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1

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REDUCTION PILOT PLANT (WV.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: International Nickel Company WV.01-1 Location: Cole Street at Alterizer Ave. , Huntington , West Virginia WV.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 WV.01-1 Site Operations: Manufactured powdered Nickel for use at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants and Nickel plated a small quantity of Uranium slugs. WV.01-2 WV.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantities of radioactive material used on the site. Potential for residual radioactive material from AEC operations conducted at the site considered remote - confirmed by radiological survey. WV.01-1 WV.01-3

2

Category:Elkins, WV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elkins, WV Elkins, WV Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Elkins, WV" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 59 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 60 KB SVHospital Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVHospital Elkins WV H... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeHotel Elkins WV... 57 KB SVLargeOffice Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeOffice Elkins W... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVMediumOffice Elkins ... 59 KB SVMidriseApartment Elkins WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png

3

Category:Charleston, WV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WV WV Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Charleston, WV" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 59 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 60 KB SVHospital Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVHospital Charleston ... 57 KB SVLargeHotel Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeHotel Charlesto... 57 KB SVLargeOffice Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVLargeOffice Charlest... 58 KB SVMediumOffice Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png SVMediumOffice Charles... 60 KB SVMidriseApartment Charleston WV Harrison Rural Elec Assn Inc.png

4

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WV DoE-NRCCE-APERC DRAFT February 16, 2009 WV DoE-NRCCE-APERC DRAFT February 16, 2009 1 West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Customer Complaints to WV PSC about Electric Power Service Ali Feliachi, Muhammad Choudhry, John Saymansky and Ed Sneckenberger February 16, 2009 Introduction APERC has appreciated that one of the most important sources for data on the consumer perspective of the current electric power grid in West Virginia would be the WV Public Service Commission (WV PSC). Thus, an email request was sent on December 19, 2008 to Byron Harris at the WV PSC to request any advice or approaches to determine customer and regulatory perspectives of the current electric power grid in WV. Customer Complaint Data Bryon Harris was able to provide a spreadsheet of customer complaints in West Virginia for

5

NETL: 2010 WV Science Bowl Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 WV Science Bowl 2010 WV Science Bowl The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) invites you to participate in one of the premier scientific events for high school students, the West Virginia High School Science Bowl 2010 on February 6, 2010. This will be NETL's 19th year sponsoring the high school competition. There is a change this year in the registration process from past years, all teams who are registering to complete, must do so through the National Science Bowl website. For those who are not familiar with the West Virginia Science Bowl here are some highlights: The competition is open to high school students (school, scouts, home school) from West Virginia. Complete eligibility requirements are located at the National Science Bowl website.

6

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator, Ultra-Deepwater Resources Portfolio Office of Research and...

7

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- The Carborundum Co Inc - WV 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The Carborundum Co Inc - WV 02 The Carborundum Co Inc - WV 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: THE CARBORUNDUM CO., INC (WV.02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: AMAX Inc WV.02-1 Location: Wood County , West Virginia WV.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1982 WV.02-1 Site Operations: Produced high-grade Zirconium metal for use in construction of nuclear reactors for the Navy circa late-1950s and 1960s; Conducted small scale Zirconium and Uranium testing in the mid-1970s. WV.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC/NRC licensed site. No Authority for cleanup under FUSRAP WV.02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Thorium, Uranium WV.02-2 Radiological Survey(s): Yes WV.02-3 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP

8

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project APERC Report on Assessment of As-Is Grid by Non-Utility Stakeholders Introduction One goal of this grid modernization project is to assess the current status of the electric power grid in West Virginia in order to define the potential to implement smart grid technologies. Thus, an initial task of this project was to define the current state or "As-Is" grid in West Virginia. Financial and time constraints prohibited the development and execution of formal surveys to solicit input from the various stakeholders. However attempts were made to obtain their input through informal questionnaires and meeting with focus groups. list of stakeholders which

9

134Cs and 137Cs activities in coastal seawater along Northern Sanriku and Tsugaru Strait, northeastern Japan, after Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 37 seawater samples were collected at 10 sites along the coastline of the Northern Sanriku and Tsugaru Strait, 250–450 km north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in April–December 2009 and May–June 2011, and analyzed for 134Cs and 137Cs activities using low-background ?-spectrometry. The 134Cs and 137Cs activities measured in these samples in May 2011 were found to be 2–3 mBq/L and 2.5–4 mBq/L, respectively. By June, these values had decreased by 25–45%/month and 5–30%/month, respectively. These results can be plausibly explained by surface infusion of these isotopes into the sea by atmospheric transport from Fukushima and their subsequent reduction by water migration to off-shore and deeper regions.

M. Inoue; H. Kofuji; Y. Hamajima; S. Nagao; K. Yoshida; M. Yamamoto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Northeastern REMC - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pump: $1,000 Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Geothermal Heat Pump: $100/ton or $500/unit Air Source Heat Pump: $250/unit Water Heater: $100 Provider Northeastern REMC Northeastern Rural Electric Membership Corporation (REMC) is a consumer-owned corporation that supplies electric power to more than 25,000 members in Northeastern Indiana. Northeastern REMC offers rebates to its residential customers for the purchase of geothermal heat pumps, air-source

11

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Traci Rodosta Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Joshua Hull Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-0906 joshua.hull@netl.doe.gov Erik Westman Principal Investigator Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 100 Holden Hall Blacksburg, VA 24061 540-0231-7510 Fax: 540-231-4070 ewestman@vt.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12/01/2009 12/31/2012 COST Total Project Value $257,818 DOE/Non-DOE Share $248,441 / $9,377 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. P R OJ E C T FAC T

12

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Dawn Deel Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Sherry Mediati Business Contact California Energy Commission 1516 9th Street, MS 1 Sacramento, CA 95814 916-654-4204 smediati@energy.state.ca.us Mike Gravely Principal Investigator California Energy Commission 1516 Ninth Street, MS 43 Sacramento, CA 95814 916-327-1370 mgravely@energy.state.ca.us Elizabeth Burton Technical Director Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 925-899-6397 eburton@lbl.gov West Coast Regional Carbon

13

File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf Appalach6-WV-VA-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 17.02 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

14

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines CONTACTS Richard A. Dennis Technology Manager, Turbines National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4515 richard.dennis@netl.doe.gov Travis Shultz Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1370 travis.shultz@netl.doe.gov Jacob A. Mills Principal Investigator Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc 1701 Military Trail Suite 110 Jupiter, FL 33458-7887 561-427-6349 jmills@fttinc.com PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 06/28/2012 08/13/2015 COST Total Project Value $1,149,847 DOE/Non-DOE Share $1,149,847 / $0 AWARD NUMBER SC0008218 Air-Riding Seal Technology for Advanced Gas Turbine Engines-Florida Turbine

15

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rodosta Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Darin Damiani Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4398 darin.damiani@netl.doe.gov Vivak Malhotra Principal Investigator Southern Illinois University Neckers 483A Mailcode: 4401 Carbondale, IL 62901 618-453-2643 Fax: 618-453-1056 vmalhotra@physics.siu.edu PARTNERS None Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rock under Non-Equilibrium Conditions Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)

16

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PO Box 880 PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea McNemar Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Charles D. Gorecki Technical Contact Senior Research Manager Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota 15 North 23 rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 701-777-5355 cgorecki@undeerc.org Edward N. Steadman Deputy Associate Director for Research Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota 15 North 23 rd Street, Stop 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 701-777-5279 esteadman@undeerc.org John A. Harju Associate Director for Research Energy & Environmental Research Center University of North Dakota

17

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACTS Joseph Stoffa Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-0285 joseph.stoffa@netl.doe.gov Xingbo Liu Principal Investigator Dept. MechanaWest Virginia University P.O. Box 6106 Morgantown, WV 26506-6106 304-293-3339 xingbo.liu@mail.wvu.edu Shailesh D. Vora Technology Manager, Fuel Cells National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-7515 shailesh.vora@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 08/31/2012 09/30/2015 COST Total Project Value $634,839 DOE/Non-DOE Share $499,953 / $134,886 AWARD NUMBER FE0009675 Fundamental Understanding of Oxygen Reduction and Reaction Behavior and Developing High Performance and Stable

18

File:EIA-Appalach6-WV-VA-GAS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appalach6-WV-VA-GAS.pdf Appalach6-WV-VA-GAS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 18.09 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Southern West Virginia and Southwestern Virginia By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Virginia File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

19

File:EIA-Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf Appalach5-eastWV-BOE.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Appalachian Basin, Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(6,600 × 5,100 pixels, file size: 17.26 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Appalachian Basin, Eastern West Virginia and Western Maryland By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States West Virginia, Maryland File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

20

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Romanosky Romanosky Crosscutting Research Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-4721 robert.romanosky@netl.doe.gov Richard Dunst Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6694 richard.dunst@netl.doe.gov Shizhong Yang Principal Investigator Southern University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SBOT WEST VIRGINIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB -WV POC Larry Sullivan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WEST VIRGINIA WEST VIRGINIA NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LAB -WV POC Larry Sullivan Telephone (412) 386-6115 Email larry.sullivan@netl.doe.gov ADMINISTATIVE / WASTE / REMEDIATION Facilities Support Services 561210 Employment Placement Agencies 561311 Temporary Help Services 561320 Professional Employer Organizations 561330 Document Preparation Services 561410 Security Guards and Patrol Services 561612 Security Systems Services (except Locksmiths) 561621 Janitorial Services 561720 Landscaping Services 561730 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Disposal 562211 Remediation Services 562910 Materials Recovery Facilities 562920 All Other Miscellaneous Waste Management Services 562998 CONSTRUCTION Industrial Building Construction 236210 Commercial and Institutional Building Construction 236220 Power and Communication Line and Related Structures Construction

22

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R &D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

23

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species SOFC Anode Interaction with Trace Coal Syngas Species U.S. Dept of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507 Gregory Hackett, Kirk Gerdes, Randall Gemmen Phone: (304)285-5279, Gregory.Hackett@NETL.DOE.GOV Utilization of coal as a fuel source for highly efficient integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power generation facilities is technologically and environmentally attractive. IGFC plants are expected to offer the highest efficiency coal gasification processes, even when carbon capture and storage systems are included in the design. One element of IGFC research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory is the investigation of syngas cleanup processes for these integrated systems. Of particular interest are the effects of trace elements naturally contained in

24

Microsoft Word - 2014 WVSB - WV HS letter (generic for PDF).docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 REPLY TO: Morgantown Office ï‚· steven.woodruff@netl.doe.gov ï‚· Voice (304) 285-4175 ï‚· Fax (304) 285-0903 ï‚· www.netl.doe.gov September 23, 2013 Dear Science Chair or Principal: On behalf of the Secretary of Energy, I am pleased to announce the opening of the 2014 National Science Bowl, a tournament-style academic competition challenging students in the fields of science and mathematics. In support of the National Science Bowl, the U.S. Dept of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is once again proud to host the West Virginia Regional Science Bowl. The WVSB is one of many regional competitions held for high school teams across

25

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maira Reidpath Maira Reidpath Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304- 285-4140 maria.reidpath@netl.doe.gov Steven S.C. Chuang Principal Investigator The University of Akron Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering 230 E. Buchtel Commons Akron, OH 44325 330-972-6993 schuang@uakron.edu PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 09/01/2009 08/31/2013 COST Total Project Value $1,713,961 DOE/Non-DOE Share $1,370,977/$342,984 AWARD NUMBER Techno-Economic Analysis of Scalable Coal-Based Fuel Cells-University of Akron Background In this congressionally directed project, the University of Akron (UA) will develop a scalable coal fuel cell manufacturing process to a megawatt scale. UA has demonstrated the

26

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maria Reidpath Maria Reidpath Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304- 285-4140 maria.reidpath@netl.doe.gov Bogdan Gurau Principal Investigator NuVant Systems, Inc. 130 N West Street Crown Point, IN 46307 219-644-3232 b.gurau@nuvant.com PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 08/01/2009 05/31/2013 COST Total Project Value $1,142,481 DOE/Non-DOE Share $913,985 / $228,496 AWARD NUMBER Improved Flow-field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells-NuVant Systems, Inc. Background In this congressionally directed project, NuVant Systems, Inc. (NuVant) will improve the performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) by designing anode flow-fields specifically for the delivery of liquid methanol. The goal is to deliver concentrated

27

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FACTS FACTS Carbon Storage - ARRA - GSRA CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Robert Noll Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7597 robert.noll@netl.doe.gov Joseph Labuz Principal Investigator University of Minnesota 500 Pillsbury Drive SE Room 122 CivE 0851 Minneapolis, MN 55455 612-625-9060 jlabuz@umn.edu PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12/01/2009 11/30/2012 COST Total Project Value $299,568 DOE/Non-DOE Share $299,568 / $0 PROJECT NUMBER DE-FE0002020 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the

28

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R& R& D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

29

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROJEC PROJEC T FAC TS Carbon Storage - ARRA - GSRA CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Robert Noll Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7597 robert.noll@netl.doe.gov Gordon Bierwagen Principal Investigator North Dakota State University P.O. Box 6050 Department 2760 Fargo, ND 58108-6050 701-231-8294 gordon.bierwagen@ndsu.edu PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date 12/01/2009 End Date 11/30/2011 COST Total Project Value $298,949 DOE/Non-DOE Share $298,949 / $0 PROJECT NUMBER DE-FE0002054 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the

30

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARRA - GSRA CONTACTS Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Andrea Dunn Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-7594 andrea.dunn@netl.doe.gov Jose Castillo Principal Investigator San Diego State University 5500 Campanile Drive San Diego, CA 92122 619-594-7205 castillo@myth.sdsu.edu PARTNERS Sienna Geodynamics and Consulting, Inc. PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12/01/2009 11/30/2012 COST Total Project Value $299,993 DOE/Non-DOE Share $299,993 / $0 PROJECT NUMBER DE-FE0002069 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the

31

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Briggs White Briggs White Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-5437 briggs.white@netl.doe.gov Jeff Stevenson Principal Investigator Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999, MS K2-44 Richland, WA 99352 509-372-4697 jeff.stevenson@pnl.com PARTNERS Oak Ridge National Laboratory University of Connecticut PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 10/01/1999 09/30/2013 (annual continuations) COST Total Project Value $52,889,667 DOE/Non-DOE Share $52,889,667 / $0 AWARD NUMBER FWP40552 PR OJ E C T FAC T S Fuel Cells Low Cost Modular SOFC Development- Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has a mission to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security,

32

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Traci Rodosta Traci Rodosta Carbon Storage Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov Karen Kluger Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6667 karen.kluger@netl.doe.gov Gary Mavko Principal Investigator Stanford University 397 Panama Mall Stanford, CA 94305-2215 650-723-9438 Fax: 650-723-1188 mavko@stanford.edu PROJECT DURATION Start Date 12/01/2009 End Date 06/30/2013 COST Total Project Value $385,276 DOE/Non-DOE Share $295,777/ $89,499 Government funding for this project is provided in whole or in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage

33

Albany, OR Anchorage, AK Morgantown, WV Pittsburgh, PA Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albany, OR · Anchorage, AK · Morgantown, WV · Pittsburgh, PA · Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl-285-5437 briggs.white@netl.doe.gov Neil Nofziger Principal Investigator seM-coM company, Inc. 1040 North Westwood 304-285-4717 daniel.driscoll@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS University of Toledo Ceramatec, Inc. PROJECT

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

34

Temporal variations in 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in seawater along the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast in northeastern Japan, one year after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Ninety-six seawater samples were collected between May 2011 and March 2012 at 6 sites along the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast, 250–450 km north of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). Cesium-134 and 137Cs concentrations were determined by low-background ?-spectrometry. During May–June 2011, 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in surface waters decreased from 1.0–2.8 to 0.7–1.5 mBq/L and from 2.1–3.9 to 1.9–3.0 mBq/L, respectively. These decreases were due to diffusion and advection in the ocean after atmospheric input of the FDNPP-derived radionuclides. However, in July–August 2011, the concentrations of both radionuclides in the water samples collected on the Pacific side of the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast exhibited 30–50-fold increases (?40 mBq/L for 134Cs and ?50 mBq/L for 137Cs) over concentrations observed at these sampling sites in June 2011 in contrast to the gradual decreases in the concentrations on the Tsugaru Strait side of the Shimokita Peninsula. These results suggest that radiocesium-contaminated waters offshore in the Pacific Ocean were transported to coastal regions along the Pacific side of the Shimokita Peninsula and the northern Sanriku coast by ocean currents.

Hisaki Kofuji; Mutsuo Inoue

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creep-Fatigue-Environment Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Coal Power Plants Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes the advancement of computational capabilities to develop materials for advanced fossil energy power systems. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Advanced Research (AR) Program is working to enable the next generation of Fossil Energy (FE) power systems. One goal of the AR Materials Program is to conduct research leading to a scientific understanding of high-performance materials capable of service in the hostile environments associated with advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) coal-fired power plants. A-USC plants will increase coal-fired power plant efficiency by allowing operation

36

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO2 Capture Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while

37

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Swirl Injectors for Hydrogen Gas Low-Swirl Injectors for Hydrogen Gas Turbines in Near-Zero Emissions Coal Power Plants-Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy Hy(DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is leading a project in partnership with gas turbine manufacturers and universities to develop a robust ultra-low emission combustor for gas turbines that burn high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from gasification of coal. A high efficiency and ultra-low emissions HHC fueled gas turbine is a key component of a near-zero emis- sions integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) clean coal power plant. This project is managed by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). NETL is researching advanced turbine technology with the goal of producing reliable,

38

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Oxy-fired Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Development and Scale-up for New and Retrofit Coal-fired Power Plants Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to

39

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Membrane Contactors for Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Carbon Capture Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The Carbon Capture R&D Program portfolio of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for new and existing coal- fired power plants in the event of carbon constraints. Post-combustion separation and capture of CO

40

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Coal-Biomass to Liquids a Coal-Biomass to Liquids Plant in Southern West Virginia Background Concerns regarding global supplies of oil, energy security, and climate change have generated renewed interest in alternative energy sources. The production of liquid fuels from coal provides an option for reducing petroleum use in the U.S. transportation sector and enhancing national and economic security by decreasing the nation's reliance on foreign oil. Two basic methods can be employed to produce liquid fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Conductivity, High Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments-University of Connecticut Background Improved turbine materials are needed to withstand higher component surface temperatures and water vapor content for successful development and deployment of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in particular are required to have higher surface temperature capability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to attack at high temperature by contaminants such as calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate (CMAS) and water vapor. There is also a concurrent need to address cost and availability issues associated with rare earth elements used in all low thermal conductivity TBCs.

42

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase III Xlerator Program: Rapid Phase III Xlerator Program: Rapid Commercialization of Advanced Turbine Blades for IGCC Power Plants-Mikro Systems Background Mikro Systems, Inc. is developing their proprietary TOMO SM manufacturing technology to produce turbine blades with significantly improved internal cooling geometries that are beyond current manufacturing state-of-the-art, thus enabling higher operating temperatures. Funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase III Xlerator Program will be directed towards accelerating commercial adoption of TOMO SM technology by leading turbine manufacturers through the demonstration of superior manufacturability, cost, and performance. Ultimately, this technology will lead to improved efficiency

43

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling for IGCC Turbine Cooling for IGCC Turbine Blades-Mikro Systems Background Turbine blade and vane survivability at higher operating temperatures is the key to improving turbine engine performance for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. Innovative cooling approaches are a critical enabling technology to meet this need. Mikro Systems, Inc. is applying their patented Tomo-Lithographic Molding (TOMO) manufacturing technology to produce turbine blades with significantly improved internal cooling geometries that go beyond the current manufacturing state-of-the-art to enable higher operating temperatures. This project addresses two important aspects. First is the need to increase the quality and reliability of the core manufacturing process capability to

44

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation on Flame Characteristics Investigation on Flame Characteristics and Burner Operability Issues of Oxy-Fuel Combustion Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is necessary to allow the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently underrepresented in the United States. Education and training activities

45

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joining of Advanced Joining of Advanced High-Temperature Materials Background To remain economically competitive, the coal-fired power generation industry needs to increase system efficiency, improve component and system reliability, and meet ever tightening environmental standards. In particular, cost-effective improvements in thermal efficiency are particularly attractive because they offer two potential benefits: (1) lower variable operating cost via increased fuel utilization (fuel costs represent over 70 percent of the variable operating cost of a fossil fuel-fired power plant) and (2) an economical means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other emissions. To achieve meaningful gains, steam pressure and temperature must be increased to

46

New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon August 9, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis A computer-generate image shows the biorefinery in Boardman, Oregon. | Photo Courtesy of Matt Kegler, diagram supplied by Burns & McDonnell A computer-generate image shows the biorefinery in Boardman, Oregon. | Photo Courtesy of Matt Kegler, diagram supplied by Burns & McDonnell Lindsay Gsell Recovery Act supports construction of new biorefinery in Boardman, Ore. Facility could create 20 permanent jobs when fully operational in 2011 ZeaChem plans to work with local farmers to supply biofuel material In northeastern Oregon, ZeaChem, a Colorado-based biofuel company, recently broke ground on a 250,000 gallon integrated cellulosic biorefinery. The

47

New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon New Biorefinery Will Bring Jobs to Northeastern Oregon August 9, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis A computer-generate image shows the biorefinery in Boardman, Oregon. | Photo Courtesy of Matt Kegler, diagram supplied by Burns & McDonnell A computer-generate image shows the biorefinery in Boardman, Oregon. | Photo Courtesy of Matt Kegler, diagram supplied by Burns & McDonnell Lindsay Gsell Recovery Act supports construction of new biorefinery in Boardman, Ore. Facility could create 20 permanent jobs when fully operational in 2011 ZeaChem plans to work with local farmers to supply biofuel material In northeastern Oregon, ZeaChem, a Colorado-based biofuel company, recently broke ground on a 250,000 gallon integrated cellulosic biorefinery. The

48

Ecology and Geography of Plague Transmission Areas in Northeastern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plague in Brazil is poorly known and now rarely seen, so studies of its ecology are difficult. We used ecological niche models of historical (1966-present) records of human plague cases across northeastern Brazil to assess hypotheses regarding...

Giles, John R; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ameida, Alzira

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Natural gas pricing in the Northeastern U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines natural gas pricing at five citygate locations in the northeastern United States using daily and weekly price series for the years 1994-97. In particular, the effects of the natural gas price at Henry ...

