed to the base of the cylinder. The battery is 50 mm long and 38.1 mm in diameter. The mass of the battery is 165 g. The battery was designed and developed to provide the power for the W82 JTA Telemetry System. 8 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs.

Scharrer, G.L.; Lasky, F.P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Higgs Searches  

SciTech Connect

We present the status and prospects of Higgs searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Results from the Tevatron are using up to 5 fb{sup -} of data collected with the CDF and D0 detectors. The major contributing processes include associated production (WH {yields} l{nu}bb, ZH {yields} {nu}{nu}bb, ZH {yields} llbb) and gluon fusion (gg {yields} H {yields} WW{sup (*)}). Improvements across the full mass range resulting from the larger data sets, improved analyses techniques and increased signal acceptance are discussed. Recent results exclude the SM Higgs boson in a mass range of 160 < m{sub H} < 170 GeV. Searches for the neutral MSSM Higgs boson in the region 90 < m{sub A} < 200 GeV exclude tan {beta} values down to 30 for several benchmark scenarios.

Peters, Krisztian

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

D0 Higgs physics results  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for the Standard Model (SM) and non Standard Model Higgs bosons using of about 200-260 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the upgraded Run II D0 detector at Fermilab Tevatron. Low-mass SM Higgs boson is searched in the associated production with W or Z and limits are placed on the cross section and the kinematic properties of the W or Z plus heavy flavor production. SM Higgs boson with mass greater than 135 GeV is searched for in its dominant decay mode WW with W's decaying into electron or muon final states. Non SM Higgs searches are done in the associated production of neutral SUSY Higgs with b quarks. Data are compared to various predictions and the limits are derived on model parameters.

Rani, K.Jyothsna; /Tata Inst.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Single top and Higgs associated production at the LHC.  

SciTech Connect

We study the production of a standard model (SM) Higgs boson in association with a single top quark and either a light jet or W boson at the LHC with a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. Because of the destructive interference of the contributing SM diagrams, the value of the top Yukawa coupling and the sign of the WWh coupling may be probed for Higgs masses above 150 GeV, where WW and ZZ are the dominant Higgs decays. We consider Higgs masses of m{sub h} = 120, 150, 180, and 200 GeV and devise experimental cuts to extract the signal from SM backgrounds and measure the top Yukawa coupling.

Barger, V.; McCaskey, M.; Shaughnessy, G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Northwestern Univ.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Search for Beyond the Standard Model Physics at D0  

SciTech Connect

The standard model (SM) of particle physics has been remarkably successful at predicting the outcomes of particle physics experiments, but there are reasons to expect new physics at the electroweak scale. Over the last several years, there have been a number of searches for beyond the standard model (BSM) physics at D0. Here, we limit our focus to three: searches for diphoton events with large missing transverse energy (E{sub T}), searches for leptonic jets and E{sub T}, and searches for single vector-like quarks. We have discussed three recent searches at D0. There are many more, including limits on heavy neutral gauge boson in the ee channel, a search for scalar top quarks, a search for quirks, and limits on a new resonance decaying to WW or WZ.

Kraus, James

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

)s . )s . l * q 4 S Q . M E M O R A N D U M D A T E S U B J E C T t O W N E R ( S ) -w---w-- P a m t x _----------------------- Currltnt t -------------------------- O w n e r - contacted r ~ yes 0 no; if yc)~, d a tr contacted ----------w-w T Y P E O F O P E R A T IO N H --w------v--- @ search & Devel a p m e n t 0 Facility T y p m < = Production scale testing 0 P ilot S c a l e 0 B e n c h S c a l e P r o c e s s 0 T h e o r e tical S tu d i e s Cl S a m p le & Analysis Mrnuf acturi n g University R e s e w c h O rganization G o v e r n m e n t S p o n s o r e d Facility O ther --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage T Y P E O F C O N T R A C T ---I------------ Q Prim* u b c o n tractbr P u r c h a s e O r d e r Contract/Purch*se n U O th w information (i.e., cost + fixe d fee, unit price. tim e & m a terial, e tc) - -s.----- C O N T R A C T I N G P E R IO D , -,,-,-,-e-m-------* s---w -------------------------------

377

T O  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

. . . M A ' lb-3 T O : FILE F R O M : A ---------w-w-- M E M O R A N D U M S U B J E C T : ;;HEl l,ol p & b !& T-- & A L T E R N A T E . -------v--B ----------------------- N C I M E I ---------------------- C ITY : & L - & S ? ? --m m -------------------- S T A T E 8 M l+ -M---w O W N E R ( S ) -------- P a u tx ------------------------ Current: -------------------------- O w n e r contacted 0 yes 0 no; if ymm, d a t m contactrd ---------B-B- T Y P O F O P E R A T IO N -- & --------w--w- e a e a r c h 8 1 D e v e l o p m e n t c) P roduction scale testing d P ilot S c a l e 0 B e n c h S c a l e Process 0 T h e o r e tical S tu d i e s 0 S a m p l e 8 1 Analysis 0 P roduction 0 Disposal /S to r a g e T Y P E O F C O N T R A C T ---------------- 0 P rim * 0 S u b c o n tract& F P u r c h a s e O r d e r 0 Facility T y p e J & tla n u facturing 0 University 0 R e s e a r c h O rganization

378

Inspecting the Higgs for New Weakly Interacting Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore new physics scenarios which are optimally probed through precision Higgs measurements rather than direct collider searches. Such theories consist of additional electroweak charged or singlet states which couple directly to or mix with the Higgs boson; particles of this kind may be weakly constrained by direct limits due to their meager production rates and soft decay products. We present a simplified framework which characterizes the effects of these states on Higgs physics by way of tree level mixing (with neutral scalars) and loop level modifications (from electrically charged states), all expressed in terms of three mixing angles and three loop parameters, respectively. The theory parameters are constrained and in some cases even fixed by ratios of Higgs production and decay rates. Our setup is simpler than a general effective operator analysis, in that we discard parameters irrelevant to Higgs observables while retaining complex correlations among measurements that arise due to the underlying mixing and radiative effects. We show that certain correlated observations are forbidden, e.g. a depleted ratio of Higgs production from gluon fusion versus vector boson fusion together with a depleted ratio of Higgs decays to bb versus WW. Moreover, we study the strong correlation between the Higgs decay rate to gamma gamma and WW and how it can be violated in the presence of additional electrically charged particles. Our formalism maps straightforwardly onto a variety of new physics models, such as the NMSSM. We show, for example, that with a Higgsino of mass > 100 GeV and a singlet-Higgs coupling of lambda=0.7, the photon signal strength can deviate from the vector signal strength by up to ~ 40-60% while depleting the vector signal strength by only 5-15% relative to the Standard Model.

Clifford Cheung; Samuel D. McDermott; Kathryn M. Zurek

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Search for VH $\\bf\\to$ VWW Standard Model \\\\ Higgs Production in the Trilepton Signature\\\\ with $\\bf5.9\\fb$ of Data from $\\bf\\ppbar$ Collisions \\\\ at $\\bf\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ GeV  

SciTech Connect

We present here the search for Standard Model VH {yields} VWW {yields} lll + E{sub T} (missing energy due to neutrinos) production, where V is a W or Z weak vector boson, which uses up to 5.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This analysis has recently added to the CDF high-mass Higgs group three new signal topologies characterized by a tri-lepton signature, which are chosen to isolate the VH {yields} VWW associated production signals in the three-lepton signature. As such, we define three new regions for a WH analysis, a ZH 1-jet analysis, and a ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis with which we expect to contribute an additional {approx} 5.8% (for m{sub H} = 165 GeV) acceptance to the current H {yields} WW dilepton analysis. The ZH trilepton regions are defined by events passing a Z-boson selection: events having at least one lepton pairing (among three possible pairings) with opposite sign, same flavor, and a dilepton invariant mass within [76.0, 106.0] GeV - a {+-} 15 GeV window around the Z-boson mass. The WH trilepton region is then defined as the set of trilepton events that are complement to those chosen by the Z-boson selection. These three new event topologies make a substantial contribution to the H {yields} WW group result. As a measure of the sensitivity of this search, we compute the median expected limit on the at 95% confidence level ('C.L.') on the production cross section (effectively the rate of production) for a Standard Model Higgs boson and report the result as a ratio to the theoretical production cross section. An observed limit ratio of one or less at a given mass would rule out the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson at that mass with 95% confidence. At m{sub H} = 165 GeV, the WH analysis expected limits reach 7.2 times the standard model cross section; the ZH 1-jet analysis is set at 29 times the expected standard model cross section; the ZH {ge} 2-jet analysis is set at 9.9 times the expected standard model cross section; and the combined trilepton analysis is set at 4.9 times the expected standard model cross section. We announce that the combination of this trilepton VH {yields} VWW Higgs boson search and the previous CDF dilepton H {yields} WW search achieves an expected median limit of 1.00 at 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. The expected median limit of 1.00 indicates we anticipate a 50% probability of ruling out the existence of a Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 165 GeV/c{sup 2}. This is the first time a single hadron collider experiment has achieved sensitivity to the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson. We do not see evidence for a significant signal of Higgs bosons in the data and place observed limits on the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of 165 GeV/c{sup 2} at 1.08 times Standard Model production cross section.

Nett, Jason Michael; /Wisconsin U., Madison

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mixed-Matric Membranes for CO2 and H2 Gas Separations Using Metal-Organic Framework and Mesoporus Hybrid Silicas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have investigated the separation performance of polymer-based mixed-matrix membranes containing metal-organic frameworks and mesoporous hybrid silicas. The MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} and MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited improved dispersion and mechanical strength that allowed high additive loadings with reduced aggregation, as is the case of the 80 wt% MOP-18/Matrimid{reg_sign} and the 80% (w/w) Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes. Membranes with up to 60% (w/w) ZIF-8 content exhibited similar mechanical strength and improved dispersion. The H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation properties of MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes was improved by either keeping the selectivity constant and increasing the permeability (MOF-5, Cu-MOF) or by improving both selectivity and permeability (ZIF-8). In the case of MOF-5/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.6 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 24.4 to 53.8 Barrers. For the Cu-MOF/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity was kept at 2.05 and the H{sub 2} permeability increased from 17.1 to 158 Barrers. These two materials introduced porosity and uniform paths that enhanced the gas transport in the membranes. When ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} mixed-matrix membranes were studied, the H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity increased from 2.9 to 4.4 and the permeability of H{sub 2} increased from 26.5 to 35.8 Barrers. The increased H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity in ZIF-8/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes was explained by the sieving effect introduced by the ZIF-8 crystals (pore window 0.34 nm) that restricted the transport of molecules larger than H{sub 2}. Materials with microporous and/or mesoporous cavities like carbon aerogel composites with zeolite A and zeolite Y, and membranes containing mesoporous ZSM-5 showed sieving effects for small molecules (e.g. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}), however, the membranes were most selective for CO{sub 2} due to the strong interaction of the zeolites with CO{sub 2}. For example, at 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity increased from 34.7 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 56.4. The large increase in selectivity was the result of the increase in CO{sub 2} permeability from 7.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 14.6 Barrers. At 30 wt% ZSM-5 loading, the H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation was also improved from 83.3 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 136.7 with an increase in H{sub 2} permeability from 17.5 (Matrimid{reg_sign}) to 35.3 Barrers. The 10% carbon aerogel-zeolite A and -zeolite Y composite/Matrimid{reg_sign} membranes exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} separation from 34.7 to 71.5 (zeolite A composite) and to 57.4 (zeolite Y composite); in addition, the membrane exhibited an increase in the CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation from 33.1 to 50 (zeolite A composite) and to 49.4 (zeolite Y composite), indicating that these type of materials have affinity for CO{sub 2}. The inclusion of mesoporosity enhanced the dispersion of the additive allowing loadings of up to 30% (w/w) without the formation of non-selective voids.

