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Sample records for worth basin texas

  1. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  2. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin ... Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  3. Texas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas

  4. Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

  5. Texas' lightly drilled Dalhart basin getting more oil exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzet, G.A.

    1991-06-24

    The Dalhart basin of the northwestern Texas Panhandle, the state's least drilled prospective area, is showing signs of another round of exploratory drilling. Horizon Oil and Gas Co., Dallas, opened ERT (Granite Wash) field in Potter County at 102 Bivins Ranch 9 miles north of Amarillo in early June. The discovery well pumped 105 b/d of 37.7{degrees} gravity oil and 48 b/d of water with gas too small to measure from perforations at 5,820-5,913 ft. Total depth is 7,516 ft in granite. In Hartley County, McKinney Operating Co., Amarillo, is pumped testing a second well in a field it discovered in 1990 that opened the first commercial Permian oil production in the Dalhart basin. The discovery well, McKinney's 1 Proctor, in section 63, block 22, CSL Survey, 19 miles west of Channing, pumped 12 b/d of oil and 15 b/d of water from Wolfcamp perforations at 4,038-50 ft. The well, which opened Proctor Ranch field, is producing about 35 b/d of oil.

  6. Crosswell seismic imaging in the Permian Basin, West Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langan, R.T.; Harris, J.M.; Jensen, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Crosswell seismic imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the last three years as the processing methods have become more robust, the cost of data acquisition has fallen, and the interwell distances of operation have increased. The Permian Basin of west Texas, USA is proving to be an ideal environment in which to develop this technology because of the relatively low seismic attenuation of the carbonate-dominated lithology, the moderate well spacings in the large number of mature fields, and the unusually high number of reflecting horizons. Current technology permits us to operate in carbonates at well spacings on the order of 2000 ft (650 m) and to image P- and S-wave reflecting horizons on a scale of 8 to 25 ft (2.4 to 7.6 m). Crosswell technology is not limited to carbonates, although the majority of recent applications have been in this environment. We are involved in three separate crosswell experiments in the Permian Basin, each with unique objectives. The first experiment involves a CO{sub 2} pilot project in a Grayburg Formation reservoir on the eastern edge of the Central Basin Platform. Here we are attempting to characterize the reservoir at a scale unobtainable from 3-D surface seismic data and to image CO{sub 2} fronts directly. The second experiment deals with a waterflood in a Middle Clearfork Formation reservoir on the Eastern Shelf, where we are trying to explain the erratic response of adjacent wells to water injection. In the third project we are trying to image the structure and stratigraphy of subtle {open_quotes}anomalies{close_quotes} in 3-D surface seismic images of the Wolfcamp Formation.

  7. Urban stormwater quality, event-mean concentrations, and estimates of stormwater pollutant loads, Dallas-Fort Worth area, Texas, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldys, S.; Raines, T.H.; Mansfield, B.L.; Sandlin, J.T.

    1998-12-31

    The quality of urban stormwater is characterized with respect of 188 properties and constituents. Event-mean concentrations and loads for three land uses (residential, industrial, commercial), and annual loads for 12 selected properties and constituents for 26 gaged basins in the Dallas-Forth Worth study area are presented. Event-mean concentrations (EMCs) were computed for each land use for biochemical oxygen demand; chemical oxygen demand; suspended and dissolved solids; total nitrogen and ammonia plus organic nitrogen; total and dissolved phosphorus; total recoverable copper, lead, and zinc; and total diazinon. The EMCs of chemical oxygen demand; total nitrogen and ammonia plus organic nitrogen; total and dissolved phosphorus; and total diazinon were greatest in samples from residential land-use basins. The EMCs of biochemical oxygen demand; suspended and dissolved solids; and total copper, lead, and zinc were greatest in samples from industrial land-use basins.

  8. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  9. Structural evolution of Val Verde basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.E.; Petersen, N.

    1984-04-01

    The Val Verde basin is a northwest-southeast trending foreland basin contained within the southern portion of the Permian basin. The Val Verde basin has several large fields, e.g., Brown Bassett and JM, which have a combined ultimate recovery of over 1 tcf of gas. Structurally, the major fields are complexly faulted features related to differential uplift of basement blocks. Middle and Upper Permian strata are not present in the central and southern Val Verde basin. Appreciable amounts of Permian sediment were eroded prior to deposition of Cretaceous strata, thus, Cretaceous rocks unconformably overlie Wolfcamp sediments. Restored estimates for vitrinite reflectance data indicate a minimum of 8000-10,000 ft (2400-3000 m) of Permian rocks have been eroded. Therefore, in the central and southern portions of the basin, Paleozoic rocks are inferred to have occupied depths several miles deeper than present. Vitrinite reflectance values for Ellenburger (Ordovician) rocks at Brown Bassett are approximately 1.8 to 2.0% R/sub o/. Ellenburger reflectance values increase to the south and southeast to values greater than 4.5% R/sub o/. The most southerly wells also have reflectance depth trends which show a break in gradient within Wolfcamp sediments (9000-10,000 ft, 2700-3000 m). The change in gradient suggests a thermal event contemporaneous with the basin's rapid downwarping and Wolfcamp deposition. Any exploration in the basin, therefore, must recognize the unique relationships between structural timing, structural position, depth of burial, thermal pulses, and hydrocarbon mobility for a large portion of Val Verde basin.

  10. Geology and geohydrology of the east Texas Basin. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies (1979)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitler, C.W.; Agagu, O.K.; Basciano, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    The program to investigate the suitability of salt domes in the east Texas Basin for long-term nuclear waste repositories addresses the stability of specific domes for potential repositories and evaluates generically the geologic and hydrogeologic stability of all the domes in the region. Analysis during the second year was highlighted by a historical characterization of East Texas Basin infilling, the development of a model to explain the growth history of the domes, the continued studies of the Quaternary in East Texas, and a better understanding of the near-dome and regional hydrology of the basin. Each advancement represents a part of the larger integrated program addressing the critical problems of geologic and hydrologic stabilities of salt domes in the East Texas Basin.

  11. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  12. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  13. Wolfcampian sequence stratigraphy of eastern Central Basin platform, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candelaria, M.P.; Entzminger, D.J.; Behnken, F.H. ); Sarg, J.F. ); Wilde, G.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Integrated study of well logs, cores, high-resolution seismic data, and biostratigraphy has established the sequence framework of the Atokan (Early Pennsylvanian)-Wolfcampian (Early Permian) stratigraphic section along the eastern margin of the Central Basin platform in the Permian basin. Sequence interpretation of high-resolution, high-fold seismic data through this stratigraphic interval has revealed a complex progradational/retrogradational evolution of the platform margin that has demonstrated overall progradation of at least 12 km during early-middle Wolfcampian. Sequence stratigraphic study of the Wolfcamp interval has revealed details of the internal architecture and morphologic evolution of the contemporaneous platform margin. Two generalized seismic facies assemblages are recognized in the Wolfcampian. Platform interior facies are characterized by high-amplitude, laterally continuous parallel reflections; platform margin facies consist of progradational sigmoidal to oblique clinoforms and are characterized by discontinuous, low-amplitude reflections. Sequence interpretation of carbonate platform-to-basin strata geometries helps in predicting subtle stratigraphic trapping relationships and potential reservoir facies distribution. Moreover, this interpretive method assists in describing complex reservoir heterogeneities that can contribute to significant reserve additions from within existing fields.

  14. Controls on reservoir development in Devonian Chert: Permian Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruppel, S.C.; Hovorka, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    Chert reservoirs of the Lower Devonian Thirtyone Formation contain a significant portion of the hydrocarbon resource in the Permian basin. More than 700 million bbl of oil have been produced from these rocks, and an equivalent amount of mobile oil remains. Effective exploitation of this sizable remaining resource, however, demands a comprehensive appreciation of the complex factors that have contributed to reservoir development. Analysis of Thirtyone Formation chert deposits in Three Bar field and elsewhere in the Permian basin indicates that reservoirs display substantial heterogeneity resulting from depositional, diagenetic, and structural processes. Large-scale reservoir geometries and finer scale, intra-reservoir heterogeneity are primarily attributable to original depositional processes. Despite facies variations, porosity development in these cherts is principally a result of variations in rates and products of early silica diagenesis. Because this diagenesis was in part a function of depositional facies architecture, porosity development follows original depositional patterns. In reservoirs such as Three Bar field, where the Thirtyone Formation has been unroofed by Pennsylvanian deformation, meteoric diagenesis has created additional heterogeneity by causing dissolution of chert and carbonate, especially in areas of higher density fracturing and faulting and along truncated reservoir margins. Structural deformation also has exerted direct controls on heterogeneity that are particularly noteworthy in reservoirs under waterflood. High-density fracture zones create preferred flow paths that result in nonuniform sweep through the reservoir. Faulting locally creates compartments by offsetting reservoir flow units. As such, the processes and models defined here improve understanding of the causes of heterogeneity in all Thirtyone chert reservoirs in the Permian basin and aid recovery of the sizable hydrocarbon resource remaining in these rocks.

  15. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  16. Geostatistical analysis of potentiometric data in Wolfcamp aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, W.V.; Furr, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    This report details a geostatistical analysis of potentiometric data from the Wolfcamp aquifer in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas. Such an analysis is a part of an overall uncertainty analysis for a high-level waste repository in salt. Both an expected potentiometric surface and the associated standard error surface are produced. The Wolfcamp data are found to be well explained by a linear trend with a superimposed spherical semivariogram. A cross-validation of the analysis confirms this. In addition, the cross-validation provides a point-by-point check to test for possible anomalous data.

  17. Tectonic mechanisms for formation of the Central Basin platform and adjacent basinal areas, Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kennming; Dorobek, S.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Formation of the Central Basin platform (CBP), with the Delaware basin to its west and the Midland basin to its east, has been attributed to the crustal deformation in the foreland area of the Marathon Orogen during the late Paleozoic. Because of complexities in the areal distribution and magnitudes of uplift along the length of the CBP, its formative mechanisms are still controversial. Previous interpretations about the mechanisms for uplift of the CBP are based on the characteristics of the boundary faults between the CBP and adjacent basinal areas. Here, an integrated tectonic model is proposed for formation of the uplift and adjacent basins based on studies of the structure of sedimentary layers overlying Precambrian basement rocks of the uplift and restoration of the lower Paleozoic strata in the Delaware basin.

  18. Comparison of selected oil-field brines from fields in the Permian basin, West Texas-southeast New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, H.G. III

    1992-04-01

    Stiff diagrams of oil-field brines from the west Texas Permian basin are identifiable within the geological framework. Plotted from a simple analysis of three cations and three anions, older Paleozoic waters can be categorized as either 'pristine' or modified, usually by a later influx of Permian or early Pennsylvanian water. These different plots can be segregated by geologic province. The Permian brines differ by age and also by environment (shelf, basin, etc.).

  19. Evaporite replacement within the Permian strata of the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming and the Delaware Basin, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer, D.S.; Scholle, P.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The Park City and Goose Egg Formations of the Big Horn Basin, Wyoming and the Seven Rivers, Yates and Tansill Formations of west Texas and New Mexico contain numerous examples of silicified and calcitized evaporites. Both areas show significant preserved interstitial evaporite, but on outcrop the discrete crystals and nodular evaporites have been extensively replaced. These replacements appear to be a multistage phenomenon. Field and petrographic evidence (matted fabrics in nodules; evaporite inclusions) indicate that silicification involved direct replacement of evaporites and probably occurred during earlier stages of burial. Calcitization, however, appears to be a much later phenomenon and involved precipitation of coarse crystals within evaporite molds. The calcites are typically free of evaporite inclusions. Isotopic analyses of these calcites give a wide range of values from [minus]6.04 to [minus]25.02 [per thousand] [delta][sup 18]O and +6.40 to [minus]25.26 [per thousand] [delta][sup 13]C, reflecting their complex diagenetic histories. In both localities, silicification of evaporites was completed by the end of hydrocarbon migration and emplacement. The extremely broad isotopic range of the calcites indicates that the calcitization occurred during a long period of progressive uplift and increased groundwater circulation associated with mid-Tertiary block faulting. The very light oxygen values within the Bighorn Basin were produced by thermochemical sulfate reduction during deepest burial of the region. Evaporite diagenesis in both the Bighorn and Delaware Basins is an ongoing process that started prior to hydrocarbon migration, continued over millions of years, and has the potential to do significant porosity change.

  20. Rare earth elements in chloride-rich groundwater, Palo Duro Basin, Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosselin, D.C. ); Smith, M.R.; Lepel, E.A. ); Laul, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    Rare earth element (REE) data for groundwater samples from the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas, USA, illustrates the potential use of REE for inferring groundwater flow paths through different geologic materials. The REE content of the groundwaters range over 2.5 orders of magnitude and are depleted by 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 5} relative to aquifer materials. The shale-normalized REE patterns for groundwater that have primarily interacted with arkosic sandstones (granite wash) are flat with similar heavy REE (HREE) enrichments ((Lu/La){sub n} = 0.60 to 0.80). The samples with highest REE contents and REE patterns, which are enriched in the intermediate REEs (IREEs; Sm-Tb) reflect variable degrees of interaction with carbonate rocks. The IREE enrichment is the result of fluid interaction with Fe-Mn coatings on carbonate minerals and/or secondary minerals in fractures and vugs. The chloride complex. (LnCl{sup 2+}), and free-ions are the predominant REE species, accounting for over 95% of the REEs. Carbonate and sulfate species account for the other 5% and have very little influence on the behavior of the REEs. Although this study indicates a potentially important role for the REEs in understanding geochemical transport and groundwater movement, it also indicates the necessity for developing a better understanding of REE speciation in high ionic strength solutions.

  1. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  2. Geochemistry of post-uplift calcite in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, W.D.; Harris, P.M. ); Burruss, R.C. )

    1993-06-01

    Integration whole-oil gas chromatography of produced oil and oil inclusions, formation-water chemistry, and stable isotopes has identified environment-diagnostic differences in calcite cements between oil field and outcrop environments in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. Calcite-[delta][sup 13]C and fluid-inclusion composition are the most diagnostic of pore-fluid evolution and can help interpret rock-fluid reactions. Late-stage calcite cement in the northwestern part of the basin formed in a meteoric aquifer that was emplaced by Neogene-age uplift and tilting of the Guadalupe Mountains. Where the confined aquifer intersects the Henderson oil field, the water, which is less saline than sea water, has 900-1,400 ppm bicarbonate alkalinity because of oil oxidation and contains 750 ppm H[sub 2]S as a result of anhydrite calcitization and sulfate reduction. The oil field has been severly damaged by biodegradation. Modeling of [delta][sup 13]C in pore-filling calcite from the field (mean [delta][sup 13]C = [minus]17% PDB) suggests oxidation of oil provided nearly 100% of the carbon in the cement. Comparison of gas chromatograms of produced oil and oil liberated from fluid inclusions in calcite shows that inclusion oil is older and more severely biodegraded (paraffin-free) than produced oil. This implies that oil in the reservoir was remobilized soon after Neogene-age meteoric invasion and carbonate cementation. The Algerita Escarpment in the Guadalupe Mountains is the site of active meteoric water recharge and growth of phreatic calcite cement. The phreatic cement contains single-phase, aqueous fluid inclusions. The cement is depleted in [sup 13]C to an extent that is diagnostic of a 1:1 mixture of soil-CO[sub 2] from decay of C[sub 4]-type plants (desert grasses) and carbon derived from dolomite matrix by ground-water dissolution. 64 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Facies architecture of Spraberry submarine fan reservoirs (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, E.H.; Tyler, N.