Gunnarshaug, Jasmin

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Votschia, a new genus of Theophrastaceae from northeastern Panama  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new genus,Votschia, based onJacquinia nemophila Pittier, is described and the new combinationVotschia nemophila...(Pittier) Ståhl is made. The genus is known only from a small coastal area in northeastern Panama

Bertil StÅhl

51

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siemens Energy Siemens Energy Background Siemens Energy, along with numerous partners, has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop hydrogen turbines for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Siemens Energy is expanding this program for industrial applications such as cement, chemical, steel, and aluminum plants, refineries, manufacturing facilities, etc., under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines for industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

52

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Pressure, Temperature Combined Pressure, Temperature Contrast, and Surface-Enhanced Separation of Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Carbon Capture Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The Carbon Capture R&D Program portfolio of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control tech- nologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for new and existing coal-fired

53

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Efficiency Molten Bed Oxy- Coal Combustion with Low Flue Gas Recirculation Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO 2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

54

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology to Mitigate Syngas Technology to Mitigate Syngas Cooler Fouling Background Coal gasification, in conjunction with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power production, is under development to increase efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with coal-based power production. However, coal gasification plants have not achieved their full potential for superior performance and economics due to challenges with reliability and availability. In particular, performance of the syngas cooler located downstream of the gasifier has been an issue. The syngas cooler is a fire tube heat exchanger located between the gasifier and the gas turbine. The purpose of the syngas cooler is to cool the raw syngas from the gasifier and recover heat. Although

55

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing and Evaluation of Next Processing and Evaluation of Next Generation Oxygen Carrier Materials for Chemical Looping Combustion Background The Department of Energy (DOE) supports research towards the development of efficient and inexpensive CO 2 capture technologies for fossil fuel based power generation. The Department of Energy Crosscutting Research Program (CCR) serves as a bridge between basic and applied research. Projects supported by the Crosscutting Research Program conduct a range of pre-competitive research focused on opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality by research in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, and computational energy science. Within the CCR, the University Coal Research (UCR) Program sponsors

56

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies to Enable Robust, Studies to Enable Robust, Reliable, Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels-University of Michigan Background The University of Michigan will perform experimental and computational studies which can provide an improved and robust understanding of the reaction kinetics and other fundamental characteristics of combustion of high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels that are vital to advancing HHC turbine design and to making coal gasification power plants environmentally sustainable and cost- competitive. The scope of work includes Rapid Compression Facility (RCF) studies of HHC ignition delay times and hydroxyl radical (OH) time-histories, flame speeds, and flammability limits. A range of temperatures, pressures, and test gas mixture compositions will

57

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Low-Cost Process for Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications-Tennessee Technological University Background One of the material needs for the advancement of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is the development of low-cost effective manufacturing processes for application of coating architectures with enhanced performance and durability in coal derived synthesis gas (syngas)/hydrogen environments. Thermal spray technologies such as air plasma spray (APS) and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) are currently used to fabricate thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for large land- based turbine components. In this research Tennessee Technological University (TTU) will develop metal chromium-aluminum-yttrium (MCrAlY; where M = nickel [Ni], cobalt

58

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Thermal Gas Turbine Thermal Performance-Ames Laboratory Background Developing turbine technologies to operate on coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), hydrogen fuels, and oxy-fuels is critical to the development of advanced power gener-ation technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle and the deployment of near-zero-emission type power plants with capture and separation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's

59

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen Carriers for Coal-Fueled Oxygen Carriers for Coal-Fueled Chemical Looping Combustion Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is necessary to allow the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training activities are needed to develop a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers who

60

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressurized Oxy-combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background Pennsylvania State University is teaming with Princeton University to enhance scientific understanding of the underlying factors affecting combustion for turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants operating on synthesis gas (syngas). The team is using this knowledge to develop detailed, validated combustion kinetics models that are useful to support the design and future research and development needed to transition to fuel flexible operations, including high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from coal syngas, the product of gasification of coal. This project also funda- mentally seeks to resolve previously reported discrepancies between published ex-

62

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbo Machinery Oxy-Fuel Turbo Machinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications-Clean Energy Systems Background Clean Energy Systems (CES), with support from Siemens Energy and Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT), has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop an oxy-fuel combustor for highly efficient near zero emission power plants. CES is expanding this development for an industrial-scale, oxy-fuel reheat combustor- equipped intermediate-pressure oxy-fuel turbine (IP-OFT) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Through the design, analysis, and testing of a modified Siemens SGT-900 gas turbine, the team will demonstrate a simple-cycle oxy-fuel system. ARRA funding is accelerating advancement in OFT technology for

63

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Cost Alloys for High-Temperature Low-Cost Alloys for High-Temperature SOFC Systems Components - QuesTek Innovations Background One of the key opportunities for cost reduction in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system is the set of balance of plant (BOP) components supporting the fuel cell itself, including the heat exchanger and air/fuel piping. These represent about half of the overall cost of the system. A major enabling technological breakthrough is to replace incumbent nickel-based superalloys in high-temperature BOP components with low-cost ferritic stainless steel. However, the ferritic alloys are unsuitable for SOFC application without additional coatings due to the inherent volatile nature of the alloy's chromium oxide (Cr2O3) element, which tends to poison the fuel cell's cathode

64

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Thermal Barrier Coatings for Operation in High Hydrogen Content Fueled Gas Turbines-Stony Brook University Background Traditional thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) based on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) will likely not be suitable in gas turbines used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. This is due to higher operating temperatures that will not only affect phase stability and sintering but will accelerate corrosive degradation phenomena. Coatings provide a framework to combat degradation issues and provide performance improvements needed for higher temperature environments. The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University, in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology, is investigating science and

65

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-up Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available CO2 capture and storage significantly reduces efficiency of the power cycle. The aim of the ACS program is to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near zero emissions of other flue gas pollutants.

66

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SO SO 2 -Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO 2 Capture Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is necessary to allow the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training activities are needed to develop a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers who

67

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Efficient Regeneration of Physical and Chemical Solvents for CO 2 Capture Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies is necessary to allow the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training activities are needed to develop a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers who

68

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low Rank Coal in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (biomass, petroleum coke, etc.) produces synthesis gas (syngas), which can be cleaned and used to produce electricity and a variety of commercial products that support the U.S. economy, decrease U.S. dependence on oil imports, and meet current and future environmental emission standards. The major challenge is cost, which needs to be reduced to make integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology competitive. An IGCC plant combines a combustion turbine operating on a gasified fuel stream--syngas--with a steam turbine to capture what would otherwise be waste heat. Currently, the estimated cost of power from IGCC is higher than

69

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOFC Protection Coatings Based on a SOFC Protection Coatings Based on a Cost-Effective Aluminization Process- NexTech Materials Background To make solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems easier to manufacture and reduce costs, less expensive stainless steels have been substituted into the stack design as alternatives to ceramic interconnects. Stainless has also been substituted for high-cost, nickel-based superalloys in balance of plant (BOP) components. For successful implementation of these steels, protective coatings are necessary to protect the air-facing metal surfaces from high-temperature corrosion/oxidation and chromium (Cr) volatilization. NexTech Materials Ltd. (NexTech) will develop an aluminide diffusion coating as a low- cost alternative to conventional aluminization processes and evaluate the ability of the

70

Abundances of Hyperthermophilic Autotrophic Fe(III) Oxide Reducers and Heterotrophs in Hydrothermal Sulfide Chimneys of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sulfide Chimneys of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Published ahead of print on 31...Fuca Ridge in the northeastern Pacific Ocean (see Fig. S1 in the supplemental...three sites in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 36...

Helene C. Ver Eecke; Deborah S. Kelley; James F. Holden

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Northeastern Rural E M C | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeastern Rural E M C Northeastern Rural E M C Jump to: navigation, search Name Northeastern Rural E M C Place Indiana Utility Id 20603 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Outdoor Lighting Energy: Ballasted Lamps 1000W Lighting Outdoor Lighting Energy: Ballasted Lamps 100W Lighting Outdoor Lighting Energy: Ballasted Lamps 150W Lighting Outdoor Lighting Energy: Ballasted Lamps 175W Lighting Outdoor Lighting Energy: Ballasted Lamps 200W Lighting Outdoor Lighting Energy: Ballasted Lamps 250W Lighting

72

Feasibility study of wood-fired cogeneration at a Wood Products Industrial Park, Belington, WV. Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Customarily, electricity is generated in a utility power plant while thermal energy is generated in a heating/cooling plant; the electricity produced at the power plant is transmitted to the heating/cooling plant to power equipments. These two separate systems waste vast amounts of heat and result in individual efficiencies of about 35%. Cogeneration is the sequential production of power (electrical or mechanical) and thermal energy (process steam, hot/chilled water) from a single power source; the reject heat of one process issued as input into the subsequent process. Cogeneration increases the efficiency of these stand-alone systems by producing these two products sequentially at one location using a small additional amount of fuel, rendering the system efficiency greater than 70%. This report discusses cogeneration technologies as applied to wood fuel fired system.

Vasenda, S.K.; Hassler, C.C.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lightning Climatology of the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lightning climatology over the Northeastern United States and Mid-Atlantic United States is examined from United States Precision Lightning Network observations because studying lightning climatology is… (more)

Etters, Kyle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Purification of a Water Extract of Chinese Sweet Tea Plant (Rubus suavissimus S. Lee) by Alcohol Precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purification of a Water Extract of Chinese Sweet Tea Plant (Rubus suavissimus S. Lee) by Alcohol Precipitation ... To purify this water extract for potential elevated bioactivity, an alcohol precipitation (AP) consisting of gradient regimens was applied, and its resultants were examined through colorimetric and HPLC analyses. ... Prior to performing alcohol precipitation of the aqueous extract samples, various extract-to-water ratios ranging from 1:4 w/v to 1:8 w/v were tested to determine the amount of precipitant (thus the reciprocal amount of the purified extract) caused by extract solubility itself. ...

Gar Yee Koh; Guixin Chou; Zhijun Liu

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Winter distribution and abundance of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) off Northeastern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil Alexandre N. Zerbini* , Artur Andriolo+ , Jesuina M. da Rocha# , Paulo César Simões'). The northeastern coast of Brazil was an important whaling ground in the 20th century. Shipboard sighting surveys off northeastern Brazil suggests that the species is reoccupying historical areas of distribution

Simões-Lopes, Paulo César

76

GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND SOIL FORMATION OF ARID LANDS IN NORTHEASTERN JORDAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOMORPHIC FEATURES AND SOIL FORMATION OF ARID LANDS IN NORTHEASTERN JORDAN GEOMORPHOLOGISCHE. BUCKb and H. C. MONGERc a Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid-22110-Jordan; b University the geomorphic features and soil formation of the arid lands in northeastern Jordan, to provide information

Ahmad, Sajjad

77

J. Nvar et al.Stand biomass in Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico Original article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Návar et al.Stand biomass in Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico Original article Estimating stand biomass in the Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico José Návara* , Eduardo Méndeza standing biomass measurements and estimates using quadrat attributes in the Tamaulipan thornscrub

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National of inundation risk from sea level rise and storm surge in northeastern coastal national parks. Journal of Coastal Research, 00(0), 000­000. Coconut Creek (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Sea level rise and an increase

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

79

Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV (DOE/EIS-0361) (04/29/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14 Federal Register 14 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 83 / Tuesday, April 29, 2008 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, Greenbrier County, WV AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Record of Decision (ROD) and Floodplain Statement of Findings. SUMMARY: DOE has decided to implement the Proposed Action alternative, identified as the preferred alternative, in the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0361; November 2007) (FEIS). That alternative is to provide approximately $107.5 million (up to 50% of the development costs) to Western Greenbrier Co-Generation, LLC

80

Low?frequency sound attentuation in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Signals from SUS bombs were received at four hydrophones suspended in the deep ocean from the Research Platform FLIP. Using digital processing equipment and fast Fourier transform methods energy?flux spectral densities were determined for approximately 700 shots out to a maximum range of 1600 nautical miles. Differences in propagation losses at various octave and one?third?octave frequency bands up to 400 Hz were used to calculate attenuation values. The resulting values are lower than those predicted from Thorp's equation but are in agreement with published values determined from cw acoustic transmission experiments in the Northeastern Pacific [J. R. Lovett J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 58 620–625 (1975)]. [Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

G. B. Morris

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SHORT-TERM PRECIPITATION AND TEMPERATURE TRENDS ALONG AN ELEVATION GRADIENT IN NORTHEASTERN PUERTO RICO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As is true of many tropical regions, Northeastern Puerto Rico is an ecologically sensitive area with biological life that is highly elevation-dependent on precipitation and temperature. Climate change has the potential to increase the risk of ...

Ashley E. Van Beusekom; Grizelle González; Maria M. Rivera

82

Water Intensity Assessment of Shale Gas Resources in the Wattenberg Field in Northeastern Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Intensity Assessment of Shale Gas Resources in the Wattenberg Field in Northeastern Colorado ... Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. ...

Stephen Goodwin; Ken Carlson; Ken Knox; Caleb Douglas; Luke Rein

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Subinertial Slope-Trapped Waves in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current velocity from moored arrays of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) deployed on the outer shelf and slope, south of Mobile Bay in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, shows evidence of alongslope, generally westward-propagating ...

Z. R. Hallock; W. J. Teague; E. Jarosz

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting northeastern brazil Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Guy- ana, known as the Guianas-Brazil... of northeastern Brazil, French Guiana, Suriname and Guyana (1975-77). In A. C. Jones and L. Villegas (Editors... working group met in...

85

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as a way to maximize the integration of variable renewable energy in power systems: The case of wind generation in northeastern Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several studies have proposed different tools for analyzing the integration of variable renewable energy into power grids. This study applies an optimization tool to model the expansion of the electric power system in northeastern Brazil, enabling the most efficient dispatch of the variable output of the wind farms that will be built in the region over the next 20 years. The expected combined expansion of wind generation with conventional inflexible generation facilities, such as nuclear plants and run-of-the-river hydropower plants, poses risks of future mismatch between supply and demand in northeastern Brazil. Therefore, this article evaluates the possibility of using a fleet of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) to regularize possible energy imbalances. Findings indicate that a dedicated fleet of 500 thousand \\{PHEVs\\} in 2015, and a further 1.5 million in 2030, could be recharged overnight to take advantage of the surplus power generated by wind farms. To avoid the initial costs of smart grids, this article suggests, as a first step, the use of a governmental PHEV fleet that allows fleet managers to control battery charging times. Finally, the study demonstrates the advantages of optimizing simultaneously the power and transport sectors to test the strategy suggested here.

Bruno Soares M.C. Borba; Alexandre Szklo; Roberto Schaeffer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

87

Depth dependence of ambient noise in the northeastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Omnidirectional ambient noise levels were measured at two deep?water locations in the northeastern Pacific Ocean.Hydrophones were positioned throughout the water column at depths ranging from about 200 m below the surface to about 150 m above the sea bottom. Analyses of the data over the frequencies from 15 to 800 Hz show that at low frequencies the noise levels decrease with increasing depth. The decrease with depth is greater below the critical depth than it is in the sound channel. These low?frequency noise levels and their depth dependence are independent of the wind speed. At higher frequencies the noise levels and the depth dependence are controlled by the wind?generated noise. At low wind speeds there is a decrease in levels below the critical depth but above this depth both increases and decreases in levels with depth were noted. At these high frequencies during high wind speeds the noise levels not only rise but also fill the water column to the extent that there is little decrease in level with increasing depth even for the region below the critical depth.

Gerald B. Morris

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: (0472-1537) Northeastern University -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

37) Northeastern University - 37) Northeastern University - Multiscale Development of L 10 Materials for Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy LocationCs) CCity/County/State): New York, Michigan, Massachusetts, and Nebraska. Proposed Action Description: Funding will support the development of an ultra-strong ferromagnetic magnet material with a tetragonal L 10 structure, that does not contain rare earth materials and is designed for use in clean energy technologies such as electric vehicle motors and wind turbine generators. Northeastern University's application was selected for an initial 18-month period (Phase 1) of funding. The ARPA-E Program Director may decide to negotiate and fund project activities for an additional 18-month period (Phase II) after evaluating the work performed in Phase I. ARPA-E has not obligated

89

214Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 Ethel Wilkerson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

214Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 Ethel Wilkerson quality recreational experiences (Manfredo et al.1983) with protection of environmental values (Kuss and Leung 2001). Degradation of trails can also impact the quality and enjoyment of recreation experiences

90

Dissipation of fast strike-slip faulting within and beyond northeastern Tibet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strike-slip faulting within and beyond northeastern Tibet Alison R. Duvall and Marin K. Clark Department of Geological Sciences...Arnaud N., Wittlinger G., Jingsui Y. 2001, Oblique step wise rise and growth of the Tibet Plateau: Science, v. 294, p...

Alison R. Duvall; Marin K. Clark

91

NUVABAT: Northeastern University Virtual Ankle and Balance Trainer Ye Ding1, Mark Sivak1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUVABAT: Northeastern University Virtual Ankle and Balance Trainer Ye Ding1, Mark Sivak1 , Brian-373-5274. ABSTRACT The ability to control the ankle muscles and produce adequate range ofmotion in the ankle joints, such as stroke or traumatic brain injury, frequently lose gait and balance function due in part to loss of ankle

Mavroidis, Constantinos

92

Anthropogenic and Natural Emissions of Mercury (Hg) in the northeastern United Jeffrey MacAdam Sigler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Anthropogenic and Natural Emissions of Mercury (Hg) in the northeastern United States impact may depend on the emission rate. Anthropogenic Hg emissions in the United States are poorly characterized. Natural Hg emissions are poorly understood worldwide, due to lack of data or measurement systems

Lee, Xuhui

93

OBSERVATIONS ON THE FISH FAUNA ASSOCIATED WITH OFFSHORE PLATFORMS IN THE NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

active only during the day, and others only at night. Offshore oil drilling platforms are known to atOBSERVATIONS ON THE FISH FAUNA ASSOCIATED WITH OFFSHORE PLATFORMS IN THE NORTHEASTERN GULF the summer and fall, but many species begin to move offshore or southward as the water temperature drops

94

The Role of Cetaceans in the Shelf-Edge Region of the Northeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Cetaceans in the Shelf-Edge Region of the Northeastern United States JAMES H. W. HAIN, MARTIN A. M. HYMAN, ROBERT D. KENNEY, and HOWARD E. WINN Introduction Man has been, and continues to be, RI 02881; the present address of J. H. W. Hain is Associated Scientists at Woods Hole, Box 721, Woods

95

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

Kraft, Clifford E.

96

Late-Successional Biomass Development in Northern Hardwood-Conifer Forests of the Northeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Late-Successional Biomass Development in Northern Hardwood-Conifer Forests of the Northeastern-successional biomass dynamics in northern hardwood-conifer forests using a data set spanning the north- eastern United that aboveground biomass can accumulate very late into succession in northern hardwood-conifer forests, recognizing

Vermont, University of

97

Project Information Form Project Title Intercity Travel in Northeastern Non-metropolitan Regions: What Roles do  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) USDOT $73,000 Total Project Cost $73,000 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start and End DatesProject Information Form Project Title Intercity Travel in Northeastern Non-metropolitan Regions September 2014 to August 2016 Brief Description of Research Project Little is known about intercity travel

California at Davis, University of

98

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

99

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams Clifford E and associated streams. During 1999 and 2000, tree canopy damage, stream physical habitat, and wood deposition were evaluated within 51 first-, second-, and third-order streams located within five eastern

Kraft, Clifford E.

100

Analyzing the effectiveness of alternative fuel reductions of a forested landscape in Northeastern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing the effectiveness of alternative fuel reductions of a forested landscape in Northeastern reduction, and fiscal input. We used the LANDIS model to study the effects of alternative fuel reduction to the effective fire suppression started in the early 1950s. Consequently, high fuel accumulation coupled

He, Hong S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High frequency plantlet regeneration from callus and artificial seed production of rock plant Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. (Poaceae)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pogonatherum paniceum (Lam.) Hack. is a rock plant with good potential for vegetative recovery on naked lands. A high frequency in vitro regeneration system was developed for P. paniceum. Calli were induced from explants of mature seeds, seedlings, young leaves, and stem segments on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 1.0 mg L?1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 2.0 mg L?1 ?-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.2 mg L?1 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP). High induction rates (59.57%) and regeneration rates (100%) were obtained from mature seed explants; calli were sub-cultured for over 2 years and still retained a high regenerative capacity. One seed explant resulted in 69,997 plants in 1 year. Shoot buds derived from calli were used for encapsulation in liquid MS medium containing 3% sucrose and two different alginate matrices (3% sodium alginate (w/v) + MS medium containing 3% sucrose and 3% sodium alginate + 1% activated carbon (w/v) + MS medium containing 3% sucrose) with a 20-min exposure to 2% CaCl2 and 0.3% bavistin (w/v). The capsule with 3.0% sodium alginate (w/v) and 1% activated carbon (w/v) showed a higher conversion rate (61.58%) and stronger plantlets under non-aseptic conditions. These systems are useful for the rapid clonal propagation and dissemination of artificial seed material of P. paniceum for eco-recovery.

Wen-Guo Wang; Sheng-Hua Wang; Xiao-Ai Wu; Xing-Yu Jin; Fang Chen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants Background The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) University Coal Research (UCR) Program seeks to further develop the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to improve our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner; maintain and upgrade the coal research capabilities and facilities of U.S. colleges and

103

Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area...

Guo, Mengdong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

An Appalachian-sourced deltaic sequence, northeastern Alabama, U.S.A.: biofacies-lithofacies relationships and interpreted community patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thin sequence of Lowe Pennsylvania rocks along Sand Mountain, Plateau coal field, northeastern Alabama, U.S.A., records the deposition in a deltaic coastal-plain paleoenvironment along the ancient Appalachian seaway. The section is laterally continuous, well exposed, and preserves a rich macrobiota. Identified coexisting paleodepositional environments contain distinctive biofacies. Biofacies in deltaic sites are characterized by the presence of various macrofloral assemblages. Alluvial-plain swamps, identified lithologically by homogeneous mudstone and siltstone, preserve bedded-plant litter as coalified compressions and impressions. Deep-swamp biofacies are comprised either of monotypic lycophyte canopy assemblages (Lepidophloios) or their subterranean axial systems (Stigmaria). Alluvial swamps and proximal levee sites contain canopy detritus of a mixed flora. This is reflected in the reduced domination of Lepidophloios, the increased importance of the lycophytes Sigillaria and Lepidodendron, and an abundance of gymnosperms, pteridosperms, pteridophytes, and Calamites. Macro-invertebrates occur almost exclusively as behavioral trackways of xiphosurid arthropods and epifauna attached to fragmentary plant parts. The peat-accumulating swamp biofacies is identified from palynological preparations. Palynofloras parallel macrofloral clastic swamp diversity and contain an abundance of palynomorphs with affinities to ferns and lyginopterid pteridosperms. Channel-form sandstone represent distributary and crevasse channel deposits in the lower part of the section, and uncomformable bedload-dominated, laterally migrating, braided-river channel deposits at the top of the sequence. Oriented sandstone cast and compressed logs (lycophytes and Calamites) occur with bedload features in distributary and braided channels. Crevasse sanstones preserve a higher proportion of calamitean axes, as well as trunks and rachises of medullosan pteridosperms. Macro-invertebrates and ichnofaunas have not been identified in these paleoenvironments. Bayfill sequences contain several in situ macro-invertebrate communities in addition to allochthonous plant detritus. This plant biofacies is characterized by calamitean and pteridospermous vegetation, that originated from levee sites. The macrofaunal biofacies is characterized by a molluscan assemblage, with community replacement relative to physical parameters of the water. The initial bayfill phase contains an inarticulate brachiopod community of Orbiculoidea and Lingula. The transition to the molluscan-dominated biofacies is signaled by infaunal colonization by Pteronites and Planolites (burrows). Biotic changes are reflected by the increasing abundance of brachiopods and other invertebrates usually considered to represent more open-marine conditions. Insights into Late Carboniferous open-marine communities can be discerned from lag accumulations of marine epifauna in storm-generated sandstones.

Robert A. Gastaldo; Michael A. Gibson; Tony D. Gray

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Basement/cover rock relations of the Dry Fork Ridge Anticline termination, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming and Montana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BASEMENT/COVER ROCK RELATIONS OF THE DRY FORK RIDGE ANTICLINE TERMINATION, NORTHEASTERN BIGHORN MOUNTAINS, WYOMING AND MONTANA A Thesis by PETER HILL HENNINGS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Geology BASEMENT/COVER ROCK RELATIONS OF THE DRY FORK RIDGE ANTICLINE TERMINATION, NORTHEASTERN BIGHORN MOUNTAINS, WYOMING AND MONTANA A Thesis by PETER HILL HENNINGS Approved...

Hennings, Peter Hill

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Geology INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN SARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA...

Kranz, Dwight Stanley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Salt tectonism and seismic stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic in the Destin Dome Region, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SALT TECI'ONISM AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER JURASSIC IN THE DESTIN DOME REGION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by GRANT MACRAE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Oceanography SALT TECI'ONISM AND SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER JURASSIC IN THE DESTIN DOME REGION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by GRANT MACRAE Approved...

MacRae, Grant

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

108

Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Northeastern Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Source Signature of Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Natural Gas Operations in Northeastern Colorado ... Only 4% of all samples at BAO had high ROH+VOCO&NG and were from the western sector where the nearest wells are located indicating that they were not the dominant O&NG source at BAO. ... parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during Feb., 1991. ...