Inga Musselman; Kenneth Balkus, Jr.; John Ferraris

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Evaluation of antioxidative/antimicrobial potential of Oriental nutraceutical herb extracts in raw and cooked goat meat and beef products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was conducted to determine the effects of alcohol extracts of several Oriental nutraceutical herbs on storage properties of raw and cooked ground goat meat and beef. White peony root, red peony root, sappanwood stem, rehmania root, moutan cortex root, angelica root, and rosemary leaves were dehydrated, extracted with 95% ethanol, and freed of the solvent. The sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary samples contained the largest amounts of total phenolics. Extracts were added to ground goat meat, and treated meat samples were aerobically stored at 4C for 6 days, with or without cooking. Each herbal extract was also added to ground beef at 0.25% (w/w), with or without adding NaCl at 2% (w/w), and stored as raw and cooked patties. Peony (red or white) root extracts, whether added at 0.5, 1, or 2% levels, showed strong antioxidant effects in cooked goat meat, decreasing TBARS content more than 90% at day 6. The extracts were less antioxidative in raw goat meat, lowering the day-6 TBARS content less than 50%. The extracts from rehmania root, sappanwood, and moutan cortex were as antioxidative as the extracts from red and white peony roots, decreasing the TBARS content in cooked goat meat more than 88% at day 6. When red peony root extract was evaluated for antimicrobial activity in raw goat meat, it decreased APCs at day 3, but not at day 6. Extracts from white and red peony roots, sappanwood, moutan cortex, and rosemary were highly antioxidative in both raw and cooked beef patties, decreasing TBARS more than 88% by day 6. However, rehmania and angelica root extracts were less inhibitory. The antioxidant activity of the herbal extracts correlated (P 0.05) with total phenolic levels. All the extracts, other than rosemary extract, showed no antimicrobial activity in raw beef patties at either day 3 or day 6, presumably due to the relatively high microbial counts found in the initial untreated meat. Rosemary extract decreased APCs only at day 3.

Han, Jaejoon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Polyamide desalination membrane characterization and surface modification to enhance fouling resistance.  

SciTech Connect

The market for polyamide desalination membranes is expected to continue to grow during the coming decades. Purification of alternative water sources will also be necessary to meet growing water demands. Purification of produced water, a byproduct of oil and gas production, is of interest due to its dual potential to provide water for beneficial use as well as to reduce wastewater disposal costs. However, current polyamide membranes are prone to fouling, which decreases water flux and shortens membrane lifetime. This research explored surface modification using poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGDE) to improve the fouling resistance of commercial polyamide membranes. Characterization of commercial polyamide membrane performance was a necessary first step before undertaking surface modification studies. Membrane performance was found to be sensitive to crossflow testing conditions. Concentration polarization and feed pH strongly influenced NaCl rejection, and the use of continuous feed filtration led to higher water flux and lower NaCl rejection than was observed for similar tests performed using unfiltered feed. Two commercial polyamide membranes, including one reverse osmosis and one nanofiltration membrane, were modified by grafting PEGDE to their surfaces. Two different PEG molecular weights (200 and 1000) and treatment concentrations (1% (w/w) and 15% (w/w)) were studied. Water flux decreased and NaCl rejection increased with PEGDE graft density ({micro}g/cm{sup 2}), although the largest changes were observed for low PEGDE graft densities. Surface properties including hydrophilicity, roughness and charge were minimally affected by surface modification. The fouling resistance of modified and unmodified membranes was compared in crossflow filtration studies using model foulant solutions consisting of either a charged surfactant or an oil in water emulsion containing n-decane and a charged surfactant. Several PEGDE-modified membranes demonstrated improved fouling resistance compared to unmodified membranes of similar initial water flux, possibly due to steric hindrance imparted by the PEG chains. Fouling resistance was higher for membranes modified with higher molecular weight PEG. Fouling was more extensive for feeds containing the cationic surfactant, potentially due to electrostatic attraction with the negatively charged membranes. However, fouling was also observed in the presence of the anionic surfactant, indicating hydrodynamic forces are also responsible for fouling.

Sharma, Mukul M. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Freeman, Benny D. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Van Wagner, Elizabeth M. (Univeristy of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Hickner, Michael A. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Altman, Susan Jeanne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze into biologically active compounds. Jatropha curcas SM does not contain glucosinolates but contains curcin, a known phytotoxin (toxalbumin). A 14-d greenhouse study was conducted to determine how Sinapis alba (white mustard, WM), Brassica juncea (Indian mustard, IM), Camelina sativa (camelina) and Jatropha curcas (jatropha) applied to soil at varying application rates and incubation times affected seed germination and seedling survival of cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)], sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Seed meals were analyzed for the presence of glucosinolates, and were applied at 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 percent (w/w) to Darco fine sand soil and incubated for 1, 7 or 14 d prior to planting. With the weed species, germination and survival was most reduced by 2.5 percent WM SM incubated 1d for Johnsongrass and 14 d for redroot pigweed. Cotton and sorghum seedlings showed strong negative responses to WM SM applications of 2.5 percent at any incubation time. All crops and weed species were most inhibited by 2.5 percent application with any SM, but incubation days varied. Seed meals of each species showed negative results dependent on the incubation day, but overall, WM and camelina SMs were most detrimental compared to IM and jatropha. A second greenhouse study was conducted to determine the availability of nutrients in SMs (WM and IM) to cotton and sorghum compared to inorganic fertilization. Seed meals were applied at 1.0 and 2.5 percent (w/w) and initially incubated for 35 days prior to planting. Emergence of both species was so poor that treatments were incubated for an additional 21 d and replanted. Application rates of 2.5 percent WM and IM SMs reduced sorghum heights and biomass, but only WM had a negative effect on cotton yield. However, the higher of the SM application rates provided greater levels of nutrients compared to the fertilized treatment and control. Results suggested that the type, rate, and timing of SM applications should be considered before land-applying SMs in organic cropping systems in order to successfully manage weeds while producing a profitable crop.

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Data:D2bbd34c-518c-482f-8a8c-e8fe4572f717 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bbd34c-518c-482f-8a8c-e8fe4572f717 bbd34c-518c-482f-8a8c-e8fe4572f717 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 200 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

386

S M TW T F S SM TWT F S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

' - ' - S M TW T F S SM TWT F S 12 3 4 567 1 2345 ,May@°^i«^f 0Gi^ °"8 91011121314 6 78 9101112 M aB ynw WW 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 M ay 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 Monday. Apt 3C _- Thursday, May 03 Tuesday, May 01i_ Fnday, May ___ Wednesday. ay 021 oSatluay, May o Sunday, May O Hutto, Chase 1 2o6 4 DOE034-0018 hllag f -^ *May 2001 June2001 IMSa' y 07 - s M TW T F S S M TW T F S 1234 5 12 6 7 8 910 11 12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 et-ayB W :~L.t~a3^ ~13 14 1516 17 18 19 10111213141516 filay .13 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Monday, May 07 Thursday, May 1 , ___ Tuesday, May 0 ______ Friday, May 11 Weanesday, May 0o Saturday, May 1 ,_ _ __ Sunday, May 3 Huno, aase 1 2alw°5 DOE034-0019

387

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 18660 of 28,905 results. 51 - 18660 of 28,905 results. Download EXC-12-0013- In the Matter of EiKO, Ltd. On November 16, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by EiKO, Ltd. (EiKO) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program:... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/exc-12-0013-matter-eiko-ltd Download EXC-12-0014- In the Matter of Topaz Lighting Corporation On November 16, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Topaz Lighting Corporation (Topaz) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy... http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/exc-12-0014-matter-topaz-lighting-corporation Download EXC-13-0003- In the Matter of W.W. Grainger, Inc. On March 18, 2013, OHA issued a decision denying an Application for

388

I'T Slide Page I of I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I'T Slide Page I of I I'T Slide Page I of I '^° J/ «- -I . .. X -. . ,;.~-:~ ~li~ e r 48 AD:- Alaska Slide 20 of 33 hrp: vw;-\-\ eia doe.ov\pub'oil_pas:natural_gas/presentations'2000"markets reliabilit lcc. 2, 122 782 DOE006-0139 PP1 Slide Page I of 1 _ -_ Slide 21 of 33 ' I http://www.iadoc-gov/pub/oilgas/naturalgas/presentations/2000/marketsreliability)_ele... 2/12/20(783 DOE006-0140 DOE006-0 140 PPT Slide Page I of 1 (g~* * Slide 22 of 33 Slide 22 of 33 hnp://ww.eia.doe.gov/pub/oilgas/natura l gas/presentations/2000/markets_rel iability ele... 2/I2/202784 DOE006-0141 I i slide Page I of I ;x b mmlps g q:-.j^^., Slide 23 of 33 http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_ gas/natural_gas/prcsentations/2000/markets_rel iability_cile... 2/1 /20 7 8 5 DOE006-0142 rri ao31e Page I of I - . .v 1,, I !9 2'-;-;/' .. -

389

Data:86e280f9-ed35-46d6-91bb-b8537914bbdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ed35-46d6-91bb-b8537914bbdf ed35-46d6-91bb-b8537914bbdf No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Edmond, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Effective date: 2009/09/30 End date if known: Rate name: TSL-LED-1 Traffic Signal Lights LEDs Sector: Lighting Description: *Per intersection fee is $19.98/month for 250 kWw, thus the rate per kwh is $19.98/250 kwh = 0.0799200/kWh. As seen in the flat rate buy field. Source or reference: http://edmondok.com/DocumentCenter/Home/View/442 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

390

What's New in the Computational Biology Section  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New? What's New? Kane, SR, Chakicherla, AY, Chain, PSG, Schmidt, R, Shin, MW, Legler, TC, Scow, KM, Larimer, FW, Lucas, SM, Richardson, PM, and Hristova, KR. (2007). Whole-Genome Analysis of the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1. J. Bacteriol. 189(5): 1931-1945. PubMed Scott KM, Sievert SM, Abril FN, Ball LA, Barrett CJ, Blake RA, Boller AJ, Chain PS, Clark JA, Davis CR, Detter C, Do KF, Dobrinski KP, Faza BI, Fitzpatrick KA, Freyermuth SK, Harmer TL, Hauser LJ, Hugler M, Kerfeld CA, Klotz MG, Kong WW, Land M, Lapidus A, Larimer FW, Longo DL, Lucas S, Malfatti SA, Massey SE, Martin DD, McCuddin Z, Meyer F, Moore JL, Ocampo LH, Paul JH, Paulsen IT, Reep DK, Ren Q, Ross RL, Sato PY, Thomas P, Tinkham LE, Zeruth GT. (2006). The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2. PLoS Biol. 4(12): e383. PubMed

391

Data:F63123dd-1ac1-41a7-83c0-13fdfd2dc3f0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

123dd-1ac1-41a7-83c0-13fdfd2dc3f0 123dd-1ac1-41a7-83c0-13fdfd2dc3f0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 100 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

392

Data:87e897b6-ce99-417a-a8e7-23ffc17c7657 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b6-ce99-417a-a8e7-23ffc17c7657 b6-ce99-417a-a8e7-23ffc17c7657 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 50 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