    1989-03-01

    Facies of mud-rich submarine fans of the Spraberry formation (Permian, Leonardian) form oil reservoirs in the central part of the Midland basin, west Texas. The principal reservoirs are submarine-channel and associated facies in the upper parts of generally upward-coarsening and upward-thickening sequences of the Jo Mill (lower Spraberry) and Driver and overlying Floyd (upper Spraberry) fans. They are naturally fractured, massive and laminated, very fine-grained, calcareous sandstones and siltstones usually occurring in beds 2 to approximately 12 ft thick. Two main subdivisions, inner and middle to outer fan, are recognized using isoliths, log motifs, and cores of predominantly terrigenous clastic, mostly basin-wide genetic intervals. The boundary between the subdivisions approximately coincides with the location of the subjacent Horseshoe atoll (Pennsylvanian). The narrow range in grain size of the fans results in limited basinward variations in texture and sedimentary structures and paucity of Bouma sequences. Facies architecture strongly influences hydrocarbon distribution and recovery. Wells having the best cumulative productions generally occur in sandstone depositional axes. Most accumulations in inner fan facies are scattered structural traps having relatively high recovery efficiencies (24%, Jo Mill field). The largest accumulations in mid to outer fan facies are stratigraphic traps in meandering to anastomosing channel sandstone belts 1-3 mi wide occurring in a widespread area. Recovery efficiencies range from 5% (Spraberry trend, stratigraphic trap) to 15% (Benedum field, combined stratigraphic-structural trap). Additional reserves can be recovered from partly drained and untapped reservoir compartments, especially in layered and compartmentalized middle to outer fan facies.

  4. Precambrian basement geology of the Permian basin region of west Texas and Eastern New Mexico: A geophysical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R.

    1996-03-01

    Because most of the Permian basin region of west Texas and southern New Mexico is covered by Phanerozoic rocks, other means must be found to examine the Precambrian upper crustal geology of the region. We have combined geologic information on the Precambrian from outcrops and wells with geophysical information from gravity and magnetic surveys in an integrated analysis of the history and structure of basement rocks in the region. Geophysical anomalies can be related to six Precambrian events: formation of the Early Proterozoic outer tectonic belt, igneous activity in the southern Granite-Rhyolite province, an episode of pre-Grenville extension, the Grenville orogeny, rifting to form the Delaware aulacogen, and Eocambrian rifting to form the early Paleozoic continental margin. Two geophysical features were studied in detail: the Abilene gravity minimum and the Central Basin platform gravity high. The Abilene gravity minimum is shown to extend from the Delaware basin across north-central Texas and is interpreted to be caused by a granitic batholith similar in size to the Sierra Nevada batholith in California and Nevada. This batholith appears to be related to formation of the southern Granite- Rhyolite province, possibly as a continental margin arc batholith. Because of this interpretation, we have located the Grenville tectonic front southward from its commonly quoted position, closer to the Llano uplift. Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions are found to core the Central Basin platform and the Roosevelt uplift. These intrusions formed at about 1.1 Ga and are related in time to both the Mid-Continent rift system and the Grenville orogeny in Texas. Precambrian basement structures and changes in lithology have influenced the structure and stratigraphy in the overlying Permian basin, and thus have potential exploration significance.

  5. Cycle stratigraphy and porosity in Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian shelf limestones, eastern Central Basin Platform, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saller, A.H.; Dickson, J.A.D.; Boyd, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Pennyslvanian and Lower Permian shelfal limestones were studied in core and wireline logs on the eastern side of the Central Basin platform in west Texas. Sixty-three (63) cycles were delineated in the study interval, which includes 200-250 m of Canyon (Missourian), Cisco (Virgilian), and Wolfcamp strata. Four general lithofacies are present: fossiliferous wackestones and packstones, grainstones, phylloid algal boundstones, and shales. These lithologies typically occur in 1-18-m-thick cycles bounded by subaerial exposure surfaces. Grainstones in the upper part of some cycles indicate a shallowing of environments prior to subaerial exposure. Many cycles have subaerial exposure surfaces developed on subtidal fossiliferous wackestones or packstones suggesting rapid falls in sea level. Long-term transgressive intervals (transgressive systems tracts or TST) are dominated by thick (>4 m) cycles, whereas long-term regressive intervals (highstand systems tract or HST) are dominated by thinner cycles. Stable carbon isotope data suggest that thick cycles in TSTs were subjected to short periods of subaerial exposure, whereas thin cycles in the HSTs were subjected to much longer subaerial exposure. Where present, reservoir-grade porosity occurs in the upper part of cycles, 0.3-5 m below subaerial exposure surfaces. Prolonged subaerial exposure apparently reduced matrix porosity by allowing more time for calcite precipitation, which was especially effective in reducing porosity in micritic strata below exposure surfaces.

  6. Hydrogeologic investigations based on drill-stem test data: Palo Duro Basin Area, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bair, E.S.; O'Donnell, T.P.; Picking, L.W.

    1985-02-01

    Drill-stem test (DST) data were compiled from wildcat wells and DOE-sponsored wells in the Palo Duro Basin area of Texas and New Mexico. The data were used to construct pressure-depth diagrams and to map regional potentiometric surfaces, based on equivalent freshwater heads calculated from initial shut-in pressures of the Wolfcamp and Pennsylvanian brine aquifers, the two regionally important deep-basin aquifers downgradient of the proposed repository host rock. Eighty percent of the 5502 DSTs were screened from the data base containing DST data from various deep-basin geologic units because they did not comply with shut-in time and shut-in pressure agreement criteria. After screening, three sets of pressure-depth diagrams and potentiometric surfaces were constructed, corresponding to three levels of data refinement. These results indicate the possible need for more data from an areally extended study area.

  7. Lower Permian facies of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: depositional systems, shelf-margin evolution, paleogeography, and petroleum potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    A Palo geological study suggests that potential hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in shelf-margin carbonates, delta-front sandstones, and fan-delta arkoses. Zones of porous (greater than 10 percent) dolomite are concentrated near shelf margins and have configurations similar to productive Lower Permian shelf-margin trends in New Mexico. Delta-front sandstones (log-computed porosity of 18 to 25 percent) are similar to producing deltaic sandstones of Morris Buie-Blaco Fields in North-Central Texas. Porous (18 percent) fan-delta sandstones along the south flank of the Amarillo Uplift may form reservoirs similiar to that of the Mobeetie Field on the north side of the Amarillo Uplife in Wheeler County, Texas. Potential hydrocarbon source beds occur in slope and basinal environments. Total organic carbon generally ranges from 1 to 2.3 percent by weight and averages 0.589 percent by weight.

  8. The Spraberry trend, Midland basin, Texas: Development, innovation, and reserve growth potential in a mature giant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, E.H. ); Tyler, N. )

    1991-03-01

    The Spraberry trend area field is a stratigraphic trap about 60 mi long (N-S) and 40 mi wide (E-W) on a west-dipping monocline in the central Midland basin, west Texas. It contained 9,500 MMbls of in-place oil at discovery in 1949; recovery efficiency in these solution-gas-drive, originally underpressured reservoirs is projected to be 8%. There are more than 10,000 wells in the field, which, in the 1980s, was among the most intensely drilled areas in the nation. Wells are mostly at 160-ac and locally at 40-ac centers. Rapid production declines prompted local waterflooding. The Spraberry trend has been the experimental site of significant technological innovations, among them imbibition flooding, drilling using air, horizontal wells, and development of naturally fractured reservoirs. Main reservoirs occur in the Spraberry, Dean, and upper Wolfcamp formations (Lower Permian) at depths ranging from about 6,000 to 9,000 ft. They are naturally fractured, very fine-grained sandstones and siltstones in beds up to 14 ft thick, forming part of mid- to outer-fan, channel-fill and associated submarine-fan facies. Permeabilities average less than 1 md, and porosities are mostly less than 10%. Geochemical data suggest indigenous oils and short migration paths. Oils are paraffinic-naphthenic, light (36-40 API), and low in sulfur (0.17%). Entrapment is a product of reservoir pinch-out into slope and base-of-slope mud facies. Internal reservoir compartments result from channel-to-interchannel facies changes causing intrareservoir stratigraphic traps.

  9. City of Forth Worth- Green Building Policy for Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Fort Worth adopted a goal to reduce its electricity consumption by 5% each fiscal year for 10 years beginning in 2011 in reaction to Texas S.B. 898, which required political subdivisi...

  10. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Zirczy, Helena H.

    2000-05-24

    The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  11. Texas - Compare - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Texas

  12. Texas - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Texas

  13. Texas - Search - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Texas

  14. Depositional environments, sequence stratigraphy, and trap configuration of lower Wolfcampian clastics along eastern edge of Midland basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, N.R.; Reuter, S.G.

    1989-03-01

    The Lower Permian (lower Wolfcampian) along the eastern edge of the Midland basin, west Texas, is characterized by ramp-type shelf margins. During eustatic lowstand, nearshore sedimentation shifted drastically to the west into a basinal setting below the Pennsylvanian (Canyon) shelf margin. Core descriptions demonstrate that lowstand systems tract (LST) and transgressive systems tract (TST) siliciclastics were deposited in deltaic and coastal-plain environments. Prodelta, delta-front, and stream-mouth bar facies are associated with the LST. Coastal-plain and distributary channels are preserved in the TST. The sequence stratigraphic framework indicates type 1 sequence boundaries at 287 Ma, 282 Ma, and 280 Ma in the lower Wolfcampian clastics. This lower Wolfcampian package of sedimentary rocks overlies the Pennsylvanian and is capped by the 279-Ma middle Wolfcampian unconformity. All three sequence boundaries and associated systems tract deposits exhibit a prograding stacking pattern within the sequence stratigraphic framework. Basinally restricted prograding LST deltaic rocks are overlain by backstepping TST deltaics and highstand systems tract (HST) outer marine shales. Production in lower Wolfcampian clastic fields is associated with fine-grained quartzarenites up to 45 ft thick which were deposited in stream-mouth bars. Delta-front and prodelta low-permeability shales encase the reservoir facies, forming lateral permeability barriers. HST outer marine shales deposited over the stream-mouth-bar sandstones act as a top seal, creating a stratigraphic trap and providing source for the high-BTU gas and oil produced from these basinally restricted LST deltaics.

  15. Regional basinal sandstone depositional patterns during the Guadalupian (Late Permian), Delaware basin, west Texas-New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisen, J.H.; Scholle, P.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Examination of well logs from more than 300 Delaware basin wells penetrating the Bell Canyon and Brushy Canyon formations has allowed definition of regional depositional patterns during the Late Permian (Guadalupian). Characteristic gamma-ray hot-kicks mark thin but widespread calcareous shales or limestones representing starved basin sedimentation during sea level highstands. Correlation of such markers along three strike and ten dip lines permitted isopaching of intervening lowstand clastic wedges. The low-stand wedges typically thin significantly from basin margin to basin center and are marked by a prominent linearity oriented perpendicular to the margin. These lineations probably represent channelized turbidite and grain-flow deposits. Most intervals show dozens of such lineations indicating multiple input points for terrigenous detritus rather than just a few major point sources of debris. The resulting deposits appear to be more apron-like than fan-like and coalesce into broad, sheetlike deposits toward the basin center. Isopach thicks vary in position through time, but terrigenous sediment transport is predominantly from northerly directions throughout the analyzed interval. Thus, the filling of the Midland basin at the close of Cherry Canyon deposition did not result in a major new source of terrigenous debris from the east (Central Basin platform). The well-sorted nature of the basinal sands, their widely distributed input points, apron-like geometry, and other factors argue for migration of eolian dunes to the shelf margin during sea level lowstands. Transport of these well-sorted, unconsolidated sands into the basin was not however, mainly by direct eolian processes as has been proposed recently, but must have involved submarine current mechanisms.

  16. Geology and geohydrology of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C.; Presley, M.W.; Handford, C.R.; Finley, R.J.; Dutton, S.P.; Baumgardner, R.W. Jr.; McGillis, K.A.; Simpkins, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Since early 1977, the Bureau of Economic Geology has been evaluating several salt-bearing basins within the State of Texas as part of the national nuclear repository program. The Bureau, a research unit of The University of Texas at Austin and the State of Texas, is carrying out a long-term program to gather and interpret all geologic and hydrologic information necessary for description, delineation, and evaluation of salt-bearing strata in the Palo Duro and Dalhart Basins of the Texas Panhandle. The program in FY 79 has been subdivided into four broad research tasks, which are addressed by a basin analysis group, a surface studies group, a geohydrology group, and a host-rock analysis group. The basin analysis group has delineated the structural and stratigraphic framework of the basins, initiated natural resource assessment, and integrated data from 8000 ft (2400 m) of core material into salt-stratigraphy models. Salt depth and thickness have been delineated for seven salt-bearing stratigraphic units. Concurrently, the surface studies group has collected ground and remotely sensed data to describe surficial processes, including salt solution, slope retreat/erosion mechanisms, geomorphic evolution, and fracture system development. The basin geohydrology group has begun evaluating both shallow and deep fluid circulation within the basins. The newly formed host-rock analysis group has initiated study of cores from two drilling sites for analysis of salt and the various lithologies overlying and interbedded with salt units. This paper, a summary report of progress in FY 79, presents principal conclusions and reviews methods used and types of data and maps generated.

  17. Porosity distribution in Wolfcamp strata, Palo Duro basin, Texas panhandle: implications for deep-basin ground-water flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conti, R.D.; Wirojanagud, P.

    1984-04-01

    Average-porosity distributions in the Wolfcamp deep-basin aquifer are critical to discernment of the geographic trends in effective-porosity in the Palo Duro basin. Precise data are used to improved resolution of porosity values for computer-simulated areal ground-water modeling. Assessing vertical distributions of lithology and porosity in each well studied involves analysis of crossplotted neutron- and density-porosity log responses. This method more accurately identifies lithology and porosity than does the commonly employed crossplotted neutron-porosity and sonic (interval travel time) responses. Log-derived average-porosity distributions yield information about effective pore volume (i.e., movable water) in the Wolfcamp aquifer and enhance the accuracy of estimated of travel times and velocities of brines in basinwide traverses. Mathematical analysis of average travel time and total effective pore volume yield estimates of the rates of annual discharge from the Wolfcamp aquifer in the Palo Duro basin. Based on average flush rates between 2.2 and 1.5 m.y., annual discharge rates from the Wolfcamp aquifer across the northern and eastern basin boundaries, are about 3.6 x 10/sup 5/ m/sup 3/ year/sup -1/ to 5.3 x 10/sup 5/m/sup 3/ year/sup -1/.