J. B. Gilman; B. M. Lerner; W. C. Kuster; J. A. de Gouw

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

109

Journal: Forest Ecology and Management1 Title Bridge Scour Physical Road and Stream Network Connectivity, Northeastern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Bridge Scour Physical Road and Stream Network Connectivity, Northeastern Puerto Rico Authors ­ Sherrill, K.R.1 , Pike, A.S.2 , Laituri, M.J.1* , Scatena, F.N.2 , Helmer, E.H.3 , and Blanco, J.F.4 1, CO 80523-1472, USA 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Key Words ­ Bridge Scour, Physical Road and Stream Network

110

Preconstruction of the Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

The work undertaken under this Contract is the prosecution of the preconstruction activities, including preliminary engineering design, well field development, completion of environmental review and prosecution of permits, and the economic and financial analysis of the facility. The proposed power plant is located in northeastern California in Lassen County, approximately 25 miles east of the town of Susanville. The power plant will use a combination of wood residue and geothermal fluids for power generation. The plant, when fully constructed, will generate a combined net output of approximately 33 megawatts which will be sold to Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG E) under existing long-term power sales contracts. Transfer of electricity to the PG E grid will require construction of a 22-mile transmission line from the power plant to Susanville. 11 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Preconstruction of the Honey Lake Hybrid Power Plant: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The work undertaken under this Contract is the prosecution of the preconstruction activities, including preliminary engineering design, well field development, completion of environmental review and prosecution of permits, and the economic and financial analysis of the facility. The proposed power plant is located in northeastern California in Lassen County, approximately 25 miles east of the town of Susanville. The power plant will use a combination of wood residue and geothermal fluids for power generation. The plant, when fully constructed, will generate a combined net output of approximately 33 megawatts which will be sold to Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGandE) under existing long-term power sales contracts. Transfer of electricity to the PGandE grid will require construction of a 22-mile transmission line from the power plant to Susanville. 11 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, WV and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement (6/3/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 11 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 106 / Tuesday, June 3, 2003 / Notices Dated: May 27, 2003. Judge Eric Andell, Deputy Under Secretary for Safe and Drug- Free Schools. [FR Doc. 03-13836 Filed 6-2-03; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Western Greenbrier Co-Production Demonstration Project, Rainelle, WV and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Floodplain/Wetlands Involvement. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the

113

Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "1. Northeastern","Coal","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1815 "2. Muskogee","Coal","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1524 "3. Seminole","Gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1504 "4. Kiamichi Energy Facility","Gas","Kiowa Power Partners LLC",1178 "5. Redbud Power Plant","Gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1160 "6. Oneta Energy Center","Gas","Calpine Central L P",1086 "7. Riverside","Gas","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1070 "8. Sooner","Coal","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1046 "9. GRDA","Coal","Grand River Dam Authority",1010

114

Black Bear Prep plant replaces high-frequency screens with fine wire sieves  

SciTech Connect

At the Black Bear prep plant (near Wharncliffe, WV, USA) the clean coal from the spirals traditionally reported to high-frequency screens, which removed high-ash clay fines. Screens have inherent inefficiencies that allow clean coal to report to the screen underflow. The goal of this project was to capture the maximum amount of spiral clean coal while still removing the high-ash clay material found in the spiral product. The reduction of the circulating load and plant downtime for unscheduled maintenance were projected as additional benefits. After the plant upgrade, the maintenance related to the high frequency screens was eliminated and an additional 2.27 tons per hour (tph) of fine coal was recovered, which resulted in a payback period of less than one year. The article was adapted from a paper presented at Coal Prep 2007 in April 2007, Lexington, KY, USA. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Barbee, C.J.; Nottingham, J.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microsoft Word - Plant Process Control Workshop cover.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 2006 June 2006 By Susan Maley and Robert R. Romanosky U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Plant Process Control Workshop Summary Report Executive Summary 1.0 Introduction/Overview 2.0 Summary of Discussions 2.1 Comments on Current "State-of-the Art" for Process Control 2.2 Process Control Issues and Emerging Trends 2.3 Future R&D Opportunities 2.4 Comments/Recommendations Appendix A: List of Workshop Attendees Appendix B: Workshop Agenda Appendix C: Workshop Presentation Topics Appendix D: Workshop Presentations 2 Today more than ever, the supply and demand requirements within the energy industry are continually evolving; requiring newer and more creative methods in advanced technology to

117

Proceedings of the 2010 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-94 141 HOW PLACE ATTACHMENTS INFLUENCE RECREATION CONFLICT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings of the 2010 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-94 141 HOW PLACE ATTACHMENTS INFLUENCE RECREATION CONFLICT AND COPING BEHAVIOR Cheng-PingWang DepartmentofTourism Shih.--Thepurposeofthisstudywastoexplore how place attachment influences recreation conflict andcopingbehaviorsbasedontheTransactional Stress

118

The Cabo de la Vela MaficUltramafic Complex, Northeastern Colombian Caribbean region: a record of Multistage evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cabo de la Vela Mafic­Ultramafic Complex, Northeastern Colombian Caribbean region: a record-related rocks have been described from the Colombian Caribbean (MacDonald 1964; Lockwood 1965; Alvarez 1967. Geological setting The Meso-Cenozoic history of the Colombian Andes in the Caribbean region is characterized

Bermingham, Eldredge

119

GROWTH OF PACIFIC SAUR~ COWLABlS SAlRA, IN THE NORTHEASTERN AND NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC OCEANI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the northeastern and northwestern Pacific Ocean was studied using otolith growth increments. We found that growth, Cololabis saira (Brevoort), is distributed throughout the North Pacific Ocean and is one of the most the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Details of sampling and methods of reading otoliths are summarized in Table 1

120

Frozen plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frozen plants Frozen plants Name: janicehu Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Why do some plants freeze and others do not? Replies: The main reason some plants freeze and others do not is that some plants do not have much water in them. Pine tree leaves have little water and are therefore difficult to freeze. Another reason is that some plants make chemicals to put into their fluids that reduce the freezing temperature. Salts and oils are some. The polyunsaturated fats found in many plants freeze at a lower temperature than the saturated fats found in many animals. Therefore plant fats are liquid (oils) at room temperature, and animal fats are solid. Plants could not use so many saturated fats as warm blooded animals do or they would freeze up solid at higher temperatures. I know little of plants but many animals can make ethylene glycol to keep themselves from freezing. Ethylene glycol is the active ingredient in car anti-freeze

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Carnivorous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carnivorous Plants Carnivorous Plants Nature Bulletin No. 597-A March 27, 1976 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CARNIVOROUS PLANTS Plants, generally, are eaten by insects or furnish other food for them. But there are a few families of strange plants that, instead, "eat" insects and other small animals. About 500 species are distributed over the world, from the arctic to the tropics. Most of them have peculiar leaves that not only attract insects but are equipped to trap and kill their victims. Even more remarkable is the fact that some have glands which secrete a digestive juice that softens and decomposes the animal until it is absorbed by the plant in much the same way as your stomach digests food.

122

Hillslope erosion at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site, northeastern Kentucky. Water Resources Investigation  

SciTech Connect

Maxey Flats, a disposal site for low-level radioactive waste, is on a plateau that rises 300 to 400 feet above the surrounding valleys in northeastern Kentucky. Hillslope gradients average 30 to 40 percent on three sides of the plateau. The shortest distance from a hillslope to a burial trench is 140 feet on the west side of the site. The report presents the results of a 2-year study of slope erosion processes at the Maxey Flats disposal site, and comments on the long-term integrity of the burial trenches with respect to slope retreat. Thus, the report is of much broader scope in terms of earth-surface processes than the period of data collection would suggest. As such, the discussion and emphasis is placed on infrequent, large-magnitude events that are known to occur over the time scale of interest but have not been specifically documented at the site.

Carey, W.P.; Lyverse, M.A.; Hupp, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE/NETL's Existing Plants-Emissions and Capture R&D Program Jared Ciferno  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Coal-Fired Power Plants, CCS, and a "Coal-Fired Power Plants, CCS, and a Use for the CO 2 " Charles E. Taylor, Director, Chemistry and Surface Science Division Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory * Only DOE national lab dedicated to fossil energy - Fossil fuels provide 85% of U.S. energy supply * One lab, one management structure, five locations - Full-service DOE Federal laboratory - 3 R&D locations * >1,200 Federal and support- contractor employees * Research spans fundamental science to technology demonstrations Pittsburgh, PA Morgantown, WV Albany, OR Fairbanks, AK Sugar Land, TX Office of Fossil Energy U.S. data from EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011; World data from IEA, World Energy Outlook 2010, Current Policies Scenario 716 QBtu / Year

124

SPIXIANA 23 1 71-83 Miinchen, 01. Marz 2000 ISSN 0341-8391 A new species of Mantidactylus from northeastern Madagascar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 182 valid species were scientifically named until the end of the 20th century, but a total of at least Naturelle Integrate Marojezy", Camp 4(ca. 1250 m above sea level), northeastern Madagascar, on 28 February

125

wvBLACK DIAMONDS table of contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'RE ON THE WEB! www.mine.cemr.wvu.edu Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources DEPARTMENT OF MINING

Mohaghegh, Shahab

126

wvBLACK DIAMONDS table of contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with mining! WE'RE ON THE WEB! www.mine.cemr.wvu.edu College of Engineering and Mineral Resources DEPARTMENT

Mohaghegh, Shahab

127

An Appalachian-sourced deltaic sequence, northeastern Alabama, USA: biofacies-lithofacies relationships and interpreted community patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thin sequence of Lower Pennsylvania rocks along Sand Mountain, Plateau coal field, northeastern Alabama, U.S.A., records the deposition in a deltaic coastal-plain paleoenvironment along the ancient Appalachian seaway. The section is laterally continuous, well exposed, and preserves a rich macrobiota. Identified coexisting paleodepositional environments contain distinctive biofacies. Specific paleoenvironments of deposition contain unique biofacies in this Late Carboniferous (Westphalian A) sequence. The criteria established for the recognition of these biofacies can be utilized to assist in refined interpretations of deltaic sites in Carboniferous coastal paleoenvironments. Identifiable biofacies include those preserved under a variety of forested wetland (swamp) conditions, distributary and crevasse-splay channels, coastal bays (“interdistributary” and lagoonal), barrier sands, and distal storm deposits (Fig. 1; Gastaldo et al., 1989). Vegetation in forested wetlands grew either in clastic substrates or peat substrates. The principal biofacies preserved in clastic substrate swamps were lycophyte-dominated, and can be recognized by either a predominance of canopy litter or subterranean stigmarian appendages (Gastaldo, 1986). The canopy litter that has accumulated on the forest floor was preserved under unique sedimentological conditions, and reflects the ecological gradient associated with the distribution of lycophyte genera in the swamp (Gastaldo, 1987). A monotypic assemblage of lycophytes characterized edaphically stressed sites. In sites proximal to the levee, a mixed assemblage of lycophytes, calamiteans, pteridophytes and pteridosperms is common. In the absence of compressed canopy macrodetritus, subterranean axes with helically arranged appendages (“rootlets”) crosscutting the bedding may be preserved. Macro-invertebrates are restricted to traces and trails, reflecting behavioral traits when conditions were conducive for their movement into these sites. Peat-colonizing vegetation parallels that of the clastic swamp. Deep distributary channels contain sandstone-cast and compressed aerial trunks of lycophytes and spenophytes. These occur in bedload deposits along with quartz and quartzose pebbles and cobble-size phyllite clasts. Degradation of external morphology usually precludes assignment of logs to a systematic position lower than order. In shallower, en-echelon stacked crevasse sands occur a mixture of lycophyte, calamitean and pteridosperm “woody” parts. Additionally, scoriaceous fern-like foliage may be found. Little evidence exists for macro-invertebrate communities in these unstable settings. Coastal bays preserve in situ macro-invertebrate communities, as well as allochthonous macrodetritus that was derived principally from levee vegetation. Four phases of biofacies development can be delineated (Gibson and Gastaldo, 1987). Stress-tolerant inarticulate brachiopods dominate the initial transgressive phase. Individuals are found isolated in the siltstone, commonly preserved by authigenic cementation in siderite concretions. Rarely are patches or clusters of individual encountered. Where clustering does occur it is associated with the colonization of “woody” plant parts. Transition to the molluscan-dominated phase is accompanied by the establishment of a rich ichnofauna. Continued transgression and the development of more normal salinities under lagoonal conditions are paralleled by an increase in species richness and abundance. The third biofacies phase remains molluscan dominated, but the assemblages at any particular point in time are represented by monospecific genera. Plant macrodetritus was utilized by the macro-invertebrate communities, and that which is preserved is restricted to highly fragmentary, unindentifiable remains. The fourth biofacies phase reflects the development of lagoonal conditions. This change can be recognized by macro-invertebrate body and ichnofossil fauna (Seilacher's Cruziana ichnofacies) diversification. An increase in the abundance of brachiopods and other

R.A. Gastaldo; M.A. Gibson; T.D. Gray

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Medicinal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal Plants Medicinal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 187 April 11, 1981 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation MEDICINAL PLANTS In springtime, many years ago, grandma made her family drink gallons of tea made by boiling roots of the sassafras. That was supposed to thin and purify the blood. Children were sent out to gather dandelion, curly dock, wild mustard, pokeberry and other greens as soon as they appeared -- not only because they added welcome variety to the diet of bread, meat, potatoes and gravy, but because some of them were also laxatives. For a bad "cold on the lungs," she slapped a mustard plaster on the patient's back, and on his chest she put a square of red flannel soaked in goose grease. For whooping cough she used a syrup of red clover blossoms. She made cough medicine from the bloodroot plant, and a tea from the compass plant of the prairies was also used for fevers and coughs. She made a pleasant tea from the blossoms of the linden or basswood tree. For stomach aches she used tea from any of several aromatic herbs such as catnip, fennel, yarrow, peppermint, spearmint, sweetflag, wild ginger, bergamot and splice bush.

129

Bog Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bog Plants Bog Plants Nature Bulletin No. 385-A June 6, 1970 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation BOG PLANTS Fifty years ago there were probably more different kinds of plants within a 50 mile radius from the Loop than anywhere else in the Temperate Zone. Industrial, commercial and residential developments, plus drainage and fires have erased the habitats where many of the more uncommon kinds flourished, including almost all of the tamarack swamps and quaking bogs. These bogs were a heritage from the last glacier. Its front had advanced in a great curve, from 10 to 20 miles beyond what is now the shoreline of Lake Michigan, before the climate changed and it began to melt back. Apparently the retreat was so rapid that huge blocks of ice were left behind, surrounded by the outwash of boulders, gravel and ground-up rock called "drift". These undrained depressions; became lakes. Sphagnum moss invaded many of them and eventually the thick floating mats of it supported a variety of bog-loving plants including certain shrubs, tamarack, and a small species of birch. Such lakes became bogs.

130

A climatological estimate of incident solar energy in Tamaulipas, northeastern Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An estimation of climatological fields of incident solar energy in Tamaulipas State, northeastern Mexico, is presented. Monthly mean evolution of solar energy in 7 automatic meteorological stations distributed along the State shows that the maximum values generally exceed 500 ± 200 W m?2 during fall-winter (Nov–Feb), and 700 ± 200 W m?2 during spring-summer (May–Aug). An empirical model, which estimates the solar energy as function of other climatic variables (minimum temperature, maximum temperature, evaporation, and precipitation) recorded in 165 climatological conventional stations, is used to extend the climatological solar-energy estimate in the study area. The mean values of both measured and estimated solar energy are objectively mapped to fill the observation gaps and reduce the noise associated with inhomogeneous statistics and estimation errors. The highest values of solar energy ( ? 6.7  kW h m?2 during the summer and ? 4.0  kW h m?2 during the winter) are observed in the highlands, southwestern part of the State, whereas the lowest values ( ? 5.7  kW h m?2 during the summer and ? 2.8  kW h m?2 during the winter) are observed in the south-central part of the State.

David Rivas; Salomón Saleme-Vila; Rogelio Ortega-Izaguirre; Fabio Chalé-Lara; Felipe Caballero-Briones

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Abundance Inhomogeneity in the Northeastern Rim of the Cygnus Loop Revealed by Suzaku Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a spatially resolved spectral analysis from four Suzaku observations covering the northeastern rim of the Cygnus Loop. A two-kT_e non-ionization equilibrium (NEI) model fairly well represents our data, which confirms the NEI condition of the plasma there. The metal abundances are depleted relative to the solar values almost everywhere in our field of view. We find abundance inhomogeneities across the field: the northernmost region (Region A) has enhanced absolute abundances compared with other regions. In addition, the relative abundances of Mg/O and Fe/O in Region A are lower than the solar values, while those in the other regions are twice higher than the solar values. As far as we are concerned, neither a circumstellar medium, fragments of ejecta, nor abundance inhomogeneities of the local interstellar medium around the Cygnus Loop can explain the relatively enhanced abundance in Region A. This point is left as an open question for future work.

S. Katsuda; H. Tsunemi; H. Uchida; E. Miyata; N. Nemes; E. D. Miller; K. Mori; J. P. Hughes

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Avian use of forest habitats in the Pembina hills of northeastern North Dakota. Resource pub  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota has the least extensive total area of forested habitats of any of the 50 United States. Although occurring in limited area, forest communities add considerably to the total ecological diversity of the State. The forests of the Pembina Hills region in northeastern North Dakota are one of only three areas large enough to be considered of commercial value. During 1981 the authors studied the avifauna of the upper valley of the Pembina River in the Pembina Hills. Field work extended from 20 April to 23 July; breeding bird censuses were conducted 7 June to 2 July. Of the 120 bird species recorded during the study period, 79 species were recorded during the breeding season. The total breeding population was estimated at nearly 76,000 breeding pairs. The wood warblers (Parulidae) were the most numerous family, accounting for about 28,000 breeding pairs. The yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) was the most abundant breeding species, making up 19.4% of the population. American redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) was second in abundance, accounting for 10.5% of the breeding population. Largest breeding densities occurred in the willow (Salix sp.) shrub community.

Faanes, C.A.; Andrew, J.M.

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Poisonous Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants Plants Nature Bulletin No. 276 October 1, 1983 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation POISONOUS PLANTS In the autumn of 1818, Nancy Hanks Lincoln died of milk sickness and left her son, Abe, motherless before he was ten years old. Since colonial times, in most of the eastern half of the United States, that dreaded disease has been a hazard in summer and fall, wherever cattle graze in woodlands or along wooded stream banks. In the 1920s it was finally traced to white snakeroot -- an erect branched plant, usually about 3 feet tall, with a slender round stem, sharply-toothed nettle-like leaves and, in late summer, several small heads of tiny white flowers. Cows eating small amounts over a long period develop a disease called "trembles", and their milk may bring death to nursing calves or milk sickness to humans. When larger amounts are eaten the cow, herself, may die.

134

Bagdad Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bagdad Plant Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon Drive Leechburg, P A 15656 * ATI Allegheny "'I Ludlum e-mail: Raymond.Polinski@ATImetals.com Mr. James Raba U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 205585-0121 Raymond J. Polinski General Manager Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel RE: Distribution Transformers Rulemaking Docket Number EE-2010-STD-0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Submitted 4-10-12 via email Mr. Raba, I was planning to make the following closing comments at the DOE Public Meeting on February 23, 2012, but since the extended building evacuation caused the meeting to run well past the scheduled completion time I decided to submit my comments directly to you for the record.

135

Life cycle assessment of an onshore wind farm located at the northeastern coast of Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article assesses the life cycle emissions of a fictive onshore wind power station consisting of 141.5-MW wind turbines situated on the northeastern coast of Brazil. The objective is to identify the main sources of CO2(eq)-emissions during the life cycle of the wind farm. The novelty of this work lies in the focus on Brazil and its emerging national manufacturing industry. With an electricity matrix that is primarily based on renewable energy sources (87% in 2010), this country emits eight times less CO2 for the production of 1 kWh of electricity than the global average. Although this fact jeopardizes the CO2 mitigation potential of wind power projects, it also reduces the carbon footprint of parts and components manufactured in Brazil. The analysis showed that reduced CO2-emissions in the material production stage and the low emissions of the component production stage led to a favorable CO2-intensity of 7.1 g CO2/kWh. The bulk of the emissions, a share of over 90%, were unambiguously caused by the production stage, and the transportation stage was responsible for another 6% of the CO2-emissions. The small contributions from the construction and operation phases could be neglected. Within the manufacturing process, the steel tower was identified as the source responsible for more than half of the emissions. The environmental impacts of the wind farm are small in terms of CO2-emissions, which can be credited to a green electricity mix. This scenario presents an advantage for the country and for further production sites, particularly in the surroundings of the preferred wind farm sites in Brazil, which should be favored to reduce CO2 emissions to an even greater extent.

Kerstin B. Oebels; Sergio Pacca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Hillslope erosion at the Maxey Flats Radioactive Waste Disposal Site, northeastern Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Maxey Flats, a disposal site for low level radioactive waste, is on a plateau that rises 300 to 400 ft above the surrounding valleys in northeastern Kentucky. Rates of hillslope retreat were determined through a combination of direct erosion measurements during the 2-year study and through dendrogeomorphic techniques. Rates of hillslope retreats were determined through a combination of direction erosion measurements during the 2-year study and through dendrogeomorphic techniques. Rates of hillslope retreat determined from dendrogeomorphic evidence rate from 3.8 to 9.1 in/century, so that time to exposure of the trenches ranges from 35,000 to 65,000 years. The minimum estimate of 35,000 years is for the most actively eroding southern slope. Throughout tens of thousands of years, the rate of hillslope retreat is determined more by the occurrence of infrequent extreme events such as slope failure than by the continuous processes of slope wash observed in this study. These slope failures cause as much erosion in one event as hundreds or even thousands of years of slope wash. Periods of tens of thousands of years are also sufficiently long for significant changes in climate and tectonic activity to occur. Rates of erosion observed during this 2-year study are highly unlikely to be indicative of rates averaged over periods of tens of thousands of years during which many extreme events can occur. Thus, the long-term geomorphic stability of the Maxey Flats disposal site will be highly dependent upon the magnitude and frequency of extreme erosive events and upon trends in climate change and tectonic activity.

Carey, W.P., Lyverse, M.A.; Hupp, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Site and frequency dependence of ambient noise in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One?hour averages of omidirectional ambient noise measurements at 60 and 165 Hz are analyzed for two nearby deep ocean sites in the Northeastern Pacific during February and March 1981. Site A is a high noise site and is located near major east–west shipping lanes and near major Pacific storm paths. Site B is a lower noise site and is located approximately 450 nm from site A away from major shipping lanes and near major Pacific storm paths. The site and frequency dependence of ambient noise is found to be highly variable with shipping noise being totally dominant at 60 Hz at site A and stormnoise being totally dominant at 165 Hz at site B. Both shipping and stormnoise can dominate the 165?Hz site A or 60?Hz site B noise levels depending on weather conditions. Storms have a possible indirect effect on shipping noise since very low noise periods occur in between storms especially when the storm passes nearby the site. A limited number of WMO ships sampled indicate that ships slow down or stay in port during storms. Average omnidirectinal noise levels at 60 Hz at both sites and at 165 Hz at site A were 3 to 4 dB lower during a stormy week than they were during a relatively calm week. Array noise gain measurements at site B indicate that the coherence of noise during stormy periods is much less than it is during calm periods. Generally this implies that the increase in beam level at 165 Hz caused by stormnoise will be significantly less than corresponding increase in omnidirectional noise levels.

James H. Wilson

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gasification Plant Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Plant Databases News Gasifipedia Gasifier Optimization Feed Systems Syngas Processing Systems Analyses Gasification Plant Databases International Activity Program Plan...

139

Plant Rosettes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rosettes Rosettes Nature Bulletin No. 662 January 13, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist PLANT ROSETTES In winter our landscape is mostly leafless trees silhouetted against the sky, and the dead stalks of wildflowers, weeds and tall grasses -- with or without a blanket of snow. Some snows lie on the ground for only a few days. Others follow one after another and cover the ground with white for weeks at a time. Soon the eye begins to hunger for a glimpse of something green and growing. Then, in sunny spots where the snow has melted or where youngsters have cleared it away, there appear clusters of fresh green leaves pressed tight to the soil. Whether it is a dandelion in the lawn, a pansy in a flower border, or a thistle in a vacant lot, such a typical leaf cluster -- called a winter rosette -- is a ring of leaves around a short central stem. The leaves are narrow at the base, wider toward the tip, and spread flat on the ground with little or no overlap. This arrangement gives full exposure to sunlight and close contact with the warmer soil beneath. Such plants continue to grow, sometimes faster, sometimes slower, even under snow, throughout winter.

140

1Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 MANAGING RECREATION ON MOUNTAIN SUMMITS IN THE NORTHERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1Proceedings of the 2009 Northeastern Recreation Research Symposium GTR-NRS-P-66 MANAGING RECREATION ON MOUNTAIN SUMMITS IN THE NORTHERN FOREST REGION OF MAINE, NEW HAMPSHIRE, NEW YORK, AND VERMONT the quality of the recreation experience. Crowding, conflict, and resource impacts can detract from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact StatementS Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Utilities Service U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers Title: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement Location: Proposed Big Stone II Plant: Big Stone City, South Dakota Proposed Transmission Facilities: Northeastern South Dakota and Southwestern Minnesota Contacts: For additional information on this Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement, or to receive a copy, contact: For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act process, write or call: Ms. Nancy Werdel Western Area Power Administration

142

NETL: News Release - Clean Coal Plant to Anchor West Virginia "Eco-Park"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2004 7, 2004 Clean Coal Plant to Anchor West Virginia "Eco-Park" $215 Million Co-Production Demonstration Plant to Create 6,000 New Jobs LEWISBURG, WV - Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham today commissioned a new $215 million West Virginia clean coal project based on new technology that over the next 60 months will deliver environmental improvements, economic benefits and thousands of new jobs. The project is part of President Bush's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a key component of the National Energy Policy that competitively selects commercial-scale technology demonstrations to continue and expand the use of coal as a fuel source. Development of the new technology, termed atmospheric-pressure circulating fluidized-bed combustion, is a joint-venture between the Department of Energy (DOE) and Western Greenbrier Co-Generation LLC. It will use nearby waste-coal to generate electric power with ultra-low emissions of pollutants while concurrently producing combustion ash byproducts and heat to support industrial activities. The power plant will serve as the anchor tenant for a new "Eco-Park" site in Rainelle, W. Va.

143

Seafood Plant Sanitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hygienically designed plant can improve the wholesomeness of seafood and the sanitation program. The location of the seafood plant can contribute to the sanitation of...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis in plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel transgenic plants and plant cells are capable of biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Heterologous enzymes involved in PHA biosynthesis, particularly PHA polymerase, are targeted to the peroxisome of a transgenic plant. Transgenic plant materials that biosynthesize short chain length monomer PHAs in the absence of heterologous .beta.-ketothiolase and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase are also disclosed.