393

E  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * . - - . _ _ ._ ,, E in ,' w. Do stephauuron, Ad#tRe to Am8 lhlager, Pltteburgh V. J. Del Veoohib, Mreotor, Fiaanoe Divfeion, Bilcnr York Operat;iom OffPoe -... i ci) y* cil-2 / / i TITAEXtJH ALLOT liUl?UFACTURINO DXVLSIQI?, XATIONAL LEAD W?iIPAEY, CWXEUCTS AT (So-l) 62.01 AT (60-l) 661 - OVERHEW AUDIT - .- SYEB0LrFAtRCS~jld Furswrnt to your rsgmt (rti aaidft of the book6 ww mm-it3 at the plarxt of the sub$mt oorxtractor oovering ovcrheacl oostls for Lhe period July 1, 3950 to bfaroh 31, 1961. I?ork on oontrect AT (So-l) 620 was dismntinued durina; August 1950. The physioal' work on oontraot AT (SO-r> 861 MB oomplab~d &ring Dec~nber, 1950, and paper work and reporta were aarriad an throuir,h March 1951. Teat ohsokr of the acmtrrcrtor~~ reaorda were mado to the latent dssrnsd

394

INTEGRABILITY CONDITIONS FOR ALMOST HERMITIAN AND ALMOST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. If W+ denotes the self dual part of the Weyl tensor of any Khler 4-manifold and S its scalar curvature, then the relation |W+ | 2 = S 2 /6 is well-known. For any almost Khler 4-manifold with S ? 0, this condition forces the Khler property. A compact almost Khler 4-manifold is already Khler if it satisfies the conditions |W+ | 2 = S 2 /6 and ?W+ = 0 and also if it is Einstein and |W+ | is constant. Some further results of this type are proved. An almost Hermitian 4-manifold (M, g, J) with supp(W+) = M is already Khler if it satisfies the condition |W+ | 2 = 3(S ? ? S/3) 2 /8 together with |?W+ | = |?|W+| | or with ?W+ + ?log |W+|?W+ = 0, respectively. The almost complex structure J enters here explicitely via the star scalar curvature S ? only. 2002 Mathematics Subject Classification: 53B20, 53C25 This paper is related to the following general question: Which curvature properties of an almost Hermitian (almost Khler) manifold (M, g, J) imply that (M, g, J) is in fact a Hermitian manifold or a Khler manifold, respectively? On can also consider the stronger problem which curvature properties of the corresponding oriented Riemannian manifold (M, g) force that (M, g, J) is already

Khler -manifolds

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with W and Z bosons in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the full 2011 data sample, from an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Higgs boson decay modes to tau tau and WW are explored by selecting events with three or four leptons in the final state. No excess above the standard model expectation is observed, resulting in exclusion limits on the product of Higgs associated production cross section and decay branching fraction for Higgs boson masses between 110 and 200 GeV in these channels. Combining these results with other CMS associated production searches using the same dataset in the H $\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and H $\\to b\\bar{b}$ decay modes, the cross section for associated Higgs boson production 3.3 times the standard model expectation or larger is ruled out at the 95% confidence level for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV.

Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Er, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hrmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knnz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Lonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jrmie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Ald Jnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custdio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Mntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Hrknen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampn, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindn, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Menp, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Data:Efb2e184-0892-4b63-a992-710c3c88d842 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efb2e184-0892-4b63-a992-710c3c88d842 Efb2e184-0892-4b63-a992-710c3c88d842 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING LED 100 Watt Sector: Lighting Description: this is for 24 hour service. Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

397

L. James Rainwater and the Atomic Nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

L. James Rainwater and the Atomic Nucleus L. James Rainwater and the Atomic Nucleus Resources with Additional Information James Rainwater Courtesy AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives, W. F. Meggers Gallery of Nobel Laureates "During W.W. II, I [James Rainwater] worked ... [on the] Manhattan Project, mainly doing pulsed neutron spectroscopy using the small Columbia cyclotron. ... [Maria Geoppert-Mayer] shell model suggestion in 1949 was a great triumph and fitted my belief that a nuclear shell model should represent a proper approach to understanding nuclear structure. Combined with developments of Weizsaker's semi-empirical explanation of nuclear binding, and the Bohr-Wheeler 1939 paper on nuclear fission, emphasizing distorted nuclear shapes, I was prepared to see an explanation of large nuclear quadrupole moments. The full concept came to me in late 1949 when attending a colloquium by Prof. C.H. Townes who described the experimental situation for nuclear quadrupole moments. It was a fortuitous situation made even more so by the fact that I was sharing an office with Aage Bohr that year. We had many discussions of the implications, subsequently very successfully exploited by Bohr, [Ben] Mottelson, and others of the Copenhagen Institute."1

398

Data:1cfe4daa-c208-4709-a485-7a325fe669b0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cfe4daa-c208-4709-a485-7a325fe669b0 cfe4daa-c208-4709-a485-7a325fe669b0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: 236 DUSK TO DAWN LIGHTING 400 watt Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

399

Data:Ec554b62-3b1a-4913-a7a0-16e580478ac6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

54b62-3b1a-4913-a7a0-16e580478ac6 54b62-3b1a-4913-a7a0-16e580478ac6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 250 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

400

0. Y, ooopw  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y, ooopw Y, ooopw $letaIlurgical Haboratorp Irmqueat drosaing nor did It fill up* Althacgh it rpa roawnlmt ocarae, lt somod to give the best rentltr of any w hd trld. It mar l oar- bonmdullwbee1mrmbara6a3. Ontkyl8, aaae rhort plooer ofrod 2 um indhokr wro poundrt~ok prollaimry to oladdlzgdth atao Onyhy 25, ' 01110 S foottubm W I-. l oourotely ground et Olobeto b okd dthelllmimm. For N00.00~1 Ohtdhl& OXpUiWW ha &WI3 tbt tb tuba should not or bo out of round mom than about .002". 6 foot tube ma8 ground end this longer Ion&b, barsdl5.n6, m muooosrfullyoladdth altinm. l d tbmt oantcrlo8r griadlng uan be ooulroy w l hwt along plooes of ut-ua= PtoridLng too far out Of raund, doer not lnlw ezoOrelvo taper fr 1 of tba right ooaporitlGa la u0.d. Al10 no ot the arohlw propwly.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Data:1d73302b-b6f5-4c73-84c9-e95347e00113 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b-b6f5-4c73-84c9-e95347e00113 b-b6f5-4c73-84c9-e95347e00113 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 1000 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

402

Data:45bd4ee8-3dd4-47b2-97b1-b9f1a905e225 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ee8-3dd4-47b2-97b1-b9f1a905e225 ee8-3dd4-47b2-97b1-b9f1a905e225 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 70 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

403

3emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of best wrwd if these l dditioual s@s.idas~ad specifloetions providedby e? ow or tte &eign agencl.m. be perfomad in +uLldlngs City of hffelo, 3s~ York tmuter end in pee by the tenenw and proQcKcm of cd3?ion-oar, etenderds l stebllshed by the ConrpLmZon. arvlws smy be required inc1ud.l~ cher@as lorosa &Y l stinvted at $&O~oaO~OOO for fi?cal par U5$ i!;hlb no a~st CM bs mde now, ft is estkntadthet emual costs for mr~ will bs of Us3 ewe3 or grwtar es&t*. 1 ; ~&ItbOu&.ww reap 6mrv cow&bmretlon we3 &v&t.+ tId Uui&~ dbsr oontreotors for th per&xmence df this r*rllshd tbBt WQ ACP b4 tht? "bum-h& other mrlier coxltnrctrr, whleh would par m! paaiuo+Aon dlrsctiwes provided by Joq ofl-ice.

404

I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-,qy4 I _ -,qy4 I _ . I .__. ..-.- -....k ~&cTIAL USE UNL-T 0 L; : A I ,; ,' MN- I?%-(83 aj 0.3 ' f4lttaIIurgicaI lafioratorph k+ A- - p 111~ uu-mnt consists of _____. 5 ___-- .^_. F%es and.--m_m - No...---:- ---.- -.---_ Q- -15 ____ of b ,,;-+~----c------ __-_ figures - --------=-.LupieS, &je3me-&vw-y wu Readers File. - UT, h 5 lDcnLats* P&r W% l290 ma - , (1k.h kas tl61t6d xb&eeTTiul~onf aQ At the pmumat * guwxwlm on Pun* PM thracr htiheu 'ba% &+#8' end one en tiho flnl6hlBaiq 0 hb &um8 &6k4:4 t?Lo aKr0 ar eseallOZVb* ua lfo na@ifibUs A v6atiZatici~1, aycptu ha Q63&u#eoat~e~ln~ilLiua8~d#~~m~i0 pwtt;:3.tQtorr, ltio8aspLw~~~OQa-~lllCI)brrL# tmhIp sum wh6 I)&, mrdraTl6g frw droar vm6 84 cflaplpl+ktaa6xt~moma*~(~}ww

405

Data:70d94ae9-f7a4-436e-9241-36d5f1dc4efb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ae9-f7a4-436e-9241-36d5f1dc4efb ae9-f7a4-436e-9241-36d5f1dc4efb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Mercury Vapor 400 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

406

Data:037bfe4d-a64a-4cd3-abd2-02c6c953b181 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bfe4d-a64a-4cd3-abd2-02c6c953b181 bfe4d-a64a-4cd3-abd2-02c6c953b181 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING H.P. Sodium 150 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

407

L I NATIONAL' LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

L L I NATIONAL' LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO tJw HEALTH AND SAFETY DI"ISION - ANALITICIL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET _I . . NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY O F OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY DIY1SION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NATIONA-i LEn' D COMPANY OF OHIO HEALTH AND SAFETY Dl"lSlDN - m4ALITICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET NO. I DlSTRlBUTlON OF COPIES I I A,w,lytlc.al Loboratorr (RBCORD COPI) 2 Induswlol Hvalen. B Rodhtlon Dept. 3 1 Water Trsotmmt Plant c=.z w&w hnp,., Only, - . _. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO HEALiH ANO SAFETY OIVISIOH - w4ALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET INDUSTRIAL, HYGlENE AND RADIATION DEPT. 1 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY SECTION i. H. NO. IHPLEN0S.i . 7 RO"Te TO, D.TB RECEIVED, B", 464 9 - sD6:LzTEo, lB"' S/24/61 I DP

408

Data:6a81de49-47cb-46b6-8fd8-c0197f2898f2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

de49-47cb-46b6-8fd8-c0197f2898f2 de49-47cb-46b6-8fd8-c0197f2898f2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Omaha Public Power District Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: CONSUMER OWNED STREET LIGHTING Metal Halide 175 Sector: Lighting Description: CONSUMER OWNED SYSTEM OPERATED BY DISTRICT Source or reference: http://ww3.oppd.com/rates/OppdRateManual.pdf#nameddest=110 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

409

Search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with W and Z bosons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for the Higgs boson produced in association with a W or Z boson in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed with the CMS detector at the LHC using the full 2011 data sample, from an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Higgs boson decay modes to tau tau and WW are explored by selecting events with three or four leptons in the final state. No excess above background expectations is observed, resulting in exclusion limits on the product of Higgs associated production cross section and decay branching fraction for Higgs boson masses between 110 and 200 GeV in these channels. Combining these results with other CMS associated production searches using the same dataset in the H to gamma gamma and H to b b-bar decay modes, the cross section for associated Higgs boson production 3.3 times the standard model expectation or larger is ruled out at the 95% confidence level for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV.