  18. Petroleum source rock potential and thermal maturity, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Samples collected from 20 geographically widespread wells in the sparsely drilled Palo Duro Basin were analyzed for total organic carbon content (TOC). Highest values of TOC, up to 6.9%, occur in Upper Permian San Andres dolomite in the southern part of the basin. Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) basinal shales contain up to 2.4% TOC and are fair to very good source rocks. Kerogen color and vitrinite reflectance, which indicate maximum paleotemperatures, were analyzed in all samples containing greater than 0.5% TOC. Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian kerogen is yellow orange to orange, an indication that temperatures were sufficiently high to begin to generate hydrocarbons from lipid-rich organic material. Palo Duro Basin samples have a broad range of vitrinite reflectance values, but populations with the lowest reflectance probably indicate the true temperatures that were reached in the basin. Average reflectance in representative Pennsylvanian vitrinite is 0.52%; in Wolfcampian samples the average reflectance is 0.48%. These values are consistent with kerogen color and suggest that basinal source rocks may have begun to generate hydrocarbons.

  19. Wolfcampian and early Leonardian fore-shelf carbonate debris production, Permian basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, J.W.; Von Der Hoya, H.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Since 1980, a number of Wolfcampian and early Leonardian oil fields have been discovered in a previously unexplored carbonate environment of the Permian basin i.e. basinal fore-shelf debris. These fields range up to 25 MMBOE in size. The Permian basin formed during the Early Pennsylvanian through the earliest Leonardian. Carbonate buildups dominated shelf-edge deposition and a syntectonic wedge of shelf debris was shed into the basins during both high and low sea level stands. Combined eustatic and tectonic sea level fluctuations of over 300 ft have been documented. The geometry, texture, and seismic expression of the debris changes with depositional slope, which ranges from very steep fault-block edges on the Central Basin platform to gentle ramps on the eastern shelf. Productive, low-stand deposits derived from steep shelf edges, consist of turbidite grainstones; clean, very coarse, lithoclastic, debris flaws; and allochthonous slide blocks. These deposits were derived from point sources on the eroded shelf and have a single-lobe or multi-lobe fan geometry. Debris clasts commonly display subaerial lithification and leaching. Lowstand fans extend 4-8 mi into the basin. Productive, lowstand deposits derived from ramp settings have a submarine channel geometry and consist dominantly of grainstone and packstone. Porosity has been enhanced by late subsurface solution. Nonproductive, highstand deposits were derived from a line source and have an apron geometry. These deposits consist of thinly bedded shaly, bioclastic turbidites with no evidence of lithification before final transport.

  20. Evolution of Permian carbonate shelf and foreshelf detrital systems, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Reid, A.M. II; Reid, S.T.

    1986-03-01

    A major phase of shelf progradation and consequent filling of the Midland basin began in the Early Permian. Prior to this time, shelf carbonate systems were mostly ineffective in generating coarse detritus in quantities sufficient to infill adjoining basins. Beginning in the Early Permian (Wolfcampian), however, the character of shelf and basin deposition was abruptly modified, in part because of faunal changes - proliferation of rock-forming biotic communities and the consequent potential for rapid shelf-marginal oversteepening - and the effects of sea level fluctuations and periods of shale influx. Shelf systems in the northern Midland basin and Eastern shelf evolved from ramps in the lowermost Wolfcamp to steep rimmed platforms by the lower Leonard. Shelf progradation into the Midland basin was cyclic, with extensive carbonate shelves having developed during sea level highstands and massive shale wedges deposited during alternate lowstands. Coarse megabreccia with markedly little sand dominates in the lower to middle Wolfcamp systems, despite the occurrence of ramps in this section. Such an anomaly can be explained by invoking widespread shelf wastage caused by the inherent instability and failure of the shale slopes on which these ramps were deposited. In certain middle Wolfcamp zones, thin shelf-ramp sections may be recognized only because any thick shelf-marginal buildups that may have been present have been displaced into adjoining basinal tracts. The evolution to rimmed-platform shelves by the lower Leonard strata, foreshelf debris occurs mostly as complexes of megabreccia wedges and aprons, anastomosing megabreccia, and sand-channel and lobe deposits derived from adjoining rimmed-platforms. Major variations exist in the gross geometries of foreshelf units and component reservoirs even laterally within rocks of the same age.

  1. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's report on the Organic Geochemistry of Deep Groundwaters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenster, D.F.; Brookins, D.G.; Harrison, W.; Seitz, M.G.; Lerman, A.; Stamoudis, V.C.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes Argonne's review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's (ONWI's) final report entitled The Organic Geochemistry of Deep Ground Waters from the Palo Duro Basin, Texas, dated September 1983. Recommendations are made for improving the ONWI report. The main recommendation is to make the text consistent with the title and with the objective of the project as stated in the introduction. Three alternatives are suggested to accomplish this.

  2. Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

    2000-06-13

    The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

  3. First status report on regional groundwater flow modeling for the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, R.W.

    1984-12-01

    Regional groundwater flow within the principal hydrogeological units of the Palo Duro Basin is evaluated by developing a conceptual model of the flow regime in the shallow aquifers and the deep-basin brine aquifers and testing these models using a three-dimensional, finite-difference flow code. Semiquantitative sensitivity analysis (a limited parametric study) is conducted to define the system response to changes in hydrologic properties or boundary conditions. Adjoint sensitivity analysis is applied to the conceptualized flow regime in the Wolfcamp carbonate aquifer. All steps leading to the final results and conclusions are incorporated in this report. The available data utilized in this study are summarized. The specific conceptual models, defining the areal and vertical averaging of lithologic units, aquifer properties, fluid properties, and hydrologic boundary conditions, are described in detail. The results are delineated by the simulated potentiometric surfaces and tables summarizing areal and vertical boundary fluxes, Darcy velocities at specific points, and groundwater travel paths. Results from the adjoint sensitivity analysis included importance functions and sensitivity coefficients, using heads or the average Darcy velocities as the performance measures. The reported work is the first stage of an ongoing evaluation of two areas within the Palo Duro Basin as potantial repositories for high-level radioactive wastes. The results and conclusions should thus be considered preliminary and subject to modification with the collection of additional data. However, this report does provide a useful basis for describing the sensitivity and, to a lesser extent, the uncertainty of the present conceptualization of groundwater flow within the Palo Duro Basin.

  4. Geochemistry of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra sulfates in some deep brines from the Palo Duro basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langmuir, D.; Melchior, D.

    1985-11-01

    The geochemistry of Ca, Sr, Ba and Ra sulfates in some deep brines from the Palo Duro Basin of north Texas, was studied to define geochemical controls on radionuclides such as /sup 90/Sr and /sup 226/Ra. Published solubility data for gypsum, anhydrite, celestite, barite and RaSO/sub 4/ were first reevaluated, in most cases using the ion interaction approach of Pitzer, to determine solubility products of the sulfates as a function of temperature and pressure. Ionic strengths of the brines were from 2.9 to 4.8 m, their temperatures and pressures up to 40/sup 0/C and 130 bars. Saturation indices of the sulfates were computed with the ion-interaction approach in one brine from the arkosic granite wash facies and four from the carbonate Wolfcamp Formation. All five brines are saturated with respect to gypsum, anhydrite and celestite, and three of the five with respect to barite. All are undersaturated by from 5 to 6 orders of magnitude with respect to pure RaSO/sub 4/. /sup 226/Ra concentrations in the brines, which ranged from 10/sup -11.3/ to 10/sup -12.7/ m, are not controlled by RaSO/sub 4/ solubility or adsorption, but possibly by the solubility of trace Ra solid solutions in sulfates including celestite and barite.

  5. Geological characterization of permian submarine fan reservoirs of the driver waterflood unit, Spraberry Trend, Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the geological characterization and assessment of the relationship between reservoir stratigraphy and oil recovery of the Driver waterflood unit of the Spraberry Trend, Midland Basin, West Texas. In this study , the author focuses on the Driver waterflood unit, which is located in Midland, Glasscock, Upton, and Reagan Counties and is part of the giant Spraberry Trend currently being studied by the Bureau. Gamma-ray logs and scout cards from more than 350 wells and slabbed cores from 2 wells, along with core analyses and production data, provided the main sources of information for the study. Fifteen log-defined genetic-stratigraphic operational units were delineated in the Spraberry Formation and were correlated throughout the study area to define the stratigraphic framework. The text presents net sandstone and siltstone maps, cross sections, depth plots of core analyses, and maps of production data. The author describes the depositional systems and hydrocarbon distribution in the Driver unit (currently operated by Standard Oil), details the influence of reservoir stratigraphy on oil recovery, and outlines opportunities for additional recovery. He notes that reservoir management strategies must take into account the stratigraphic heterogeneities of accumulations in the unit. He concludes that a program of selective recompletions and infill drilling based on knowledge of both reservoir stratigraphy and natural fractures is the key to improving oil recovery from the Driver unit in particular and from the Spraberry Trend in general.

  6. Recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults, Palo Duro basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnik, R.T.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of Late Precambrian through Quaternary strata in the Palo Duro basin and surrounding uplifts documents recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults. Basement blocks have been uplifted with little tilting or folding of overlying strata along a system of northwest-southeast oriented faults, part of a regional trend extending from central Colorado to southwestern Oklahoma. The orientation of basement terranes in Colorado and that of a 50-mi (80-km) long mylonite zone in east-central New Mexico suggest a Precambrian age for the faults. An Arkosic sandstone overlies basement and underlies a Cambrian(.) quartzose sandstone in a few Palo Duro basin wells. It may represent debris shed from active fault blocks during the opening of the southern Oklahoma aulocogen in the Late Precambrian or Early Cambrian. Ordovician carbonates thin or are missing beneath Mississippian carbonates on some fault blocks, indicating a post-Ordovician-pre-Mississippian period of faulting. The greatest amount of deformation occurred during the Pennsylvanian. Thickness, distribution, and facies of sediments were controlled by the location of active faults. Lower Pennsylvanian strata thin by up to 50% across some structures. Fault blocks provided sources of arkosic debris and loci for carbonate buildups throughout the Pennsylvanian and Early Permian. Around the periphery of the basin, Late Pennsylvanian or Early Permian faulting caused a wedging out of older units beneath the Wolfcamp. Permian, Triassic, and Neogene units, along with present topography, all have been subtly affected by basement structures. The entire section thins over basement highs. Middle and Upper Permian evaporites are thicker in structural lows. The overlying Dockum Group (Triassic) and Ogallala Formation (Neogene), both nonmarine clastic units, become finer grained over basement highs. Present topographic highs coincide with some basement highs.

  7. Diagenetic overprint of original depositional architecture in a shallow water carbonate reservoir, Permian Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruppel, S.C.; Lucia, F.J. )

    1996-01-01

    Permian shallow-water carbonate reservoirs are highly heterogeneous because of complex variations in depositional facies produced by high-frequency sea level rise and fall. Accordingly, establishment of a cycle stratigraphic framework is fundamental to defining reservoir heterogeneity. Because nearly all of these reservoirs have experienced multiple episodes of dolomitization and sulfate emplacement, however, permeability is a n of diagenetic overprint. The extent to which diagenesis can affect permeability development is dramatically displayed in the Grayburg Formation (middle Permian) at South Cowden field, Weit Texas. Three scales of cyclicity contribute to original depositional facies heterogeneity in the Grayburg; high-frequency cycles, averaging 3 meters in thickness, constitute the fundamental architectural element in the main reservoir interval. Despite original depositional heterogeneity due to this cyclicity, however, permeability development is substantially the result of two diagenetic events: (1) dolomite diagenesis in vertically burrowed wackestones and packstones and (2) late alteration and removal of anhydrite. Dolomite diagenesis in vertically burrowed wackestones and packstones has produced irregular vertical zones of higher permeability in mud-dominated bases of high-frequency cycles in leeward ramp-crest highstand successions. Because dolomite diagenesis is concentrated in burrowed highstand successions, the distribution of resultant permeability trends is partly constrained by patterns of longterm accommodation and high frequency cyclicity. Anhydrite diagenesis, which is characterized by conversion to gypsum or by complete removal of sulfate, is developed along basinward margins of the field and cross cuts original depositional framework.

  8. Diagenetic overprint of original depositional architecture in a shallow water carbonate reservoir, Permian Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruppel, S.C.; Lucia, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    Permian shallow-water carbonate reservoirs are highly heterogeneous because of complex variations in depositional facies produced by high-frequency sea level rise and fall. Accordingly, establishment of a cycle stratigraphic framework is fundamental to defining reservoir heterogeneity. Because nearly all of these reservoirs have experienced multiple episodes of dolomitization and sulfate emplacement, however, permeability is a n of diagenetic overprint. The extent to which diagenesis can affect permeability development is dramatically displayed in the Grayburg Formation (middle Permian) at South Cowden field, Weit Texas. Three scales of cyclicity contribute to original depositional facies heterogeneity in the Grayburg; high-frequency cycles, averaging 3 meters in thickness, constitute the fundamental architectural element in the main reservoir interval. Despite original depositional heterogeneity due to this cyclicity, however, permeability development is substantially the result of two diagenetic events: (1) dolomite diagenesis in vertically burrowed wackestones and packstones and (2) late alteration and removal of anhydrite. Dolomite diagenesis in vertically burrowed wackestones and packstones has produced irregular vertical zones of higher permeability in mud-dominated bases of high-frequency cycles in leeward ramp-crest highstand successions. Because dolomite diagenesis is concentrated in burrowed highstand successions, the distribution of resultant permeability trends is partly constrained by patterns of longterm accommodation and high frequency cyclicity. Anhydrite diagenesis, which is characterized by conversion to gypsum or by complete removal of sulfate, is developed along basinward margins of the field and cross cuts original depositional framework.