Srienc, Friedrich (Lake Elmo, MN); Somers, David A. (Roseville, MN); Hahn, J. J. (New Brighton, MN); Eschenlauer, Arthur C. (Circle Pines, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ethylene insensitive plants  

SciTech Connect

Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

146

Informal and formal channels of communication preferred and used in the adoption of ranching practices by livestock producers in the state of Nuevo Leon of northeastern Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

livestock producer members was of paramount importance to this effort. Background Mexico?s livestock industry, as is the U.S. industry, has been under a great deal of internal and external pressure to change in order to stay competitive... INFORMAL AND FORMAL CHANNELS OF COMMUNICATION PREFERRED AND USED IN THE ADOPTION OF RANCHING PRACTICES BY LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS IN THE STATE OF NUEVO LE?N OF NORTHEASTERN MEXICO A Dissertation by WILLIAM LEE LAZENBY Submitted...

Lazenby, William Lee

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Plant immune systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant immune systems Plant immune systems Name: stephanie Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: Do plants have an immune system? How does it work? Are plants able to "fight off" infections such as Dutch Elm disease? Replies: In the broadest sense, an immune system is any method an organism has protect itself from succeeding to another organism's efforts to undermine its health and integrity. In this sense, yes, plants have immune systems. Plants do NOT have "active" immune systems, like humans, including macrophages, lymls, antibodies, complements, interferon, etc., which help us ward off infection. Rather, plants have "passive" mechanisms of protection. For instance, the waxy secretion of some plants (cuticle) functions to help hold in moisture and keep out microorganisms. Plants can also secrete irritating juices that prevent insects and animals from eating it. The thick bark of woody plants is another example of a defensive adaptation, that protects the more delicate tissues inside. The chemical secretions of some plants are downright poisonous to many organisms, which greatly enhance the chances of survival for the plant. Fruits of plants contain large amounts of vitamin C and bioflavonoids, compounds which have been shown in the lab to be anti-bacterial and antiviral. So in these ways, plants can improve their chances of survival. Hundreds of viruses and bacteria attack plants each year, and the cost to agriculture is enormous. I would venture to guess that once an organism establishes an infection in a plant, the plant will not be able to "fight" it. However, exposure to the sun's UV light may help control an infection, possibly even defeat it, but the plant does not have any inherent "active" way to fight the infection

148

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

SciTech Connect

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................... 79 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

150

Plant Biology 2001  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Park, PA b Graduate Research Assistant Michigan...University-Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory East Lansing...complete listing of abstracts can be found at http...University-Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory, East...

Nancy A. Eckardt; Hyung-Taeg Cho; Robyn M. Perrin; Matthew R. Willmann

151

Types of Hydropower Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

There are three types of hydropower facilities: impoundment, diversion, and pumped storage. Some hydropower plants use dams and some do not. The images below show both types of hydropower plants.

152

kansas city plant  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0%2A en Kansas City Plant http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourlocationskansas-city-plant

Page...

153

Plants & Animals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plants & Animals Plant and animal monitoring is performed to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain. April 12, 2012 A rabbit on LANL land. A rabbit on LANL land. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as other plants and animals not considered food sources. What plants and animals do we monitor? LANL monitors both edible and non-edible plants and animals to determine whether Laboratory operations are impacting human health via the food chain, or to find contaminants that indicate they are being moved in the

154

Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40°N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40°N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Tectostratigraphic evidence for Late Paleozoic Pacific plate collision and post-Upper Jurassic transpression in northeastern Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The rocks of Mina Plomosas, Chihuahua include a structurally complex association of Ordovician to Permian and Upper Jurassic strata. The structural deformation has historically been considered as two-fold including late Paleozoic compression associated with the collision of North and Afro-South America followed by loosely defined Laramide influences. These interpretations, however, are inconsistent with respect to timing, direction and style of deformation and the tectostratigraphic development of northeastern Mexico. Paleozoic strata which are folded, overturned and thrusted to the southwest are in opposition to the predicted, and elsewhere observed, northwestward compression. More likely, deformation is the result of late Paleozoic, northeastward directed Pacific plate collision causing underthrusting of the Paleozoic strata. Typical Laramide deformations are also in question. Upper Jurassic La Casita-equivalent rocks are twisted into distally thrusted, arcuate, en echelon, omega-folded anticlines which rotate into the trend of the suspected continuation of the oblique strike-slip San Marcos Fault. Such structures are diagnostic of transpressive mobile belts. The implications of late Paleozoic Pacific plate interactions and post-middle Paleozoic transpressive tectonics are that northern Mexico was located to the northwest during the Paleozoic and was repositioned following deposition of Upper Jurassic strata.

Montgomery, H.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The historical seismicity of northeastern Sonora and northwestern Chihuahua, Mexico (28–32°N, 106–111°W)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A detailed compilation of the historical seismicity of northeastern Sonora and northwestern Chihuahua (28–32°N, 106–111°W) for the period 1887–1999 from catalogs, archives, and newspaper reports yielded 64 events (excluding aftershocks). The most significant ones are the 3 May 1887 Bavispe, Sonora (MW=7.4±0.3), 26 May 1907 Colonia Morelos, Sonora (Imax=VIII, MI=5.2±0.4), 17 May 1913 Huásabas, Sonora (Imax=VIII, MI=5.0±0.4), 18 December 1923 Granados–Huásabas, Sonora (Imax=IX, MI=5.7±0.4) and 28 October 1965 Nicolás Bravo, Chihuahua (mb=5.0) earthquakes. Most of the compiled seismicity is concentrated in the epicentral region of the 1887 Bavispe earthquake, whose surface rupture is >100 km long. Other seismicity clusters have been located in the Valle de Guaymas graben and in the regions of Fronteras–Nacozari, Granados–Huásabas, and Ciudad Juárez–El Paso. These are most likely tectonic earthquakes related to normal faults of the southern Basin and Range province and the Rio Grande rift.

Max Suter

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Population dynamics and antimicrobial susceptibility of Aeromonas spp. along a salinity gradient in an urban estuary in Northeastern Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this study was to quantify population and identify culturable species of Aeromonas in sediment and surface water collected along a salinity gradient in an urban estuary in Northeastern Brazil. Thirty sediment samples and 30 water samples were collected from 3 sampling locations (A, B and C) between October 2007 and April 2008. The Aeromonas count was 10–7050 CFU/mL (A), 25–38,500 CFU/mL (B) and <10 CFU/mL (C) for water samples, and ?100–37,500 CFU/g (A), 1200–43,500 CFU/g (B) and <10 CFU/g (C) for sediment samples. Five species (Aeromonas caviae, A. sobria, A. trota, A. salmonicida and A. allosaccharophila) were identified among 41 isolates. All strains were sensitive to chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone, whereas 33 (80, 4%) strains were resistant to at least 2 of the 9 antibiotics tested. Resistance to erythromycin was mostly plasmidial. In conclusion, due to pollution, the Cocó River is contaminated by pathogenic strains of Aeromonas spp. with a high incidence of antibacterial resistance, posing a serious risk to human health.

Camila Magalhães Silva; Norma Suely Evangelista-Barreto; Regine Helena Silva dos Fernandes Vieira; Kamila Vieira Mendonça; Oscarina Viana de Sousa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

SciTech Connect

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital, the missiles, and the digital protection systems embed- ded in nuclear power plants. Obviously, safety

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

162

Prep plant population rebounds  

SciTech Connect

Demand and higher prices allows more operators to build and upgrade plants. The 2005 US Prep Plant Census found that the number of coal preparation plants has grown from 212 to 265 in five years - a 53 plant gain or a 20% increase over that reported by Coal Age in 2000. The number of bituminous coal washing facilities grew by 43 to 250. The article discusses the survey and the companies involved and presents a table giving key details of plants arranged by state. 6 tabs.

Fiscor, S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Host Plants and Their Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The information telescoped into this section is taken in large part from the records of the Plant Disease Survey as given in the Plant Disease Reporter, Plant Diseases and from the Index of Plant Diseases in the ...

R. Kenneth Horst Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Host Plants and Their Diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The information telescoped in this section is taken in large part from the records of the Plant Disease Survey as given in the Plant Disease Reporter, Plant Diseases, and the Index of Plant Diseases in the United...

R. Kenneth Horst Ph.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advancing the Deployment of Utility-Scale Photovoltaic Plants in the Northeast  

SciTech Connect

As one of the premier research laboratories operated by the Department of Energy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is pursuing an energy research agenda that focuses on renewable energy systems and will help to secure the nation's energy security. A key element of the BNL research is the advancement of grid-connected utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) plants, particularly in the northeastern part of the country where BNL is located. While a great deal of information has been generated regarding solar PV systems located in mostly sunny, hot, arid climates of the southwest US, very little data is available to characterize the performance of these systems in the cool, humid, frequently overcast climates experienced in the northeastern portion of the country. Recognizing that there is both a need and a market for solar PV generation in the northeast, BNL is pursuing research that will advance the deployment of this important renewable energy resource. BNL's research will leverage access to unique time-resolved data sets from the 37MWp solar array recently developed on its campus. In addition, BNL is developing a separate 1MWp solar research array on its campus that will allow field testing of new PV system technologies, including solar modules and balance of plant equipment, such as inverters, energy storage devices, and control platforms. These research capabilities will form the cornerstone of the new Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) being developed at BNL. In this paper, an overview of BNL's energy research agenda is given, along with a description of the 37MWp solar array and the NSERC.

Lofaro R.; Villaran, M; Colli, A.

2012-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

Sequence stratigraphy and orbital cyclostratigraphy of the Mooreville Chalk (Santonian–Campanian), northeastern Gulf of Mexico area, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cycles from the depositional sequence level to decimeter-scale rhythmic alteration of chalk and marl beds in the Mooreville Chalk (Santonian–Campanian) in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico area are studied employing an integrated biostratigraphic, cyclostratigraphic, and sequence stratigraphic approach. Two dominant frequencies, identified from the natural gamma-ray log from the Alabama Power Selma Site Test well, site 3 hole 3, are attributed to two of the Milankovitch cycles, the long eccentricity (413 ka) and eccentricity (100 ka) cycles. Parasequences, the building blocks of systems tracts, appear to be modulated by long eccentricity cycles. Individual eccentricity cycles were counted to establish a high-resolution orbital chronology, which agrees with established biostratigraphic chronology. A high-resolution record of temporal changes in sedimentation rate is established on the basis of cyclostratigraphic chronology. Two condensed sections are identified. The lower condensed section is found to correspond to a downlap surface recognized in seismic data in the offshore Alabama and Mississippi area. This condensed section and downlap surface are interpreted to represent the maximum flooding event of a third-order depositional sequence. The maximum flooding event is also represented by a marine flooding surface in eastern Mississippi and by the Mooreville tongue in eastern Alabama. The upper condensed section is found to correspond to a faunal abundance peak recognized in data from outcrop studies, and is interpreted to represent the maximum bathometric surface that was achieved as a result of a condition of rising sea level in association with low sediment input during the deposition of the early highstand systems tract.

Kaiyu Liu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

prairie restoration plant ident  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Identification Plant Identification Once your restoration is started and plants begin to germinate, the next issue you are faced with is the identification of what is growing. From my experience, the seeds you planted should start germinating after about a week to ten days. Of course, this is dependent on the weather conditions and the amount of moisture in the soil. If you are watering regularly, you will get growth much more quickly than if you are just waiting for nature to take its course. Identifying prairie plants as they germinate is very difficult. If you are an experienced botanist or an expert on prairie plants, your identification will still be a little more than an educated guess. In other words identifying prairie species from non-native species will take some time.

168

Crystals and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crystals and Plants Crystals and Plants Name: Diab Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What will the likely effects of crystallized filaments in plant cells be? I had noticed that moth balls (para dichlorbenzene) tends within a very short temperature range to transform from a solid to gas and back to solid in the form of crystal filaments. I been wondering about the likely effects of an experiment in which a plant is placed in a chamber saturated with the fumes of a substance that had the same transformation properties of its state but none of the toxic effects be on the plants and will such filaments form inside the cell and rearrange its DNA strands or kill it outright? Replies: The following might be helpful: http://biowww.clemson.edu/biolab/mitosis.html http://koning.ecsu.ctstateu.edu/Plant_Physiology/osmosis.html

169

Poisonous Plant Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are relatively unpalatable and must be consumed in substantial quantities to be lethal. Generally, animals do not graze poisonous plants by choice and are rarely poisoned if other forage is readily available. Plants do not always fall into easily defined... quickly. Control may be accomplished using mechanical, biological, chemical or prescribed burning methods. Most poisonous plants are herbaceous in growth form; thus, mechanical control methods are rarely used. There are a few exceptions. Whitebrush, a...

McGinty, Allan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Name: Jack Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do plants have any other way of growing besides photosythesis? Plants do not use photosynthesis to grow!!! They use cellular respiration just like every other organism to process energy into work. Plants use oxygen just like we do. Photosynthesis is principally only a process to change sunlight into a chemical form for storage. Replies: Check out our archives for more information. www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Steve Sample Jack, Several kinds of flowering plants survive without the use of chlorophyll which is what makes plants green and able to produce sugar through photosynthesis. Dodder is a parasitic nongreen (without chlorophyll) plant that is commonly found growing on jewelweed and other plants in damp areas. Dodder twines around its host, (A host is an organism that has fallen victim to a parasite.), like a morning glory and attaches itself at certain points along the stem where it absorbs sugar and nutrients from the hosts sap.

171

Repurposing a Hydroelectric Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis project explores repurposing a hydroelectric plant along Richmond Virginia's Canal Walk. The building has been redesigned to create a community-oriented space programmed as… (more)

Pritcher, Melissa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Plant pathogen resistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Azelaic acid or its derivatives or analogs induce a robust and a speedier defense response against pathogens in plants. Azelaic acid treatment alone does not induce many of the known defense-related genes but activates a plant's defense signaling upon pathogen exposure.

Greenberg, Jean T; Jung, Ho Won; Tschaplinski, Timothy

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

RESEARCH ARTICLE PLANT GENETICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative) in the Brassicaceae plant family is determined by the genotype of the plant at the self-incompatibility-locus phenotype in a self-incompatible Arabidopsis species. Selection has created a dynamic repertoire of s of regulation among alleles. S porophytic self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetic system that evolved in hermaph

Napp, Nils

174

Modulating lignin in plants  

SciTech Connect

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ethylene in Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... as the master controller of all plant growth and developmental processes. It now seems that ethylene, whose dramatic effects on plants have been known for more than 70 years, is ... 10 years there has been a veritable explosion of research into the physiological actions of ethylene directed towards assessing its significance as a 'natural' hormone.

L. J. AUDUS

1973-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

176

Plant Ecology An Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Plant Ecology An Introduction Ecology as a Science Study of the relationships between living and causes of the abundance and distribution of organisms Ecology as a Science We'll use the perspective of terrestrial plants Basic ecology - ecological principles Applied ecology - application of principles

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

177

Purdue extension Toxic Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service PLANTS Database/N.L.Britton,and A.Brown's An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States Poisonous to Live- stock and Pets.See References (page 23) and Online Resources (page 24) for details is as safe as possible is to keep these plants out of your fields and pastures. To do this,proper weed

Holland, Jeffrey

178

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Houston, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL R&D Tackles Technological NETL R&D Tackles Technological Challenges of the Williston Basin's Bakken Formation Recent development of the Bakken Formation in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota and eastern Montana is a good example of persistent analysis of geologic data and adaptation of new completion technologies overcoming the challenges posed by unconventional reservoirs. However, as with most unconventional plays, as Bakken development continues, questions regarding

179

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 s o l u b i li t y at r o o m temperature. CO 2 solubility testing of the most prom- ising eutectic combinations was completed. The results indicate that increasing the...

180

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

412-386-7343 Hunaid.Nulwala@contr.netl.doe.gov David Luebke Technical Co-ordinator for Carbon Capture National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage Research Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a key component of the U.S. carbon management portfolio. Numerous studies have shown that CCS can account for up to 55...

182

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membranes for Carbon Capture Background Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical component of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in...

183

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvents for Carbon Capture Background Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical com- ponent of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in...

184

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbents for Carbon Capture Background Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical component of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in...

185

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Princeton University Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a...

186

P O Box 6004 Morgantown, WV 26506-6004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Miller, Veterans Advocate at (304)293-8262 or email tdmiller@mail.wvu.edu Those needing to renew benefits

Mohaghegh, Shahab

187

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Development Phase Large-Scale Field Project Background The U.S. Department of Energy Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership...

188

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic...

189

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. industry in a complementary research program designed to develop and demonstrate oil and natural gas drilling and production methodologies in ultra-deep formations. This...

190

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer at NETL Carbon capture, quantum mechanical simulations, integrated gasification, and clean power-words like these mean the future of energy to NETL's in-house...

191

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

estimates could result in a 4 - 6% gain in overall system efficiency. Rotating Detonation Combustion (RDC) capitalizes on this cycle and offers potential as a drop in...

192

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Engineering 304-285-4685 madhava.syamlal@netl.doe.gov David Miller Technical Director Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative 412-386-6555 david.miller@netl.doe.gov RESEARCH...

193

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

needs of advanced power systems. Industries that utilize natural gas, gasifier syngas, biogas, landfill gas, or any type of fuel gas can benefit from knowing the composition of the...

194

West Virginia Smart Grid Implementation Plan (WV SGIP) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

views on the following: 1) whether the electric power utilities have shown interests in upgrading their distribution service equipment, etc., 2) whether the state regulatory...

195

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of feedstock, gasifier geometry and flow conditions. Using palladium sorbents for high temperature capture of mercury and other trace elements in flue gases is also under...

196

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Solvents for Carbon Capture Background Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical component of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in...

197

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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541-967-5885 david.alman@netl.doe.gov David Hopkinson Technical Portfolio Lead Carbon Capture 304-285-4360 david.hopkinson@netl.doe.gov OTHER PARTNERS Energy Frontiers Research...

198

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Membranes for Carbon Capture Background Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power generation is a critical com- ponent of realistic strategies for arresting the rise in...

199

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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541-967-5885 david.alman@netl.doe.gov David Hopkinson Technical Portfolio Lead Carbon Capture 304-285-4360 david.hopkinson@netl.doe.gov Figure 1: Film made from a...

200

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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science to ensure safe, essentially permanent carbon sequestration; develop reliable measurement, monitoring and verification technologies acceptable to permitting agencies;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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can simulate reservoirs that are multi-layered, exhibit dip, and have variable thickness, rock porosity, and rock permeability. The reservoirs can have fractures that open and...

202

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Assessment Partnership Initiative The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a DOE initiative that harnesses core capabilities developed across the National Laboratory...

203

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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to offshore hydrocarbon production and the recovery of unconventional resources like shale gas, estimating CO 2 storage potential in various types of geologic formations, and...

204

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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these emissions can negatively impact air quality. The environmental risks of shale gas and shale oil development may be very different from that of conventional oil and gas...

205

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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of carbon dioxide in tight formations. Benefits Production of natural gas from hydraulically-fractured shales surrounding horizontal wells is a relatively recent and...

206

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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waters with geologic media such as confining layers and fossil fuels (e.g., coal, oil shale, natural gas bearing formations); and unconventional fossil fuel extraction...

207

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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AND DEVELOPMENT Cynthia Powell Director 514-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Portfolio Lead Offshore Resources 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov...

208

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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AND DEVELOPMENT Cynthia Powell Director 541-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Portfolio Lead Offshore Resources 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov...

209

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Technical Portfolio Lead Carbon Storage 412-386-4962 angela.goodman@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Portfolio Lead Offshore Resources 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov...

210

Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Portfolio Lead National Risk Assessment Program 304-285-4688 grant.bromhal@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Portfolio Lead Offshore Resources 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov...

211

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Geological and Environmental Sciences Division 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Acting Geology Team Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy...

212

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Acting Geology Team Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy...

213

Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose EDX Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology...

214

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Ave SW...

215

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Cynthia Powell Director 541-967-5803 cynthia.powell@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Portfolio Lead Offshore Resources 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov...

216

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portfolio Lead National Risk Assessment Program 304-285-4688 grant.bromhal@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Portfolio Lead Offshore Resources 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov...

217

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Analytical Simulation Tool for CO2 Storage Capacity Estimation and Uncertainty Quantification Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon...

218

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting (MVA) and...

219

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other engineering measures to produce. The major areas of focus...

220

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

related impacts to human health and the natural environment, and induced seismicity from hydraulic fracturing. Project Description Through collaboration with its research...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

related impacts to human health and the natural environment, and induced seismicity from hydraulic fracturing. Project Description Through collaboration with its Regional...

222

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Impacts of Shale Gas Activities Background Hydraulic fracturing of gas shale is the injection of large volumes of fluid at high pressures in low permeability shale to...

223

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deleterious Events Associated with Drilling and Production Background Increasingly, offshore domestic oil and natural gas activities are associated with remote and challenging...

224

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

routes responsible for the observed catalytic effects. Such efforts will allow for the optimization of plasma systems so that they may be incorporated into a broad range of...

225

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

number of individual break-through tasks in diverse number of areas. These range from identification of new materials for gas capture, storage or separation to optimization of...

226

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and material interactions that impact environmental and resource issues related to oil, gas, and CO2 storage development. However, studying the wide variety of subsurface...

227

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association of American Railroads Augusta Systems, Incorporated Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Development Phase Cranfield Site and Citronelle Site...

228

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EOR Field Project - Development Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative consists of seven partnerships. The...

229

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Services Vecta Oil & Gas, Ltd. Washington State University Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Kevin Dome Development Phase Project Background The U.S....

230

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern United States Carbon Sequestration Training Center Background The focus of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance...

231

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to 200 o C for combustion is inefficient from both a cost and net electricity perspective. Hydrophobic solvents could be operated at higher temperatures and minimize...

232

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat in a combustion process while producing a concentrated CO 2 stream to facilitate carbon capture. Chemical looping research efforts can be categorized as: modeling tool...

233

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that are difficult or impossible to measure, such as coal jet penetration into a gasifier. This system provides the capabilities for running modeling tools at various scales...

234

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and implementing a Sponsorship Development Program that allows SECARB-Ed to be self-sustaining after the initial three-year period by establishing an advisory board, developing...

235

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

priations) to the FutureGen Industrial Alliance (Alliance) to build FutureGen 2.0-a clean coal repowering program and CO 2 pipeline and storage network. The FutureGen 2.0 Program...

236

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Fossil Energy R&D 1 Bezdek, R. Wendling, R., The Return on Investment of the Clean Coal Technology Program in the USA. Energy Policy, Vol. 54, March 2013, pp. 104-112 2...

237

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust...

238

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D 070, November 2011, rev 1114 Research facilities include the Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) for assessing materials performance in a variety...

239

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can affect permeability and porosity (flow properties), depending on the amount of sorptiondesorption. If the geological formations of interest are deep and have high...

240

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

well and post- placement. Foamed cement stability depends on time evolution of the gas bubble-size distribution (BSD) and varies as it is pumped and placed in the well. Unstable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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or particles. * High-definition, high-speed video capabilities: - Detailed information on bubble hydrodynamics. - Unprecedented resolution of hydrate surface morphology. * Provide...

242

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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changes in CO 2 -water inter- facial tension. * Experimental CO 2 injection tests in pore micro-models and parallel network model simulations demonstrate that the sweep efficiency...

243

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pollutants and CO 2 . Oxy-fuel combustion of hydrocarbon fuel (coal, natural-gas, biomass) generates denitrified combustion gas comprising dominantly CO 2 and H 2 O. The...

244

P O Box 6004 Morgantown, WV 26506-6004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-5242 Fax: (304) 293-4890 Email: finaid@mail.wvu.edu We're on the Web! www.finaid.wvu.edu 2010-2011 STUDENT

Mohaghegh, Shahab

245

P O Box 6004 Morgantown, WV 26506-6004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of students complete online at www.fafsa.gov Please consider using FAFSA on the Web. There is a FAFSA worksheet that can be downloaded from the FAFSA web site. The Financial Aid Office will also have a supply

Mohaghegh, Shahab

246

P O Box 6004 Morgantown, WV 26506-6004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

're on the Web! www.finaid.wvu.edu 2009-2010 STUDENT AID REPORT Once you submit your FAFSA to the federal

Mohaghegh, Shahab

247

P O Box 6004 Morgantown, WV 26506-6004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-5242 Fax: (304) 293-4890 Email: finaid@mail.wvu.edu We're on the Web! www.finaid.wvu.edu 2011-2012 STUDENT

Mohaghegh, Shahab

248

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency loss, so it will...

249

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

near 276 MPa. Therefore, the per turbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) model was used to calculate the fluid density, which is an input into the improved...

250

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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of meeting such a challenge is the combination of a high temperature fuel cell and a gas turbine with a gasifier or reformer. This hybrid technology has been studied...