CMS Collaboration

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

410

Characterization of chars from coal-tire copyrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is the characterization of the solid conversion product from coal-tire copyrolysis because, nowadays, any new process should be faced without resolving the problem of the subproducts generated. A low-rank coal and a nonspecific mixture of scrap automotive tires, 50/50 w/w, have been coprocessed at 400 C for 30 min at different H{sub 2} pressures and atmospheres. Once the most valuable conversion products, the liquids, were recovered by tetrahydrofuran extraction, a complementary battery of analytical techniques was applied to characterize the solids or chars, looking for their possible use. {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, immediate and ultimate analyses, ASA, and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry were performed on them. By X-ray diffractometry the presence of sphalerite, pyrrhotite, and anhydrite was detected. Thermogravimetric studies demonstrated that the combustion induction temperature is 400 C. Char combustion tests at 900 C with discussion of NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions are included. Mineral matter behaves as if only coal is processed with the Zn exception, from ZnO in the tire, which is converted into ZnS. It is shown that the char organic component has a higher aromaticity than the one from coal.

Mastral, A.M.; Callen, M.S.; Murillo, R. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica; Alvarez, R.; Clemente, C. [UM, Madrid (Spain). ETS de Ingenieros de Minas

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

An Improved Beam Screen for the LHC Injection Kickers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two LHC injection kicker magnet systems must produce a kick of 1.3 T.m with a flattop duration variable up to 7860 ns, and rise and fall times of less than 900 ns and 3000 ns, respectively. Each system is composed of two resonant charging power supplies (RCPSs) and four 5 WW transmission line kicker magnets with matched terminating resistors and pulse forming networks (PFNs). A beam screen is placed in the aperture of the magnets: the screen consists of a ceramic tube with conductors on the inner wall. The conductors provide a path for the image current of the, high intensity, LHC beam and screen the ferrite against Wake fields. The conductors initially used gave adequately low beam coupling impedance however inter-conductor discharges occurred during pulsing of the magnet: an alternative design was discharge free at the nominal operating voltage but the impedance was too high for the ultimate LHC beam. This paper presents the results of a new development undertaken to meet the often conflicting requireme...

Barnes, M J; Ducimetire, L; Garrel, N; Kroyer, T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Implications of the LHC two-photon signal for two-Higgs-doublet models  

SciTech Connect

We study the implications for Two Higgs Doublet Models of the recent announcement at the LHC giving a tantalizing hint for a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV decaying into two photons. We require that the experimental result be within a factor of two of the theoretical Standard Model prediction, and analyze the type I and type II models as well as the lepton-specific and flipped models, subject to this requirement. It is assumed that there is no new physics other than two Higgs doublets. In all of the models, we display the allowed region of parameter space taking the recent LHC announcement at face value, and we analyze the W{sup +}W{sup -}, ZZ, {bar b}b and {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} expectations in these allowed regions. Throughout the entire range of parameter space allowed by the {gamma}{gamma} constraint, the number of events for Higgs decays into WW, ZZ and b{bar b} are not changed from the Standard Model by more than a factor of two. In contrast, in the Lepton Specific model, decays to {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} are very sensitive across the entire {gamma}{gamma}-allowed region.

P. M. Ferreira, Rui Santos, Marc Sher, Joao P. Silva

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Possibility of early Higgs boson discovery in nonminimal Higgs sectors  

SciTech Connect

Particle physics models with more than one Higgs boson occur in many frameworks for physics beyond the standard model, including supersymmetry, technicolor, composite Higgs, and ''little Higgs'' models. If the Higgs sector contains couplings stronger than electroweak gauge couplings, there will be heavy Higgs particles that decay to lighter Higgs particles plus heavy particles such as W, Z, and t. This motivates searches for final states involving multiple W, Z, t, and bb pairs. A two Higgs doublet model with custodial symmetry is a useful simplified model to describe many of these signals. The model can be parameterized by the physical Higgs masses and the mixing angles {alpha} and {beta}, so discovery or exclusion in this parameter space has a straightforward physical interpretation. We illustrate this with a detailed analysis of the process gg{yields}A followed by A{yields}hZ and h{yields}WW. For m{sub A}{approx_equal}330 GeV, m{sub h}{approx_equal}200 GeV we can get a 4.5{sigma} signal with 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider.

Chang, Spencer [Physics Department, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Evans, Jared A.; Luty, Markus A. [Physics Department, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Electrochemical Evaluation of Thin-Film Li-Si Anodes Prepared by Plasma Spraying  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin-film electrodes of a plasma-sprayed Li-Si alloy were evaluated for use as anodes in high-temperature thermally activated (thermal) batteries. These anodes were prepared using 44% Li/56% Si (w/w) material as feed material in a special plasma-spray apparatus under helium or hydrogen, to protect this air- and moisture-sensitive material during deposition. Anodes were tested in single cells using conventional pressed-powder separators and lithiated pyrite cathodes at temperatures of 400 to 550 C at several different current densities. A limited number of 5-cell battery tests were also conducted. The data for the plasma-sprayed anodes was compared to that for conventional pressed-powder anodes. The performance of the plasma-sprayed anodes was inferior to that of conventional pressed-powder anodes, in that the cell emfs were lower (due to the lack of formation of the desired alloy phases) and the small porosity of these materials severely limited their rate capability. Consequently, plasma-sprayed Li-Si anodes would not be practical for use in thermal batteries.

GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; SCHARRER,GREGORY L.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

415

A combined physical/microbial process for coal beneficiation  

SciTech Connect

A combined physical/microbial process for the removal of pyritic sulfur from coal was demonstrated in a 200 L aerated trough slurry reactor. The reactor was divided into six sections, each of which acted as both a physical separator and a bioreactor. Settled solids from sections 2 through 6 were recycled to section 1 which acted as a rougher. The objective was physical removal of the larger pyritic inclusions, which would take many days to biodegrade, and biodegradation of the micropyrite, which is difficult to remove physically. The process was operated continuously for 8 months, treating two Illinois No. 6 coals (4 months each). Reduction of 90% in-pyritic sulfur with 90% energy recovery and 35% ash removal was obtained for a low pyrite Monterey coal at a 5 day coal retention time and 20% (w/w) slurry concentration. Increased coal loading reduced performance apparently due to losses of sulfur oxidizing bacteria. A low pyrite Consol coal gave 63--77% pyrite reduction with 23--30% ash removal and 77--90% heating value recovery. Product coal pyritic sulfur analysis indicated no differences between treatments of Consol coal. This suggests that the coal residence time could be further reduced and the slurry concentration increased in future work.

Noah, K.S.; Glenn, A.W.; Stevens, C.J.; McAtee, N.B.; McIlwain, M.E.; Andrews, G.F.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Evaluation of Performance Traits in Brahman Cattle: Blood Parameters, Calf Temperament, Residual Feed Intake, and Bull Reproductive Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objectives of these studies were (1) evaluate the relationship between temperament, blood parameters, and performance in Brahman calves (n = 300); (2) evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI) and reproductive development in Brahman bulls (n = 41). Serum was collected at 24 h and d 21 to 24, and analyzed for total protein (TP) immunoglobulin G (IgG), and cortisol (CS). Calves were weighed at 24 h, weighed and evaluated for temperament using exit velocity (EV) at d 21 to 24, and at 28 d intervals thereafter. Beginning 28 d prior to weaning, and at 28 d intervals through 56 d post-weaning calves were evaluated for pen score (PS) used to calculate temperament score (TS = (EV+PS)/2). The average TS from 28 d prior to weaning and weaning was used to generate temperament groups; calves 1 SD below the mean being calm, those 1 SD above the mean being temperamental and all remaining classified as intermediate. Calf TS influenced WW (P = 0.04) and ADG from birth to weaning (P = 0.03). Serum TP at 24 h affected (P 0.05) by TS. Residual feed intake classification did not influence (P > 0.05) age at reproductive milestones. Ultrasound carcass traits were not affected by TS or RFI. Serum TP at 24 h was a viable indicator of future growth performance. Temperamental animals had lower growth rates in both studies. Reproductive development was not affected by RFI. BW at reproductive milestones was lower in temperamental bulls.

Matheney, Kara J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

First Measurement of the Inclusive Rate for the Radiative Penguin Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the branching ratio for the inclusive radiative penguin process b ! sfl. We find BR(b ! sfl) = (2:32 \\Sigma 0:51 \\Sigma 0:29 \\Sigma 0:32) \\Theta 10 \\Gamma4 ; where the first error is statistical, the second error is the additive systematic error from uncertainty in yield, and the third error is the multiplicative systematic error from uncertainty in efficiency, which includes model dependence. Permanent address: University of Hawaii at Manoa 2 I. INTRODUCTION Last year CLEO observed [1] the decay B ! K (892)fl, thereby establishing the existence of the radiative penguin process b ! sfl. However, the fraction of the inclusive b ! sfl rate which hadronizes into B ! K (892)fl exhibits large model variation. The inclusive b ! sfl branching ratio is more reliably predicted [2], at (2.75 \\Sigma 0.80) \\Theta 10 \\Gamma4 for a top quark mass of 175 GeV. The branching ratio is sensitive to the existence of a charged Higgs [3], to anomalous WW fl couplings [4],...

Barish Chadha Chan; S. Chan; G. Eigen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Higgs Production with a Central Jet Veto at NNLL+NNLO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major ingredient in Higgs searches at the Tevatron and LHC is the elimination of backgrounds with jets. In current H -> WW -> lnulnu searches, jet algorithms are used to veto central jets to obtain a 0-jet sample, which is then analyzed to discover the Higgs signal. Imposing this tight jet veto induces large double logarithms which significantly modify the Higgs production cross section. These jet-veto logarithms are presently only accounted for at fixed order or with the leading-logarithmic summation from parton-shower Monte Carlos. Here we consider Higgs production with an inclusive event-shape variable for the jet veto, namely beam thrust Tau_cm, which has a close correspondence with a traditional p_T jet veto. Tau_cm allows us to systematically sum the large jet-veto logarithms to higher orders and to provide better estimates for theoretical uncertainties. We present results for the 0-jet Higgs production cross section from gluon fusion at next-to-next-to-leading-logarithmic order (NNLL), fully incorporating fixed-order results at next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO). At this order the scale uncertainty is 15-20%, depending on the cut, implying that a larger scale uncertainty should be used in current Tevatron bounds on the Higgs.

Carola F. Berger; Claudio Marcantonini; Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Prospects for Precision Higgs Physics at Linear Colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A linear e+e- collider provides excellent possibilities for precision measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson. At energies close to the Z-Higgs threshold, the Higgs boson can be studied in recoil against a Z boson, to obtain not only a precision mass measurement but also direct measurements of the branching ratios for most decay modes, including possible decay to invisible species. At higher energies, the Higgs boson coupling to top quarks and the Higgs boson self-coupling can also be measured. At energies approaching 1 TeV and above, the rising cross section for Higgs production in WW fusion allows the measurement of very small branching ratios, including the branching ratio to muon pairs. These experiments make it possible to determine the complete profile of the Higgs boson in a model-independent way. The prospects for these measurements are summarized, based on the results of detailed simulation studies performed within the frameworks of the CLIC conceptual design report and the ILC technical design report.