  9. Extent of water-rock interactions in Lower Permian Wolfcamp carbonates, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.S.; Posey, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    A laterally-extensive permeable zone in upper Wolfcampian carbonate strata constitutes the first important transmissive unit below a thick evaporite sequence that is being considered for nuclear waste isolation. The extent of water-rock interaction was evaluated by comparing the chemical and isotopic composition of formation water and core collected at four DOE test wells. Wolfcamp mineralogy is dominantly calcite and dolomite with minor anhydrite at each of the four sites despite minor variations in depositional environment, diagenetic alteration, and abundance of clastic material. Isotopic compositions of calcite and dolomite and of anhydrite are within the ranges expected for Permian marine sediments altered by early diagenesis. Wolfcamp formation water compositions are more variable than host rock compositions, and are not completely controlled by local water-rock equilibria. Wolfcamp brines from two wells in the western part of the basin have depleted isotopic compositions relative to the two eastern wells and have not equilibrated with Wolfcamp carbonates, whereas the eastern fluids have. Strontium in the western samples is more radiogenic than that of the eastern samples, indicating a greater influence of clays or feldspars on the western fluids. Comparison of water and rock compositions suggests: (1) the western brines have interacted less with the carbonate host than the eastern brines due to shorter residence times or greater water: rock ratios, and (2) the minerals encountered along flow paths prior to entering the Wolfcamp are different for the western and eastern Wolfcamp brines.

  10. Diagenesis of early Permian evaporites and carbonates, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posey, H.H.; Fisher, R.S.; Hovorka, S.D.; Elliott, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Anhydrite nodules within dolomite grainstone constitute a characteristic facies marking the transition from open marine deposits of the Lower Permian Wolfcamp Formation into hypersaline dolomite and evaporite deposits of the overlying Wichita Formation. Accompanying this transition is a shift from nodular to bedded anhydrite, a decrease in faunal diversity, finer carbonate grain size, a greater abundance of algae and a decrease in calcite abundance. Anhydrite nodules in the Upper Wolfcamp probably displaced carbonate muds before Wichita deposition. Other diagenetic features include dolomitization, and anhydrite recrystallization and replacement by silica. Sr, C, O and S isotopes help account for many of the primary and diagenetic features. Values for delta/sup 34/S and /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr from unaltered Wichita anhydrite beds (approx.13.5 per thousands and 0.7078) indicate equilibrium with Early Permian seawater. Unaltered Upper Wolfcamp nodules, most abundant in the northeastern Palo Dura Basin, have lighter delta/sup 34/S (approx.12.7 per thousands) but probably record the seawater delta/sup 34/S composition of Early Permian, pre-Wichita Formation seawater. delta/sup 34/S of altered anhydrite nodules, cements and anhydrite veins are 1 to 4 per thousands heavier, probably due to anhydrite reduction during silicification. Dolomite ranges from -1 to +5.5 (delta/sup 13/C, PDB) and -1 to +3(delta/sup 18/O, PDB) whereas limestone ranges from -1 to +7 (delta/sup 13/C) and -4.5 to -2.5 (delta/sup 18/O). Dolomite delta/sup 13/C and delta/sup 18/O values are 2 to 4 thousands heavier than adjacent limestone, suggesting that dolomite and calcite are locally in equilibrium.

  11. Strontium and sulfur isotope study of well-preserved Permian anhydrite, Palo Duro basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leary, D.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The {delta}{sup 34}S, {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio, and strontium concentrations for 50 well-preserved samples of Permian marine anhydrite have been determined. The samples were collected from two continuous cores drilled through cyclic Permian evaporites, The Department of Energy drilled the samples in its search for a permanent storage facility for high-level nuclear waste. Primary depositional fabrics (selenite pseudomorphs) and high strontium concentrations (average 1,850 ppm), in association with published bromide and fluid inclusion data from associated halite, suggest primary seawater {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios may be recorded in many of the samples. The general shape of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio curve through the Permian is in accord with previously published observations. However, the increased stratigraphic detail from this unique set of cores constrains the abrupt charge in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr during the Permian at a precision previously available only in Deep Sea Drilling Project material. Interpretation of the more complex portions of the curve is limited by poor biostratigraphic control, the specter of provincial early diagenetic effects, and interpretation of the time significance of hiatal surfaces in cyclic strata. Age relationships are constrained by a K-Ar date on an interbedded volcanic ash in the Ochoan strata, and fusulinid age determinations of a well-documented regional transgression during the earliest Guadalupe. Sulfur isotopes yield typical Permian values of 12{per thousand} during the marine portion of the basin fill phase, and abruptly shift to 10{per thousand} in those cycles with a significant component of siliciclastic sediment.

  12. Dolomitization of coeval shelf and fore-shelf carbonates, Lower Permian, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Qiuchang, Ye )

    1991-03-01

    Coeval shelf and fore-shelf carbonates in Lower Permian (Leonardian) rocks in the Midland basin are pervasively dolomitized. Shelf strata consist of a regional mosaic of shelf margin reef, lagoon, and peritidal facies associated with contemporaneous evaporite deposition; fore-shelf facies consist of resedimented shelf margin deposits. Numerous relative sea-level fluctuations that resulted in the formation of Type 1 and 2 unconformities are recognized throughout this section. Mean stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of the shelf strate suggest that dolomitization occurred essentially syndepositionally, likely by interaction with normal marine( ) and hypersaline fluids. In fore-shelf strata petrographic evidence, in combination with paleotemperature estimates from isotopic data and the burial depth-temperature history of these rocks, suggest relatively early (late Permian) dolomitization in rock-dominated systems. Three possible modes of dolomitization could have affected these fore-shelf beds: (1) dolomitization by reflux of normal-marine and/or hypersaline fluids during sea level highstands or lowstands; (2) dolomitization by mixed meteoric-marine fluids during lowstands; and (3) replacement by calcic dolomites via reaction with circulating marine fluids during deposition and early, shallow burial without organic matter influences. The latter mode of origin, however, is favored for most of the rocks examined on the basis of the slightly positive carbon isotopic compositions, Sr versus MgCO{sub 3} compositions (mean Sr 61 ppm, mean MgCO{sub 3} 49.5), and low Mn contents (mean 61 ppm) of the dolomites, although later burial recrystallization is indicated by their relatively depleted isotopic compositions.

  13. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin...

  14. Calculation and interpretation of crustal shortening along the Central Basin Platform, West Texas: A method to calculate basement motion for modeling input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoak, T.E. |; Sundberg, K.R.; Ortoleva, P.

    1998-12-31

    The analysis carried out in the Chemical Interaction of Rocks and Fluids Basin (CIRFB) model describes the chemical and physical evolution of the entire system. One aspect of this is the deformation of the rocks, and its treatment with a rigorous flow and rheological model. This type of analysis depends on knowing the state of the model domain`s boundaries as functions of time. In the Andrews and Ector County areas of the Central Basin Platform of West Texas, the authors calculate this shortening with a simple interpretation of the basic motion and a restoration of the Ellenburger formation. Despite its simplicity, this calculation reveals two distinct periods of shortening/extension, a relatively uniform directionality to all the deformation, and the localization of deformation effects to the immediate vicinities of the major faults in the area. Conclusions are drawn regarding the appropriate expressions of these boundary conditions in the CIRFB model and possible implications for exploration.

  15. Phanerozoic tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin regions (Mexico, Texas, New Mexico) using Landsat imagery, subsurface and outcrop data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markello, J.R.; Sarg, J.F.

    1996-08-01

    Integrating regional Landsat imagery, outcrop field studies, and subsurface data has resulted in a more comprehensive understanding and delineation of the tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Trans-Pecos region. Landsat imagery were acquired and registered to the existing 1:25000 scale maps and mosaiced to create a regional view of the Trans-Pecos and Permian basin region. The imagery were used to extrapolate and map key stratigraphic and tectonic elements after calibration from documented outcrop and subsurface data. The interpretations aided in the extrapolation of scattered control information and were critical in the complete reconstruction of the geologic history of the area. The Trans-Pecos Phanerozoic history comprises five tectono-depositional phases, and these have controlled the shape of the modem landscape: (1) Late Proterozoic rifting (Gondwana from Laurentia), and development of the Early-Middle Paleozoic Tobosa basin; (2) Pennsylvanian collision (South and North Americas), and differentiation of the Tobosa basin into the Midland, Delaware, Orogrande, and Pedregosa basins separated by basement blocks: Central Basin Platform, Diablo Platform, Burro-Florida Platform; (3) Middle Mesozoic transtensional rifting (Mexico from North America), and Late Jurassic failed rifting of the Mexican Chihuahua and Coahuila Troughs west and south of the Diablo Platform; (4) Late Mesozoic Laramide collision (Mexico and Texas), and development of the Chihuahua fold/thrust belt limited by the western margin of the Diablo Platform; (5) Late Cenozoic North American basin and Range rifting, and development of Rio Grande grabens, block-faulted mountains, and volcanics. The Tobosa basin was a passive-margin interior sag; its continental margin was south of the Marathons.

  16. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico - petrophysical characterization of the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F.J.

    1997-06-01

    Reservoir performance of the South Cowden Grayburg field suggests that only 21 percent of the original oil in place has been recovered. The purpose of this study is to construct a realistic reservoir model to be used to predict the location of the remaining mobile oil. Construction of reservoir models for fluid-flow simulation of carbonate reservoirs is difficult because they typically have complicated and unpredictable permeability patterns. Much of the difficulty results from the degree to which diagenetic overprinting masks depositional textures and patterns. For example, the task of constructing a reservoir model of a limestone reservoir that has undergone only cementation and compaction is easier than constructing a model of a karsted reservoir that has undergone cavern formation and collapse as well as cementation and compaction. The Permian-age carbonate-ramp reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico, are typically anhydritic dolomitized limestone. Because the dolomitization occurred soon after deposition, depositional fabrics and patterns are often retained, and a reservoir model can be constructed using depositional concepts. Recent studies of the San Andres outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and the Seminole San Andres reservoir in the Permian Basin illustrate how depositional fabrics and patterns can be used to construct a reservoir model when depositional features are retained.

  17. Water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes, northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J.E.; Halasz, S.J.; Liscum, F.

    1980-11-01

    This report contains water-quality data for aquifers, streams, and lakes in the vicinity of Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine Salt Domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin. Water-quality data were compiled for aquifers in the Wilcox Group, the Carrizo Sand, and the Queen City Sand. The data include analyses for dissolved solids, pH, temperature, hardness, calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate, chloride, and sulfate. Water-quality and streamflow data were obtained from 63 surface-water sites in the vicinity of the domes. These data include water discharge, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen. Samples were collected at selected sites for analysis of principal and selected minor dissolved constituents.

  18. Meteorite search in the deflation basins in Lea County, New Mexico and Winkler County, Texas, USA: Discovery of Lea County 003 (H4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikouchi, T; Buchanan, P C; Zolensky, M E; Welten, K C; Hutchison, R; Hutchison, M

    2000-01-14

    During the past few decades great numbers of meteorites have been recovered from the ice accumulation zones of Antarctica and from the vast Sahara. Although these two great deserts are the two most productive areas, the Southern High Plains in USA (New Mexico and Texas) and Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia have great potential for meteorite recovery. The number of meteorite finds from Roosevelt County, New Mexico alone exceeds 100 in only approximately 11 km{sup 2} area. Most meteorites from this area have been found on the floors of active deflation basins (blowouts) that have been excavated from a mantle of sand dunes. This area has no apparent fluvial or permafrost activity within the last 50,000 years, suggesting that only prevailing winds and natural aridity aid in the concentration and preservation of meteorites. The authors investigated these deflation surfaces in Lea County (the SE corner of New Mexico) and neighboring Winkler County, Texas following a prior search in this area which found two chondrites. They found a tiny H4 chondrite in this search and here they report its mineralogy and petrology along with preliminary data on its exposure history.

  19. Deep-water density current deposits of Delaware Mountain Group (Permian), Delaware basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, J.C.; Williamson, C.R.

    1988-03-01

    The Guadalupian Delaware Mountain Group is a 1000-1600-m (3281-5250-ft) thick section of siltstone and sandstone deposited in a deep-water density-stratified basin surrounded by carbonate banks or reefs and broad shallow evaporite-clastic shelves. The most prevalent style of basinal deposition was suspension settling of silt. Laminated siltstone beds are laterally extensive and cover basin-floor topographic irregularities and flat-floored channels as much as 30 m (99 ft) deep and 1 km or more wide. Channels can be observed in outcrop at the basin margin and can be inferred from closely spaced wells in the basin. The channels are straight to slightly sinuous, trend at high angles to the basin margin, and extend at least 70 km (43 mi) into the basin. Sandstone beds, confined to channels, form numerous stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon sealing beds are provided by laminated organic siltstone, which laterally can form the erosional margin where channels are cut into siltstone beds. Thick beds of very fine-grained sandstones fill the channels. These sandstones contain abundant large and small-scale traction-current-produced stratification. These sandy channel deposits generally lack texturally graded sedimentation units and show no regular vertical sequence of stratification types or bed thickness. Exploration predictions based on submarine fan models formed by turbidity currents would anticipate very different proximal-distal changes in sandstone geometry and facies. 16 figures.

  20. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, west Texas (Delaware Basin). Annual progress report, March 31, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.; Hovorka, S.D.; Cole, A.G.

    1996-08-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based field development. Reservoirs in the Delaware Mountain Group have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Detailed correlations of the Ramsey sandstone reservoirs in Geraldine Ford field suggest that lateral sandstone continuity is less than interpreted by previous studies. The degree of lateral heterogeneity in the reservoir sandstones suggests that they were deposited by eolian-derived turbidites. According to the eolian-derived turbidite model, sand dunes migrated across the exposed shelf to the shelf break during sea-level lowstands and provided well sorted sand for turbidity currents or grain flows into the deep basin.

  1. Numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow in the deep-basin brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirojanagud, P.; Kreitler, C.W.; Smith, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Bedded Permian-age evaporite sequences in the Palo Duro Basin are being considered for a permanent nuclear waste repository by the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of this modeling study is to provide an understanding of regional ground-water flow in the formations beneath the Permian evaporite section. From this understanding, more detailed, smaller scale studies can be designed. This study is also intended to provide a better understanding of the boundary conditions and permeabilities of the aquifer and aquitard system as well as provide estimates of ground-water travel times across the basin. Numerical simulations were made of the Wolfcamp aquifer modeled as a single layer and of the entire Deep-Basin Brine aquifer system, including the Wolfcamp aquifer, modeled as a single layer.

  2. Renewed petroleum generation related to Tertiary intrusions and increased heat flow, western Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, C.E.; Pawlewicz, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    Higher paleogeothermal gradients, commencing in the Tertiary after maximum burial, have caused renewed petroleum generation in the western Permian basin. Evidence for this reheating is two distinct trends in the mean random vitrinite reflectance (R/sub m/) and depth data compiled from over 40 wells. One group, with a 0.7% R/sub m//km gradient, is from the western edge of the basin; the other, with a 0.5% R/sub m//km gradient, is from the central and eastern portions. Post-Mississippian tilting produced greater subsidence and a thicker, mostly uneroded sedimentary section in the eastern portion of the Permian basin. Continued tilting prior to the Cretaceous caused uplift and erosion that exposed the Upper Permian section in the western part. Potassium-argon ages of igneous intrusions along the western edge of the basin show they were emplaced about 35 Ma, followed by Miocene to Holocene basin-and-range-type block faulting and associated high heat flow. Isopach-reflectance contours confirm this renewed heating is post-tectonic - that is, it occurred after eastward tilting and erosion had reduced burial depth. Maximum temperatures computed from R/sub m/-depth relationships infer that paleogeothermal gradients exceeded 40/degrees/C/km (2.2/degrees/F/100 ft) in the Tertiary. This reheating thermally matured rocks as young as Guadalupian in the western Permian basin and apparently caused a second episode of petroleum generation. By this time, however, the potential reservoir rocks and evaporite seals had been deeply eroded, resulting in poor conditions for trapping the renewed pulse of petroleum.