251

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Turbine Thermal Management The gas turbine is the workhorse of power generation, and technology advances to current land-based turbines are directly linked to our country's...

252

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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are used to characterize the fundamental properties of unconventional natural gas and oil reservoirs, ultra-deepwater and frontier-region reservoirs, and reservoirs that offer...

253

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

being developed for geologic carbon storage are focused on five storage types: (1) oil and natural gas reservoirs; (2) saline formations; (3) unmineable coal seams; (4)...

254

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Hybrid Performance Project Research programs initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to achieve increased efficiency and reduced emissions are expected to result in the...

255

Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S Materials Science Fuels Gasification will likely be the cornerstone of future energy and chemical processes due to its flexibility to accommodate numerous feedstocks such as...

256

Profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation for power plants in India  

SciTech Connect

Currently coal-based power plants produce about 70% of the total electricity generated in India, where non-coking (steam) coals are utilized mostly without any preparation. A massive capacity addition of at least 140,000 MWe is required (over the 81,000 MWe of current installed capacity) during the next 15 years to meet growing energy demand. Such a rapid expansion of power generation capacity poses a serious challenge to the environment (at emission controls) and transportation infrastructure in India. Furthermore, the high ash content of indigenous coals and concentration of coal mines in central and northeastern India away from urban centers exacerbate the problem. Thus, coal preparation is envisioned to play a major role in shaping the energy future of India. Under the Indo-US Coal Preparation Program, the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is coordinating coal preparation activities for the US Agency for International Development. In this context, a detailed analysis of the washability characteristics of non-coking coals was performed using the PETC Coal Preparation Plant Simulator (CPPS) to identify coal preparation strategies for India. Based on these strategies, a profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation has been conducted considering coal preparation and transportation costs, and coal quality impacts on power plant operations. This paper summarizes the results of this analysis and quantifies the significance of coal preparation for the Indian power sector.

Gollakota, S.V.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Staats, G.E. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Granby Pumping Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Granby Pumping Plant Granby Pumping Plant Skip Navigation Links Transmission Functions Infrastructure projects Interconnection OASIS OATT Granby Pumping Plant-Windy Gap Transmission Line Rebuild Project Western owns and operates a 12-mile, 69-kV electric transmission line in Grand County, Colo., that originates at Windy Gap Substation and terminates at Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard. The proposed project would rebuild the single circuit line as a double circuit transmission line and add a second power transformer. One circuit would replace the existing 69-kV line; the other circuit would be a new 138-kV line. Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard would be expanded to accommodate the second line and power transformer. Windy Gap Substation would be modified to accommodate the second line.

258

BNL | Plant Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Sciences Plant Sciences The Plant Sciences group's goal is to understand the principles underlying carbon capture, conversion, and storage in living systems; and develop the capability to model, predict and optimize these processes in plants and microorganisms. Staff Members John Shanklin Jason Candreva Jilian Fan Hui Liu Qin Liu Edward Whittle Xiaohong Yu Dax Fu Jin Chai Chang-Jun Liu Yuanheng Cai Mingyue Gou Guoyin Kai Zhaoyang Wei Huijun Yang Kewei Zhang Xuebin Zhang Jörg Schwender Jordan Hay Inga Hebbelmann Hai Shi Zhijie Sun Changcheng Xu Chengshi Yan Zhiyang Zhai Plant Sciences Contact John Shanklin, (631)344-3414 In the News No stories available Funding Agencies DOE Basic Energy Sciences Bayer CropScience The Biosciences Department is part of the Environment and Life Sciences Directorate at Brookhaven National Laboratory

259

Geological controls on matrix permeability of Devonian Gas Shales in the Horn River and Liard basins, northeastern British Columbia, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controls of matrix permeability are investigated for Devonian Gas Shales from the Horn River and Liard basins in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. Mineralogy is varied with high carbonate, high quartz and moderate quartz, carbonate and clay rich strata. Quartz content varies between 2 and 73%, carbonate varies between 1 and 93% and clay varies between 3 and 33%. The TOC content ranges between 0.3 and 6 wt.% and porosity varies between about 1 and 7%. For Horn River basin samples, quartz is mainly biogenic in origin derived from radiolarians. TOC content increases with the quartz content suggesting the TOC and quartz both are derived from siliceous phytoplankton. A positive relationship between porosity and quartz content is due to the positive relationship between quartz and TOC. Matrix permeability parallel to bedding varies between 7.5E? 02 and 7.1E? 07 mD at an effective stress of 15 MPa. Variation in permeability is due to a complex combination of factors that includes origin and distribution of minerals, pore?size distribution and fabric. Mercury intrusion capillary curves indicate that the higher matrix permeability values (> 2E? 03 mD) occurs in samples that contain interconnected pore apertures greater than 16 ?m even when these samples may contain less macropores than low permeability samples. The fabric of high permeability samples can be either isotropic or anisotropic; however permeability of anisotropic samples is more sensitive to changes in effective stress than isotropic samples. More highly anisotropic samples contain moderate amounts of quartz, carbonate and in some, clay. High permeability samples that contain a more balanced ratio between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would not only have faster flow rates but also greater access to sorbed gas within the microporosity compared to samples that lack mesopores. Several Muskwa samples compared to Evie and Besa River samples contain higher quartz, moderate clay and high TOC content coupled with high permeability, less sensitivity to effective stress and balanced ratios between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would be a lower exploration risk due a greater propensity to fracture, the ability to produce and store hydrocarbons due to higher TOC contents and greater communication between macropores and micropores in the organic and clay fractions.

Gareth R.L. Chalmers; Daniel J.K. Ross; R. Marc Bustin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Top 10 plant pathogenic bacteria in molecular plant pathology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants are being closely grouped together, for example pv.oryzae pv. oryzae AvrXa21 and implications for plant innatePseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Tanzania. Plant Dis. 91,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - aep mountaineer plant Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Medicine 11 Proposed US Demonstrations (with government support) Summary: CoalPetCoke EOR AEP New Haven, WV 334 235 MW 1.5 Mt CO2yr PCC Chilled NH3 Saline Formation NRG...

262

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Security More Documents &...

263

AVESTAR® - Smart Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Plant In the area of smart plant operations, AVESTAR's dynamic simulators enable researchers to analyze plant-wide performance over a wide range of operating scenarios, including plant startup (cold, warm, hot), shutdown, fuel switchovers, on-load cycling, high-load operations of 90-120% of rated capacity, and high frequency megawatt changes for automatic generation control. The dynamic simulators also let researchers analyze the plant's response to disturbances and malfunctions. The AVESTAR team is also using dynamic simulators to develop effective strategies for the operation and control of pre-combustion capture technology capable of removing at least 90% of the CO2 emissions. Achieving operational excellence can have significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come. If deployment of new CO2 capture technologies is to be accelerated, power generators must be confident in ensuring efficient, flexible, reliable, environmentally-friendly, and profitable plant operations.

264

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

265

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

266

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

267

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

268

Missouri Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

269

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

270

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

271

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

272

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

273

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

274

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

275

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

276

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

277

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

278

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

279

Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

280

Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

282

Iowa Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

283

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

284

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

285

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

286

Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crack the Quadrat* Code! Crack the Quadrat* Code! compass plasnt * What is a Quadrat? It's a one-meter square plot. Plants in the quadrat are identified and counted. Fermilab quadrat specialists can! Attention Citizen Scientists Are you a prairie enthusiast? Learn scientific plant monitoring techniques while enjoying our beautiful prairie. Join a unique science program open to the public, adult groups, families, scouts and more Â…. Become a prairie quadrat specialist and do real science at Fermilab! In the Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey you will learn how to identify prairie plants, map a prairie plot and track restoration progress along with our experts. Use our Website to contribute data you collect. Come once or come back two or three times to see how the prairie changes. Keep an eye on this prairie for years to come!

287

prairie restoration planting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planting Planting The most common method of planting is to broadcast spread your seeds. This is usually done by hand, but you can also use a lawn-type spreader. After you have spread your seeds, rake the area over lightly. For seeds to germinate correctly they need to have good seed to soil contact, but you also don't want to bury the seeds too deeply. The general rule is to cover seeds to a depth no deeper than twice the seed's size. For example, if a seed is 4 mm in size, you would not want to bury it any deeper than 8 mm. The seeds commonly found in a prairie matrix are usually small enough, that raking over the spread seed to mix and cover them with a thin layer of soil, is adequate. If you are involving large numbers of people in the planting, a plastic cup

288

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

289

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

290

Economics of Hydropower Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The feed-in tariff scheme, as its name suggests is based ... plant. The most important aspect of a feed-in tariff system is that the grid operator cannot ... stations must reduce their power generation. The feed-in

Prof. Dr.-Ing Hermann-Josef Wagner…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Plant Vascular Biology 2010  

SciTech Connect

This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

Ding, Biao

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

292

Plant Operations Executive Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus North Campus Recycling Operations Materials Human Resources Payroll Misc Svs Special Projects Planning Spray Shop Glass Shop Upholstery Shop Plant IT Painting Services G. Weincouff Human Resources Business Services Estimating Shutdown Coordination Scheduling L. Rastique Human Resources 67398 M

Awtar, Shorya

293

Plant indicators in Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Native plants of Iraq have shown considerable variation in their ability...Seidlitzia rosmarinus andHalocnemum strobilaceum indicate very high soil sodium contents, and others high magnesium and sulphate contents...

T. A. Al-Ani; I. M. Habib; A. I. Abdulaziz; N. A. Ouda

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Better Buildings, Better Plants:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to 1,800 plants and about 8% of the U.S. manufacturing energy footprint 2012 average energy intensity improvement 2.7% Cumulative Energy Savings 190 TBtus ...

295

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

Can distributed generation offer substantial benefits in a Northeastern American context? A case study of small-scale renewable technologies using a life cycle methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable distributed electricity generation can play a significant role in meeting today's energy policy goals, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions, improving energy security, while adding supply to meet increasing energy demand. However, the exact potential benefits are still a matter of debate. The objective of this study is to evaluate the life cycle implications (environmental, economic and energy) of distributed generation (DG) technologies. A complementary objective is to compare the life cycle implications of DG technologies with the centralized electricity production representing the Northeastern American context. Environmental and energy implications are modeled according to the recommendations in the ISO 14040 standard and this, using different indicators: Human Health; Ecosystem Quality; Climate Change; Resources and Non-Renewable Energy Payback Ratio. Distinctly, economic implications are modeled using conventional life cycle costing. DG technologies include two types of grid-connected photovoltaic panels (3 kWp mono-crystalline and poly-crystalline) and three types of micro-wind turbines (1, 10 and 30 kW) modeled for average, below average and above average climatic conditions in the province of Quebec (Canada). A sensitivity analysis was also performed using different scenarios of centralized energy systems based on average and marginal (short- and long-term) technology approaches. Results show the following. First, climatic conditions (i.e., geographic location) have a significant effect on the results for the environmental, economic and energy indicators. More specifically, it was shown that the 30 kW micro-wind turbine is the best technology for above average conditions, while 3 kWp poly-crystalline photovoltaic panels are preferable for below average conditions. Second, the assessed DG technologies do not show benefits in comparison to the centralized Quebec grid mix (average technology approach). On the other hand, the 30 kW micro-wind turbine shows a potential benefit as long as the Northeastern American electricity market is considered (i.e., oil and coal centralized technologies are affected for the short- and long-term marginal scenarios, respectively). Photovoltaic panels could also become more competitive if the acquisition cost decreased. In conclusion, DG utilization will represent an improvement over centralized electricity production in a Northeastern American context, with respect to the environmental, energy and economic indicators assessed, and under the appropriate conditions discussed (i.e., geographical locations and affected centralized electricity production scenarios).

Mourad Ben Amor; Pascal Lesage; Pierre-Olivier Pineau; Réjean Samson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS] (ORCID:0000000210428452); Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

300

The effect of fertilizer practices on N balance and global warming potential of maize–soybean–wheat rotations in Northeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Long-term agronomic studies are useful to determine cropping system nitrogen (N) use efficiency and the fate of applied fertilizers. We used a subtractive fertilizer experiment incorporating N, phosphorous (P), potassium (K) and swine manure to determine long-term changes in grain yield, soil organic carbon (SOC), total soil nitrogen (N), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The experiment was conducted on a 22-year maize–soybean–wheat rotation in Northeastern China. Crop residues were removed for cooking fuel and forage according to local practices. Five fertilizer treatments were applied annually: control (no fertilizer), NK, NP, NPK, and NPKOM (N, P, K and manure). The NPKOM treatment increased SOC and total soil N by 4.59 and 0.45 Mg ha?1, respectively. In contrast, SOC decreased by 10.6 and 6.64 Mg ha?1 in the control and NK treatments, respectively. The NPKOM treatment had an average of 2.9 times more N2O emissions than the other fertilizer treatments. The cropping system balances for N and SOC, together with fuel use for farming practices and manure handling, were used to calculate the global warming potential (GWP) of the different fertilizer treatments. Due to SOC sequestration, the GWP of the NPKOM treatment (6.77 Mg C equivalent ha?1) was significantly lower than that of both the control (14.4 Mg C equivalent ha?1) and the NK treatment (12.8 Mg C equivalent ha?1). The results suggest that in rainfed agricultural systems in Northeastern China, the application of manure supplemented with NPK can simultaneously achieve higher grain yield and lower GWP compared to mineral fertilizers alone.

Yunfa Qiao; Shujie Miao; Xiaozeng Han; Mengyang You; Xia Zhu; William R. Horwath

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Maintaining plant safety margins  

SciTech Connect

The Final Safety Analysis Report Forms the basis of demonstrating that the plant can operate safely and meet all applicable acceptance criteria. In order to assure that this continues through each operating cycle, the safety analysis is reexamined for each reload core. Operating limits are set for each reload core to assure that safety limits and applicable acceptance criteria are not exceeded for postulated events within the design basis. These operating limits form the basis for plant operation, providing barriers on various measurable parameters. The barriers are refereed to as limiting conditions for operation (LCO). The operating limits, being influenced by many factors, can change significantly from cycle to cycle. In order to be successful in demonstrating safe operation for each reload core (with adequate operating margin), it is necessary to continue to focus on ways to maintain/improve existing safety margins. Existing safety margins are a function of the plant type (boiling water reactor/pressurized water reactor (BWR/PWR)), nuclear system supply (NSSS) vendor, operating license date, core design features, plant design features, licensing history, and analytical methods used in the safety analysis. This paper summarizes the experience at Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) in its efforts to provide adequate operating margin for the plants that it supports.

Bergeron, P.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

How do plants grow?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How do plants grow? How do plants grow? Name: Sally McCombs Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: A 4th grade class at our school is doing plant research and would like to know if plants grow from the top up or from the bottom up? Thanks for your help! Replies: Plants grow from the top up (or from the bottom down, in the case of root growth). Right at the tip, more cells form by division, and just behind that is an area where cells get bigger). More amazing than all of this is where your question comes from. I went to 4th grade there!!! Amazing, Just after the school was built, I think, maybe around 1959 to about early 1960's. Then I moved on to St. Pete High School, then my parents got jobs in Alabama, where I did the last year of High School. Then onto college in New England, graduate school in California, a research job in England, and now finally as a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle. Brings back memories...

304

Texas Plants Poisonous to Livestock.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS PLANTS POISONOUS TO LIVESTOCK TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE College Station, Texas THE PROBLEM POISONOUS PLANT RESEARCH IN TEXAS TOXIC PLANT CONSTITUENTS TEXAS PLANTS... list includes plants growing in Texas and reported to be poisonous in other areas. Some species described seldom cause trouble but are included since they have been proved toxic and may, under conditions, bring about livestock losses. Poisoning...

Sperry, Omer Edison

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lateral variation of 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations in surface seawater in and around the Japan Sea after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A total of 82 surface seawater samples was collected in the Japan Sea and the southwestern Okhotsk Sea before and after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident. Analysis of 134Cs and 137Cs concentrations using low-background ?-spectrometry revealed that the 137Cs concentration of the samples collected in June 2011 was 1.5–2.8 mBq/L, which is approximately 1–2 times higher than the pre-accident 137Cs level, while the 134Cs concentration was less than detectable to 1 mBq/L. In addition to 134Cs being clearly detected (?1 mBq/L), 137Cs concentration in water samples from the northeastern Japan Sea (2–2.8 mBq/L) was also higher than that from the coast in the southwestern Japan Sea (?1.5 mBq/L). These higher concentrations in the northeastern Japan Sea could be ascribed to the atmospheric transport of nuclides from the FDNPP as aerosols and subsequent transport and dilution after delivery to the sea surface.

M. Inoue; H. Kofuji; S. Nagao; M. Yamamoto; Y. Hamajima; K. Yoshida; K. Fujimoto; T. Takada; Y. Isoda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

307

Plant and Animal Immigrants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Animal Immigrants and Animal Immigrants Nature Bulletin No. 43 December 1, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation PLANT AND ANIMAL IMMIGRANTS When foreign plants and animals are brought to a new country they either become naturalized and thrive, or they cling to their old ways and die out. after they, too, find new freedoms because they leave their enemies, competitors, parasites, and some of their diseases behind them -- much as immigrant people do. The United States now supports about 300 times as many people as it did when Columbus discovered America. This is possible because the domesticated plants and animals that the early settlers brought with them give much higher yields of food and clothing than the Indians got from wild ones.

308

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was the largest of three defense production sites in the U.S. Over the span of 40 years, it was used to produce 64 metric tons of plutonium, helping end World War II and playing a major role in military defense efforts during the Cold War. As a result, 56 million gallons of radioactive and chemical wastes are now stored in 177 underground tanks on the Hanford Site. To address this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the "Vit Plant," will use vitrification to immobilize most of Hanford's dangerous tank waste.

309

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

310

Plants making oxygen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants making oxygen Plants making oxygen Name: Doug Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How many plants are needed to make enough oxygen for one person for one hour? We are experimenting with Anacharis plants. Replies: The problem can be solved when broken down into smaller questions: 1. How much oxygen does a person need in an hour? 2. How much oxygen does a plant produce in an hour? 3. Based on the above, how many plants will provide the oxygen needs of the person for the hour? Here is the solution to the first question: A resting, healthy adult on an average, cool day breathes in about 53 liters of oxygen per hour. An average, resting, health adult breathes in about 500 mL of air per breath. This is called the normal tidal volume. Now, 150 mL of this air will go to non- functioning areas of the lung, called the "dead space." The average breath rate for this average person is 12 breaths per minute. So, the amount of air breathed in by the person which is available for use is 12 x (500 mL -150 mL) = 4,200 mL/minute. Multiply by 60 to get 252,000 mL/hour. That is, every hour, the person will breathe in 252 L of air. Now, on an average, cool, clear day, only 21% of that air is oxygen. So, 21% of 252 L is 53 L. So, in an hour, the person breathes in about 53 L of oxygen.

311

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE _______________ ) ) ss: __________________ COUNTY OF _____________ ) That I, ________________________, am the _________________________ (Indicate relationship) of ___________________________, who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 CFR, Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this authorization subject to the penalties provided in 18 U.S.C. 1001. ____________________________ SIGNATURE NOTARIZATION: SUBSCRIBED and SWORN to before me this ______day of __________, 20_____

312

Snakes and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Snakes and Plants Snakes and Plants Name: kathy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We live in the southern most tip of Illinois,on horseshoe lake. I would like to know what time of the year do snakes come out and when do they go back in? Also is there any plants to plant to keep them away? Replies: What kind of snakes, in what kind of habitat? All snakes in Illinois hibernate in winter, but their habits differ by species. I'm not sure of the range of dates for southern Illinois, but they start to come out of hibernation in northern Illinois around the end of March or in April, depending on the weather. Advance of spring is usually about 3 weeks earlier in southern Illinois than northern, so i guess snake emergence would be about that much advanced as well. They will come out when there are warm sunny days to get them warmed up, and nights are not so cold that they will be harmed. Fall entry into hibernation is roughly parallel, snakes will often bask in the sun on sunny fall days before going into hibernation, again in no. Ill usually in October but widely varying.

313

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with steel balls which grind mix into a fine powder -> Final Cement Product Associated Air Pollution: o From health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http.4 million dollars for violating the Clean Air Act and 2 million dollars for pollution controls #12

Toohey, Darin W.

314

Plants: novel developmental processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...J.K., SOYBEAN SEED LECTIN GENE AND FLANKING...EVIDENCE ON THEIR METABOLISM + TOTIPOTENCY, SCIENCE...GENETIC MANIPULATION OF CEREAL CROPS, BIO-TECHNOLOGY...MESSENGER-RNAS FOR SEED LECTIN AND KUNITZ...vascular seedless and seed-producing plants...store glucose as starch in their chloroplasts...

RB Goldberg

1988-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Chemical Plant Expansion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite $4 billion of capital expenditure for plant expansion over the past seven years, a high level of construction activity is expected to continue ... A marked increase in capital expenditures of t h e six largest chemical companies tooïç place in 1951 over 1950. ...

JOHN M. WEISS

1952-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solar Tracking by Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University of Utah, Salt Lake City 84112...Solar Tracking in Desert Plants In the arid...were coastal sage scrub, which grows during...Mohave and Colorado desert scrub, which grow in...Mohave and Colorado desert scrub communities at sites...

James Ehleringer; Irwin Forseth

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

BIOLOGY AND AQUATIC PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook First published in the United States of America in 2009 by Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration plant management. The Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation (AERF) is pleased to bring you Biology for the environmentally and scientifically sound management, conservation and restoration of aquatic ecosystems. One

Jawitz, James W.

318

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEP Climate Change Strategy AEP Climate Change Strategy Bruce Braine Vice President - Strategic Policy Analysis April 7, 2008 Mountaineer Plant - New Haven, WV Northeastern Plant - Oologah, OK 2 Coal/Lignite 67% Nat. Gas/Oil 24% Nuclear 6% Pumped Storage/ Hydro/Wind 3% AEP's Generation Fleet 38,388 MW Capacity Company Overview 5.1 million customers in 11 states Industry-leading size and scale of assets: Asset Size Industry Rank Domestic Generation ~38,300 MW # 2 Transmission ~39,000 miles # 1 Distribution ~208,000 miles # 1 3 AEP's Climate Strategy § Being proactive and engaged in the development of climate policy § Investing in science/technology R&D § Taking Voluntary action now, making real reductions thru CCX (2003-07: 40 MM Tons reductions); 2011 Voluntary Commitment (additional 5 MM Tons/year reductions).

319

Technology Data for Electricity and Heat Generating Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................63 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

320

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 4th Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado: G2G3/S2S3 Global distribution: Colorado (Larimer and Boulder counties). Possibly extending

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Annual Report 2001 -Plant Research Departme Plant Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organisation DLF-Risø Biotechnology Programme Plant Environment Interactions Programme Plant Nutrition agronomic traits and to engineer high-value plants, which are able to meet the growth conditions of the future environment. The department is divided into six research programmes that are linked through

322

Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orientation to maximize light exposure. Species Adaptations-Sun Solar tracking by leaves increases light1 Ecology of Plants and Light CAM plants have thick, succulent tissues to allow for organic acid and Light Some CAM plants not obligated to just CAM Can use C3 photosynthesis during day if conditions

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

323

Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Pantex Plant | September 2010 Aerial View Pantex Plant | September 2010 Aerial View The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear weapons in support of the NNSA stockpile stewardship program. Pantex also performs research and development in conventional high explosives and serves as an interim storage site for plutonium pits removed from dismantled weapons. Enforcement January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear Explosive Operations at the Pantex Plant November 21, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation, BWXT Pantex, LLC - EA-2006-04 Issued to BWXT Pantex, LLC, related to Quality Assurance and Safety Basis Requirements Violations at the Pantex Plant

324

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

325

Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 2A 2A Belgrade Lot Steam Plant Lot Alfond Lot Satellite Lot North Gym Lot Corbett Lot Dunn Lot Hamlin Steam Plant Crosby Machine Tool Lab Children's Center Rogers N S Estabrooke Memorial Gym Stevens

Thomas, Andrew

326

Production of virus resistant plants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of suppressing virus gene expression in plants using untranslatable plus sense RNA is disclosed. The method is useful for the production of plants that are resistant to virus infection. 9 figs.

Dougherty, W.G.; Lindbo, J.A.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Gene encoding plant asparagine synthetase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The identification and cloning of the gene(s) for plant asparagine synthetase (AS), an important enzyme involved in the formation of asparagine, a major nitrogen transport compound of higher plants is described. Expression vectors constructed with the AS coding sequence may be utilized to produce plant AS; to engineer herbicide resistant plants, salt/drought tolerant plants or pathogen resistant plants; as a dominant selectable marker; or to select for novel herbicides or compounds useful as agents that synchronize plant cells in culture. The promoter for plant AS, which directs high levels of gene expression and is induced in an organ specific manner and by darkness, is also described. The AS promoter may be used to direct the expression of heterologous coding sequences in appropriate hosts.