Frank Simon

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Higgs friends and counterfeits at hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

We consider the possibility of 'Higgs counterfeits' - scalars that can be produced with cross sections comparable to the SM Higgs, and which decay with identical relative observable branching ratios, but which are nonetheless not responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We also consider a related scenario involving 'Higgs friends,' fields similarly produced through gg fusion processes, which would be discovered through diboson channels WW,ZZ,{gamma}{gamma}, or even {gamma}Z, potentially with larger cross sections times branching ratios than for the Higgs. The discovery of either a Higgs friend or a Higgs counterfeit, rather than directly pointing towards the origin of the weak scale, would indicate the presence of new colored fields necessary for the sizable production cross section (and possibly new colorless but electroweakly charged states as well, in the case of the diboson decays of a Higgs friend). These particles could easily be confused for an ordinary Higgs, perhaps with an additional generation to explain the different cross section, and we emphasize the importance of vector boson fusion as a channel to distinguish a Higgs counterfeit from a true Higgs. Such fields would naturally be expected in scenarios with 'effective Z's,' where heavy states charged under the SM produce effective charges for SM fields under a new gauge force. We discuss the prospects for discovery of Higgs counterfeits, Higgs friends, and associated charged fields at the LHC.

Fox, Patrick J.; /Fermilab; Tucker-Smith, David; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Williams Coll. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Weiner, Neal; /New York U., CCPP /New York U. /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Neutral Higgs Bosons in the Higgs Triplet Model with nontrivial mixing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the neutral Higgs sector of the Higgs Triplet Model, with non-negligible mixing in the CP-even Higgs sector. We examine the possibility that one of the Higgs boson state is the particle observed at the LHC at 125 GeV, and the other is either the small LEP excess at 98 GeV; or the CMS excess at 136 GeV; or that the neutral Higgs bosons are (almost) degenerate and have both mass 125 GeV. We show that, under general considerations, an (unmixed) neutral Higgs boson cannot have an enhanced decay branching ratio into gamma gamma with respect to the Standard Model one. An enhancement is however possible for the mixed case, but only for the heavier of the two neutral Higgs bosons, and not for mass-degenerate Higgs bosons. At the same time the branching ratios into WW^*,ZZ^*, bb and tau tau are similar to the Standard Model, or reduced. We correlate the branching ratios of both Higgs states into Z gamma to those into gamma gamma for the three scenarios. The mixed neutral sector of the Higgs triplet model exhibits some features which could distinguish it from other scenarios at the LHC.

Fatemeh Arbabifar; Sahar Bahrami; Mariana Frank

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

Higgs friends and counterfeits at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the possibility of "Higgs counterfeits" - scalars that can be produced with cross sections comparable to the SM Higgs, and which decay with identical relative observable branching ratios, but which are nonetheless not responsible for electroweak symmetry breaking. We also consider a related scenario involving "Higgs friends," fields similarly produced through gg fusion processes, which would be discovered through diboson channels WW, ZZ, gamma gamma, or even gamma Z, potentially with larger cross sections times branching ratios than for the Higgs. The discovery of either a Higgs friend or a Higgs counterfeit, rather than directly pointing towards the origin of the weak scale, would indicate the presence of new colored fields necessary for the sizable production cross section (and possibly new colorless but electroweakly charged states as well, in the case of the diboson decays of a Higgs friend). These particles could easily be confused for an ordinary Higgs, perhaps with an additional generation to explain the different cross section, and we emphasize the importance of vector boson fusion as a channel to distinguish a Higgs counterfeit from a true Higgs. Such fields would naturally be expected in scenarios with "effective Z's," where heavy states charged under the SM produce effective charges for SM fields under a new gauge force. We discuss the prospects for discovery of Higgs counterfeits, Higgs friends, and associated charged fields at the LHC.

Patrick J. Fox; David Tucker-Smith; Neal Weiner

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

Combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson using up to 4.9 fb(-1) of pp collision data at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined search for the Standard Model Higgs boson with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using datasets corresponding to integrated luminosities from 1.04 fb{sup -1} to 4.9 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions collected at {radical}s = 7 TeV is presented. The Higgs boson mass ranges 112.9-115.5 GeV, 131-238 GeV and 251-466 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level (CL), while the range 124-519 GeV is expected to be excluded in the absence of a signal. An excess of events is observed around m{sub H} {approx} 126 GeV with a local significance of 3.5 standard deviations ({sigma}). The local significances of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}, H {yields} ZZ{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{ell}{prime}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} and H {yields} WW{sup (*)} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{ell}{prime}{sup -}{bar {nu}}, the three most sensitive channels in this mass range, are 2.8{sigma}, 2.1{sigma} and 1.4{sigma}, respectively. The global probability for the background to produce such a fluctuation anywhere in the explored Higgs boson mass range 110-600 GeV is estimated to be {approx}1.4% or, equivalently, 2.2{sigma}.

Aad G.; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Khalek, SA; Abdelalim, AA; Abdesselam, A; Abdinov, O; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, OS; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acerbia, E; Acharya, BS; Adamczyk, L; Adams, DL; Addy, TN; Adelman, J; Aderholz, M; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Ad

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

424

A combined search for the standard model Higgs boson at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new results of the search for WH to lepton neutrino b b production in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy of sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV, based on a dataset with integrated luminosity of 0.44 fb-1. We combine these new results with previously published searches by the D0 collaboration, for WH and ZH production analyzed in the MET b b final state, for ZH (to l+l- b b) production, for WH (to WWW) production, and for H (to WW) direct production. No signal-like excess is observed either in the WH analysis or in the combination of all D0 Higgs boson analyses. We set 95% C.L. (expected) upper limits on to 1.9 (3.3) pb for Higgs boson masses between 105 and 145 GeV, to be compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.13 pb for a standard model (SM) Higgs boson with mass m_H=115 GeV. After combination with the other D0 Higgs boson searches, we obtain for m_H=115 GeV an observed (expected) limit 8.5 (12.1) times higher than the SM predicted Higgs boson production cross section. For m_H=160 GeV, the corresponding observed (expected) ratio is 10.2 (9.0).

D0 Collaboration; V. M. Abazov

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

425

Combined CDF and D0 Upper Limits on Standard Model Higgs Boson Production with up to 8.2 fb-1 of Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine results from CDF and D0's direct searches for the standard model (SM) Higgs boson (H) produced in p-pbar collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV. The results presented here include those channels which are most sensitive to Higgs bosons with mass between 130 and 200 GeV/c^2, namely searches targeted at Higgs boson decays to W+W-, although acceptance for decays into tau+tau- and gamma gamma is included. Compared to the previous Tevatron Higgs search combination, more data have been added and the analyses have been improved to gain sensitivity. We use the MSTW08 parton distribution functions and the latest gg to H theoretical cross section predictions when testing for the presence of a SM Higgs boson. With up to 7.1 fb-1 of data analyzed at CDF, and up to 8.2 fb-1 at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limits on Higgs boson production is a factor of 0.54 times the SM cross section for a Higgs boson mass of 165 GeV/c^2. We exclude at the 95% C.L. the region 158

The CDF; D0 Collaborations; the TEVNPHWG Working Group

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

426

A photon-like wavepacket with quantised properties based on classical Maxwell's equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A photon-like wavepacket based on novel solutions of Maxwell's equations is proposed. It is believed to be the first 'classical' model that contains so many of the accepted quantum features. In this new work, novel solutions to Maxwell's classical equations in dispersive guides are considered where local helical twists with an arbitrary angular frequency W modulate a classical mode (angular frequency w, group velocity vg). The modal field patterns are unchanged, apart from the twist, provided that the helical velocity vh equals vg. Pairs of resonating retarded and advanced waves with modal and helical frequencies (w,W) and (w,-W)respectively, trap one temporal period of the underlying classical mode forming a photon-like packet provided W = (M+1/2)w: 'Schrodinger' frequencies. This theory supports experimental evidence that the photon velocity does not change with M in dispersive systems. Promotion and demotion increase or decrease the helical frequencies in units of w. An energy of interaction between retarded and advanced waves in the wave-packet is also proportional to these helical frequencies W = (M+1/2)w similar to Planck's law. Group velocity and polarisation are unaffected by the value of M. Advanced waves enable phase and polarisation to be predicted along all future paths and may help to explain the outcomes of experiments on delayed-choice interference and entanglement, without causality being violated.

John E. Carroll

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electroweak symmetry breaking studies at the pp colliders of the 1990's and beyond  

SciTech Connect

Within the conventional framework of a spontaneously broken gauge theory, general principles establish that the electroweak symmetry is broken by a new force that may be weak with associated new quanta below 1 TeV or strong with quanta above 1 TeV. The SSC parameters, ..sqrt..s = 40 TeV and L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/s/sup /minus/1/, define a minimal facility with assured capability to observe the signals of symmetry breaking by a strong force above 1 TeV. Foreseeable luminosity upgrades would not be able to compensate a much lower collider energy for these physics signals. If the strong WW scattering signal were seen at the SSC in the 1990's it would provide a clear imperative for a collider with the physics reach of the ELOISATRON to begin detailed studies of the new force and quanta early in the next century. 35 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Chanowitz, M.S.

1989-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

High Energy Positrons From Annihilating Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent preliminary results from the PAMELA experiment indicate the presence of an excess of cosmic ray positrons above 10 GeV. In this letter, we consider possibility that this signal is the result of dark matter annihilations taking place in the halo of the Milky Way. Rather than focusing on a specific particle physics model, we take a phenomenological approach and consider a variety of masses and two-body annihilation modes, including W+W-, ZZ, b bbar, tau+ tau-, mu+ mu-, and e+e. We also consider a range of diffusion parameters consistent with current cosmic ray data. We find that a significant upturn in the positron fraction above 10 GeV is compatible with a wide range of dark matter annihilation modes, although very large annihilation cross sections and/or boost factors arising from inhomogeneities in the local dark matter distribution are required to produce the observed intensity of the signal. We comment on constraints from gamma rays, synchrotron emission, and cosmic ray antiproton measurements.

Ilias Cholis; Lisa Goodenough; Dan Hooper; Melanie Simet; Neal Weiner

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

HIGGS PHYSICS WITH A GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDER BASED ON CLIC 1*.  

SciTech Connect

We present the machine parameters and physics capabilities of the CLIC Higgs Experiment (CLICHE), a low-energy {gamma}{gamma} collider based on CLIC 1, the demonstration project for the higher-energy two-beam accelerator CLIC. CLICHE is conceived as a factory capable of producing around 20,000 light Higgs bosons per year. We discuss the requirements for the CLIC 1 beams and a laser backscattering system capable of producing a {gamma}{gamma} total (peak) luminosity of 2.0 (0.36) x 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with E{sub CM}({gamma}{gamma}) 115 GeV. We show how CLICHE could be used to measure accurately the mass, {bar b}b, WW and {gamma}{gamma} decays of a light Higgs boson. We illustrate how these measurements may distinguish between the Standard Model Higgs boson and those in supersymmetric and more general two-Higgs-doublet models, complementing the measurements to be made with other accelerators. We also comment on other prospects in {gamma}{gamma} and e{sup -}{gamma} physics with CLICHE.