  3. Sequence stratigraphic framework and exploration potential of lower Permian (Wolfcampian) gravity-flow deposits, eastern Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.A.; Clopine, W.W. ); Kokkoros, G.F.; Wiley, B.H. )

    1996-01-01

    Eight major Wolfcampian sequences (W1-W8) have been identified on seismic data and well logs in a 1500 square mile study area along the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These sequences compose two lower frequency sequences (W1-W5 W6-W8) which are separated by a major erosional surface associated with a sea-level fall near the time of the early-middle Wolfcampian boundary. Sea-level falls associated with sequences W5 and W6 resulted in significant erosion of platform-margin deposits, incision of a submarine canyon several miles into the Eastern Shelf, and deposition of carbonate gravity flows in the Midland Basin. Gravity flows entered the basin via the submarine canyon and fed basin-floor fan systems which extend up to 25 miles basinward of the toe-of-slope. Within the study area, production from carbonate gravity-flow deposits is mostly from three submarine fan systems within sequences W5 and W6 - the Credo (10 MMBOER) fan (oldest) , the Triple M (5 MMBOER)-Howard Glasscock (7 MMBOER) fan, and the Hutto (5 MMBOER) fan (youngest). The maximum gross thickness of the fans ranges from 100 to 200 feet. Regional isolith and seismic amplitude data were used to high-grade a 70 square mile area in the vicinity of Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields. Model-based velocity inversions, constrained by sonic and density data from 52 wells, were performed utilizing a grid of 2-D seismic data and a 3-D survey. Both Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields are clearly defined by high-velocity anomalies within the productive basin-floor fan interval of sequence W6. An untested high-velocity anomaly with a velocity signature and stratal geometry similar to the two fields, and estimated reserves of 5 MMBOER, is scheduled to be drilled in 1995.

  4. Sequence stratigraphic framework and exploration potential of lower Permian (Wolfcampian) gravity-flow deposits, eastern Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.A.; Clopine, W.W.; Kokkoros, G.F.; Wiley, B.H.

    1996-12-31

    Eight major Wolfcampian sequences (W1-W8) have been identified on seismic data and well logs in a 1500 square mile study area along the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. These sequences compose two lower frequency sequences (W1-W5 & W6-W8) which are separated by a major erosional surface associated with a sea-level fall near the time of the early-middle Wolfcampian boundary. Sea-level falls associated with sequences W5 and W6 resulted in significant erosion of platform-margin deposits, incision of a submarine canyon several miles into the Eastern Shelf, and deposition of carbonate gravity flows in the Midland Basin. Gravity flows entered the basin via the submarine canyon and fed basin-floor fan systems which extend up to 25 miles basinward of the toe-of-slope. Within the study area, production from carbonate gravity-flow deposits is mostly from three submarine fan systems within sequences W5 and W6 - the Credo (10 MMBOER) fan (oldest) , the Triple M (5 MMBOER)-Howard Glasscock (7 MMBOER) fan, and the Hutto (5 MMBOER) fan (youngest). The maximum gross thickness of the fans ranges from 100 to 200 feet. Regional isolith and seismic amplitude data were used to high-grade a 70 square mile area in the vicinity of Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields. Model-based velocity inversions, constrained by sonic and density data from 52 wells, were performed utilizing a grid of 2-D seismic data and a 3-D survey. Both Triple M and Howard Glasscock fields are clearly defined by high-velocity anomalies within the productive basin-floor fan interval of sequence W6. An untested high-velocity anomaly with a velocity signature and stratal geometry similar to the two fields, and estimated reserves of 5 MMBOER, is scheduled to be drilled in 1995.

  5. The tectonic mechanism for uplift and rotation of crustal blocks in the Central basin platform, Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Kennming; Dorobek, S.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The Central basin platform is a positive tectonic element in the subsurface of the Permian basin. This enigmatic platform strikes north-northwest-south-southeast and at a high angle to the Marathon fold-and-thrust belt to the south. Although the uplift of the platform was related temporally to major overthrusting in the orogenic belt to the south and east, its formative mechanisms are still poorly understood. Previously compiled tectonic maps and cross sections were analyzed to identify the significant characteristics of this complicated structure. (1) Much of the platform is bounded by laterally discontinuous, high-angle faults with large vertical displacements. (2) The bounding faults suggest that the platform is composed of several discrete blocks that are arranged in a dextral en echelon pattern. (3) The southwest and northeast corners of each block typically are bounded by major faults; block uplift is greatest at the southwest and northeast corners. (4) Blocks are separated by west-northwest-east-southeast-trending transfer zones. These characteristics suggest that the Central Basin platform was subjected to a north-northwest-south-southeast-trending dextral couple that caused the platform to split into several blocks. Individual blocks rotated in the same clockwise sense and produced the maximum uplift observed at the southwest and northeast corners of blocks. In addition to the above characteristics, the amount of uplift an the width of individual blocks progressively decrease toward the north; block boundaries also become less defined northward. However, these additional complexities are not fully understood yet.

  6. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  7. Socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian basin, west Texas. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagoe, B.K.

    1994-05-01

    This investigative study presents results on the socioeconomic impact of infill drilling recovery from carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The amount of incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling in 37 carbonate reservoir units is established using decline curve analysis. The increase in incremental recovery is used to compute the amount of increased revenue and taxes (local, state and federal). A job market analysis is performed to determine the impact of these increased revenues on primary jobs in the oil industry and secondary jobs in the community. Secondary jobs are generated by oil industry workers spending money in the community. The appropriation of the estimated taxes is analyzed to determine which government agencies benefit most from the infill drilling. The observations from this research are that most of the San Andres and Clearfork carbonate reservoir units in the Permian Basin are potentially profitable to infill drill. The incremental oil and gas production from infill drilling could maintain or create many primary jobs within the local oil industry and also secondary jobs in the community. The incremental production could generate taxes which would greatly benefit certain local, state, and federal government agencies.

  8. Reservoir characterization of a Permian Slope Fan/basin-floor fan complex: Cherry Canyon Formation, Ward County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spain, D.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The Cherry Canyon Formation consists of a 925-ft- (280-m) thick section of up to 25 different sandstone and siltstone units that were deposited in a deep-water environment in the Delaware basin. Lowstand sedimentation by fluid density currents with periodic turbidity currents resulted in a broad-migrating channelized slope fan/basin-floor fan complex interpreted to exhibit an intricate reservoir geometry. Thirteen lithofacies are identified. Primary reservoirs are found in massive channel sandstones, and beds of lesser reservoir quality are present in laminated overbank/interchannel sandstones. Original depositional fabric modified by diagenetic cements and authigenic clays created three petrophysical rock types. Type I reservoirs contain intergranular macroporosity relatively free of carbonate cement and authigenic clay. Types II and III reservoirs contain mesoporosity and abundant microporosity created by moderate to abundant carbonate cementation and plugging of pore throats by authigenic grain-coating chlorite and pore-bridging fibrous illite. Depositional and diagenetic factors combine with insufficient oil column height to yield low initial oil saturations that decrease with depth in a hydrocarbon-water transition zone. Mercury injection capillary pressure measurements illustrate the vertical stratification of petrophysical rock types that exist in the section; reservoirs which contain all water are interbedded with reservoirs containing mostly oil. Subsequently, a slight change in height above free water can drive production from all water to all oil. Hydrocarbon column heights greater than 60 ft are required to establish water-free oil production. Accurate reservoir water saturations can be derived using Archie's equation; when combined with a movable oil analysis and drainage relative permeability/fractional flow curves, initial water cuts can be predicted to maximize deliverability.

  9. Geohydrology of the Keechi, Mount Sylvan, Oakwood, and Palestine salt domes in the northeast Texas salt-dome basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, J.E.; Halasz, S.J.; Peters, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The salt within these domes has penetrated as much as 20,000 feet of Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata, and presently extends to within 120 to 800 feet of the land surface. The salt penetrates or closely underlies major freshwater and salinewater aquifers within the basin. To provide a safe repository for radioactive wastes within one or more of these domes, a thorough understanding of the geohydrology needs to be obtained, and the hydrologic stability of the domes needs to be established for the expected life of the storage facility. Dissolution may exist at all four candidate salt domes, possibly through contact with Cretaceous or Tertiary aquifers, or through fault systems in the vicinity of the domes. Strata overlying and surrounding Palestine and Keechi Salt Domes have been arched into steeply-dipping folds that are complexly faulted. Similar conditions exist at Oakwood and Mount Sylvan Domes, except that the Tertiary strata have been only moderately disturbed. Additional problems concerning the hydrologic stability of Oakwood and Palestine Salt Domes have resulted from the disposal of oil-field salinewater in the cap rock at the Oakwood Dome and previous solution mining of salt at the Palestine Dome.

  10. Disequilibrium study of natural radionuclides of uranium and thorium series in cores and briny groundwaters from Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Smith, M.R.

    1988-05-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclides of the /sup 238/U and /232/Th series are reported in several cores and in ten deep and five shallow briny groundwaters from various formations in the Palo Duro Basin. The formations include Granite Wash, Pennsylvanian Granite Wash, Wolfcamp Carbonate, Pennsylvanian Carbonate, Seven River, Queen Grayburg, San Andres, Yates and Salado. The natural radionuclide data in cores suggest that the radionuclides have not migrated or been leached for at least a period of about 1 million years. Relative to the U and Th concentrations in cores, the brines are depleted by a factor of 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/, indicating extremely low solubility of U and Th in brines. The natural radionuclide data in brines suggest that radium is not sorbed significantly and thus not retarded in nine deep brines. Radium is somewhat sorbed in one deep brine of Wolfcamp Carbonate and significantly sorbed in shallow brines. Relative to radium, the U, Th, Pb, Bi, and Po radionuclides are highly retarded by sorption. The retardation factors for /sup 228/Th range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/, whereas those for /sup 230/Th and /sup 234/U range from 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/, depending on the formation. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U ratios in these brines are constant at about 1.5. The magnitude of the /sup 234/U//sup 230/Th ratio appears to reflect the degree of redox state of the aquifer's environment. The /sup 234/U//sup 230/Th ratio in nine deep brines is about unity, suggesting that U, like Th/sup +4/, is in the +4 state, which in turn suggests a reduced environment. 49 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

  11. Pyrolysis and hydrocarbon source bed potential of the Upper Devonian Woodford Shale, Hovey Channel, southern Permian basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, M.; Bloom, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Upper Devonian Woodford Shale in the Hovey Channel area, southern Permian basin, is 50 m thick and composed largely of brown to black, pyritic, spore-bearing, organic-rich, fissile shale an chert. Total organic carbon, distillable hydrocarbons, genetic potential, organic carbon index, hydrogen index, temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation, and kerogen transformation index of the Woodford Shale suggest a matured to overmatured, gas-generating source bed. The total organic carbon content of the formation ranged from a low of 0.77% in the cherty samples to a high of 4.59% in a shaley sample, averaging 2.18%. Distillable hydrocarbon content of the samples is fairly high (averaging 1.72 mg HC/gm{degree} rock), varying from 0.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock to 3.22 mg HC/gm{degree} rock. Genetic potential evaluated in terms of both residual and total generative potential showed above average potential, averaging 3.25 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the residual and 4.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the total, respectively. Live organic carbon index values ranged from 11-28%, characterizing the formation as a moderate to good source bed. Hydrogen index values ranged from 73 mg HC/gm{degree} C org to 155 mg HC/gm{degree} C org, suggesting overmaturity and gas-generation potential of the source bed. Temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation values and kerogen transformation ratio values (averaging 0.34) also indicate overmatured nature of the Woodford Shale.

  12. Bowie County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas De Kalb, Texas Hooks, Texas Leary, Texas Maud, Texas Nash, Texas New Boston, Texas Red Lick, Texas Redwater, Texas Texarkana, Texas Wake Village, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  13. Navarro County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Navarro County, Texas Angus, Texas Barry, Texas Blooming Grove, Texas Corsicana, Texas Dawson, Texas Emhouse, Texas Eureka, Texas Frost, Texas Goodlow, Texas Kerens, Texas Mildred,...

  14. McLennan County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lorena, Texas Mart, Texas McGregor, Texas Moody, Texas Riesel, Texas Robinson, Texas Ross, Texas Valley Mills, Texas Waco, Texas West, Texas Woodway, Texas Retrieved from...

  15. What's Green Worth? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    What's Green Worth? What's Green Worth? July 23, 2015 - 6:12pm Addthis The Self-Help Office Building in Wilmington, N.C., reduced nearly 11,000 in annual energy costs and ...

  16. Brazoria County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Hillcrest, Texas Holiday Lakes, Texas Iowa Colony, Texas Jones Creek, Texas Lake Jackson, Texas Liverpool, Texas Manvel, Texas Oyster Creek, Texas Pearland, Texas Quintana,...

  17. Henderson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eustace, Texas Gun Barrel City, Texas Log Cabin, Texas Mabank, Texas Malakoff, Texas Moore Station, Texas Murchison, Texas Payne Springs, Texas Poynor, Texas Seven Points, Texas...

  18. Fannin County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Fannin County, Texas Bailey, Texas Bonham, Texas Dodd City, Texas Ector, Texas Honey Grove, Texas Ladonia, Texas Leonard, Texas Pecan Gap, Texas Ravenna, Texas Savoy,...

  19. Galveston County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Clear Lake Shores, Texas Dickinson, Texas Friendswood, Texas Galveston, Texas Hitchcock, Texas Jamaica Beach, Texas Kemah, Texas La Marque, Texas League City, Texas San...

  20. Early Pennsylvanian wrenching along the Red River-Matador Arch: Formation of a pull-apart basin, Depocenter for Atokan to Lower Des Moines (bend) clastics, Cottle County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, W.C. Jr.; Gunn, R.D.