Coruzzi, Gloria M. (New York, NY); Tsai, Fong-Ying (New York, NY)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

US prep plant census 2008  

SciTech Connect

Each year Coal Age conducts a fairly comprehensive survey of the industry to produce the US coal preparation plant survey. This year's survey shows how many mergers and acquisitions have given coal operators more coal washing capacity. The plants are tabulated by state, giving basic details including company owner, plant name, raw feed, product ash %, quality, type of plant builder and year built. 1 tab., 1 photo.

Fiscor, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality...

330

Okeanskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

331

Mendeleevskaya Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Owner Ministry of Natural Resources of Russia Commercial Online Date 2007 Power Plant Data Type of Plant Number of Generating Units...

332

Mecca Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Mecca Plant Biomass Facility Facility Mecca Plant Sector Biomass Location Riverside County, California Coordinates...

333

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

SciTech Connect

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

TERRORISM AT THE PLANT LEVEL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TERRORISM AT THE PLANT LEVEL ... IN THE DAYS FOLLOWING THE Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, chemical plant officials say they have increased security through greater plant surveillance, more guards, intense vehicle inspections, and plans to better coordinate security with similar facilities, fire departments, and police. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Special Better Plants Training Opportunities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In-Plant Trainings (INPLTs) are system-specific workshops led by Better Plants experts that train participants on how to identify, implement, and replicate energy-saving projects. Better Plant partners host an on-site, three-day training at one of their facilities, and invite others to attend.

336

ENDING PLANTS’ WASTING WAYS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small DOE industrial energy auditing program shows BIG ENERGY EFFICIENCY, financial gains ... FREDERICK FENDT DIDN’T EXPECT too much from a Department of Energy-led, three-day energy audit of Rohm and Haas’s Deer Park, Texas, chemical plant. ... So when Paul Scheihing, who manages the DOE Industrial Technologies Program and coordinates the audits, urged Fendt to take part in a free energy assessment, he agreed. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Plants of the Bible  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bible Bible Nature Bulletin No. 188-A April 16, 1965 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation PLANTS OF THE BIBLE When Jesus suffered on the cross, we are told in the Gospel according to St. Matthew (27:48) that at the ninth hour he thirsted and a sponge, filled with vinegar and put upon a reed, was raised to His lips. It is so related in St. Mark (15:36) but according to St. John (19:29), "they filled a sponge with vinegar, and put it upon hyssop, and put it into his mouth. " What was hyssop. The plant is mentioned frequently in the Bible. The hyssop of our herb gardens is not native to Palestine, Syria or Egypt, but there is evidence that when Solomon "spoke of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall" (I Kings 4:23), he spoke of the herb we call marjoram. The hyssop dipped in the blood of a sacrificial lamb and used by the Israelites in Egypt to mark their doorways (Exodus 12:22), and the hyssop referred to by St. John but called a reed by St. Matthew and St. Mark, was probably sorghum, a tall cereal plant grown by the Jews for food and also used for brushes and brooms.

338

Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant Poinsettia -- The Christmas Plant Nature Bulletin No. 699 December 22, 1962 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor POINSETTIA -- THE CHRISTMAS PLANT Christmas is a day of family gatherings. In each home they have their own traditional customs. Some of us cherish those that are peculiar to the region where we were children, or the land from whence our forefathers came. Most of us have also adopted customs -- such as decorating with holly and mistletoe -- that stem from ancient pagan ceremonies or festivals but have lost their original significance. There are many myths and legends about the origin of our Yuletide customs. (See Bulletins No. 135, 173, 211, 326 and 475). In this country most families have a Christmas tree, a custom that was introduced from Germany by Hessian troops in the British army during the Revolutionary War. It prevails in Britain and most of northern Europe but is unusual in Italy, Spain and Latin America. There, the symbol of Christmas and heart of the celebration in a home is not an Evergreen tree but a miniature reproduction of the stable and manger where Christ was born.

339

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Deming Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Deming Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer New Solar Ventures/ Solar Torx 50/50 Location New Mexico Coordinates 34.9727305°, -105.0323635° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9727305,"lon":-105.0323635,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Prescott Airport Solar Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Prescott Airport Solar Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer APS Location Prescott, Arizona Coordinates 34.5400242°, -112.4685025° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5400242,"lon":-112.4685025,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plant Solar Power Plant Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Solana Generating Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Under Construction Developer Abengoa Solar Location Gila Bend, Arizona Coordinates 32.916163°, -112.968727° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.916163,"lon":-112.968727,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Saguargo Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Facility Saguargo Solar Power Plant Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status In Service Developer Solargenix Location Red Rock, Arizona Coordinates 32.54795°, -111.292887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.54795,"lon":-111.292887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Review Report 2013 Review of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Work Planning and Control Activities, April 2013 Review Report 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, November 2012 Activity Reports 2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, September 2011 Review Reports 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Carlsbad Field Office and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 2007 Review Reports 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Summary Report, August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - Volume I, August 2002

344

Intimate Alliances: Plants and their Microsymbionts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...November 2011 other Teaching Tools in Plant Biology Intimate Alliances: Plants and their Microsymbionts www.plantcell.org...the plant and microsymbiont. Collectively these intimate alliances play a major role in nutrient assimilation by plants, and...

345

Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Kemaliye Geothermal Power Plant Project Location Information...

346

Relationships among oil density, gross composition, and thermal maturity indicators in northeastern Williston basin oils and their significance for expulsion thresholds and migration pathways  

SciTech Connect

Oil density ({degree}API), gross composition, and biological market thermal maturity variations in northeastern Williston basin have stratigraphic and geographic significance controlled by migration pathways and source rock composition as it affects hydrocarbon generation and expulsion characteristics. When the depth and density of oil pools is compared to relationships predicted using the correlation between source rock thermal maturity and oil density, several different migration pathways can be inferred. Winnipegosis source oils indicate four paths. Most small pinnacle reef pools are sourced locally, but larger coalesced reefs contain oils migrated long distances through the Lower Member Winnipegosis Formation. Among oils that have migrated past Prairie salts, both locally sourced oils, like those on the flank of the Hummingbird Trough, and more mature, longer migrated oils in Saskatchewan Group reservoirs can be identified. Bakken oils have the longest migration pathways, controlled primarily by a lowstand shoreline sandstone on the eastern side of the basin. Lodgepole-sourced oils dominate Madison Group plays. Northwest of Steelman field, oil density increases primarily due to thermal maturity differences but also because of increasing biodegradation and water-washing that affect the western edge of the play trend. Along the margin of the Hummingbird Trough are a number of deep, medium-gravity pools whose oil compositions are entirely attributable to low thermal maturity and local migration pathways.

Osadetz, K.G.; Snowdon, L.R.; Brooks, P.W. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Propagation of Ornamental Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is well filled with roots. In the other types of layering, select shooi 1 of young growth that bend easily. It usuall: is advisable to wound the stem where it is covered with soil. This cut limits free movemen: ! of food materials and induces root... cuttings. lecent research findings have taken much of uesswork out of this type of propagation t now can be done for many plants with rlrative ease by the home gardener. Some alants remain difficult to propagate by any ' method, but most...

DeWerth, A. F.

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

New Markets, Outmoded Manufacturing: The Transition from Manufactured Gas to Natural Gas by Northeastern Utilities after World War II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For more than a century, large manufactured gas plants dotted the industrial landscape of the urban Northeast. Using a variety of technologies, these factories applied heat and pressure to coke, coal, and oil to produce a gas suitable for use in space heating and cooking. Yet this well-established, vital industry literally ceased to exist in the two decades after World War II, as natural gas transported from the southwestern United States replaced manufactured gas in all of the major markets in the Northeast. This abrupt victory of a new product was a modem variant of "creative destruction " as described by Joseph Schumpeter in his classic study Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy [10]. While creating a more efficient fuel supply, the coming of natural gas also destroyed the existing system for the production and distribution of manufactured gas. Yet this mid-20th century case of creative destruction differed sharply from Schumpeter's descriptions of the same process during the era of high capitalism in the late 19th century. In that dynamic period, innovations took place in a largely unfettered

Chris Castaneda; Joseph Pratt

349

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Another Nuclear Plant To Close  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station in Vernon, Vt., will permanently shut down in 2014, according to plant owner Entergy. ... In the Vermont Yankee case, Entergy’s announcement ends a long-simmering dispute between the utility and state officials and residents over the continued operation of the 620-MW plant. ... The Vermont Yankee plant design nearly mirrors that of the Fukushima reactor facility. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

351

How plants grow toward light  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How plants grow toward light How plants grow toward light Name: schwobtj Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: When a seed is planted below the surface of the ground, how does it "know" to grow toward the light? Replies: Plants don't know where the light is, they do respond to gravity. Since light is usually up, a plant seed grows up and finds light enough to keep things going. Psych One way that plants below ground can tell which way is up is with the use of STATOLITHS. Statoliths are dense pieces of material that settle to the bottom of a STATOCYST. In plants, pieces of starch or another material denser than water will settle to the bottom of the cell. Somehow the plant cell determines on what side the statolith has fallen, and then somehow relays a message (probably a chemical) that tells the bottom cells to grow faster than the top cells, therefore causing upward growth. There is still quite a lot of mystery in there to be discovered. I got this explanation from BIOLOGY by Neil Campbell. This is similar to the way in which plants use chemical signals to help them grow towards light.

352

Owners of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development of the merchant plant  

SciTech Connect

The co-authors of this paper are currently involved in over 1500 megawatts of merchant plant developments in the US. This paper will discuss the latest in combined cycle steam reheat ``H and G'' technology. Big improvements in heat rates along with substantial drop in installed cost will make this power cycle the leading merchant plant of the future. This paper will compare the actual present day performance and clearing price of a state-of-the-art merchant plant versus utility dispatch cost duration curves, known as ``system lambda''. Deregulation of the power market will ultimately provide an open market for these efficient plants to compete effectively against aging utility plants. Comparison of utility system heat rates versus merchant plant heat rates along with an increase need for generation capacity and forecasts of stable gas prices supports to the potential for a large scale building program of these high efficiency generators. This paper will also review the capacity crunch in the Northeast and Wisconsin and how problems with nuclear plants may accelerate the need for merchant plants. This paper will compare the required capacity for the population growth in the SERC Region and in Florida and how this will produce a potential ``hot bed'' for merchant plant development.

Wolfinger, R.; Gilliss, M.B.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Better Plants Partnership Agreement Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Better Buildings, Better Plants Partnership Agreement Form commits organizations to work with DOE to reduce energy intensity by 25% over ten years.

355

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Joint Information Center Emergency Manager Offsite Interface Coordinator DOE Technical Advisor Emergency Press Center Radiation Safety Figure 1. Pantex Plant Emergency Response...

356

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 ORNLTM-2007147, Vol. 5 Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research...

357

Quality In-Plant Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Quality of In-plant Envi~onment. How can employees be expected to p~oduce Wo~ld-class quality pa~ts with a "di~ty" plant? Obviously, the wo~k environment has an effect on the attitude of the wo~k force. Quality of In-plant Environment con sists... reduced to .87 years. CONCLUSION The changing business climate can present opportunities for dramatic energy savings. Concepts such as Quality of Work LiEe and Quality In-Plant Environment may initially appear to have a very negative efE~ct on total...

Petzold, M. A.

358

,"California Natural Gas Plant Processing"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Processing",3,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","1031...

359

The northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Northeast Georgia hydroelectric plants are important cultural resources to the state of Georgia and the communities immediately adjacent. If the early technology of these… (more)

Kelly, Nancy Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Better Plants Progress Update 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The 2014 Progress Update details Better Buildings, Better Plants Program accomplishments, including new partners, new initiatives, and energy and cost savings experienced by partners.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' 1 . \." _ j. .I > * .A; .i ,' / / ,/ ' , ( , ( 1: 1 i I l-1 5 ' / ,,' :A' ' , THE SCIOTO ORDNANCE PLANT . and THE MARION ENGINEER DEPOT of Marion, Ohio A Profile AFTER FORTY YEARS BY Charles D. Mosher and Delpha Ruth Mosher . . . 111 THE AUTHORS Charles D. Mosher was born on a farm located in Morrow County on Mosher Road near Mt. Gilead. He received his TH.B. from Malone College, B.A. from Baldwin-Wallace College and his B.Div. and M.Div. at the Nazarene Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO. He did additional graduate work at Western Reserve University, Kent State University and Florida State University. He has taught in Cleveland and in Morrow County and has been an Occupational Work Adjustment teacher at Harding High School in Marion

362

Fuel cell generating plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses a fuel cell generating plant. It comprises a compressed fuel supply; a fuel cell system including fuel conditioning apparatus and fuel cells; a main fuel conduit for conveying fuel from the fuel supply to the fuel cell system; a turbo compressor having a turbine receiving exhaust products from the fuel cell system and a compressor for compressing air; a main air conduit for conveying air from the compressor to the fuel cell system; an auxiliary burner having a primary burner and a pilot; an auxiliary air conduit for conveying air from the compressed fuel supply to the auxiliary burner; an auxiliary exhaust conduit for conveying exhaust products from the auxiliary burner to the turbine; a check valve located between the fuel supply and the pilot; and a gas accumulator in the auxiliary fuel conduit located between the check valve and the pilot.

Sanderson, R.A.

1990-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

(Photosynthesis in intact plants)  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the two years since the last renewal application has been excellent. We have made substantial contributions on both main fronts of the projects, and are particularly happy with the progress of our research on intact plants. The approach of basing our field work on a sound foundation of laboratory studies has enabled is to use methods which provide unambiguous assays of well characterized reactions. We have also made excellent progress in several laboratory studies which will have direct applications in future field work, and have introduced to the laboratory a range of molecular genetics techniques which will allow us to explore new options in the attempt to understand function at the level of molecular structure.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Sub-basin and the Conecuh Sub-basin of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida panhandle. This task includes identification of the petroleum systems in these basins and the characterization of the overburden, source, reservoir and seal rocks of the petroleum systems and of the associated petroleum traps. Second, emphasis is on petroleum system modeling. This task includes the assessment of the timing of deep (>15,000 ft) gas generation, expulsion, migration, entrapment and alteration (thermal cracking of oil to gas). Third, emphasis is on resource assessment. This task includes the volumetric calculation of the total in-place hydrocarbon resource generated, the determination of the volume of the generated hydrocarbon resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas, the estimation of the volume of deep gas that was expelled, migrated and entrapped, and the calculation of the potential volume of gas in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) reservoirs resulting from the process of thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbons and their transformation to gas in the reservoir. Fourth, emphasis is on identifying those areas in the onshore interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

Geothermal electric power plant status  

SciTech Connect

A status summary of the activity for the 44 proposed geothermal electric power plants in the United States as of March 31, 1981 is presented, as well as the power on-line electric plants to date. The information comes from the Department of Energy Geothermal Progress Monitor System (DOE, 1981).

Murphy, M.; Entingh, D.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NETL Water and Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Power Plants Review Water and Power Plants Review A review meeting was held on June 20, 2006 of the NETL Water and Power Plants research program at the Pittsburgh NETL site. Thomas Feeley, Technology Manager for the Innovations for Existing Plants Program, gave background information and an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants Water Program. Ongoing/Ending Projects Alternative Water Sources Michael DiFilippo, a consultant for EPRI, presented results from the project "Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities". John Rodgers, from Clemson University, presented results from the project "An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation".

367

Plants and Night Oxygen Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants and Night Oxygen Production Plants and Night Oxygen Production Name: Ashar Status: other Grade: other Location: Outside U.S. Country: India Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: I would like to know if there are any plants which produces oxygen at night (without photosynthesis). I was told by a friend that Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) produces oxygen even at night and I'm not convinced. I would like to get confirmation from experts. Replies: Some plants (particularly those of dry regions, e.g., deserts) only open their stomates at night to avoid drying out to intake CO2 (and output O2) (CAM photosynthesis) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulacean_acid_metabolism Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, PhD Missouri Botanical Garden Bringing oxygen producing plants into your home is a way to mimic the healthy lifestyle factors of longevity in humans from the longest lived cultures.

368

Overview of enrichment plant safeguards  

SciTech Connect

The relationship of enrichment plant safeguards to US nonproliferation objectives and to the operation and management of enrichment facilities is reviewed. During the review, the major components of both domestic and international safeguards systems for enrichment plants are discussed. In discussing domestic safeguards systems, examples of the technology currently in use to support nuclear materials accountability are described including the measurement methods, procedures and equipment used for weighing, sampling, chemical and isotopic analyses and nondestructive assay techniques. Also discussed is how the information obtained as part of the nuclear material accountancy task is useful to enrichment plant operations. International material accountancy verification and containment/surveillance concepts for enrichment plants are discussed, and the technologies presently being developed for international safeguards in enrichment plants are identified and the current development status is reported.

Swindle, D.W. Jr.; Wheeler, L.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2007  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Three proposed COLs expected in 2007, by Dale E. Klein, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Delivering behaviors that our customers value, by Jack Allen, Westinghouse Electric Company; Facilitating high-level and fuel waste disposal technologies, by Malcolm Gray, IAEA, Austria; Plant life management and long-term operation, by Pal Kovacs, OECD-NEA, France; Measuring control rod position, by R. Taymanov, K. Sapozhnikova, I. Druzhinin, D.I. Mendeleyev, Institue for Metrology, Russia; and, 'Modernization' means higher safety, by Svetlana Genova, Kozluduy NPP plc, Bulgaria.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Early Entrance Coproduction Plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objectives of Phase I were to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan for implementation in Phase II; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The work performed under Phase II will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation.

Mushtaq Ahmed; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Troy Raybold; Lalit S. Shah; Kenneth A. Yackly

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or other carbonaceous feedstock. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing Plan (RD and T) for implementation in Phase II. The objective of Phase II is to implement the RD and T as outlined in the Phase I RD and T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology that produces high-value products, particularly those that are critical to our domestic fuel and power requirements. The project will resolve critical knowledge and technology gaps on the integration of gasification and downstream processing to coproduce some combination of power, fuels, and chemicals from coal and other feedstocks. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; Jimmy O. Ong; Sarah J. Patel; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Aquatic plant control research  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest region of the United States contains extensive canal systems that transport water for hydropower generation. Nuisance plants, including algae, that grow in these systems reduce their hydraulic capacity through water displacement and increased surface friction. Most control methods are applied in an ad hoc fashion. The goal of this work is to develop cost-effective, environmentally sound, long-term management strategies to prevent and control nuisance algal growth. This paper reports on a multi-year study, performed in collaboration with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, to investigate algal growth in their canal systems, and to evaluate various control methodologies. Three types of controls, including mechanical, biological and chemical treatment, were selected for testing and evaluation. As part of this study, water quality data were collected and algal communities were sampled from numerous stations throughout the distribution system at regular intervals. This study resulted in a more comprehensive understanding of conditions leading to the development of nuisance algal growth, a better informed selection of treatment plans, and improved evaluation of the effectiveness for the control strategies selected for testing.

Pryfogle, P.A.; Rinehart, B.N. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, E.G. [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States). Hydro Generation Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three-phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The accomplishments of Phase I are discussed in detail in this Phase I Concept Report. A RD and T Plan and a preliminary project financing plan have been developed and are submitted separately from this report.

John S. Abughazaleh; Mushtaq Ahmed; Ashok Anand; John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Fred D. Brent; Thomas E. Chance; William K. Davis; Raymond F. Drnevich; Larry Hall; Ming He; Stephen A. Lang; David Mintner; Wendy Moore; Jimmy O. Ong; George Potoczniak; Adela G. Sanchez; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; Kalapi D. Sheth; Phil J. Shires; Rae Song

2001-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

375

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant December 31, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Pantex Plant, December 2013 Targeted Review of the Safety Significant Blast Door and Personnel Door Interlock Systems and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Pantex Plant June 6, 2013 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - May 2013 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Pantex Plant [HIAR PTX-2013-05-20] December 11, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Pantex Plant Operational Awareness Site Visit [HIAR PTX-2012-11-08] November 28, 2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant August 8, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex Plant - July 2012

376

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Braidwood Generation Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,330","19,200",20.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Byron Generating Station Unit 1, Unit 2","2,300","19,856",20.6,"Exelon Nuclear" "Clinton Power Station Unit 1","1,065","8,612",9.0,"Exelon Nuclear" "Dresden Generating Station Unit 2, Unit 3","1,734","14,593",15.2,"Exelon Nuclear" "LaSalle Generating Station

377

Valuable Plants Native to Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"in the wild" indicates that the. plant may be found growing as a native and should be procured'from such a location. Whenever possible plants should be secured from floriculturists and nurserymen. In Texas there is a large number of small... it on another tree. It is not only a curiosity but a thing of beauty. For demonstrating the recovery power of desert plants this is one of the best organisms. nunda cinnamomea L. Cinnamon Fern. Too well known to need -iption; native to the eastern part...

Parks, Harris Braley

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Geothermal Plants Geothermal Heat Flow and Existing Plants With plants in development. Click...

379

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Gasification Technologies and Transportation Fuels and Chemicals programs, DOE and Texaco are partners through Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40658 to determine the feasibility of developing, constructing and operating an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). The overall objective of the project is the three-phase development of an EECP that produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: Electric power (or heat); Fuels; and Chemicals. The objective is to have these products produced by technologies capable of using synthesis gas derived from coal and/or some other carbonaceous feedstock, such as petroleum coke. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site and to develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan for implementation in Phase II. This objective has now been accomplished. A specific site, Motiva Refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, has been selected as the location best suited for the EECP. The specific work requirements of Phase I included: Prepare an EECP Preliminary Concept Report covering Tasks 2-8 specified in the Cooperative Agreement; Develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD and T) Plan as specified in Task 9 of the Cooperative Agreement for implementation in Phase II; and Develop a Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the EECP Project as specified in Task 10 of the Cooperative Agreement. This document is the Preliminary Project Financing Plan for the design, construction, and operation of the EECP at the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery.

John H. Anderson; William K. Davis; Thomas W. Sloop

2001-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

380

CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Terminal Waste Disposal and Remedial Action Division of Remedial Action Projects ..-.. --__- _".-.-l--_--l -_._ _- --- ~~~. . ..~ CONTENTS Page - - I NTRODUCTI ON 1 Purpose 1 Docket Contents 1 Exhibit I: Summary of Activities at Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania I-l Exhibit II: Documents Supporting the Certification of Westinghouse Atomic Power Development Plant, East Pittsburgh Plant, Forest Hills, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania iii II-1 . . .- .__.^ I ^_... _.-__^-____-. - CERTIFICATION DOCKET WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Independent Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012 November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant This report provides the results of an independent...

382

Oversight Reports - Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Independent Oversight Assessment, Pantex Plant - November 2012 Assessment of Nuclear Safety Culture at the Pantex Plant August 8, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Pantex...

383

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford...

384

Oversight Reports - Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 Orientation Visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant HIAR-WIPP-2011-09-07 November 26, 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - December 2007...

385

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

386

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

387

New Hampshire Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (nw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

388

Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Name Matsukawa Geothermal Power Plant Facility ower Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Iwate, Japan Coordinates 39.980897288029,...

389

Tuzla Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tuzla Geothermal Power Plant Facility Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Ayvacik, Canakkale Coordinates 39.553940696342, 26.161228192504 Loading...

390

Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 Independent Oversight Inspection, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Summary Report - August 2002 August 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and...

391

Independent Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant - June 2009 |...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Inspection, Pantex Plant - June 2009 June 2009 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Pantex Plant This report documents the results of an inspection of the...

392

Camptothecine, a selective plant growth regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Camptothecine, a selective plant growth regulator ... The literature documents several hundred plant products that appear to exhibit growth-regulating activity. ...

J. George Buta; Joseph F. Worley

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advanced Plant Pharmaceuticals Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pharmaceuticals Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Advanced Plant Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Place: New York, New York Product: String representation "Advanced Plant ... f its...

394

Independent Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant, Summary Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection, Pantex Plant, Summary Report - November 2002 November 2002 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management at the Pantex Plant This report...

395

Independent Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant, February 2005...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Inspection, Pantex Plant, February 2005 February 2005 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Pantex Plant This report provides the results...

396

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download...

397

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operators prepare drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for loading into transportation containers Operators prepare...

398

Better Tools for Better Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Tools for Better Plants Better Tools for Better Plants Andre de Fontaine Bill Orthwein, CEM Advanced Manufacturing Office, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy November 15, 2011 2 | Advanced Manufacturing Office eere.energy.gov Today * New opportunities - AMO Overview - Better Buildings, Better Plants Program - Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge * New and revised tool suite - Energy Management Toolkit - Updated system assessment tools - Tool-related training 3 | Advanced Manufacturing Office eere.energy.gov Manufacturing Matters * 11% of U.S. GDP * 12 million U.S. jobs * 60% of U.S. engineering and science jobs % Manufacturing Job Growth or Loss 31.8% of all manufacturing jobs lost from 2000-2011 Jobs 31% of all 2010 U.S. total energy consumption

399

Gasification of selected woody plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article contains laboratory data comparing the rate of gasification of five types of woody plants—beech, ... oak, willow, poplar and rose. The gasification rate was determined thermogravimetrically. Carbon di...