ASNER,D.; BURKHARDT,H.; DE ROECK,A.; ELLIS,J.; GRONBERG,J.; HEINEMEYER,S.; SCHMITT,M.; SCHULTE,D.; VELASCO,M.; ZIMMERMAN,F.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Finite width effects in Higgs boson decays as a means of measuring massive particle widths  

SciTech Connect

We calculate decays of a standard model Higgs boson via a virtual massive particle and discuss how this depends on the massive particle total width. If the partial width for a Higgs boson to decay via a virtual massive particle can be measured, this gives a measurement of that massive particle{close_quote}s width. We discuss how one would go about measuring these partial widths of a Higgs boson experimentally, and how this could lead to a measurement of the {ital W} boson and {ital t} quark widths. For the latter, extreme dependence on the Higgs boson mass and the small {ital H}{r_arrow}{ital tt{sup {asterisk}}} branching ratios mean that little can be learned about the {ital t} quark width. For the former there is also a larger dependence on the Higgs boson mass; however, this can be removed by taking the ratio of {ital H}{r_arrow}{ital WW{sup {asterisk}}} decays to {ital H}{r_arrow}{ital ZZ{sup {asterisk}}} decays. This ratio also has the advantage of being fairly insensitive to physics beyond the standard model. Unfortunately, for Higgs boson masses of interest the {ital H}{r_arrow}{ital ZZ{sup {asterisk}}} branching ratio is small enough that we require many thousands of tagged Higgs boson decays before an accurate measurement of the {ital W} width can be made. This is likely to be hard experimentally. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Summers, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Primary Piping Static Test Design Request  

SciTech Connect

It is requested that a design be initiated for the primary piping static test. This test is necessary to provide information as to the reliability of the pipe subjected to reactor operating conditions. The test conditions are as follows: temperature - 2000 F (isothermal), pressure effective - 42 psi, and test time - 10,000 hours. It will be necessary to test two sizes of pipe as shown on the preliminary piping layout (2.250-inch O.D. x .095-inch wall and 3 1/2 SCH. 10 pipe). The test specimens shall be jacketed in an inconel containment vessel. The test rig should be similar to the design of the 4-inch pressure vessels (T-1030244). In addition an outer containment vessel constructed of stainless steel must be provided around the clam shell heaters and the inconel containment vessel. This is to provide an inert atmosphere for the inconel vessel. Provisions should be made in the design for a 1/4-inch clad thermocouple. It is planned to use the pipe test as a vehicle for studying experimental Tc's (Cb-Mo and W-W.26% Re).

O' Brien, R.W.

1961-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fermentation of soybean hulls to ethanol while retaining protein value  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybean hulls were evaluated as a resource for production of ethanol by the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process, and no pretreatment of the hulls was found to be needed to realize high ethanol yields with S. cerevisiae D5A. The impact of cellulase, -glucosidase and pectinase dosages were determined at a 15% biomass loading, and ethanol concentrations of 25-30 g/L were routinely obtained, while under these conditions corn stover, wheat straw, and switchgrass produced 3-4 times lower ethanol yields. Removal of carbohydrates also concentrated the hull protein to over 25% w/w from the original roughly 10%. Analysis of the soybean hulls before and after fermentation showed similar amino acid profiles including an increase in the essential amino acids lysine and threonine in the residues. Thus, eliminating pretreatment should assure that the protein in the hulls is preserved, and conversion of the carbohydrates to ethanol with high yields produces a more concentrated and valuable co-product in addition to ethanol. The resulting upgraded feed product from soybean hulls would likely to be acceptable to monogastric as well as bovine livestock.

Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Wyman, Professor Charles E [University of California, Riverside; John, Bardsley [Dartmouth College

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Folding Proteins at 500 ns/hour with Work Queue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractMolecular modeling is a field that traditionally has large computational costs. Until recently, most simulation techniques relied on long trajectories, which inherently have poor scalability. A new class of methods is proposed that requires only a large number of short calculations, and for which minimal communication between computer nodes is required. We considered one of the more accurate variants called Accelerated Weighted Ensemble Dynamics (AWE) and for which distributed computing can be made efficient. We implemented AWE using the Work Queue framework for task management and applied it to an all atom protein model (Fip35 WW domain). We can run with excellent scalability by simultaneously utilizing heterogeneous resources from multiple computing platforms such as clouds (Amazon EC2, Microsoft Azure), dedicated clusters, grids, on multiple architectures (CPU/GPU, 32/64bit), and in a dynamic environment in which processes are regularly added or removed from the pool. This has allowed us to achieve an aggregate sampling rate of over 500 ns/hour. As a comparison, a single process typically achieves 0.1 ns/hour. I.

Badi Abdul-wahid; Li Yu; Dinesh Rajan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

MC4523 Sealed Cap: Component & characteristics development report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MC4523 Sealed Cap is a WW42C1 Percussion Primer that is pressed into a steel cylinder. Hermaticity of the input end is then provided by welding a thin steel closure disk on the input end of the MC4523. Thus, the user is provided with a component that is prequalified in terms of ignition sensitivity and hermeticity. The first customer is the Thermal Battery Department (1522). The MC4523 will be used on the MC2736A Thermal Battery which in turn will be used on the W78 JTA. Attachment of the MC4523 to the battery is with a laser weld. Combined test results of four production lots at a commercial supplier (PPI, TMS, WR1, and WR2) show an all-fire ignition sensitivity (.999 @ 50%) of approximately 60 millijoules of mechanical energy with a 2.2 gram firing pin. The firing pin had an impact tip with a radius of 0.020 inch. This firing pin is like that to be used in the W78 JTA application. Approximately 112 millijoules of mechanical energy will be supplied in the application, thus the design margin is more than adequate.

Begeal, D.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Determination of Zinc-Based Additives in Lubricating Oils by Flow-Injection Analysis with Flame-AAS Detection Exploiting Injection with a Computer-Controlled Syringe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A flow-injection system is proposed for the determination of metal-based additives in lubricating oils. The system, operating under computer control uses a motorised syringe for measuring and injecting the oil sample (200 L) in a kerosene stream, where it is dispersed by means of a packed mixing reactor and carried to an atomic absorption spectrometer which is used as detector. Zinc was used as model analyte. Two different systems were evaluated, one for low concentrations (range 010 ppm) and the second capable of providing higher dilution rates for high concentrations (range 0.02%0.2 % w/w). The sampling frequency was about 30 samples/h. Calibration curves fitted a second-degree regression model (r 2 = 0.996). Commercial samples with high and low zinc levels were analysed by the proposed method and the results were compared with those obtained with the standard ASTM method. The t test for mean values showed no significant differences at the 95 % confidence level. Precision (RSD%) was better than 5 % (2 % typical) for the high concentrations system. The carryover between successive injections was found to be negligible. 1.

Gustavo Pignalosa; Moiss Knochen; Noel Cabrera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

You are now leaving Energy.gov | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

https://www2.dteenergy.com/wps/portal/dte/business/productsPrograms/details/SolarCurrents/Benefits/!ut/p/b1/hZHJkptAEES_xR-goaFpliMMO2ITi4AL0SBAQgPCEmL7ekt22I6xY2bqVhEvK6MyiZSIibTD46nGw-nS4bfnnjIZ5LZ2hELHCxRfBPouCilG9IEqkQ8geQKOsPPpJwCA_AQkVzM5qFrsp3r0Ww8-GAG81yOoc0APBCiGkKIA_cf_Y-AL_z0RBwnFSxd9UuS0OuKoAcAQE3F3tnlNnjT89kZeGoU3qykvYRGId7h2xuIXrVWAkB8FT0dOxyDBPloMd5vH8gaZphaDjZvaB97IvXLJ3XywZ6lnumS33PyKMpcseSVB1cmnuNJL5VTPVZ_XpaReAcmbcYobdf-278WF1qHjC6Pnq9poHtF-Ew9CMihkAvY4s7iqlsK1yPN_c_j_0S96NIj0lLcvU9G-gBcasZCGNE-xiIYMhR4ppb8OfNLzT-CzIr-q0tYubUkkD4z9i22B_zBiHWRTHKSAQBMBEQM685ul19fzumtWb7bz1AokeQLXcArkNbLDMwiGyLYlbyHZENi5B_w1Mq0VQ9_W3EO0C0VBuM1RQb3_nOUYSNGQ4jjEIMBCImoSepZofZL1OHs9DxpTkPe6nRyj_67nQuhgZYv7K4k37mEfJMd7MFZ3VCK-4SvOPWqp61mqVaTF0Lllm3aidRoHNTp2ZY15XVavOw8fQOLj0rX2r5mKp0rBaRqpNsOm0uF-y4yZ20yLSZuR2s1b1wwUgLSD0cistRwum-05MaIp70Cfc0ITOudmza5ULJPDzYhx3ze-cwT1Mpx7EG0nNF5NsTeyqC5dUqLHSA0vWUB7rTNzLkn0bRiG4xYZciXFq_DtBw5NexQ!/dl4/d5/L2dBISEvZ0FBIS9nQSEh/

437

Experimental Characterization of Canola Oil Emulsion Combustion in a Modified Furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetable oils have been researched as alternative source of energy for many years because they have proven themselves as efficient fuel sources for diesel engines when used in the form of biodiesel, vegetable oildiesel blends, vegetable oil-water-diesel blends and mixtures thereof. However, very few studies involving the use of emulsified low grade alcohols in straight vegetable oils, as fuels for combustion have been published. Even, the published literature involves the use of emulsified fuels only for compression ignition diesel engines. Through this project, an attempt has been made to suggest the use of alcohol-in-vegetable oil emulsions (AVOE) as an alternate fuel in stationary burners like electric utility boiler producing steam for electricity generation and more dynamic systems like diesel engines. The main goal of this study is to understand the effect of the combustion of different methanol-in-canola oil emulsions, swirl angle and equivalence ratio on the emission levels of NOx, unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), CO and CO2. The 30 kW furnace facility available at Coal and Biomass Energy Laboratory at Texas A & M University was modified using a twin fluid atomizer, a swirler and a new liquid fuel injection system. The swirler blades were positioned at 60 and 51 angles (with respect to vertical axis) in order to achieve swirl numbers of 1.40 and 1.0, respectively. The three different fuels studied were, pure canola oil, 89-9 emulsion [9 percent methanol in 89 percent canola oil emulsion with 2 percent surfactant (w/w)] and 85-12.5 emulsion [12.5 percent methanol in 85 percent canola oil (w/w) emulsion with 2.5 percent surfactant]. All the combustion experiments were conducted for a constant heat output of 72,750 kJ/hr. One of the major findings of this research work was the influence of fuel type and swirl number on emission levels. Both the emulsions produced lower NOx, unburned (UHC) hydrocarbon and CO emissions than pure canola oil at both swirl numbers and all equivalence ratios. The emulsions also showed higher burned fraction values than pure oil and produced more CO2. Comparing the performance of only the two emulsions, it was seen that the percentage amount of methanol added to the blend had a definite positive impact on the combustion products of the fuel. The higher the percentage of methanol in the emulsions, the lesser the NOx, UHC and CO emissions. Of all the three fuels, 85-12.5 emulsion produced the least emissions. The vorticity imparted to the secondary air by the swirler also affected the emission levels. Increased vorticity at higher swirl number led to proper mixing of air and fuel which minimized emission levels at SN = 1.4. The effect of equivalence ratio on NO_x formation requires a more detailed analysis especially with regards to the mechanism which produces nitrogen oxides during the combustion of the studied fuels.