    1995-06-01

    Early Pennsylvanian wrenching along the Red River-Matador Arch (Tectonic Zone) created a braided series of en echelon faults and folds with associated pop-up structures and pull-apart basins. Local extension, or overstepping, in Southeast Cottle County, Texas, has produced the deepest pull-apart basin along the arch with over 10,000` of structural relief. The emerging Wichita-Amarillo Uplift, to the north, provided an abundant sediment source, which prograded rapidly southward as an alluvial fan-braided river complex. Exposure of basement rocks and lower Paleozoic sediments along the Red River-Matador Arch, also contributed to the basin fill. Syntectonic sedimentation led to the accumulation of over 6000` of Bend (Atoka-lower Des Moines) sediments within the basin. Deposition was dominated initially by alluvial fan to fluvial siliciclastics. As basin subsidence was further amplified by sediment loading, accommodation exceeded sedimentation capturing a large segment of the southward prograding Wichita-Amarillo derived clastic wedge. Encroachment of the late Atoka to lower Des Moines epeiric sea promoted further evolution of depositional environments to fan deltas, marine dominated clastics and, later, localized carbonate development. Type III kerogen rich organic shales produced abundant gas prone source rocks. The extreme depth of the basin combined with the local geothermal gradient provided for significant hydrocarbon generation. By early 1988 new well control helped revise previous stratigraphic correlation demonstrating a rapidly expanding lower Des Moines to Atokan section. The drilling of the Gunn Oil Company-Brothers No. 1 to a total depth of 10,301` in the Mississippian Chappel Limestone, encountered 2025` of Bend sediments, with 279` of gross Bend Conglomerate (162` of net pay). The Brothers No. 1 was potentialled on 11/19/89 with a CAOF of 6.0 MMCFD and filed as the field discovery for the Broken Bone (Bend Conglomerate) field.

  1. Lithospheric flexure and composite tectonic loads in the foreland of the Marathon orogenic belt: Permian Basin, west Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kenn Ming; Dorobek, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Lithospheric flexure caused by loading of orogenic belts is regarded as the main process that produces subsidence in foreland basins. However in some foreland areas, subsidence may be affected by synorogenic foreland uplifts that act as additional loads. The Permian Basin is located in the foreland area of the late Paleozoic Marathon orogenic belt (Mob). The Permian Basin consists of several sub-basins that are separated by several structurally complex uplifts. Uplift of the Central Basin Platform (CBP) and subsidence in adjacent basins were coeval with final stages of deformation in the Marathon orogen. The CBP is oriented at high angles to the Marathon orogen and consists of several blocks arranged in an en echelon pattern. Data suggest that uplift of the CBP was affected by clockwise rotation of crustal blocks between NNW-SSE trending boundary faults. Although both the Delaware Basin (DB) and Val Verde Basin (VVB) are adjacent to the Mob, the synorogenic geometries of these basins are different. The VVB has a typical flexural profile that apparently is due to loading of the Marathon orogen. However, the flexural profile becomes narrower and deeper toward the western end of the VVB where the basin is bordered by the southernmost block of the CBP. In contrast, synorogenic DB profiles have composite wavelengths which show maximum deflection next to the Mob and toward the uplifted blocks of the CBP. This suggests that synorogenic subsidence of the DB was affected by loading of the CBP. In addition, the loading geometry across the uplifted CBP is asymmetric, with greater uplift and basement shortening on the western side of the CBP and less uplift and basement shortening on the eastern side. This may explain greater synorogenic subsidence in the DB than the Midland Basin.

  2. Willacy County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Lasara, Texas Los Angeles Subdivision, Texas Lyford South, Texas Lyford, Texas Port Mansfield, Texas Ranchette Estates, Texas Raymondville, Texas San Perlita, Texas Santa...

  3. Orange County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City, Texas Mauriceville, Texas Orange, Texas Pine Forest, Texas Pinehurst, Texas Port Arthur, Texas Rose City, Texas Vidor, Texas West Orange, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  4. Jefferson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Central Gardens, Texas China, Texas Groves, Texas Nederland, Texas Nome, Texas Port Arthur, Texas Port Neches, Texas Taylor Landing, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  5. Ellis County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Milford, Texas Oak Leaf, Texas Ovilla, Texas Palmer, Texas Pecan Hill, Texas Red Oak, Texas Venus, Texas Waxahachie, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  6. Starr County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Los Alvarez, Texas Los Villareales, Texas North Escobares, Texas Rio Grande City, Texas Roma Creek, Texas Roma, Texas Salineno, Texas San Isidro, Texas Santa Cruz, Texas Retrieved...

  7. Guadalupe County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Guadalupe County, Texas Cibolo, Texas Geronimo, Texas Kingsbury, Texas Marion, Texas McQueeney, Texas New Berlin, Texas New Braunfels, Texas Redwood, Texas San...

  8. Cass County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype A. Places in Cass County, Texas Atlanta, Texas Avinger, Texas Bloomburg, Texas Domino, Texas Douglassville, Texas Hughes Springs, Texas Linden, Texas Marietta, Texas Queen...

  9. Bexar County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Converse, Texas Cross Mountain, Texas Elmendorf, Texas Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas Grey Forest, Texas Helotes, Texas Hill Country Village, Texas Hollywood Park, Texas Kirby,...

  10. Tarrant County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benbrook, Texas Blue Mound, Texas Briar, Texas Burleson, Texas Colleyville, Texas Crowley, Texas Dalworthington Gardens, Texas Edgecliff Village, Texas Euless, Texas Everman,...

  11. Hidalgo County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas San Juan, Texas San Manuel-Linn, Texas Scissors, Texas South Alamo, Texas Sullivan City, Texas Villa Verde, Texas Weslaco, Texas West Sharyland, Texas Retrieved from...

  12. New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-01-22

    While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- American Manufacturing Co of Texas -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TX 08 Manufacturing Co of Texas - TX 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: American Manufacturing Co of Texas - TX 08 ( TX.08 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: North Sylvania Ave. , Fort Worth , Texas TX.08-1 Evaluation Year: Circa 1995 TX.08-1 TX.08-2 Site Operations: Specialized tube elongation and billet piercing tests on Uranium metal for the AEC. TX.08-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Based upon the results of

  14. EIS-0520: Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    20: Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas EIS-0520: Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas Summary The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its intent to ...

  15. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1997-05-29

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

  16. A Competition Worth Winning | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Competition Worth Winning A Competition Worth Winning August 31, 2011 - 11:59am Addthis U.S. solar cell (PV) and module manufacturing market share. | Sources: PV News and Navigating Consulting. U.S. solar cell (PV) and module manufacturing market share. | Sources: PV News and Navigating Consulting. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs Since 2009, the Department of Energy's Loan Program has supported a robust, diverse portfolio of more than 40 projects that are

  17. Travis County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Travis County, Texas Texas General Land Office Places in Travis County, Texas Anderson Mill, Texas Austin, Texas Barton Creek, Texas Bee Cave, Texas Briarcliff, Texas Cedar...

  18. Williamson County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Williamson County, Texas Texas General Land Office Places in Williamson County, Texas Anderson Mill, Texas Austin, Texas Bartlett, Texas Brushy Creek, Texas Cedar Park, Texas...

  19. Austin County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Austin County, Texas Ag Fuels Ltd Places in Austin County, Texas Bellville, Texas Brazos Country, Texas Industry, Texas San Felipe, Texas Sealy, Texas Wallis, Texas Retrieved...

  20. Caldwell County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Caldwell County, Texas Lockhart, Texas Luling, Texas Martindale, Texas Mustang Ridge, Texas Niederwald, Texas San Marcos, Texas Uhland, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  1. Comal County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Canyon Lake, Texas Fair Oaks Ranch, Texas Garden Ridge, Texas New Braunfels, Texas San Antonio, Texas Schertz, Texas Selma, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  2. Bee County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Bee County, Texas Beeville, Texas Blue Berry Hill, Texas Normanna, Texas Pawnee, Texas Pettus, Texas Skidmore, Texas Tuleta, Texas...

  3. Petrographic report on clay-rich samples from Permian Unit 4 salt, G. Friemel No. 1 well, Palo Duro Basin, Deaf Smith County, Texas: unanalyzed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukui, L M

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of mineralogic and petrographic analyses performed on five samples of clay-rich rock from salt-bearing Permian strata sampled by drill core from G. Friemel No. 1 Well, Deaf Smith County, Texas. Five samples of clay-rich rock from depths of about 2457, 2458, 2521, 2548, and 2568 feet were analyzed to determine the amounts of soluble phase (halite) and the amounts and mineralogy of the insoluble phases. The amounts of halite found were 59, 79, 47, 40, and 4 weight percent, respectively, for the samples. The insoluble minerals are predominately clay (20 to 60 volume percent) and anhydrite (up to 17 volume percent), with minor (about 1.0%) and trace amounts of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, and gypsum. The clays include illite, chlorite, and interstratified chlorite-smectite. The results presented in this petrographic report are descriptive, uninterpreted data. 2 references, 7 tables.

  4. Early-to-late-diagenetic dolomitization of platform carbonates: Lower Ordovician Ellenburger Group, Permian basin, west Texas and southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.E. ); Friedman, G.M. Northeastern Science Foundation, Troy, NY )

    1991-03-01

    Pervasive early- to late-diagenetic dolomitization of Lower Ordovician Ellenburger carbonates in the deep Permian basin is recorded in core samples having present-day burial depths of 1.5 to 7.0 km. Fine-crystalline planar replacement dolomite formed during early diagenesis in a subtidal to peritidal setting under near-surface, low-temperature conditions, with Mg{sup 2+} for dolomitization of precursor lime mud supplied by diffusion from overlying seawater. During intermediate burial (500-2,000 m), medium- to coarse-crystalline planar-s dolomite replaced allochems and matrix, or occurred as void-filling. Burial-history and thermal maturation calculations suggest that deep-burial dolomite cementation occurred during the Late Pennsylvanian/Early Permian. Inter- and intracrystalline dissolution surfaces are observed within the paragenetic sequence. Major truncation surfaces between early replacement dolomites and later void-filling dolomites, and between planar and nonplanar dolomite cements are evidence for dolomite dissolution. Deep-discharge of meteoric fluids as a result of frequent periods of karsting in overlying strata, and long-distance fluid migration during the Ouachita orogeny from foreland basins to the south are invoked for sources of undersaturated fluids causing dolomite dissolution and creating matrix-porosity in the deep subsurface. Similar diagenetic relationships have been described from other deeply buried carbonate rocks elsewhere, indicating that trends and timing of dolomitization, dissolution and porosity formation, and cementation by late dolomite and calcite are intimately related to the evolution of sedimentary basins. The origin of massive dolostones such as the Ellenburger is best explained in the context of basin evolution, rather than by a single model of dolomite formation.

  5. Tectonic and eustatic controls on the carbonate stratigraphy of the Leonardian-Guadalupin (Permian) section, northwestern Delaware basin, New Mexico and Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, K.S.; Vail, P.R. ); Jordan, J.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of tectonics and eustasy on carbonate sedimentation have been determined using seismic, well logs, and outcrop data for the middle Permian of the Delaware basin. Sequence and chronostratigraphic analyses indicate the section contains a broad, tectonically controlled aggradational/progradational cycle overprinted by eustatic sea level cycles. Early Leonardian deposition of the Abo Formation and the third Bone Spring sand occurred during a period of rapid subsidence, producing the aggradational geometry observed on seismic and well logs. This followed a time of uplift to the northwest of the study area, which caused enhanced shelf erosion during the late Wolfcampian. The aggradational style of deposition continued through the middle Leonardian. Late Leonardian time is characterized by progradational geometry, due to a slower subsidence rate. This resulted in a 15-km progradation of the Bone Spring shelf margin in the northwestern part of the Delaware basin. A second period of uplift to the northwest followed, leading to the deposition of the sands of the Brushy Canyon Formation (Guadalupian). This aggradational/progradational cycle is followed by a similar cycle which ends after the deposition of the Capitan Formation. Within the carbonate-dominated Leonardian aggradational/progradational cycle, nine sea level cycles are recognized. The lowstand systems tracts within this package are of two types. The lowstands within the aggradational part of the section consist primarily of slope fans, while those associated with progradation contain large lowstand prograding wedges. Steep margins are associated with aggradation, while progradation is characterized by a ramplike geometry. Highstands are widespread on the shelf and prograde into the basin throughout this interval.

  6. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

  7. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, Jerry F.; Kerans, Charles

    1997-05-29

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study. Subsurface Activities - We continue to prepare two final reports that summarize research results of the South Cowden Field study. One report summarizes results of the petrophysical characterization research, and one summarizes results of the fluid-flow modeling research. Outcrop Activities - We also continue to prepare the final report, which summarizes the research results of the Grayburg outcrop reservoir study.

  8. Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, Jerry F.; Kerans, Charles

    1997-05-19

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study. Subsurface Activities - We continue to prepare two final reports that summarize research results of the South Cowden Field study. One report summarizes results of the petrophysical characterization research, and one summarizes results of the fluid-flow modeling research. Outcrop Activities - We also continue to prepare the final report, which summarizes the research results of the Grayburg outcrop reservoir study.

  9. Angelina County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype A. Places in Angelina County, Texas Burke, Texas Diboll, Texas Hudson, Texas Huntington, Texas Lufkin, Texas Zavalla, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  10. Hale County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Edmonson, Texas Hale Center, Texas Petersburg, Texas Plainview, Texas Seth Ward, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHaleCounty,Texas&oldid...

  11. Hunt County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Hunt County, Texas Caddo Mills, Texas Campbell, Texas Celeste, Texas Commerce, Texas Greenville, Texas Hawk Cove, Texas Josephine,...

  12. Frio County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Subtype B. Places in Frio County, Texas Bigfoot, Texas Dilley, Texas Hilltop, Texas Moore, Texas North Pearsall, Texas Pearsall, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  13. Hardin County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Hardin County, Texas Kountze, Texas Lumberton, Texas Pinewood Estates, Texas Rose Hill Acres, Texas Silsbee, Texas Sour Lake, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.org...

  14. Chambers County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Texas Reliant Baytown Biomass Facility Places in Chambers County, Texas Anahuac, Texas Baytown, Texas Beach City, Texas Cove, Texas Mont Belvieu, Texas Old...

  15. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's reports on preferred repository sites within the Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenster, D.; Edgar, D.; Gonzales, S.; Domenico, P.; Harrison, W.; Engelder, T.; Tisue, M.

    1984-04-01

    Documents are being submitted to the Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to satisfy milestones of the Salt Repository Project of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Some of these documents are being reviewed by multidisciplinary groups of peers to ensure DOE of their adequacy and credibility. Adequacy of documents refers to their ability to meet the standards of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as enunciated in 10 CFR 60, and the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act and the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Credibility of documents refers to the validity of the assumptions, methods, and conclusions, as well as to the completeness of coverage. This report summarizes Argonne's review of ONWI's two-volume draft report entitled Identification of Preferred Sites within the Palo Duro Basin: Vol. 1 - Palo Duro Location A, and Vol. 2 - Palo Duro Location B, dated January 1984. Argonne was requested by DOE to review these documents on January 17 and 24, 1984 (see App. A). The review procedure involved obtaining written comments on the reports from three members of Argonne's core peer review staff and three extramural experts in related research areas. The peer review panel met at Argonne on February 6, 1984, and reviewer comments were integrated into this report by the review session chairman, with the assistance of Argonne's core peer review staff. All of the peer review panelists concurred in the way in which their comments were represented in this report (see App. B). A letter report and a draft of this report were sent to SRPO on February 10, 1984, and April 17, 1984, respectively. 5 references.