Buryan Petr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy Efficiency in Chilling Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Energy Efficiency in Chilling Plants Xin Wang????PhD. CandidateBuilding Energy Research Centre, Tsinghua University2006.10.11 2 Index ? Improve COP of chillers ? Increase load ratio? Decrease cooling water temperature? Increase chilled water...

Wang, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

"NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.5 hours" "NATURAL GAS PROCESSING PLANT SURVEY" "FORM EIA-757" "Schedule A: Baseline Report " "This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public...

402

Freeport Begins Offshore Sulfur Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Freeport Begins Offshore Sulfur Plant ... Discovered by Humble Oil & Refining, the sulfur deposit off Grand Isle is believed by industry observers to be one of the largest discovered in recent years. ...

1958-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

Pantex Plant | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

including explosives, at DOE's Pantex Plant. January 7, 2013 Enforcement Letter, NEL-2013-01 - January 7, 2013 Issued to B&W Pantex, LLC related to the Conduct of Nuclear...

404

Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Site Description Plants ESIS ESD FSGD ESI Forestland ESI Rangeland Data Access > Return CHARACTERISTICS Site Type: Rangeland Site Name: Red Sandy Loam 25-32" PZ Site ID: R082AY369TX Major Land Resource

405

Computer Control of Unattended Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Providing a cost-effective and reliable computer monitoring, control, and optimization package is a greater challenge for small, unattended plants than for large energy intensive facilities. This paper describes the successful application of a...

Vinson, D. R.; Chatterjee, N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Intercellular Communication during Plant Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...metabolic processes; however, levels are tightly regulated as excess ROS can be cytotoxic. Plants also actively produce ROS through...circadian and ultradian clocks, such as their disruption by lithium, suggest that these clocks may share some regulatory mechanisms...

Jaimie M. Van Norman; Natalie W. Breakfield; Philip N. Benfey

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

Issues for New Nuclear Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Explore * Idaho's energy picture * Nuclear power in the U.S. * Potential for a nuclear power plant in Idaho 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Million Megawatt-Hours Total...

408

Balancing people, plants, and practices  

SciTech Connect

Two of the biggest challenges facing the US power industry today are retaining an experienced, capable workforce and operating and maintaining a reliable, diversified fleet of generating plants. Success in the marketplace requires a proper balancing of staff and new technology, something few gencos do well. Following this introductory paper in this issue are several technical articles representing a small sample of the steps that gencos nationwide are taking to prolong plant life. Unlike the false promise of Ponce de Leon's fountain of youth in Florida, the promise of longer life for aging plants is real wherever experienced engineers and technicians are on the job. The article looks at problems across America, from the East Coast to the West Coast. It is supported by diagrams projecting US new capacity and plant type additions up to 2014. 5 figs.

Peltier, R.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermal Solar Power Plants Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel with rising interest in solar power generation, several solar thermal facilities of different configuration and size were ... were designed as modest-size experimental or prototype solar power plants ...

W. Grasse; H. P. Hertlein; C.-J. Winter; G. W. Braun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms  

Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Overview BETTER BUILDINGS, BETTER PLANTS  

Energy Savers (EERE)

1,700 Cumulative Avoided CO 2 Emissions (Million Metric Ton) 18.5 Average Annual Energy Intensity Improvement Rate through 2013 2.4% Better Plants Snapshot, February 2015...

412

A neighborhood alternative energy plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design that proposes the redefinition of the role of a power plant facility within a community by creating a humane environment for recreation, education, community gathering, living, and energy production; rather than ...

Brooks, Douglas James

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mixtec plant nomenclature and classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capsicum pubescens L. , SOLANACEAE yutu tuya’a kuán: la matade chile amarillo (PIN) tuya’a: chili plants (JAM) chá’a:nika’ndi ya’a: chilar (CAB) tuya’a (COI) Clethra mexicana

de Avila, Alejandro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

415

DSM Power Plant in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

India is facing acute energy shortage that is likely to affect its economic development. There are severe supply side constraints in term of coal and gas shortages that are likely to continue in the near future. Hence, in its current focus to solving the energy shortage problem and sustaining the development trajectory, the country should aim at a balance between supply side and demand side measures. Energy Efficiency in end use is increasingly gaining importance as one of the most cost effective options for achieving short to medium term energy savings. India has initiated the National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency under National Action Plan for Climate Change which addresses various aspects of energy efficiency such as technology, financing, fiscal incentive and also creation of energy efficiency as a market instrument. However, even though energy efficiency has substantial scope in the Indian subcontinent, the market for energy efficiency has been limited. This paper discusses the concept of mega Demand Side Management projects as a DSM Power Plant. A DSM Power Plant acts as an umbrella with multiple energy efficiency schemes under its ambit aimed at transforming energy efficiency into a business by providing a push to the scale of operation as well as financial sustenance to energy efficiency projects. This paper expounds on the various aspects of DSM Power Plant in terms of its policy and institutional mechanism for the large scale implementation of energy efficiency in India. This paper provides an illustration of the concept of DSM Power Plant model through a case study in one of the states (Rajasthan) of India. Further, a comparative analysis of the cost of generation from DSM Power Plant and a representative conventional power plant (CPP) in Rajasthan has been undertaken and the DSM Power Plant comes out to be a more cost effective option. The concept of DSM Power Plant will not only address the issue of energy shortages but will also help the financially thwarted utilities to reduce their revenue deficit in the near future.

Saurabh Gupta; Tanushree Bhattacharya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Researching power plant water recovery  

SciTech Connect

A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

NONE

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

In situ LA–MC–ICP–MS boron isotope and zircon U–Pb age determinations of Paleoproterozoic borate deposits in Liaoning Province, northeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A large number of Paleoproterozoic borate deposits are hosted by the lower units of a volcanic-sedimentary sequence in Liaoning Province, northeastern China, and are a major source of boron in China. The ore-bearing wall rocks in the deposits are serpentinized ultrabasic rocks and carbonates, with layered leptynites, leptites, amphibolites, and migmatites adjacent to the ore. Both the borate ores and country rocks contain tourmaline, although the country rocks have much lower abundances of the mineral. Based on in situ boron isotope measurements using laser ablation–multi-collector–inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (LA–MC–ICP–MS), boron isotope data show that: (1) ?11B values of borate ores range from + 6.8‰ to + 13.9‰ (mean + 10.8‰); (2) tourmalines from the borate ores have ?11B values from + 9.5‰ to + 12.7‰; and (3) the wall rocks within the borate ores yield slightly lower ?11B values ranging from + 5.7‰ to + 7.6‰, and those outside the deposits from ? 9.9‰ to ? 5.9‰. Positive ?11B values in borates as well as in tourmalines inside the mining area indicate that boron in these Paleoproterozoic borate deposits was derived from marine evaporites. ?34SV-CDT (where V-CDT is Vienna Canyon Diablo Troilite) values of borate ores, serpentinized marbles, and anhydrites range from + 16.1‰ to + 24.7‰, whereas ?13CV-PDB (where V-PDB is Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite) values of marbles range from + 3.2‰ to + 5.9‰. These isotopic characteristics are interpreted to reflect formation in a marine evaporative environment. LA–MC–ICP–MS zircon weighted207Pb/206Pb ages of leptite and serpentinized olivine basalt from the hanging wall of the borate deposits are 2139 ± 13 Ma and 2130 ± 19 Ma, respectively. Therefore, the (~ 2.2 Ga) borate deposits may have originated from marine evaporative boron-bearing sediments, which were interbedded within bimodal volcanic rocks during the early stages of development of the Liaoji rift.

Guyue Hu; Yanhe Li; Changfu Fan; Kejun Hou; Yue Zhao; Lingsen Zeng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

Ernest A. Mancini

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization is progressing. Data on reservoir production rate and pressure history at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been tabulated, and porosity data from core analysis has been correlated with porosity as observed from well log response. Data integration is on schedule, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database for reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation for the reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs for each of these fields.

Ernest A. Mancini

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Arabidopsis Hexokinase-Like1 and Hexokinase1 Form a Critical Node in Mediating Plant Glucose and Ethylene Responses  

SciTech Connect

Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) hexokinase-like1 (HKL1) lacks Glc phosphorylation activity and has been shown to act as a negative regulator of plant growth. Interestingly, the protein has a largely conserved Glc binding domain and protein overexpression was shown previously to promote seedling tolerance to exogenous 6% (w/v) Glc. Since these phenotypes occur independently of cellular Glc signaling activities, we have tested whether HKL1 might promote crosstalk between the normal antagonists Glc and ethylene. We show that repression by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) of the Glc-dependent developmental arrest of wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings requires the HKL1 protein. We also describe an unusual root hair phenotype associated with growth on high Glc media that occurs prominently in HKL1 overexpression lines and in gin2-1, a null mutant of hexokinase1 (HXK1). Seedlings of these lines produce bulbous root hairs with an enlarged base, after transfer from agar plates with normal media to plates with 6% Glc. Seedling transfer to plates with 2% Glc plus ACC mimics the high Glc affect in the HKL1 overexpression line, but not in gin2-1. A similar ACC-stimulated, bulbous root hair phenotype also was observed in wild-type seedlings transferred to plates with 9% Glc. From transcript expression analyses, we found that HKL1 and HXK1 have differential roles in Glc-dependent repression of some ethylene biosynthesis genes. Since we show by co-immunoprecipitation assays that HKL1 and HXK1 can interact, these two proteins likely form a critical node in Glc signaling that mediates overlapping, but also distinct cellular responses to Glc and ethylene treatments.

Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Xioxia, Xia [Clemson University; Moore, Brandon [Clemson University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The potential technical and economic risks to the EECP from Task 2.5 can be mitigated by demonstrating that the end-use products derived from the upgrading of the F-T synthesis total liquid product can meet or exceed current specifications for the manufacture of ethylene and propylene chemicals from F-T naphtha, for the generation of hydrogen from F-T naphtha to power fuel cells, for direct blending of F-T diesels into transportation fuels, for the conversion of F-T heavy product wax to transportation fuels, and the conversion of F-T Heavy product wax to a valuable high melting point food-grade specialty wax product. Product evaluations conducted under Task 2.5 of Phase II successfully mitigated the above technical and economic risks to the EECP with the development of product yields and product qualities for the production of chemicals, transportation fuels, and specialty food-grade waxes from the F-T synthesis products.

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; Ming He; James F. Stevens; Centha A. Davis; Michael Henley; Jerome Mayer; Harry Tsang; Jimell Erwin; Jennifer Adams; Michael Tillman; Chris Taylor; Marjan J. Roos; Robert F. Earhart

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc., GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I, a design basis for the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis section was developed based on limited experience with the specified feed gas and operating conditions. The objective of this Task in Phase II RD&T work was to confirm the performance of the F-T reactor at the set design conditions. Although much of the research, development, and testing work were done by TES outside of this project, several important issues were addressed in this phase of the project. They included Rejuvenation/Regeneration of the Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst, online Catalyst Withdrawal and Addition from the synthesis reactor, and the Fischer-Tropsch Design Basis Confirmation. In Phase III the results from these RD&T work will be incorporated in developing the engineering design package. This Topical Report documents the Phase II RD&T work that was completed for this task.

David Storm; Govanon Nongbri; Steve Decanio; Ming He; Lalit Shah; Charles Schrader; Earl Berry; Peter Ricci; Belma Demirel; Charles Benham; Mark Bohn

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

424

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Cooperative Agreement to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. to provide a preliminary engineering design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award, continuous and diligent work has been undertaken to achieve the design of an economical facility that makes strides toward attaining the goal of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to power while coproducing transportation fuels, chemicals, and useful utilities such as steam. This objective is being pursued in a three-phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems, LLC. (TES), the successor to Texaco Energy Systems, Inc. The key subcontractors to TES include General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root. ChevronTexaco provided gasification technology and Rentech Inc.'s Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology that has been developed for non-natural gas sources. GE provided gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair provided air separation technology and KBR provided engineering to integrate the facility. A conceptual design was completed in Phase I and the report was accepted by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of technical success of the EECP. The objective of Phase II was to mitigate the risks by executing research, development, and testing. Results from the Phase II work are the subject of this report. As the work of Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Preliminary Engineering Design. Work in Phase II requires additional technical development work to correctly apply technology at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The decision to proceed with Phase III centers on locating a new site and favorable commercial and economic factors.

John Anderson; Charles Schrader

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was developed to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 identified as potential technical risks to the EECP the fuel/engine performance and emissions of the F-T diesel fuel products. Hydrotreating the neat F-T diesel product reduces potentially reactive olefins, oxygenates, and acids levels and alleviates corrosion and fuel stability concerns. Future coproduction plants can maximize valuable transportation diesel by hydrocracking the F-T Synthesis wax product to diesel and naphtha. The upgraded neat F-T diesel, hydrotreater F-T diesel, and hydrocracker F-T diesel products would be final blending components in transportation diesel fuel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully carried out fuel lubricity property testing, fuel response to lubricity additives, and hot-start transient emission tests on a neat F-T diesel product, a hydrocracker F-T diesel product, a blend of hydrotreater and hydrocracker F-T diesel products, and a Tier II California Air Resources Board (CARB)-like diesel reference fuel. Only the neat F-T diesel passed lubricity inspection without additive while the remaining three fuel candidates passed with conventional additive treatment. Hot-start transient emission tests were conducted on the four fuels in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Federal Test Procedure (FTP) specified in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40, Part 86, and Subpart N on a rebuilt 1991 Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 60 heavy-duty diesel engine. Neat F-T diesel fuel reduced oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), total particulate (PM), hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) by 4.5%, 31%, 50%, 29%, and 35%, respectively, compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The hydrocracker F-T diesel product and a blend of hydrocracker and hydrotreater F-T diesel products also reduced NO{sub x}, PM, HC, CO and SOF by 13%, 16% to 17%, 38% to 63%, 17% to 21% and 21% to 39% compared to the Tier II CARB-like diesel. The fuel/engine performance and emissions of the three F-T diesel fuels exceed the performance of a Tier II CARB-like diesel. Phase II RD&T Task 2.6 successfully met the lubricity property testing and F-T diesel fuel hot-start transient emissions test objectives. The results of the testing help mitigate potential economic risks on obtaining a premium price for the F-T diesel fuel

Fred D. Brent; Lalit Shah; Earl Berry; Charles H. Schrader; John Anderson; J. Erwin; Matthew G. Banks; Terry L. Ullman

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

426

Montana State University -College of Agriculture Plant Science & Plant Pathology Department Program of Study for: Biotechnology -Plant Systems Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program of Study for: Biotechnology - Plant Systems Options 2010-2012 Catalog Student ID #: Required Cr- Intro to Biotechnology 3 F W BIOB 160 - Prin Living Systems (or BIOB 260 F) 4 F,S Q BIOB 375 - Genetics,S,Su BIOB 430 - Plant Biotechnology 3 S even BIOO 433 - Plant Physiology 3 S HORT 447 - Advanced Plant

Lawrence, Rick L.

427

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC or TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified several potential methods to reduce or minimize the environmental impact of the proposed EECP. The EECP Project Team identified F-T catalyst disposal, beneficial gasifier slag usage (other than landfill), and carbon dioxide recovery for the gas turbine exhaust for study under this task. Successfully completing the Task 2.10 RD&T provides additional opportunities for the EECP to meet the goals of DOE's Vision 21 Program. The gasification section offers several opportunities to maximize the environmental benefits of an EECP. The spent F-T catalyst can be sent to landfills or to the gasification section. Testing in Phase II shows that the spent F-T catalyst with a small wax coating can safely meet federal landfill requirements. As an alternative to landfilling, it has been proposed to mix the spent F-T catalyst with the petroleum coke and feed this mixture to the gasification unit. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience with gasification and the characteristics of the spent F-T catalyst this appears to be an excellent opportunity to reduce one potential waste stream. The slag from the gasification unit can be commercially marketed for construction or fuel (such as cement kiln fuel) uses. The technical and economic benefits of these options must be reviewed for the final EECP before incorporating a specific alternative into the design basis. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, particularly carbon dioxide, is an important goal of the EECP. The Texaco gasification process provides opportunities to capture high purity streams of carbon dioxide. For Phase II, a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS) was tested to determine its potential to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust of a gas turbine. Testing on with a simulated gas turbine exhaust shows that the CFCMS is able to remove high purity carbon dioxide from the exhaust. However, more development is required to optimize the system.

John H. Anderson; Charles Benham; Earl R. Berry; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah; O.O. Omatete; T.D. Burchell

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES), a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco, General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, Inc. GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP, Phase II RD&T included tests of an alternative (to Rentech's Dynamic Settler) primary catalyst/wax separation device and secondary catalyst/wax separation systems. The team evaluated multiple technologies for both primary and secondary catalyst/wax separation. Based on successful testing at Rentech (outside of DOE funding) and difficulties in finalizing a contract to demonstrate alternative primary catalyst/wax separation technology (using magnetic separation technology), ChevronTexaco has selected the Rentech Dynamic Settler for primary catalyst/wax separation. Testing has shown the Dynamic Settler is capable of producing filtrate exceeding the proposed EECP primary catalyst/wax separation goal of less than 0.1 wt%. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system appeared to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of 10 parts per million (weight) [ppmw]. The other technologies, magnetic separation and electrostatic separation, were promising and able to reduce the solids concentrations in the filtrate. Additional RD&T will be needed for magnetic separation and electrostatic separation technologies to obtain 10 ppmw filtrate required for the proposed EECP. The Phase II testing reduces the technical and economic risks and provides the information necessary to proceed with the development of an engineering design for the EECP Fischer-Tropsch catalyst/wax separation system.

John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Roko Bujas; Ming He; Ken Kwik; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Dennis Slater; Donald Todd; Don Wall

2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

429

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which uses petroleum coke to produce at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to its detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC (TES) (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR). The work was under cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing the gasification technology and the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech Inc., GE is providing the combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing the air separation technology, and KBR is providing overall engineering. Each of the EECP's subsystems was assessed for technical risks and barriers in Phase I. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified catalyst/wax separation as a potential technical and economic risk. To mitigate risks to the proposed EECP concept, Phase II RD&T included tests for secondary catalyst/wax separation systems as part of Task 2.3--Catalyst/Wax Separation. The LCI Scepter{reg_sign} Microfiltration system was determined to be best suited for producing a filtrate that met the EECP secondary catalyst/wax separation standards of producing F-T wax containing less than10 ppmw solids. As part of task 2.3, micro-filtration removal efficiencies and production rates for two FT feeds, Rentech Inc. bubble column reactor (BCR) product and LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) product, were evaluated. Based on comparisons between the performances of these two materials, the more readily available LaPorte AFDU material was judged an acceptable analog to the BCR material that would be produced in a larger-scale F-T synthesis. The present test was initiated to obtain data in an extended range of concentration for use in the scale-up design of the secondary catalyst/wax separation system that would be operating at the EECP capacity.

John Anderson; Mark Anselmo; Earl Berry; Mark Bohn; Ming He; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit Shah; Donald Todd; Robert Schavey

2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using petroleum coke and ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are Texaco Energy Systems LLC. (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified F-T reactor scale-up as a potential technical risk. The objective of Task 2.3 was to confirm engineering models that allow scale-up to commercial slurry phase bubble column (SPBC) reactors operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. In developmental work outside the scope of this project, historical data, literature references, and a scale-up from a 1 1/2-in. (3.8 cm) to 6-ft (1.8 m) SPBC reactor have been reviewed. This review formed the background for developing scale-up models for a SPBC reactor operating in the churn-turbulent flow regime. The necessary fundamental physical parameters have been measured and incorporated into the mathematical catalyst/kinetic model developed from the SPBC and CSTR work outside the scope of this EECP project. The mathematical catalyst/kinetic model was used to compare to experimental data obtained at Rentech during the EECP Fischer-Tropsch Confirmation Run (Task 2.1; reported separately). The prediction of carbon monoxide (CO) conversion as a function of days on stream compares quite closely to the experimental data.

Randy Roberts

2003-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

431

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. During Phase I the team identified the integration of the water produced in the F-T synthesis section with the gasification section as an area of potential synergy. By utilizing the F-T water in the petroleum coke slurry for the gasifier, the EECP can eliminate a potential waste stream and reduce capital costs. There is a low technical risk for this synergy, however, the economic risk, particularly in regards to the water, can be high. The economic costs include the costs of treating the water to meet the locally applicable environmental standards. This option may require expensive chemicals and treatment facilities. EECP Phase II included tests conducted to confirm the viability of integrating F-T water in the slurry feed for the gasifier. Testing conducted at ChevronTexaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) included preparing slurries made using petroleum coke with F-T water collected at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The work included bench scale tests to determine the slurry ability of the petroleum coke and F-T water. The results of the tests show that F-T water does not adversely affect slurries for the gasifier. There are a few cases where in fact the addition of F-T water caused favorable changes in viscosity of the slurries. This RD&T task was executed in Phase II and results are reported herein.

Abdalla H. Ali; Raj Kamarthi; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The 1999 U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) award to Texaco Energy Systems Inc. (presently Texaco Energy Systems LLC, a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco) was made to provide a Preliminary Engineering Design of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP). Since the award presentation, work has been undertaken to achieve an economical concept design that makes strides toward the DOE Vision 21 goal. The objective of the EECP is to convert coal and/or petroleum coke to electric power plus transportation fuels, chemicals and useful utilities such as steam. The use of petroleum coke was added as a fuel to reduce the cost of feedstock and also to increase the probability of commercial implementation of the EECP concept. This objective has been pursued in a three phase effort through the partnership of the DOE with prime contractor Texaco Energy Systems LLC and subcontractors General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown and Root (KBR). ChevronTexaco is providing gasification technology and Rentech's Fischer-Tropsch technology that has been developed for non-natural gas feed sources. GE is providing gas turbine technology for the combustion of low energy content gas. Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering to integrate the facility. The objective of Phase I was to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was completed in 2000. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was prepared based on making assumptions for the basis of design for various technologies that are part of the EECP concept. The Phase I Preliminary Concept Report was approved by the DOE in May 2001. The Phase I work identified technical and economic risks and critical research, development, and testing that would improve the probability of the technical and economic success of the EECP. The Project Management Plan (Task 1) for Phase II was approved by the DOE in 2001. The results of RD&T efforts for Phase II are expected to improve the quality of assumptions made in Phase I for basis of design for the EECP concept. The RD&T work plan (Task 2 and 3) for Phase II has been completed. As the RD&T work conducted during Phase II concluded, it became evident that sufficient, but not necessarily complete, technical information and data would be available to begin Phase III - Basic Engineering Design. Also due to the merger of Chevron and Texaco, the proposed refinery site for the EECP was not available. It became apparent that some additional technical development work would be needed to correctly apply the technology at a specific site. The objective of Task 4 of Phase II is to update the concept basis of design produced during Phase I. As part of this task, items that will require design basis changes and are not site dependent have been identified. The team has qualitatively identified the efforts to incorporate the impacts of changes on EECP concept. The design basis has been modified to incorporate those changes. The design basis changes for those components of EECP that are site and feedstock dependent will be done as part of Phase III, once the site has been selected.

Charles Benham; Mark Bohn; John Anderson; Earl Berry; Fred Brent; Ming He; Randy Roberts; Lalit Shah; Marjan Roos

2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Waste Treatment Plant - 12508  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will immobilize millions of gallons of Hanford's tank waste into solid glass using a proven technology called vitrification. The vitrification process will turn the waste into a stable glass form that is safe for long-term storage. Our discussion of the WTP will include a description of the ongoing design and construction of this large, complex, first-of-a-kind project. The concept for the operation of the WTP is to separate high-level and low-activity waste fractions, and immobilize those fractions in glass using vitrification. The WTP includes four major nuclear facilities and various support facilities. Waste from the Tank Farms is first pumped to the Pretreatment Facility at the WTP through an underground pipe-in-pipe system. When construction is complete, the Pretreatment Facility will be 12 stories high, 540 feet long and 215 feet wide, making it the largest of the four major nuclear facilities that compose the WTP. The total size of this facility will be more than 490,000 square feet. More than 8.2 million craft hours are required to construct this facility. Currently, the Pretreatment Facility is 51 percent complete. At the Pretreatment Facility the waste is pumped to the interior waste feed receipt vessels. Each of these four vessels is 55-feet tall and has a 375,000 gallon capacity, which makes them the largest vessels inside the Pretreatment Facility. These vessels contain a series of internal pulse-jet mixers to keep incoming waste properly mixed. The vessels are inside the black-cell areas, completely enclosed behind thick steel-laced, high strength concrete walls. The black cells are designed to be maintenance free with no moving parts. Once hot operations commence the black-cell area will be inaccessible. Surrounded by black cells, is the 'hot cell canyon'. The hot cell contains all the moving and replaceable components to remove solids and extract liquids. In this area, there is ultrafiltration equipment, cesium-ion exchange columns, evaporator boilers and recirculation pumps, and various mechanical process pumps for transferring process fluids. During the first phase of pretreatment, the waste will be concentrated using an evaporation process. Solids will be filtered out, and the remaining soluble, highly radioactive isotopes will be removed using an ion-exchange process. The high-level solids will be sent to the High-Level Waste (HLW) Vitrification Facility, and the low activity liquids will be sent to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility for further processing. The high-level waste will be transferred via underground pipes to the HLW Facility from the Pretreatment Facility. The waste first arrives at the wet cell, which rests inside a black-cell area. The pretreated waste is transferred through shielded pipes into a series of melter preparation and feed vessels before reaching the melters. Liquids from various facility processes also return to the wet cell for interim storage before recycling back to the Pretreatment Facility. (authors)

Harp, Benton; Olds, Erik [US DOE (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Career Map: Site/Plant Manager  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Site/Plant Manager positions.