Bhimani, Shreyas Mahesh

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Search for the Higgs Boson Using High-pT Isolated Like-Sign Dil Events in 1.96-TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions  

SciTech Connect

Our physics objective is to search for the neutral on using events containing a like-sign dilepton pair in the following reaction: q{bar q} {yields} W{sup {+-}} H {yields} W{sup {+-}} W*W* {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{ell}{sup {+-}} + X. The relevant Higgs boson mass region is above 160 GeV/c{sup 2} for the Standard Model Higgs boson where the branching fraction of H {yields} W*W* supersedes that of H {yields} b{bar b}. The search for this signature in the region at low mass (less than 135 GeV/c{sup 2}) is, however, still important because we need to investigate various Higgs boson couplings as an essential test to convince that signals are attributed to the Higgs boson production. This channel also covers the case beyond the Standard Model that the Higgs boson couples only to the gauge bosons, which is referred to as the bosophilic or fermiophobic Higgs boson. The corresponding mass region suitable to our signature is above 110 GeV/c{sup 2} where the branching fraction of H {yields} {gamma}{gamma} is overtaken by this channel. On the experimental side, the like-sign dilepton event is one of the cleanest signature in hadron collisions. This analysis exploiting such a distinctive signature is therefore expected to have a high potential of the sensitivity for the search of the Higgs boson. The data were collected with the CDF II detector between March 2002 and September 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 193.5 pb{sup -1}. At off-line, the central region (|{eta}| < 1.1) is considered for the lepton detection. We require at least one electron with E{sub T} > 20 GeV or muon with p{sub T} > 20 GeV/c which is considered to be responsible for firing the corresponding trigger, and at least one other electron with E{sub T} > 6 GeV or muon with p{sub T} > 6 GeV/c. The leptons are required to be isolated in terms of the calorimeter cone-isolation with a cone size of R = 0.4. We require that the isolation is less than 2 GeV for each lepton. For the events with like-sign two or more leptons that pass our selection above, we apply a cosmic-ray veto, dilepton mass cut (M{sub {ell}{ell}} > 12 GeV/c{sup 2}), and a Z-decay removal to clean up the sample. We also explicitly require that the leptons must be consistent with coming from the same vertex, which is an important requirement for multi-lepton signatures especially in a high-luminosity situation. The selection cuts identifies high-p{sub T}, isolated leptons with almost ''standard'' identification criteria. We observed 45 like-sign dilepton events in data.

Kobayashi, Hirokazu; /Tsukuba U.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Identification of a haloalkaliphilic and thermostable cellulase with improved ionic liquid tolerance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some ionic liquids (ILs) have been shown to be very effective solvents for biomass pretreatment. It is known that some ILs can have a strong inhibitory effect on fungal cellulases, making the digestion of cellulose inefficient in the presence of ILs. The identification of IL-tolerant enzymes that could be produced as a cellulase cocktail would reduce the costs and water use requirements of the IL pretreatment process. Due to their adaptation to high salinity environments, halophilic enzymes are hypothesized to be good candidates for screening and identifying IL-resistant cellulases. Using a genome-based approach, we have identified and characterized a halophilic cellulase (Hu-CBH1) from the halophilic archaeon, Halorhabdus utahensis. Hu-CBH1 is present in a gene cluster containing multiple putative cellulolytic enzymes. Sequence and theoretical structure analysis indicate that Hu-CBH1 is highly enriched with negatively charged acidic amino acids on the surface, which may form a solvation shell that may stabilize the enzyme, through interaction with salt ions and/or water molecules. Hu-CBH1 is a heat tolerant haloalkaliphilic cellulase and is active in salt concentrations up to 5 M NaCl. In high salt buffer, Hu-CBH1 can tolerate alkali (pH 11.5) conditions and, more importantly, is tolerant to high levels (20percent w/w) of ILs, including 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). Interestingly, the tolerances to heat, alkali and ILs are found to be salt-dependent, suggesting that the enzyme is stabilized by the presence of salt. Our results indicate that halophilic enzymes are good candidates for the screening of IL-tolerant cellulolytic enzymes.

Zhang, Tao; Datta, Supratim; Eichler, Jerry; Ivanova, Natalia; Axen, Seth D.; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Chen, Feng; Kyrpides, Nikos; Hugenholtz, Philip; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sale, Kenneth L.; Simmons, Blake; Rubin, Eddy

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

Zhang Xinghua [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 610540 (China); Wang Tiejun [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 610540 (China)], E-mail: wangtj@ms.giec.ac.cn; Ma Longlong; Chang Jie [Key Laboratory of Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 610540 (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ww tment roject" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The limiting mutual diffusion coefficients of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products in near-critical hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is used to convert synthesis gas into petroleum products such as gasoline and diesel fuel. It was developed in Germany during WW 11 as an alternative fuel source during the fuel embargo and is still used as a major source of fuel in South Africa. The objective of our work will be to run the reaction in the supercritical region with a hydrocarbon solvent in order to utilize the advantages of supercritical fluids (SCFs). SCFs have the advantages of high diffusivities, low viscosities, and increased mass transfer. Effective pore diffusivities for the reactants and reaction products become important when modeling the reaction. One of the most important factors in determining effective diffusivities is the molecular diffusivity of the organic in the supercritical fluid. However, data for diffusivities in supercritical fluids are scarce. Because diffusion coefficients cannot be determined a priofi, it is necessary to measure them. We have utilized the Taylor dispersion technique to measure the limiting mutual diffusion coefficients of some FTS products, namely 1-octene and 1-tetradecene, in subcritical and supercritical ethane and propane in the temperature range 293.2-338.25 K and the pressure range 55.2-110.3 bar. It has been found that diffusion coefficients are a strong function of the solvent density and the molecular weight and diameter of the solute and solvent. We have correlated the data to predict the diffusion coefficients using the rough-hard-spheres (RHS) theory; however, it has been found that this theory underpredicts the data. Therefore, we have used modifications to the RHS theory of diffusion by Sung and Stell (1984) to better predict the data. These modifications to the RHS theory predict the data we obtained within the experimental limits.

Noel, James Michael

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

Ross, Pamela K. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); ExxonMobil Biomedical Sciences, Annandale, NJ (United States); Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Cunningham, Michael L. [National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Pre-treating Seed to Enhance Germination of Desert Shrubs  

SciTech Connect

Creosotebush [Larrea tridentata (D.C.) Cav.] and white bursage [Ambrosia dumosa (A. Gray) W.W. Payne] seeds were subjected to pre-treatments of rinsing and soaking in water and thiourea to enhance germination in laboratory experiments. The effects of darkness, temperature, seed source, and soil moisture were also evaluated in the laboratory. The best pre-treatment from the laboratory experiments, rinsing with water for 36 hours followed by drying, was field-tested at Fort Irwin, California. Two sites and two seeding dates (early March and mid April) were determined for each site. Five mulch treatments (no mulch, straw, gravel, chemical stabilizer, and plastic) were evaluated in combination with the seed pre-treatments. Field emergence was greatly enhanced with the seed pre-treatment for white bursage during the March (18-42% increase in germination) and April seedings (16-23% increase in germination). Creosotebush showed poor germination during March (2-5%) when soil temperatures averaged 15 C, but germination increased during the April trials (6-43%) when soil temperatures averaged 23 C. The seed pre-treatment during the April trials increased germination from 16-23%. The plastic mulch treatment increased germination dramatically during both the March and April trials. The plastic mulch increased soil temperatures (8-10 C)and maintained high humidity during germination. Both the chemical stabilizer and the gravel mulches improved germination over the control while the straw mulch decreased germination. These results suggest that seed pre-treatments combined with irrigation and mulch are effective techniques to establish these two dominant Mojave Desert species from seed.

W. K. Ostler; D. C. Anderson; D. J. Hansen

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development of a Residential Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A residential-size ground-source integrated heat pump (GSIHP) system has been developed and is currently being field tested. The system is a nominal 2-ton (7 kW) cooling capacity, variable-speed unit, which is multi-functional, e.g. space cooling, space heating, dedicated water heating, and simultaneous space cooling and water heating. High-efficiency brushless permanent-magnet (BPM) motors are used for the compressor, indoor blower, and pumps to obtain the highest component performance and system control flexibility. Laboratory test data were used to calibrate a vapor-compression simulation model (HPDM) for each of the four primary modes of operation. The model was used to optimize the internal control options and to simulate the selected internal control strategies, such as controlling to a constant air supply temperature in the space heating mode and a fixed water temperature rise in water heating modes. Equipment performance maps were generated for each operation mode as functions of all independent variables for use in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. These were performed for the GSIHP installed in a well-insulated 2600 ft2(242 m2) house and connected to a vertical ground loop heat exchanger(GLHE). We selected a 13 SEER (3.8 CSPF )/7.7 HSPF (2.3 HSPF, W/W) ASHP unit with 0.90 Energy Factor (EF) resistance water heater as the baseline for energy savings comparisons. The annual energy simulations were conducted over five US climate zones. In addition, appropriate ground loop sizes were determined for each location to meet 10-year minimum and maximum design entering water temperatures (EWTs) to the equipment. The prototype GSIHP system was predicted to use 52 to 59% less energy than the baseline system while meeting total annual space conditioning and water heating loads.

Rice, C Keith [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Hern, Shawn [ClimateMaster, Inc.; McDowell, Tim [Thermal Energy System Specialists, LLC; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Glycine phases formed from frozen aqueous solutions: Revisited  

SciTech Connect

Glycine phases formed when aqueous solutions were frozen and subsequently heated under different conditions were studied by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Crystallization of ice I{sub h} was observed in all the cases. On cooling at the rates of 0.5 K/min and 5 K/min, glassy glycine was formed as an intermediate phase which lived about 1 min or less only, and then transformed into {beta}-polymorph of glycine. Quench cooling of glycine solutions (15% w/w) in liquid nitrogen resulted in the formation of a mixture of crystalline water ice I{sub h} and a glassy glycine, which could be preserved at cryogenic temperatures (80 K) for an indefinitely long time. This mixture remained also quite stable for some time after heating above the cryogenic temperature. Subsequent heating under various conditions resulted in the transformation of the glycine glass into an unknown crystalline phase (glycine 'X-phase') at 209-216 K, which at 218-226 K transformed into {beta}-polymorph of glycine. The 'X-phase' was characterized by Raman spectroscopy; it could be obtained in noticeable amounts using a special preparation technique and tentatively characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (P2, a= 6.648 A, b= 25.867 A, c= 5.610 A, {beta}= 113.12 Masculine-Ordinal-Indicator ); the formation of 'X-phase' from the glycine glassy phase and its transformation into {beta}-polymorph were followed by DSC. Raman scattering technique with its power for unambiguous identification of the crystalline and glassy polymorphs without limitation on the crystallite size helped us to follow the phase transformations during quenching, heating, and annealing. The experimental findings are considered in relation to the problem of control of glycine polymorphism on crystallization.