  16. Fluvial and deltaic facies and environments of the late permian back-reef shelves of the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Artesia Group is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and clastics that was deposited across the back-reef shelves of the Permian Basin during late Permian time. There has been some controversy over the depositional environments of the clastic members of the Artesia Group and the role of sea level fluctuations in their accumulation. However, the results of a regional core study of the Queen Formation of the Artesia Group indicate that they were largely deposited in desert fluvial and deltaic environments during low-stands of sea level. Three fluvial-deltaic facies are recognized within the clastic members of the Queen. The first consists of medium to very find sandstones and silty sandstones with cross-beds, ripple cross-laminae, and planar and wavy laminae. This facies forms wavy sheets that thicken and thin along linear trends, and was deposited in sandy braided streams. The second facies consists of very find to fine sandstones, silty sandstones, and siltstones with ripple cross-laminae, planar and wavy laminae, cross-beds, clay drapes and pedogenetic cutans, as well as siltstones and silty mudstones with haloturbation structures and evaporite nodules. This facies forms thick planar sheets, and was deposited in fluvial sandflats and adjacent fluvial-dominated continental sabkhas. The third facies consists of cyclic deposits of haloturbated silty mudstones that grade into siltstones and very fine sandstones with crossbeds, planar and wavy laminae, haloturbation structures and evaporite nodules. Each cycle forms a lobate body that is bounded by carbonates or evaporites and which was deposited in sheet deltas that formed along the landward margins of a back-reef lagoon.

  17. ,"Texas Natural Gas Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","2... 6:46:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TX3"...

  18. Uvalde County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Uvalde County, Texas Knippa, Texas Sabinal, Texas Utopia, Texas Uvalde Estates, Texas Uvalde, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  19. Cameron County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Island, Texas South Point, Texas Tierra Bonita, Texas Villa Pancho, Texas Villa del Sol, Texas Yznaga, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCameronCou...

  20. Milam County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Milam County, Texas Buckholts, Texas Cameron, Texas Milano, Texas Rockdale, Texas Thorndale, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  1. Duval County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Duval County, Texas Benavides, Texas Concepcion, Texas Freer, Texas Realitos, Texas San Diego, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  2. Nacogdoches County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Nacogdoches County, Texas Appleby, Texas Chireno, Texas Cushing, Texas Garrison, Texas Nacogdoches, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Hall County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B. Places in Hall County, Texas Estelline, Texas Lakeview, Texas Memphis, Texas Turkey, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleHallCounty,Texas&oldid...

  4. Central Texas Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Biofuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Central Texas Biofuels LLC Place: Giddings, Texas Zip: 78942 Product: Biodiesel producer in Giddings, Texas. References:...

  5. Texas Solar Energy Society | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Society Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Solar Energy Society Name: Texas Solar Energy Society Address: P. O. Box 1447 Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78767 Region: Texas Area...

  6. South Texas Blending | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: South Texas Blending Place: Laredo, Texas Zip: 78045 Product: Biodiesel producer based in Texas. References: South Texas Blending1 This article is a stub....

  7. Biodiesel Coalition of Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coalition of Texas Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Biodiesel Coalition of Texas Name: Biodiesel Coalition of Texas Address: 100 Congress Avenue Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701...

  8. Dynamic worth of control element assemblies in PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, P.; Popovic, D. ); Pesic, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic worth of control element assemblies (CEAs) in a nuclear reactor is considered in this paper. Conservation of the CEA worth for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) as a function of fuel burnup, xenon and samarium poisoning, boric acid concentration, and power density axial offset value is analyzed. Calculations of the dynamic worth of CEAs are carried out by newly developed quasi-static four-group neutron one-dimensional and two-dimensional diffusion computer codes. The nonconservation of the CEA worth is shown.

  9. DOE-Sponsored IGCC Project in Texas Takes Important Step Forward...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The captured CO2 will be used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the West Texas Permian Basin, a process that both prevents the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere and ...

  10. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  11. Texas City, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Texas City is a city in Chambers County and Galveston County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional...

  12. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico-stratigraphic hierarchy and cycle stacking facies distribution, and interwell-scale heterogeneity: Grayburg Formation, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnaby, R.J.; Ward, W.B.; Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-06-01

    The Grayburg Formation (middle Guadalupian) is a major producing interval in the Permian Basin and has yielded more than 2.5 billion barrels of oil in West Texas. Grayburg reservoirs have produced, on average, less than 30 percent of their original oil in place and are undergoing secondary and tertiary recovery. Efficient design of such enhanced recovery programs dictates improved geological models to better understand and predict reservoir heterogeneity imposed by depositional and diagenetic controls. The Grayburg records mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentation on shallow-water platforms that rimmed the Delaware and Midland Basins. Grayburg outcrops in the Guadalupe and Brokeoff Mountains region on the northwest margin of the Delaware Basin present an opportunity to construct a detailed, three-dimensional image of the stratigraphic and facies architecture. This model can be applied towards improved description and characterization of heterogeneity in analogous Grayburg reservoirs. Four orders of stratigraphic hierarchy are recognized in the Grayburg Formation. The Grayburg represents a long-term composite sequence composed of four high-frequency sequences (HFS 1-4). Each HFS contains several composite cycles comprising two or more cycles that define intermediate-scale transgressive-regressive successions. Cycles are the smallest scale upward-shoaling vertical facies successions that can be recognized and correlated across various facies tracts. Cycles thus form the basis for establishing the detailed chronostratigraphic correlations needed to delineate facies heterogeneity.

  13. Enernoc (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lamar Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77002 Region: Texas Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Demand response provider serving commercial and industrial customers Website:...

  14. Platform, Delaware Basin, and Midland Basin, West Texas and New...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The two primary emphases were on: (1) delineating the temporal and spatial evolution of the regional stress state; and (2) calculating the amount of regional shortening...

  15. Parmer County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Texas Scandia Wind Southwest LLC Places in Parmer County, Texas Bovina, Texas Farwell, Texas Friona, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleParmerCo...

  16. Grimes County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Grimes County, Texas Anderson, Texas Bedias, Texas Navasota, Texas Todd Mission, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  17. Matagorda County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Matagorda County, Texas Gulf Coast Green Energy Places in Matagorda County, Texas Bay City, Texas Blessing, Texas Markham, Texas...

  18. Callahan County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Callahan County, Texas Baird, Texas Clyde, Texas Cross Plains, Texas Putnam, Texas Retrieved from "http:...

  19. Coke County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype B. Places in Coke County, Texas Blackwell, Texas Bronte, Texas Robert Lee, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCokeCounty,Texas&oldid...

  20. Collingsworth County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Places in Collingsworth County, Texas Dodson, Texas Quail, Texas Samnorwood, Texas Wellington, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCollingsworthCounty,...

  1. Jim Hogg County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Jim Hogg County, Texas Guerra, Texas Hebbronville, Texas Las Lomitas, Texas South Fork Estates, Texas Retrieved from...

  2. Ector County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Ector County, Texas Gardendale, Texas Goldsmith, Texas Odessa, Texas West Odessa, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Brooks County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Brooks County, Texas Airport Road Addition, Texas Cantu Addition, Texas Encino, Texas Falfurrias, Texas Flowella,...

  4. Medina County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Castroville, Texas Devine, Texas Hondo, Texas LaCoste, Texas Lytle, Texas Natalia, Texas San Antonio, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMedinaCounty,T...

  5. San Patricio County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in San Patricio County, Texas Aransas Pass, Texas Corpus Christi, Texas Del Sol-Loma Linda, Texas Doyle, Texas Edgewater-Paisano, Texas Edroy, Texas Falman-County...

  6. Bastrop County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Bastrop County, Texas Bastrop, Texas Camp Swift, Texas Circle D-KC Estates, Texas Elgin, Texas Mustang Ridge, Texas Smithville, Texas...

  7. Lamar County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A. Places in Lamar County, Texas Blossom, Texas Deport, Texas Paris, Texas Roxton, Texas Sun Valley, Texas Toco, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLamar...

  8. Corsicana, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 6th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Corsicana, Texas Corsicana Chemical Company References US Census...

  9. Texas Power, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Texas Power, LP Place: Texas Website: www.texaspoweronline.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesTexas-Power-LP110752578951516 References: EIA Form...

  10. Third Planet Windpower (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Windpower (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Third Planet Windpower Address: 909 Fannin Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77010 Region: Texas Area Sector: Wind energy Product:...

  11. Fermilab Today | University of Texas at Arlington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas at Arlington Aug. 22, 2012 NAME: University of Texas at Arlington HOME TOWN: Arlington, Texas MASCOT: Blaze the Mustang SCHOOL COLORS: Orange and blue COLLABORATING AT...

  12. Texas Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Department of Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Department of Transportation Name: Texas Department of Transportation Abbreviation: TxDOT Place: Austin,...

  13. Texas Emerging Technology Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emerging Technology Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Emerging Technology Fund Place: Texas Product: String representation "The Texas Emerg ... hnology fields." is too...

  14. Texas General Land Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Land Office Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas General Land Office Name: Texas General Land Office Address: 1700 Congress Ave Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Website:...

  15. Austin, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Entrepreneurs Network Austin Technology Incubator Biodiesel Coalition of Texas Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association Texas Solar Energy Society The Wind Coalition...

  16. Texas Nuclear Profile - South Texas Project

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    South Texas Project" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,280","11,304",100.8,"PWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

  17. Texas | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Submitted by Alevine(5) Member 29 July, 2013 - 14:46 Texas Legal Review BHFS flora and fauna leasing Legal review permitting roadmap Texas The NREL roadmap team recently met with...

  18. Texas Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the...

  19. Texas Workshop Program V01

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop on Studies of Super-Heavy Nuclei at the SHE Factory and Super-Heavy Element Collaboration Meeting Texas A&M University College Station, Texas March 12-13, 2013 Tuesday, ...

  20. Nueces County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Nueces County, Texas Agua Dulce, Texas Aransas Pass, Texas Bishop, Texas Corpus Christi, Texas Driscoll, Texas...

  1. Hood County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Hood County, Texas Brazos Bend, Texas Cresson, Texas DeCordova, Texas Granbury, Texas Lipan, Texas Oak Trail...

  2. Zavala County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Zavala County, Texas Batesville, Texas Chula Vista-River Spur, Texas Crystal City, Texas La Pryor, Texas Las Colonias, Texas Retrieved...

  3. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Texas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Onshore Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 790,721 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Texas Onshore-Texas

  4. Texas Onshore Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Onshore Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 4,763,732 5,274,730 5,854,956 6,636,937 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Texas Onshore-Texas

  5. Texas Hydrogen Education Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David; Bullock, Dan

    2011-06-30

    The Texas Hydrogen Education project builds on past interest in hydrogen and fuel cells to help create better informed leaders and stakeholders and thereby improve decision making and planning for inclusion of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies as energy alternatives in Texas. In past years in Texas, there was considerable interest and activities about hydrogen and fuel cells (2000-­‐2004). During that time, the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) created a fuel cell consortium and a fuel cell testing lab. Prior to 2008, interest and activities had declined substantially. In 2008, in cooperation with the Texas H2 Coalition and the State Energy Conservation Office, HARC conducted a planning process to create the Texas Hydrogen Roadmap. It was apparent from analysis conducted during the course of this process that while Texas has hydrogen and fuel cell advantages, there was little program and project activity as compared with other key states. Outreach and education through the provision of informational materials and organizing meetings was seen as an effective way of reaching decision makers in Texas. Previous hydrogen projects in Texas had identified the five major urban regions for program and project development. This geographic targeting approach was adopted for this project. The project successfully conducted the five proposed workshops in four of the target metropolitan areas: San Antonio, Houston, Austin, and the Dallas-­‐Ft. Worth area. In addition, eight outreach events were included to further inform state and local government leaders on the basics of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The project achieved its primary objectives of developing communication with target audiences and assembling credible and consistent outreach and education materials. The major lessons learned include: (1) DOE’s Clean Cities programs are a key conduit to target transportation audiences, (2) real-­‐world fuel cell applications (fuel cell buses, fuel cell

  6. Gillespie County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Gillespie County, Texas Fredericksburg, Texas Harper, Texas Stonewall, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGillesp...

  7. Calhoun County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Calhoun County, Texas Point Comfort, Texas Port Lavaca, Texas Seadrift, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  8. Renewable Energy Systems Inc (RES Americas) (Texas) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Renewable Energy Systems Inc (RES Americas) Address: 9050 Capital of Texas Hwy Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78759 Region: Texas Area Sector:...

  9. Blanco County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Blanco County, Texas Blanco, Texas Johnson City, Texas Round Mountain, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  10. Crosby County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype B. Registered Energy Companies in Crosby County, Texas Brownfield Biodiesel LLC Places in Crosby County, Texas Crosbyton, Texas Lorenzo, Texas Ralls,...

  11. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT. NO. 13-160-LNG - 3443 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT. NO. 13-160-LNG - 3443 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April ...

  12. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT. NO. 13-160-LNG - 3443 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT. NO. 13-160-LNG - 3443 October 2014 April 2015 More...

  13. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico. Quarterly report, January 1--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1996-04-30

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low-permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

  14. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity that occur in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study. Technical progress is reported for outcrop activities and subsurface activities.

  15. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  16. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian basin, west Texas and New Mexico. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low-permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study. Mapping and documenting ooid channel deposits continued through the third quarter. A report on the geological characterization of the South Cowden field has been completed and submitted as the 1995 annual report. An initial simulation model of part of the Moss Unit has been prepared using a simple layering scheme and geostatistical techniques.

  17. Abilene, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Abilene is a city in Jones County and Taylor County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 13th congressional district and Texas's 19th...

  18. WKN Texas LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: A wind farm developer based in Texas. Originally a subsidiary of Windkraft Nord USA, WKN Texas LLC is currently owned by Enel North America. References: WKN Texas LLC1...

  19. Ferris, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ferris is a city in Dallas County and Ellis County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 30th congressional district and Texas's 6th...

  20. Texas Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Municipal Power Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Municipal Power Agency Place: Texas Sector: Wind energy Phone Number: (936) 873-1100 Website: www.texasmpa.org...

  1. ,"Texas Underground Natural Gas Storage - All Operators"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...010TX2","N5020TX2","N5070TX2","N5050TX2","N5060TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","Texas Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Base Gas) (MMcf)","Texas ...

  2. Friendswood, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Friendswood is a city in Galveston County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional district and Texas's 22nd...

  3. Tomball, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tomball is a city in Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 10th congressional district and Texas's 8th...