435

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

Plants having modified response to ethylene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype. 31 figs.

Meyerowitz, E.M.; Chang, C.; Bleecker, A.B.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Plants having modified response to ethylene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

Meyerowitz, Elliot M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Plants having modified response to ethylene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention includes transformed plants having at least one cell transformed with a modified ETR nucleic acid. Such plants have a phenotype characterized by a decrease in the response of at least one transformed plant cell to ethylene as compared to a plant not containing the transformed plant cell. Tissue and/or temporal specificity for expression of the modified ETR nucleic acid is controlled by selecting appropriate expression regulation sequences to target the location and/or time of expression of the transformed nucleic acid. The plants are made by transforming at least one plant cell with an appropriate modified ETR nucleic acid, regenerating plants from one or more of the transformed plant cells and selecting at least one plant having the desired phenotype.

Meyerowitz, Elliott M. (Pasadena, CA); Chang, Caren (Pasadena, CA); Bleecker, Anthony B. (Madison, WI)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cement Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Plant EPI Cement Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder Technical documentation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ENERGY STAR plant certification | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

» ENERGY STAR plant certification » ENERGY STAR plant certification Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Get started with ENERGY STAR Make the business case Build an energy management program Measure, track, and benchmark Improve energy performance Industrial service and product providers Earn recognition ENERGY STAR Partner of the Year Award

442

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Flat Glass Manufacturing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

443

Juice Processing Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Juice Processing Plant EPI Juice Processing Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

444

Automobile Assembly Plant EPI | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automobile Assembly Plant EPI Automobile Assembly Plant EPI Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

445

EARLY ENTRANCE COPRODUCTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the three phase development of an Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) which produces at least one product from at least two of the following three categories: (1) electric power (or heat), (2) fuels, and (3) chemicals using ChevronTexaco's proprietary gasification technology. The objective of Phase I is to determine the feasibility and define the concept for the EECP located at a specific site; develop a Research, Development, and Testing (RD&T) Plan to mitigate technical risks and barriers; and prepare a Preliminary Project Financing Plan. The objective of Phase II is to implement the work as outlined in the Phase I RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. The objective of Phase III is to develop an engineering design package and a financing and testing plan for an EECP located at a specific site. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information needed by industry to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation. The partners in this project are TES (a subsidiary of ChevronTexaco), General Electric (GE), Praxair, and Kellogg Brown & Root (KBR) in addition to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). TES is providing gasification technology and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) technology developed by Rentech, GE is providing combustion turbine technology, Praxair is providing air separation technology, and KBR is providing engineering. Each of the EECP subsystems were assessed for technical risks and barriers. A plan was identified to mitigate the identified risks (Phase II RD&T Plan, October 2000). The RD&T Plan identified petroleum coke characteristics as a potential technical risk. The composition of petroleum coke varies from one refinery to another. Petroleum coke characteristics are a function of the crude oil slate available at the refinery and the coker operating parameters. The specific petroleum coke characteristics at a refinery affect the design of the Gasification and Acid Gas Removal (AGR) subsystems. Knowing the petroleum coke composition provides the necessary data to proceed to the EECP Phase III engineering design of the gasification process. Based on ChevronTexaco's experience, the EECP team ranked the technical, economic, and overall risks of the petroleum coke composition related to the gasification subsystem as low. In Phase I of the EECP Project, the Motiva Port Arthur Refinery had been identified as the potential EECP site. As a result of the merger between Texaco and Chevron in October 2001, Texaco was required to sell its interest in the Motiva Enterprises LLC joint venture to Shell Oil Company and Saudi Refining Inc. To assess the possible impact of moving the proposed EECP host site to a ChevronTexaco refinery, samples of petroleum coke from two ChevronTexaco refineries were sent to MTC for bench-scale testing. The results of the analysis of these samples were compared to the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis developed for Motiva's Port Arthur Refinery. The analysis confirms that if the proposed EECP is moved to a new refinery site, the Phase I EECP Gasification Design Basis would have to be updated. The lower sulfur content of the two samples from the ChevronTexaco refineries indicates that if one of these sites were selected, the Sulfur Recovery Unit (SRU) might be sized smaller than the current EECP design. This would reduce the capital expense of the SRU. Additionally, both ChevronTexaco samples have a higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio than the Motiva Port Arthur petroleum coke. The higher hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio could give a slightly higher F-T products yield from the F-T Synthesis Reactor. However, the EECP Gasification Design Basis can not be updated until the site for the proposed EECP site is finalized. Until the site is finalized, the feedstock (petroleum coke) characteristics are a low risk to the EECP project.

Abdalla H. Ali; John H. Anderson; Earl R. Berry; Charles H. Schrader; Lalit S. Shah

2003-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: Colorado Rare Plant Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium September 5, 2008 Montrose, Colorado Sponsored by: Colorado Rare Plant Technical CommitteeColorado Rare Plant Technical Committee Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish

447

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 2nd Annual Rare Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 2nd Annual Rare Plant Symposium Friday, September 16th, 2005 8am-noon: 2nd Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium (Discuss G1 species) 6:30-7:30pm with the Colorado Native Plant Society's Annual Meeting Sponsored by: #12;The Second Annual Colorado Rare Plant

448

Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant Science Graduates Spring 2011 Bachelor of Science in Plant Sciences Joshua Paul Baker, Old Dale Wallace, Centerville Master of Science Reginald Jason Millwood, Plant Sciences Kara Lee Warwick, Plant Sciences Undergraduate Degrees, Summer Term 2011 Henry Joseph Cope, III, Plant Sciences David

Tennessee, University of

449

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Systems Annual Peer Review November 2-3, 2006 Progress Report Presented by Robert Haug Executive Director Iowa Association of Municipal Utilities for Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is ISEP? ISEP is a DOE-supported effort of municipal utilities in Iowa, Minnesota, and the Dakotas for development of 200 (now 268) MW of compressed air energy storage (CAES) and 75 MW of wind capacity. THE IOWA STORED ENERGY PLANT What is the ISEP Agency? The ISEP Agency is an intergovernmental entity formed under Iowa law in 2005 and governed by a board of directors composed of representatives of participating local governments. Board of Directors: * Dennis Fannin, Osage * John Bilsten, Algona * Sheila Boeckman, Waverly * Scott Tonderum, Graettinger * Niel Ruddy, Carlisle

450

Why sequence Dothideomycetes plant pathogens?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dothideomycetes plant pathogens? Dothideomycetes plant pathogens? The largest and most diverse group of fungi, Dothideomycetes are found on every continent and play key roles in maintaining the local ecosystems by degrading biomass and contributing to regulating the carbon cycle. Many of these fungi are also tolerant of environmental extremes such as heat, humidity and cold. Among the members of this group are pathogens that infect nearly every major crop used for food, fiber or fuel. As crop rotations are being reduced, fewer crops are being grown on larger acreages, making them more susceptible to severe crop losses due to disease. Understanding the plant pathogens of these crops could reduce fertilizer use, which could in turn help reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To better understand the members of this group, the project calls for

451

NETL: Innovations for Existing Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovations for Existing Plants Innovations for Existing Plants Coal and Power Systems Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Previous Next Chemical Looping Summary Chemical Looping Summary (July 2013) This summary provides a technical description of this advanced technology, describes its advantages, examines the R&D areas of need, and summarizes DOE's R&D efforts. DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update (June 2013) This comprehensive handbook provides an update on DOE/NETL R&D efforts on advanced CO2 capture technologies for coal-based power systems. CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations (July 2013) This meeting highlighted DOE/NETL RD&D efforts to develop advanced pre-, post-, and oxy-combustion CO2 capture technologies.

452

Power plant | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power plant Power plant Dataset Summary Description No description given. Source Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Date Released January 26th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated June 07th, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords eGrid eGRID2007 EIA Electricity emissions epa Power plant Data application/zip icon eGRID2007_Version1-1.zip (zip, 18.7 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Work of the U.S. Federal Government. Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

453

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant name/total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Beaver Valley Unit 1, Unit 2","1,777","14,994",19.3,"FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company" "Limerick Unit 1, Unit 2","2,264","18,926",24.3,"Exelon Nuclear" "PPL Susquehanna Unit 1, Unit 2","2,450","18,516",23.8,"PPL Susquehanna LLC" "Peach Bottom Unit 2, Unit 3","2,244","18,759",24.1,"Exelon Nuclear" "Three Mile Island Unit 1",805,"6,634",8.5,"Exelon Nuclear"

454

Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of leaves: (1) floating and firm textured and (2) submersed, thin linear and membranous. Numerous pencil-like spikes are visible beneath the pond surface in early summer. Stems are jointed and have fibrous roots at the lower nodes. Identification within.... FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS Heteranthera sp. (Mud plantain) Water star grass, a submersed or floating rooted plant, usually is found along muddy shores and in water up to 5 ft. deep. The leaves are approximately 2 inches long and 3/16 inch wide...

Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on growth responses, membrane transport, stomatal function, and paradigms of ion accumulation toxicity. Ion transport . Potassium Introduction Sodium is the sixth most abundant element in earth's crust+ ) is one of the most intensely researched ions in plant biology and has attained a repu- tation for its

Kronzucker, Herbert J.

456

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

457

INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

458

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

459

Design and simulation of a plant control system for a GCFR demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect

A plant control system is being designed for a 300 MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. Plant models and simulations are being developed to generate information necessary to further define control system requirements for subsequent plant design iterations.

Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance November 2000 Independent Oversight Evaluation of the Pantex Plant Emergency Response Exercise OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................... 1 2.0 RESULTS ................................................................................................... 4 2.1 Positive Program Attributes ............................................................... 4 2.2 Weaknesses and Items Requiring Attention ..................................... 5 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ........................................................................................ 9 4.0 RATING .................................................................................................... 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Plant Peroxisomes: Biogenesis and Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Plant Peroxisomes: Biogenesis and Function Jianping Hu a b 1 Alison Baker c Bonnie Bartel d Nicole Linka e Robert T. Mullen f Sigrun...peroxisomes and/or fuse together in a controlled, step-wise fashion to form a new peroxisome (Trelease and Lingard, 2006...

Jianping Hu; Alison Baker; Bonnie Bartel; Nicole Linka; Robert T. Mullen; Sigrun Reumann; Bethany K. Zolman

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Plants in a cold climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperature also imposes a dehydrative stress, by lowering water absorption by the root and water transport in the shoot. A direct and...conditions? M. Smallwood. There is some evidence that even chill- ing intolerant plants may use some of the same signalling...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM 26-29 NOVEMBER 1984 GALVESTON, TEXAS June 1985 Final report 26-29 NOVEMBER 1984, 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NC:'IBER GALVESTON, TEXAS 7. AU THOR(.) 8 Control Research Program was held in Galveston, Texas, on 26-29 November 1984, to review current research

US Army Corps of Engineers

464

How a Plant Builds Leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...affect many different processes. The theory and technology are now poised to define...M. (1999). Signaling of cell fate decisions by CLAVATA3 in Arabidopsis shoot meristems...regulate plant meristematic cell fate decisions. Sci. Signal. 1 : pe53. Green, P...

Siobhan A. Braybrook; Cris Kuhlemeier

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

Photobiology: Plants Respond to Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... EFFECTS of light on the behaviour of plants, and some of the associated techniques were the basis ... were the basis of a meeting of the Photobiology Group held at the Department of Horticulture, University of Reading, on March 27 and 28.

A Correspondent

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Plant Peroxisomes: Biogenesis and Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...State University-Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory...Stavanger, N-4036 Stavanger, Norway h Department of Biology, University...fatty acid degradation lack the energy or metabolites necessary for...insufficient supply of carbon and energy from fatty acid metabolism...

Jianping Hu; Alison Baker; Bonnie Bartel; Nicole Linka; Robert T. Mullen; Sigrun Reumann; Bethany K. Zolman

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

467

Landscape epidemiology of plant diseases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1094/PHYTO-96-1027 Gilbert, G.S 2002Evolutionary ecology...phyto.40.021202.110417 Gilbert, G.S , S.P Hubbell...345 Webb, C.O , G.S Gilbert, and M.J Donoghue2006Phylodiversity-dependent...Pesticides Plant Diseases microbiology statistics & numerical data...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

THE ORIGIN OF LAND PLANTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alone remain to remind us of their past glories. The more humble ferns and club-mosses still play an important role in the...seed plants still existing, the conifers-pines, firs, redwood, etc.-are the most nu-merous and familiar. The flowers...

Douglas H. Campbell

1930-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

469

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdel-Aal, Radwan E. - Computer Engineering Department, King Fahd University of...

470

Selecting Landscape Plants: Shade Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selecting Landscape Plants: Shade Trees Diane Relf, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia for any landscape plan. They set the stage for the entire home grounds design. The type used. Many will live and enhance the landscape for 100 or more years if they are given a chance. Because

Liskiewicz, Maciej

471

Advanced nuclear plant control complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An advanced control room complex for a nuclear power plant, including a discrete indicator and alarm system (72) which is nuclear qualified for rapid response to changes in plant parameters and a component control system (64) which together provide a discrete monitoring and control capability at a panel (14-22, 26, 28) in the control room (10). A separate data processing system (70), which need not be nuclear qualified, provides integrated and overview information to the control room and to each panel, through CRTs (84) and a large, overhead integrated process status overview board (24). The discrete indicator and alarm system (72) and the data processing system (70) receive inputs from common plant sensors and validate the sensor outputs to arrive at a representative value of the parameter for use by the operator during both normal and accident conditions, thereby avoiding the need for him to assimilate data from each sensor individually. The integrated process status board (24) is at the apex of an information hierarchy that extends through four levels and provides access at each panel to the full display hierarchy. The control room panels are preferably of a modular construction, permitting the definition of inputs and outputs, the man machine interface, and the plant specific algorithms, to proceed in parallel with the fabrication of the panels, the installation of the equipment and the generic testing thereof.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

The 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The 5th Annual Colorado Rare Plant Symposium: G2 Plants of Colorado September 5, 2008 8 am - 4 pm they shouldn't collect because th

473

Modeling the Impact of Plant Toxicity on Plant–Herbivore Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will not be possible for the selected parameter values if the herbivore pop- ulation is .... plant material can alter equilibrial relationships of 2-species plant com-.

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

474

Does fundamental host range match ecological host range? A retrospective case study of a Lygus plant bug parasitoid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the retrospective case study of Peristenus digoneutis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) introduced in the United States for biological control of native Lygus plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae), laboratory and field studies were conducted in the area of origin to evaluate whether the fundamental host range of P. digoneutis matches its ecological host range. Furthermore, it was determined whether these approaches would have been indicative of the post-introduction host range of P. digoneutis in North America [Day, W.H., 1999. Host preference of introduced and native parasites (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of phytophagous plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae) in alfalfa-grass fields in the north-eastern USA, BioControl 44, 249–261.]. Seven non-target mirid species were selected to define the fundamental host range of P. digoneutis in the area of origin in Europe. Laboratory choice and no-choice tests demonstrated that all selected non-target species were attacked by P. digoneutis and were largely suitable for parasitoid development. To confirm the validity of the fundamental host range, the ecological host range of P. digoneutis in the area of origin was investigated. Peristenus digoneutis was reared from 10 hosts, including three Lygus species and seven non-target hosts from the subfamily Mirinae. Despite the fact that laboratory tests demonstrated a high parasitism level in non-targets, ecological assessments in both North America (Day, 1999) and Europe suggest a much lower impact of P. digoneutis on non-target mirids, with low levels of parasitism (below 1% in Europe). Therefore, ecological host range studies in the area of origin provide useful supplementary data for interpreting pre-release laboratory host range testing.

T. Haye; H. Goulet; P.G. Mason; U. Kuhlmann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Exciting time to be at the U.S. NRC, by Dale Klein, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Extraordinary steps to ensure a minimal environmental impact, by George Vanderheyden, UniStar Nuclear Energy, LLC.; Focused on consistent reduction of outages, by Kevin Walsh, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; On the path towards operational excellence, by Ricardo Perez, Westinghouse Electric Company; Ability to be refuelled on-line, by Ian Trotman, CANDU Services, Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd.; ASCA Application for maintenance of SG secondary side, by Patrick Wagner, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, Phillip Battaglia and David Selfridge, Westinghouse Electric Company; and, An integral part of the landscape and lives, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Steam generator bowl drain repairs, by John Makar and Richard Gimple, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

476

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

477

Geothermal/Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal/Power Plant Geothermal/Power Plant < Geothermal(Redirected from Power Plant) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Land Use Leasing Exploration Well Field Power Plant Transmission Environment Water Use Print PDF Geothermal Power Plants General List of Plants Map of Plants Regulatory Roadmap NEPA (19) Binary power system equipment and cooling towers at the ORMAT Ormesa Geothermal Power Complex in Southern California. Geothermal Power Plants discussion Electricity Generation Converting the energy from a geothermal resource into electricity is achieved by producing steam from the heat underground to spin a turbine which is connected to a generator to produce electricity. The type of energy conversion technology that is used depends on whether the resource is predominantly water or steam, the temperature of the resource, and the

478

Flash Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flash Steam Power Plant Flash Steam Power Plant (Redirected from Flash Steam Power Plants) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Flash Steam Power Plants General List of Flash Steam Plants Flash Steam power plant process diagram - DOE EERE 2012 Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation in the world today. Fluid at temperatures greater than 360°F (182°C) is pumped under high pressure into a tank at the surface held at a much lower pressure, causing some of the fluid to rapidly vaporize, or "flash." The vapor then drives a turbine, which drives a generator. If any liquid remains in the tank, it can be flashed again in a second tank to extract even more energy.[1] Facility Name Owner Capacity (MW) Facility

479

Geothermal Steam Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Dry Steam) (Redirected from Dry Steam) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home General List of Dry Steam Plants List of Flash Steam Plants Steam Power Plants Dry Steam Power Plants Simple Dry Steam Powerplant process description - DOE EERE 2012 Dry steam plants use hydrothermal fluids that are primarily steam. The steam travels directly to a turbine, which drives a generator that produces electricity. The steam eliminates the need to burn fossil fuels to run the turbine (also eliminating the need to transport and store fuels). These plants emit only excess steam and very minor amounts of gases.[1] Dry steam power plants systems were the first type of geothermal power generation plants built (they were first used at Lardarello in Italy in 1904). Steam technology is still effective today at currently in use at The

480

Energeticals power plant engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energeticals power plant engineering Energeticals power plant engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name energeticals power plant engineering Place München, Bavaria, Germany Zip 81371 Sector Biomass, Geothermal energy Product Planning, design, installation and operation of turnkey plants for heat and electricity generation in the field of solid Biomass, deep and shallow geothermal energy and water power. References energeticals power plant engineering[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. energeticals power plant engineering is a company located in München, Bavaria, Germany . References ↑ "[ energeticals power plant engineering]" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Energeticals_power_plant_engineering&oldid=344770

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wv northeastern plant" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Coal-Fired Power Plants New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 1/13/2012) January 13, 2012 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to provide an overview of proposed new coal-fired power plants that are under development. This report may not represent all possible plants under consideration but is intended to illustrate the potential that exists for installation of new coal-fired power plants. Additional perspective has been added for non-coal-fired generation additions in the U.S. and coal-fired power plant activity in China. Experience has shown that public announcements of power plant developments do not provide an accurate representation of eventually

482

Nuclear power plants: structure and function  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed include: steam electric plants; BWR type reactors; PWR type reactors; thermal efficiency of light water reactors; other types of nuclear power plants; the fission process and nuclear fuel; fission products and reactor afterheat; and reactor safety.

Hendrie, J.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

484

Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Plant Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy and ClimateRenewable SystemsRenewable EnergyWind EnergyWind Plant Optimization Wind Plant Optimization swift21 swift20 swift19 swift18 swift17 swift16 swift15 swift14...

485

US nuclear power plants: Emergency planning inadequate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... local ! area are considered inadequate. The I operators of the plants - both at IndianIndianPoint ...

Peter David

1983-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

486

Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants.

487

Interdisciplinary Research and Training Program in the Plant Sciences  

SciTech Connect

Research on plants continued. Topics include: Molecular basis of symbiotic plant-microbe interations; enzymatic mechanisms and regulation of plant cell wall biosynthesis; molecular mechanisms that regulate the expression of genes in plants; resistance of plants to environmental stress; studies on hormone biosynthesis and action; plant cell wall proteins; interaction of nuclear and organelle genomes; sensor transduction in plants; molecular mechanisms of trafficking in the plant cell; regulation of lipid metabolism; molecular bases of plant disease resistance mechanisms; biochemical and molecular aspects of plant pathogenesis; developmental biology of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria; environmental control of plant development and its relation to plant hormones.

Wolk, C.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Property:PlantParasiticConsump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name PlantParasiticConsump Property Type Number Description Plant Parasitic Consumption (MWh). Pages using the property "PlantParasiticConsump" Showing 3 pages using this...

489

Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Guadalupe Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility Guadalupe Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

490

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Power Plant Market, Economic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors for current parabolic trough systems under development range from 25% for solar only plants to greater than 40% for plants with thermal storage. Such plants provide...

491

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Needs Assessment | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Needs Assessment Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Needs Assessment May 2012 This Needs Assessment for former Waste Isolation Pilot Plant production workers...

492

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Activites More Documents & Publications EIS-0026: 2010 Annual Mitigation...

493

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Isolation Pilot Plant Update Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Update More Documents & Publications TRUPACT-III Quick Facts "TRU" Success: SRS Recovery...

494

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Overview of WIPP presented by Dr. Dave Moody. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant...

495

Drizo protects turbo expander plant  

SciTech Connect

A triethylene glycol (TEG) unit using Dow's Drizo technology in front of processes was installed in a turbo expander plant owned by Valero Hydrocarbons, San Antonio, Texas. The TEG unit was placed in the process because methanol consumption had run higher than design conditions had predicted; gas flow rates and water content varied widely; and the gas was found to be contaminated considerably with iron sulfide. The TEG unit optimized gas processing by reducing the water content of gas to the system, accepting variable gas flow and water content to smooth out feed gas quality, removing iron sulfide and other contaminants before processing, and being amenable to conversion from other equipment already in existence at other Valero plant locations. The TEG Drizo process provides an azeotropic agent injected into the hot glycol, and the glycol solution is used to reduce residual water content of gas. Details of the equipment and process conversion are given.

Frazier, C.W.; Force, J.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado Rare Plant Technical Committee presents: 3rd Annual Rare Plant Symposium Sponsored by: Colorado Native Plant Society University of Colorado Herbarium US Fish and Wildlife Service Colorado and Eastern Colorado (Las Animas, Weld, Kit Carson, Huerfano, Pueblo, Otero, Prowers, Fremont, and El Paso

497

SPECIAL FEATURE FACILITATION IN PLANT COMMUNITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Horton2 1 Ecological Farming Systems, Agroscope Reckenholz-Ta¨nikon, Research Station ART, Zurich on seedling species identity, mycorrhizal identity, plant species combinations and study system. We present plant­plant interactions and by supplying and recycling nutrients. Key-words: arbuscular mycorrhizal

Horton, Tom

498

Volvo Trucks Manufacturing Plant in Virginia  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Volvo Group North America’s 1.6-million-square-foot New River Valley Plant in Dublin, Virginia, is the company’s largest truck manufacturing plant in the world. The company has implemented many energy savings solutions as part of the Better Buildings, Better Plants Challenge.

499

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Morris Plant Energy Efficiency Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optimization, heat transfer improvement, flare gas loss reduction, and compressed air system optimization. Steam System Optimization The data historian has been instrumental in identifying malfunctioning steam letdown (i.e., pressure control) valves... and maintained excellent surface condenser vacuum and heat transfer rates. This has resulted in additional reductions in steam demand for turbine operation. Flare Gas Loss Reduction The Morris plant produces off-gases rich in hydrogen and methane as a by...

Betczynski, M. T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z