Surovtsev, N. V. [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Adichtchev, S. V.; Malinovsky, V. K. [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ogienko, A. G.; Manakov, A. Yu. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Drebushchak, V. A. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ancharov, A. I.; Boldyreva, E. V. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Institute of Solid Chemistry and Mechanochemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Yunoshev, A. S. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Task A, High Energy Physics Program experiment and theory: Task B, High Energy Physics Program numerical simulation of quantum field theories. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effort of the experimental group has been concentrated on the CERN ALEPH and FERMILAB D0 collider experiments and completion of two fixed target experiments. The BNL fixed target experiment 771 took the world`s largest sample of D(1285) and E/iota(1420) events, using pion, kaon and antiproton beams. Observing the following resonances: 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1280], 1{sup {plus}{plus}} [1280], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1420], 0{sup {minus_plus}} [1470], 1{sup {plus_minus}} [1415]. The Fermilab fixed target experiment E711, dihadron production in pN interactions at 800 GeV, completed data reduction and analysis. The atomic weight dependence, when parameterized as {sigma}(A) = {sigma}{sub o}A{sup {alpha}}, yielded a value of {alpha} = 1.043 {plus_minus} 0.011 {plus_minus} .012. The cross section per nucleon and angular distributions was also measured as a function of two particle mass and agrees very well with QCD calculations. The D0 Fermilab Collider Experiment E740 began its first data taking run in April 1992. The CERN collider experiment ALEPH at LEP is presently taking more data. The Z mass and width, the couplings to the upper and lower components of the hadronic isospin doublet, forward-backward asymmetries of hadronic events, and measurements of the fragmentation process have been made. The effort of detector development for the SSC has substantially increased with particular emphasis on scintillators, both in fibers and plates. Work has continued on higher-order QCD calculations using the Monte Carlo technique developed previously. This year results for WW, ZZ, WZ, and {sub {gamma}{gamma}} production have been published. A method for incorporating parton showering in such calculations was developed and applied to W production. The multicanonical Monte Carlo algorithm has stood up to the promises anticipated; it was used in multicanonical simulations of first-order phase transitions and for spin glass systems.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Heavy Oil Process Monitor: Automated On-Column Asphaltene Precipitation and Re-Dissolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated separation technique was developed that provides a new approach to measuring the distribution profiles of the most polar, or asphaltenic components of an oil, using a continuous flow system to precipitate and re-dissolve asphaltenes from the oil. Methods of analysis based on this new technique were explored. One method based on the new technique involves precipitation of a portion of residua sample in heptane on a polytetrafluoroethylene-packed (PTFE) column. The precipitated material is re-dissolved in three steps using solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, toluene, and methylene chloride. The amount of asphaltenes that dissolve in cyclohexane is a useful diagnostic of the thermal history of oil, and its proximity to coke formation. For example, about 40 % (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolves in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. The automated procedure takes one hour. Another method uses a single solvent, methylene chloride, to re-dissolve the material that precipitates on heptane on the PTFE-packed column. The area of this second peak can be used to calculate a value which correlates with gravimetric asphaltene content. Currently the gravimetric procedure to determine asphaltenes takes about 24 hours. The automated procedure takes 30 minutes. Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric methods. Methods based on the new on-column precipitation and re-dissolution technique provide significantly more detail about the polar constituent's oils than the gravimetric determination of asphaltenes.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Mark Sanderson

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS-bar 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110ng/L) were significantly higher (P<0.05; Wilcoxon rank sum test) than those of samples taken upstream (12+/-15ng/L). Compared to surface water, mean TCC concentrations found in dried, primary sludge obtained from municipal sewage treatment plants in five states were six orders of magnitude greater (19,300+/-7100{mu}g/kg). Several river samples contained a co-contaminant, identified based on its chromatographic retention time, molecular base ion, and MS/MS fragmentation behavior as 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide (DCC; CAS-bar 1219-99-4). In addition to TCC and DCC, municipal sludge contained a second co-contaminant, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorocarbanilide (TetraCC; CAS-bar 4300-43-0). Both newly detected compounds were present as impurities (0.2%{sub w/w} each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC.

Sapkota, Amir [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103 (United States); Heidler, Jochen [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103 (United States); Halden, Rolf U. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University Center for Water and Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-2103 (United States)]. E-mail: rhalden@jhsph.edu

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Experimental investigation of the quality characteristics of agricultural plastic wastes regarding their recycling and energy recovery potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definition of parameters characterising agricultural plastic waste (APW) quality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analysis of samples to determine APW quality for recycling or energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Majority of APW samples from various countries have very good quality for recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upper limit of 50% w/w soil contamination in APW acceptable for energy recovery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chlorine and heavy metals content in APW below the lowest limit for energy recovery. - Abstract: A holistic environmentally sound waste management scheme that transforms agricultural plastic waste (APW) streams into labelled guaranteed quality commodities freely traded in open market has been developed by the European research project LabelAgriWaste. The APW quality is defined by the APW material requirements, translated to technical specifications, for recycling or energy recovery. The present work investigates the characteristics of the APW quality and the key factors affecting it from the introduction of the virgin product to the market to the APW stream reaching the disposer. Samples of APW from different countries were traced from their application to the field through their storage phase and transportation to the final destination. The test results showed that the majority of APW retained their mechanical properties after their use preserving a 'very good quality' for recycling in terms of degradation. The degree of soil contamination concerning the APW recycling and energy recovery potential fluctuates depending on the agricultural plastic category and application. The chlorine and heavy metal content of the tested APW materials was much lower than the maximum acceptable limits for their potential use in cement industries.

Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E. [Agricultural University of Athens, Agricultural Engineering Department, 75 Iera Odos Str., 11855 Athens (Greece); Antiohos, S.K., E-mail: santiohos@titan.gr [Titan Cement Company S.A., Group R and D and Quality Department, Kamari Plant, P.O. Box 18, 19200 Elefsina (Greece); Papadi, C., E-mail: c.papadi@polyeco.gr [Polyeco S.A., 16 km National Road Athens-Korinthos, Aspropyrgos 19300 (Greece)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Precision measurements of the top quark mass and width with the D0 detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the discovery of the top quark in 1995 at the Fermliab Tevatron Collider, top quark properties have been measured with ever higher precision. In this article, recent measurements of the top quark mass and its width using up to 3.6 fb{sup -1} of D0 data are summarized. Different techniques and final states have been examined and no deviations within these measurements have been observed. In addition to the direct measurements, a measurement of the top quark mass from its production cross section and a measurement of the top-antitop quark mass difference are discussed. With a mass of 173.3 {+-} 1.1 GeV, the top quark is the heaviest of all known fundamental particles. Due to the high mass, its Yukawa coupling is close to unity suggesting that it may play a special role in electroweak symmetry breaking. Precise measurements of both, the W boson and the top quark mass, constrain the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson and allow to restrict certain extensions of the Standard Model. At the Tevatron collider with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, 85% of the top quark pairs are produced in quark-antiquark annihilation; 15% originate from gluon fusion. Top quarks are predicted to decay almost exclusively to a W boson and a bottom quark. According to the number of hadronic W decays, top events are classified into all-jets, lepton+jets and dilepton events. The lepton+jets channel is characterized by four jets, one isolated, energetic charged lepton and missing transverse energy. With 30%, the branching fraction of the lepton+jets channel is about seven times larger than the one of the dilepton channel whereas the signal to background ratio is about three times smaller. The main background in this final state comes from W +jets events. Instrumental background arises from events in which a jet is misidentified as an electron and events with heavy hadrons that decay into leptons which pass the isolation requirements. The topology of the dilepton channel is described by two jets, two isolated, energetic charged leptons and significant missing transverse energy from the undetected neutrinos. The main background are Z + jets and diboson events (WW/WZ/ZZ+jets) as well as instrumental background as characterized above. At the D0 experiment, different techniques are used to measure the top quark mass. They are summarized in the following sections together with the first measurement of the top anti-top quark mass difference and the first precise determination of the top quark width.

Grohsjean, Alexander; /IRFU, SPP, Saclay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

The effect of flaxseed hulls on expanded corn meal products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brown flaxseed hulls were added to de-germed corn meal and processed into extrudates with acceptable texture and increased nutritional benefits. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls to a corn based expanded snack increases the dietary fiber, alpha omega 3 fatty acids, and antioxidants levels. The addition of flaxseed hulls to a corn based snack can increase its susceptibility to oxidative rancidity which can limit shelf life. Whole ground tannin sorghum with added brown flaxseed hulls was processed into extrudates and texture, antioxidant activity, and stability were evaluated. Brown flaxseed hulls were mixed with de-germed yellow corn meal in ratios of 0:100, 15:85, 20:80, and 25:75 (w/w) and extruded with 12 and 15% feed moistures using a twin screw extruder to produce direct expanded extrudates. Expansion of extrudates containing brown hulls decreased as the amount of hulls increased. Dried extrudates had acceptable flavor immediately after processing. Total phenols and antioxidant activity of extrudates containing 20 and 25% brown flaxseed hulls, extruded at 15% feed moisture were higher than de-germed corn meal extruded at 16% feed moisture. Brown flaxseed hulls were added at 20% to whole ground white and sumac (tannin) sorghums and processed into extrudates. Expansion increased for sorghum extrudates containing brown flaxseed hulls. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls increased antioxidant activity and total phenols of both white and sumac (tannin) extrudates. The sumac (tannin) extrudates had the longest delay in producing off odor (paintlike odor) and had the lowest p-Anisidine values compared to white (ATX631x RTX 436) sorghum and corn meal with added flaxseed hulls. Corn meal extrudates with 20% brown flaxseed hulls produce off odors more rapidly than other extrudates. This suggests that the tannins in sorghum maybe extending shelf life because of their antioxidant activity. The addition of brown flaxseed hulls can be used to increase nutritional value and antioxidant levels in a direct expanded product. Also the use of tannins sorghums in products containing flaxseed may help delay oxidation, thus preventing the occurrence of off odors. Further work needs to be done to verify results.

Barron, Marc Edward

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

I. Interaction of ammonia with single crystal rhodium catalysts. II. Hydrogen and nitrogen adsorption on a W(111) surface: a theoretical molecular orbital approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rates of ammonia decomposition on (110), (100), and (111) single crystal faces of rhodium were measured at 580 to 725/sup 0/K and 10/sup -3/ to 500 x 10/sup -3/ torr. The decomposition rates were proportional to P/sub NH/sub 3//sup/1/2/ and P/sub NH/sub 3// at low and high hydrogen pressures, respectively. The H/sub 2/ kinetic order varied from 0 (low P/sub H/sub 2//) to -1.0 (high P/sub H/). The rate was independent of N/sub 2/ pressure. NH/sub 3/ decomposes about 1.5 times faster than ND/sub 3/ on the (110) and (111) faces. Rates on the (110) surface are over 10 times as rapid as on the (111). LEED, Auger, and flash desorption experiments indicated that boron was a significant surface poison and that the Rh(110) surface was essentially nitrogen-free. A rate expression is derived from a model involving surface species Rh/sub 2/NH, RhH, and RhN on a nearly bare RH surface. The rate limiting process involves the concurrent dehydrogenation of Rh/sub 2/NH and desorption of N/sub 2/. A decreasing NH/sub 3/ order (< 1/2) at high P/sub NH/sub 3// and low T is due to buildup of surface intermediates. The relative bonding energies of hydrogen and nitrogen chemisorbed at three sites on a W(111) surface were obtained via the extended Hueckel molecular orbital theory. The preferred site for both H and N chemisorption was determined as the TOP position, i.e., a single coordination site on top of a protruding W atom. The W(111) surface was simulated by truncated arrays of seven tungsten atoms. The basis set for the calculations included the tungsten valence orbitals plus the filled 5p orbitals needed for repulsion at small internuclear distances. N adsorption in the three-fold holes available on the W(111) lattices used disrupted the W--W bonds sufficiently to cause the overall bond energy to be less than for the single coordination site. The dissymmetry between the three-fold lattices and the four-fold W d orbitals may also be a contributing factor.

Vavere, A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

456

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb{sup -1}. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb{sup -1} projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb{sup -1} have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H {yields} WW, H {yields} ZZ and H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.

Huske, Nils Kristian; /Paris U., VI-VII

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 < m{sub H} < 160 GeV the SM would remain a self consistent theory up to highest energy scales O(m{sub Pl}). This could have direct implications on theories of cosmological inflation using the Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV. A light Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb{sup -1}. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 < m{sub H} < 109 GeV as well as 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV based on the observed final limits at 95% C.L. In the most interesting low mass region between 115 and 135 GeV, even the full Tevatron combination is not yet sensitive enough to exclude a Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb{sup -1} projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb{sup -1} have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H {yields} WW, H {yields} ZZ and H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.

Huske, Nils Kristian; /Paris U., VI-VII

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z