  4. Seabrook, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI by expanding it. Seabrook is a city in Chambers County and Galveston County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional district and Texas's 22nd...

  5. Shoreacres, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Shoreacres is a city in Chambers County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional district and Texas's 22nd...

  6. Pearland, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI by expanding it. Pearland is a city in Brazoria County and Fort Bend County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional district and Texas's 22nd...

  7. Humble, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Humble is a city in Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 2nd congressional district and Texas's 18th...

  8. Stafford, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Stafford is a city in Fort Bend County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 9th congressional district and Texas's 22nd...

  9. Baytown, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Baytown is a city in Chambers County and Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 14th congressional district and Texas's 2nd...

  10. Pasadena, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Pasadena is a city in Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 22nd congressional district and Texas's 29th...

  11. CPower (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Provides various energy efficiencymanagement services Website: www.cpowered.com Coordinates: 30.264043, -97.744762 Show Map...

  12. Texas A&M University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from women, minorities, individuals with disabilities, and veterans. In addition, Texas A&M University strives to be responsive to the particular needs of dual career...

  13. Fermilab Today | Texas Tech University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and to increasing public awareness of physics research. FUNDING AGENCIES: DOE, NSF Texas Tech University High-Energy Physics Group: (Left) From left: Kittikul Kovitanggoon, Nural...

  14. OpenEI Community - Texas

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Legal Review http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogtexas-legal-review

    The NREL roadmap team recently met with our legal team Brownstein Hyatt Farber and Schreck...

  15. LANL awards Recovery Act contract worth up to $100 million

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL Awards Recovery Act contract LANL awards Recovery Act contract worth up to $100 million TerranearPMC, LLC will haul demolition debris and soils from LANL's Recovery Act cleanup projects for disposal in licensed facilities. March 10, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  16. RAPID/Geothermal/Land Access/Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas GLO Coastal Forms Texas GLO Highway Right of Way Leasing Forms Texas GLO Oil and Gas Sealed Bid Forms Texas GLO Rights of Way Forms Texas General Land Office - Rights of...

  17. Geopower Texas Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Oregon-based Geo Texas was founded in January 2009 by former Vulcan Power CEO Steve Munson to develop geothermal projects in Texas. Coordinates: 44.05766,...

  18. Fermilab Today | University of Texas at Austin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Austin March 13, 2013 NAME: University of Texas at Austin HOME TOWN: Austin, Texas MASCOT: Bevo the Longhorn COLORS: Burnt orange COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: Mid-1990s...

  19. SVTC Technologies (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Austin, Texas Zip: 78741 Region: Texas Area Sector: Solar Product: Provides emiconductor process tools for new silicon developers Website: www.svtc.com Coordinates: 30.218411,...

  20. Texas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TexasWind Resources < Texas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small...

  1. Element Labs (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blvd Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78758 Region: Texas Area Sector: Efficiency Product: LED Producer Website: www.elementlabs.com Coordinates: 30.376797, -97.715649 Show Map...

  2. Texas Beachfront Construction Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Construction Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Texas Beachfront Construction Webpage Author Texas General Land Office Published...

  3. Texas Water Development Board | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Board Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Texas Water Development Board Name: Texas Water Development Board Abbreviation: TWDB Address: 1700 North Congress Avenue Place:...

  4. Waco, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Registered Research Institutions in Waco, Texas Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Registered Energy Companies in Waco, Texas McDowell Research...

  5. Texas Solar Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1703 W Koenig Ln Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78756 Region: Texas Area Sector: Solar Product: Design, sales and installation of renewable energy equipment and systems Website:...

  6. Amarillo, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Act Smart Grid Projects in Amarillo, Texas Golden Spread Electric Cooperative, Inc. Smart Grid Project Utility Companies in Amarillo, Texas Golden Spread Electric...

  7. ,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ... 7:01:01 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...

  8. ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End ... 6:36:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ...

  9. ,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ... 7:09:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption ...

  10. ,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage ... 7:00:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage ...

  11. Texas/Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    137) Incentive Incentive Type Active AEP Texas North Company - CitySmart Program (Texas) Utility Rebate Program Yes AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency...

  12. PEPCO Energy Services (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PEPCO Energy Services (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: PEPCO Energy Services Place: Texas Website: www.pepcoenergy.com References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for...

  13. REC Generator Certification Application - Texas | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    REC Generator Certification Application - Texas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: REC Generator Certification Application - Texas...

  14. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  15. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  16. Coastal land loss in Texas - An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, R.A.; Paine, J.G. )

    1990-09-01

    Each year in Texas more than 1,500 acres of prime real estate and productive wetlands are destroyed along the Gulf shoreline and near the bay margins primarily as a result of coastal erosion and submergence. Wetland losses constitute about half of the total land losses. Historical analyses of maps and aerial photographs since the mid-1800s indicate that land losses are accelerating and that human activities are either directly or indirectly responsible for the increased losses, Natural decreases in sediment supply since the modern sea-level stillstand have been exacerbated by (1) river basin projects that reduce the volume of sediment transported to the coast and (2) coastal structures and navigation projects that prevent redistribution of littoral sediments along the coast. Erosion is primarily caused by high wave and current energy combined with an inadequate supply of sediment. Erosion is responsible for higher local rates of land loss than submergence, and the erosion losses are more perceptible, especially after major storms when the greatest losses occur. The principal components of submergence are subsidence and the eustatic rise in sea level. Together these components are recorded by tide gauges as a relative rise in sea level. Submergence converts uplands to wetlands and wetlands to open water. These surficial changes occur mostly on the coastal plain but are also observed on barrier islands and bayhead deltas and within entrenched valleys. Although compactional subsidence is a natural process operating in the Gulf Coast basin, most of the accelerated land-surface subsidence in Texas is attributed to extraction of shallow ground water or production of hydrocarbons at moderate depths. Faults activated by the withdrawal of these fluids concentrate the subsidence near the fault planes. Coastal land losses caused by dredging are less than those caused by erosion and submergence, but they constitute a growing percentage of total land losses.

  17. Hydrogeologic subdivision of the Wolfcamp series and Pennsylvanian system of eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayal, R.R.; Kistner, D.J.; Kranes, R.; Verock, F.P.

    1987-03-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Wolfcamp section in the Palo Duro Basin includes brine aquifers that are considered to be the most important ground-water flow paths in the deep-basin system. This report is the fifth in a series providing summary documentation of studies that subdivide the section into hydrogeologic units based on their judged relative capacities for transmitting water. This report extends the hydrogeologic study area to the eastern Texas Panhandle, north-central Texas, and southwestern Oklahoma. It includes 37 counties in Texas and Oklahoma. Underground patterns of rock distribution are delineated from a hydrologic perspective and at a level of detail appropriate for numerical modeling of regional ground-water flow. Hydrogeologic units are defined and characterized so that appropriate porosity and permeability values can be assigned to each unit during construction of the numerical models (not part of this study), and so that modelers can combine units where necessary. In this study, hydrogeologic units have been defined as mappable, physically continuous rock bodies that function in bulk as water-transmitting or water-retarding units relative to adjacent rocks. Interpretations are made primarily from geophysical logs. Hydrologic characteristics are assessed on the basis of properties typically associated with certain lithologies (e.g., sandstones are more pervious than shales) and on the basis of gross variations in effective porosity (particularly in carbonate sequences). 44 refs., 32 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Marfa Quadrangle, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, C D; Duex, T W; Wilbert, W P

    1982-09-01

    The uranium favorability of the Marfa 1/sup 0/ by 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Texas, was evaluated in accordance with criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface and subsurface studies, to a 1500 m (5000 ft) depth, and chemical, petrologic, hydrogeochemical, and airborne radiometric data were employed. The entire quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province and is characterized by Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks overlying mainly Cretaceous carbonate rocks and sandstones. Strand-plain sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous San Carlos Formation and El Picacho Formation possess many favorable characteristics and are tentatively judged as favorable for sandstone-type deposits. The Tertiary Buckshot Ignimbrite contains uranium mineralization at the Mammoth Mine. This deposit may be an example of the hydroauthigenic class; alternatively, it may have formed by reduction of uranium-bearing ground water produced during diagenesis of tuffaceous sediments of the Vieja Group. Although the presence of the deposit indicates favorability, the uncertainty in the process that formed the mineralization makes delineation of a favorable environment or area difficult. The Allen intrusions are favorable for authigenic deposits. Basin fill in several bolsons possesses characteristics that suggest favorability but which are classified as unevaluated because of insufficient data. All Precambrian, Paleozoic, other Mesozoic, and other Cenozoic environments are unfavorable.

  20. EIS-0520: Texas LNG Project; Cameron County, Texas | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    proposal to construct and operate a natural gas liquefaction and export terminal at the Port of Brownsville Ship Channel in Cameron County, Texas. DOE, Office of Fossil Energy, has...

  1. EIS-0444: Texas Clean Energy Project (TCEP), Ector County, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has prepared a draft Supplement Analysis to the Texas Clean Energy Project due to changes made to the project after the issuance of the record of decision. See the draft SA for more detailed information on these changes.

  2. Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John V.; Carlson, William R.; Yarbrough, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

  3. Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas, Oil and Gas Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Railroad Commission, Oil and Gas Division Address: 1701 N. Congress Place: Texas Zip: 78711-2967 Website:...

  4. Texas's 21st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Companies in Texas's 21st congressional district Texas General Land Office Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTexas%27s21stcongressionaldistrict&oldid204390...

  5. Texas's 25th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Companies in Texas's 25th congressional district Texas General Land Office Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTexas%27s25thcongressionaldistrict&oldid204394...

  6. Sevin Rosen Funds (Texas - Dallas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dallas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sevin Rosen Funds (Texas - Dallas) Address: 13455 Noel Road, Suite 1670 Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75240 Region: Texas Area Product:...

  7. Sevin Rosen Funds (Texas - Austin) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Austin) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sevin Rosen Funds (Texas - Austin) Address: 6300 Bridgepoint Parkway, Building 1, Suite 500 Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78730 Region: Texas...

  8. Texas State Technical College Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In Service Owner Texas State Technical College Developer Texas State Technical College Energy Purchaser Texas State Technical College Location Sweetwater TX Coordinates...

  9. Midland County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype B. Registered Energy Companies in Midland County, Texas Hilliard Energy Renovar Energy Corp Skyward Energy LLC Places in Midland County, Texas Midland, Texas Odessa,...

  10. Martin County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Subtype B. Registered Energy Companies in Martin County, Texas Hilliard Energy Renovar Energy Corp Skyward Energy LLC Places in Martin County, Texas Ackerly, Texas Midland,...

  11. Electricity Reliability Council of Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reliability Council of Texas Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Electricity Reliability Council of Texas Name: Electricity Reliability Council of Texas Abbreviation: ERCOT Address:...

  12. Public Utility Commission of Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Utility Commission of Texas Name: Public Utility Commission of Texas Address: 1701 N. Congress Avenue Place: Austin, Texas Zip: 78701 Year Founded: 1975 Website:...

  13. Topic A and B Awardee: Electric Reliability Council of Texas...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and B Awardee: Electric Reliability Council of Texas Topic A and B Awardee: Electric Reliability Council of Texas The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) manages the flow ...

  14. Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program PDF icon Texas Department of State Health Services - WIPP Program ...

  15. First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Texas Programmatic Agreement First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement First Amendment to the Programmatic Agreement among the U.S. Department of Energy, the Texas ...

  16. New Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) ...2016 Next Release Date: 8312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed New Mexico-Texas

  17. Texas | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Wind farm generating more renewable energy than expected for Pantex The Texas Panhandle has some of the world's best winds for creating renewable energy, and the Wind Farm at the ...

  18. Concho County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Concho County, Texas Eden, Texas Paint Rock, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleConchoCounty,Texa...

  19. Castro County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 4 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Castro County, Texas Dimmitt, Texas Hart, Texas Nazareth, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCastroCo...

  20. Terry County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Terry County, Texas Brownfield, Texas Meadow, Texas Wellman, Texas Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  1. EA-377 DC Energy Texas LLC | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 DC Energy Texas LLC EA-377 DC Energy Texas LLC Order authorizing DC Energy Texas LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-377 DC Energy Texas LLC More Documents & ...

  2. San Antonio, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    city in Bexar County and Comal County and Medina County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 20th congressional district and Texas's 21st congressional district and Texas's 23rd...

  3. Texas-New Mexico Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas-New Mexico Power Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas-New Mexico Power Co Place: Texas Service Territory: Texas Website: www.tnmp.com Twitter: @TNMP Facebook: https:...

  4. Integrated Synthesis of the Permian Basin: Data and Models for Recovering Existing and Undiscovered Oil Resources from the Largest Oil-Bearing Basin in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Katherine Jackson

    2008-09-30

    Large volumes of oil and gas remain in the mature basins of North America. This is nowhere more true than in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico. A critical barrier to recovery of this vast remaining resource, however, is information. Access to accurate geological data and analyses of the controls of hydrocarbon distribution is the key to the knowledge base as well as the incentives needed by oil and gas companies. The goals of this project were to collect, analyze, synthesize, and deliver to industry and the public fundamental information and data on the geology of oil and gas systems in the Permian Basin. This was accomplished in two ways. First we gathered all available data, organized it, and placed it on the web for ready access. Data include core analysis data, lists of pertinent published reports, lists of available cores, type logs, and selected PowerPoint presentations. We also created interpretive data such as type logs, geological cross sections, and geological maps and placed them in a geospatially-registered framework in ARC/GIS. Second, we created new written syntheses of selected reservoir plays in the Permian basin. Although only 8 plays were targeted for detailed analysis in the project proposal to DOE, 14 were completed. These include Ellenburger, Simpson, Montoya, Fusselman, Wristen, Thirtyone, Mississippian, Morrow, Atoka, Strawn, Canyon/Cisco, Wolfcamp, Artesia Group, and Delaware Mountain Group. These fully illustrated reports include critical summaries of published literature integrated with new unpublished research conducted during the project. As such these reports provide the most up-to-date analysis of the geological controls on reservoir development available. All reports are available for download on the project website and are also included in this final report. As stated in our proposal, technology transfer is perhaps the most important component of the project. In addition to providing direct access to data and reports through

  5. RAPID/Overview/Geothermal/Exploration/Texas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas < RAPID | Overview | Geothermal | Exploration(Redirected from RAPIDAtlasGeothermalExplorationTexas) Redirect page Jump to: navigation, search REDIRECT...

  6. Taylor, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Taylor is a city in Williamson County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 31st congressional...

  7. Clint, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Clint is a town in El Paso County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 23rd congressional district.12 References...

  8. Vinton, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Vinton is a village in El Paso County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 16th congressional district.12 References...

  9. Socorro, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Socorro is a city in El Paso County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 16th congressional district.12 References...

  10. Anthony, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Anthony is a town in El Paso County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 16th congressional district.12 References...